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Economics

Economics

WHY DO INTERNSHIPS AND PLACEMENTS MATTER?

Society for Research into Higher Education

Why do Internships and Placement Matter? Further Sharing of Current Research

Date – Friday 2 May 2014, 11:00-15:45

Venue – SRHE, 73 Collier Street, London, N1 9BE

Network – Network for Employability, Enterprise and Work based Learning

 

This session is run jointly with the Association of Sandwich Education and Training (ASET)

We had so much interest in our first special interest group session on placements and internships that we are hosting another session on the topic.  Feedback from our sessions has shown that participants would like more opportunity to hear about current research and to discuss it.  We have, therefore, asked some more of our members to talk about their research.  At this session the themes will be short placements, third sector internships, internships for postgraduate students and placements in art and design.  The session will begin with a challenge from our keynote speaker, Andy Phippen, from PlymouthBusinessSchool, who will talk on Placements and Internships: Opportunities beyond the Student Experience.
Programme

11:00 Introductions

11:15 Keynote 1:  Andy Phippen, Associate Head (External Relations)
Plymouth Business School
Placements and Internships – Opportunities Beyond the Student Experience?

12:00 Showcasing of current placement research 1

Among the topics: Short placements
Third sector internships
Internships for PG students
Placements in Art and Design

12:45 Discussion:  Emerging issues for research

13:15 Lunch and networking

14:00 Showcasing of current placement research 2

15:00 Discussion panel of research contributors

15:30 Final remarks and conclusions

15:45 Close
If you are currently working on research into any kind of employability, enterprise and workbased learning and would like to share your work at later events, please contact us on h.e.higson@aston.ac.uk

Convenors:

Professor Helen E Higson OBE, Professor of Higher Education Learning and Management, Deputy Vice Chancellor, Aston University

Dr Richard Blackwell, Deputy Vice Chancellor, Southampton Solent University

 

To reserve a place at this seminar: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

Note: Unless otherwise stated SRHE events are free to members, there is a charge of £45 for non-members

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

The Future of Education

The Future of Education

WESTMINSTER HIGHER EDUCATION FORUM KEYNOTE SEMINAR

The student academic experience – expectations, engagement and complaint resolution

With

Heather Fry, Director of Participation and Education, HEFCE; Dr Camille Kandiko, Research Fellow, King’s Learning Institute, King’s College London and Gwen van der Velden, Director of Learning and Teaching Enhancement, University of Bath

And

Professor Robert J Allison, Loughborough University; Sami Benyahia, Ipsos Mori; Professor Stuart Brand, Birmingham City University; Robin Dutton, University College Birmingham; David Ellis, Student Money Saver; Jaswinder Gill, Royds Solicitors; Gervas Huxley, University of Bristol; Felicity Mitchell, Office of the Independent Adjudicator and speaker confirmed from the NUS

Chaired by:

Paul Blomfield MP, Member, Business, Innovation and Skills Select Committee and Secretary, All-Party Parliamentary University Group and Baroness Deech QC (Hon), Chair, Bar Standards Board

This event is CPD certified

 

Morning, Thursday, 16th January 2014

Central London

Our Website | Book Online

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Digitisation Perspectives

Digitisation Perspectives

THE DIGITAL STUDENT EXPERIENCE

The Digital Student Experience: Exploring the role of technology on the student experience

Society for Research into Higher Education

Date – Friday 15 November 2013

Venue – SRHE, 73 Collier Street, LondonN1 9BE

Network – Student Experience/Digital University

This event has been put together by the SRHE Student Experience Network and the Digital University Network. We will be exploring the role of technology on the student experience, with a focus on research that has engaged students and investigates their experiences.

Draft programme:

11:00am: Coffee and registration
11:30am: Introduction
11:45am: Jeremy Segrott, Cardiff University, ‘Connecting academic writers – the #Acwri Twitter group’.
12:30pm: Lunch
1:30pm: Melissa Highton, University of Oxford, ‘Researching the Digital Student Experience of Oxford University’
2:15pm: Eve Stirling, University of Sheffield, ‘Stories from Facebook’
3:00pm: Panel with questions from Twitter
3:30pm: Tea and close

‘Connecting academic writers – the #Acwri Twitter group’:

This presentation discusses our experience of developing #Acwri – a Twitter-based support network that aims to identify common challenges in the writing process; enable participants to reflect on their own practice as writers; and share strategies for effective writing.  Acwri ‘meets’ on Twitter fortnightly, using synchronous tweets (messages) and a keyword (#acwri – short for academic writing), enabling anyone with a Twitter account to follow and/participate. 

Jeremy Segrott is a research fellow in public health based in the DECIPHer Research Centre at Cardiff University His research focuses on the role of family relationships and parenting in the prevention of alcohol misuse by young people, and the effectiveness of family and school-based prevention programmes. 

‘Researching the Digital Student Experience of Oxford University’:

In 2011 researchers at Oxford University undertook a study of the student digital experience within the University in an attempt to identify technologies which appropriately support Oxford’s traditional teaching methods, graduate skills expectations, and the social dimension of student life. The purpose of the study was to inform institutional decision-making and to understand how current technologies, systems and services are perceived and experienced by students and staff.

Melissa Highton is Director of Academic IT at Oxford University. She is responsible for developing use of technology in learning and teaching across the university and maintaining Oxford’s world-class reputation in the areas of IT support for learning, teaching and research.  She leads service delivery and projects in Academic IT to meet the needs of lecturers and researchers in furthering the strategic goals of the University.

‘Stories from Facebook’

Facebook is ubiquitous in many of the lives of young undergraduate students. Research in this area shows that Facebook is a key tool in being a student (Selwyn, 2009), both through social support and supporting academic study. The focus of Eve’s research is exploring the realities of social media use by undergraduates. Specifically their use of Facebook in the first-year transition to university. She did this through a mixed method two-phase approach of large-scale questionnaires (n=685) and a longitudinal connective ethnography (n=6), across Facebook and the university campus. The findings are presented in six narrative stories of my Facebook friends at key moments across the academic year. Drawing on this data she presents two contrasting themes – “this Uni is run on Facebook” and “disconnection (I don’t want to be here, anymore)” to explore the role of technology and specifically Facebook, on the student experience.

Eve Stirling currently undertaking an ESRC funded PhD researching first year undergraduates’ usage of Facebook in their transition into university life. Her research interests include technology and higher education (HE), the use of social media in HE and the pedagogical impacts of these. She is also interested in design thinking and its influence on the research process, ethnographic research methods and the influence of space and time on the student experience. She is a member of IRis, Interdisciplinary Research in Socio-Digital Worlds and the Centre for the Study of New Literacies at The University of Sheffield. She is senior Lecturer in Design at SheffieldHallamUniversity.

Reserve a place at thus event: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

 Note: Unless otherwise stated SRHE events are free to members, there is a charge of £45 for non-members.

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski 

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

SOCIETY FOR RESEARCH INTO HIGHER EDUCATION (SRHE) ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2013

SRHE Annual Research Conference 11-13 December 2013

SRHE Newer Researchers Conference 10 December 2013

CALL FOR PAPERS AND CONFERENCE REGISTRATION www.srhe.ac.uk/conference2013

 

Experiencing Higher Education: Global Trends and Transformations

Celtic Manor, Newport in South Wales, United Kingdom

 

The SRHE extends a very warm welcome to all who wish to participate in one or both of these conferences, by submitting papers for presentation and/or by attending as a delegate and contributing to the many different discussions and debates within this vibrant three-day event. The Conference welcomes papers relating to further, higher, undergraduate, postgraduate and professional education in a wide range of research domains and is a highly participative event offering a range of plenaries and smaller discussion groups and seminars.

The Society’s Annual Conferences are truly international events bringing together delegates and contributors from over 40 countries. We invite researchers and scholars from the many forms of higher education globally to contribute to these Conferences, stimulating international debate on the way in which higher education is responding to economic, social, political and cultural pressures and both re-defining and re-asserting its nature and purpose. As higher education researchers, we aim to provide research insights and knowledge to inform and guide universities, governments and societies.

Conference Theme

The theme for 2013 is Experiencing Higher Education: Global Trends and Transformations.

Higher education globally is continuing to undergo change at a rapid pace and the experiences of all participants, those who study and those who work within the sector, are being transformed as a consequence. Presentations and discussions will explore global trends and examine what research into higher education tells us about the impact of these changes, with a particular focus on how higher education experiences are now evolving in a global context and embracing new technology.

The Conference will offer the opportunity to explore what it means, in the very broadest sense, to be part of the higher education academic community as a student, an academic researcher or teacher, a leader, a developer or other role.

Types of Contribution

You are invited to contribute to this debate in a variety of ways: by presenting a paper, sharing in a symposium, including work of a conceptual or theoretical nature, by preparing a poster or by organising a round table, on any aspect of this year’s theme or your own research interests. Empirical and scholarly research from a wide range of perspectives is welcome. Registrations from delegates not presenting work this year are also warmly welcomed. The deadline for submission of proposals is Friday 28 June 2013

Registration

Conference registration is now open via www.srhe.ac.uk/conference2013. Early booking discount ends 30 September 2013.

This timetable will enable all submitting authors to receive early notification of accepted papers and take full advantage of early booking discounts. We look forward once again to receiving your proposals and to another very successful conference at the Celtic Manor Resort in Newport, Wales, UK. I encourage you to submit your work and register for the conference as soon as possible. Registration by 30 September 2013 will guarantee accommodation at the Celtic Manor resort (rather than adjacent hotels) and attracts important early registration discounts. You can download the full Call for Papers and find all the information you need on submissions and registration from the Society’s website at www.srhe.ac.uk  – just click on ‘Conference 2013’

SRHE Newer Researchers’ Conference 10 December 2013

The SRHE Newer Researchers’ Conference on the same theme will take place at the Celtic Manor one day in advance of the SRHE Annual Research Conference. This is an excellent event for postgraduate students and newer researchers, providing the opportunity to present research work in a nurturing environment and participate in a number of seminars and discussions. The Call for Papers for this Conference will be issued shortly with the timetable for submissions and registration.

 

Kind regards

Helen Perkins

Director

Society for Research into Higher Education

73 Collier Street

London N1 9BE

Telephone 0207 427 2350

Fax number 0207 278 1135

srheoffice@srhe.ac.uk

http://www.srhe.ac.uk

 

**END**

Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory

Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

The Assault on Universities

AT THE HEART OF A HEARTLESS SYSTEM, THE NEW STUDENT EXPERIENCE? SHAPING RELATIONSHIPS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

SRHE Student Experience Network

Thursday 23rd February 2012

Registration 11.00am – 11.30am

Seminar 11.30am – 4.30pm

SRHE, 73 Collier St, London N1 9BE

At the Heart of a heartless system, the new student experience? Shaping relationships in Higher Education

A one-day SEN seminar discussing partnerships, relationships and generations

A number of current terms for student are often criticised for their ideological baggage. Monetized labels such as ‘client’ and ‘customer’ implicitly reframe academics as providers and producers, reducing the student experience to the status of product. Such thinking establishes not only fixed identity roles, but also the flow of the process governing transactions between them. One way of disturbing, or at least questioning, this logic is to focus on the quality and nature of the relationships between the actors.

This one-day Student Experience Network seminar examines the relationships between HEIs, academics and students. It questions how they are conceived and suggests ways to enact them. What, for example, is the tension between generational politics and notions of partnership? If there is a new ‘radical’, ‘lost’ or ‘jilted’ generation forming (to name three recent books), how should HEIs and practitioners pursue partnership with them and vice versa?

Structured around four speakers, the day will provoke practical and useful discussion for anyone with an interest in student engagement, staff/student relationships, and the way in which the student experience is framed around them.

Dr Paul Ashwin, Senior Lecturer in HE in here@lancaster, the HE Research and Evaluation Centre in the Department of Educational Research, Lancaster University.

Colin Bryson, Director of Combined Honours Centre, Newcastle University.

Dr Ben Little, Lecturer in Media and Cultural Studies,University of Middlesex.

Dr Sabine Little, Editor of Staff-Student Partnerships in Higher Education (Continuum, 2011), University of Sheffield.

Professor Valerie Hey, Head of Education, Professor of Education,University of Sussex. (Discussant)

Graeme Wise, Assistant Director (Policy), National Students’ Union (Discussant)

Event booking details

To reserve a place at this seminar please register at http://www.eventdotorg.co.uk/events.asp or telephone +44 (0) 207 427 2350.   SRHE events are open to all and free to SRHE members as part of their membership package. The delegate fee for non-members is £25 [full time students £20]. Non-members wishing to join the Society may do so at the time of registration and the delegate fee will be waived. Please note that places must be booked in advance and that a £25 for non-attendance will  be charged if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non-attendance has been given in advance.

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Our Universities

THE UNIVERSITY IS OURS!

Edufactory

The University is Ours!

Friday, December 2, 2011  

A Conference on Struggles Within and Beyond the Neoliberal University
April 27-29, 2012
Toronto, Ontario

The university belongs to us, those who teach, learn, research, council, clean, and create community. Together we can and do make the university work.

But today this university is in crisis. The neoliberal restructuring of post-secondary education seeks to further embed market logic and corporate-style management into the academy, killing consultation, autonomy and collective decision-making. The salaries of university presidents and the ranks of administrators swell, but the people the university is supposed to serve — students — are offered assembly-line education as class sizes grow, faculty is over-worked, and teaching positions become increasingly precarious. International students and scholars seeking post-secondary or graduate education are treated as cash cows rather than as people who might contribute to both research and society. Debt-burdened students are seen as captive markets by administrators, while faculty is encouraged to leverage public funds for private research on behalf of corporate sponsors.

The attack on what remains of public education has been total. Over the last year we have witnessed the closure of humanities programmes, further tuition hikes, the replacement of financial support with loans, union lockouts, and the accelerated development of private, for-profit universities. Yet at the same time we have seen growing waves of struggle against these incursions, as students, staff and faculty in Europe, Latin America, and across the Middle East organize, occupy and resist the transformation.

Our struggles are not limited to the university, but are a part the widespread resistance against the neoliberal market logic subsuming all sectors of our society. The university is a key battleground in this struggle, and a point of conjuncture for the various labour, economic and social justice struggles that face all of us – workers and students alike. Crucially, these struggles occur on stolen indigenous lands and manifest through colonialism, racism, sexism, homophobia, ablism and other forms of oppression that hurt and divide us and that shape what sorts of knowledge are considered valuable.

We cannot cede the ideal of the university as a site for struggle and debate. We cannot permit the dissolution of proliferating research, ideas and innovations free from the demands and control of the market. We cannot watch as universities are degraded into a mere site for corporate or state-sponsored research and marketing. The time to mobilize is now!

This conference will connect and chart the varied struggles against neoliberal restructuring of the university inNorth Americaand beyond. We envision a series of debriefings on experiences of resistance, the creation of a cartography of local and global struggles, and a strategizing session for students, teachers, workers and activists. We aim to develop a North American network of struggles.

We encourage presentations that raise questions and generate dialogue among the rest of the participants. Ideally, submissions will indicate the specific outcomes they hope will emerge from the discussion. We encourage participation from those with first-hand experience of these crises, and those engaged in the fight for free and public post-secondary education, especially student groups and trade unions.

For a better future for all – join us!

POSSIBLE THEMES:

ü        Mapping the terrain of campus struggle inCanadaandNorth America

ü        Connecting with and learning from global struggles

ü        Waged and unwaged labour in the university

ü        Abolition of student debt

ü        The university and the occupy movement

ü        The cultural politics of the neoliberal university

ü        The death of the humanities

ü        Militarization of the university

ü        Intersections of university struggles other fights against oppression

ü        Environmental justice

ü        Beyond public education

ü        Radical pedagogy

ü        Academic freedom

ü        The politics of research funding

ü        The economics of the neoliberal university

ü        University and student governance

ü        The undergraduate experience of neoliberalism

ü        Alternative/free/autonomous universities

ü        Organizing the education factory

ü        The suppression of on-campus dissent and organization

Please email submissions to universityisours@gmail.com by January 16th.

Also,if you would like to attend the conference, please RSVP to the same address so organizers can plan for numbers.

This conference is organized by the Edu-factory Collective in collaboration with theUniversityofToronto General Assembly.

Edufactory: http://www.edu-factory.org/wp/

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Student Experience

WHAT IS THE STUDENT EXPERIENCE?

SRHE Student Experience Network

Friday 21st October 2011

Registration 11.00am – 11.30am

Seminar 11.30am – 4.30pm

SRHE, London.

 

What is the student experience?

In light of the changes to Higher Education in the UK and in Europe, this seminar focuses on definition(s) of the ‘student experience’, asking how they are used to frame, discuss and package HE. With input from the NUS and the European Students’ Union, this seminar examines the concept in the discourse on HE and projects its relevance to the future.

 

The impact of national context on student experience: A comparison of France, Sweden and the UK

Nicolas Charles, University of Bordeaux

Nicolas Charles is a doctoral student in sociology at the Centre Emile Durkheim (University of Bordeaux, France). Focusing on justice in higher education, he compares student experience, HEIs and social representations of HE in France, Sweden and the UK.

Abstract

In the UK, the ‘student experience’ represents more than a sole research concept; it is a widespread notion among higher education institutions and students. The student experience has however taken a specific meaning in the UK context, far beyond its broad sense of a relation of a student to their studies. Based on a comparison of France, Sweden and the UK, this presentation will draw on a combined analysis of student practices and representations, institutional organisation at particular universities and national policy contexts. If the student experience remains heterogeneous in each country, my material suggests that strong national patterns in higher education which translate into very diverse student experiences. This discussion thus frames a more global picture of the many ways students can relate to their studies, and the specific issues they consequently face.

 

 

Student Charters: formalising consumption?

Joanna Williams, University of Kent

Joanna Williams lectures in higher education and academic practice at theUniversity ofKent.  She is interested in the impact of government policies upon education in general and higher education in particular.  Joanna’s PhD used techniques of critical discourse analysis to explore New Labour’s policies for promoting social inclusion within post-compulsory education.  More recently Joanna has been writing about the transformation of students into consumers of HE and the effect this has upon what it means to be a student, attitudes to learning and relationships with lecturers.

Abstract

The 2011 White Paper ‘Students at the Heart of the System’ states the government’s intention that ‘each institution should have a student charter … to set out the mutual expectations of universities and students’ (p. 33).  There is an assumption behind the call for charters that students are to be considered as vulnerable consumers in need of formalised protection from institutions that may provide a poor service in return for the students’ money.  Through an analysis of the Student Charter Group Final Report (January 2011), other recent higher education policy documents, contracts and charters already in use by institutions, as well as interviews with students, this paper questions whether the student experience is enriched by the use of such agreements.  Is it in the best interests of all students for their University experience to be increasingly contractualised, regulated and uniform?

 

What’s wrong with ‘the student experience’? The politics of student voice and public information

Duna Sabri, King’s College London

Duna Sabri is Visiting Research Fellow at the Centre for Public Policy, King’s College, London and an independent researcher.  Her research interests are in the sociology of higher education, pedagogy, institutional and (inter)national policy relating to HE, and the use of social theory in empirical research.

Since completing her DPhil at the University of Oxford’s Department of Educational Studies in 2007 on the assumptive worlds of academics and policymakers, she has undertaken a range of commissioned institutional research projects on topics such as students’ departure and persistence in HE, assessment practices, and the social and political functions of students’ evaluations of teaching, with a particular focus on the NSS.  Her publications have included the theoretical development of the concept of assumptive worlds, and analyses of the policy discourses that relate to academics and students.

Abstract

This paper gives an account of the ‘production, accumulation, circulation and functioning’ (Foucault 1994:31) of a discourse that surrounds ‘the student experience’.  Following Fairclough (2003) I explore how ‘the student experience’ has come to prominence in key policy texts.  I attempt to explain how it acquired such salience in the sector as a whole, and what work it does in sustaining and developing the market-oriented disciplining of higher education.  In the UK, but less so elsewhere in Europe, ‘the student experience’ has become a mantra, apparently used to give students ‘a voice’ and at the same time constraining that voice by isolating it from other voices around it, and from the complex environment that enables us meaningfully to interpret those voices. 

The role of Student Evaluations of Teaching (SET) in structuring ‘the student experience’ is explored. Moving away from questions of statistical reliability and validity, I take SET results as social objects in their own right.  Using the framework of analysis proposed by de Santos (2009) of statistics as fact-totems, I explore the production and consumption of the results of the UK National Student Survey (NSS): the convergence of the public gaze upon them, their articulation with identity narratives, and capacity to provoke drama, anxieties of anticipation and emotion.  The paper draws on a pilot study that demonstrates how the consumption of NSS results through league tables has had the effect of defining ‘problems’, redistributing resources and transforming higher education work in ways that ultimately impoverish the higher education experiences of students.

 

Panel members

Allan Päll

Chairperson of the European Students’ Union

Allan Päll is a political science student fromEstonia and the Chairperson of the European Students’ Union (ESU) since July 2011, having previously been Vice-Chairperson. He has previously in 2007-09 led social policy and student financing policy and research in the Federation of Estonian Student Unions (EÜL) and has also been closely involved in the EUROSTUDENT project inEstonia. Before being elected Chairperson, he has been coordinating the work of ESU on EU policies and Quality Assurance and has been leading ESU’s project “Quest for Quality for Students” which looks into information provision and aims to build a quality concept from the students’ perspective.

Graeme Wise

Assistant Director (Policy), National Students’ Union

Graeme is responsible for supporting the elected officers in political policy development. He is the author of many of NUS priority campaign publications including ‘Broke and Broken’ and the ‘NUS Blueprint for HE Funding’. He also leads on NUS Widening Participation work and is supporting the National President in the development of work around student charters with Universities UK.

 

Event booking details

To reserve a place at this seminar please register at http://www.eventdotorg.co.uk/events.asp or telephone +44 (0) 207 4472525.   SRHE events are open to all and free to SRHE members as part of their membership package. The delegate fee for non-members is £25 [full time students £20]. Non members wishing to join the Society may do so at the time of registration and the delegate fee will be waived. Please note that places must be booked in advance and that a £25 for non attendance will  be charged if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non attendance has been given in advance.

Interested in joining the Network-but not able to attend this event? To receive details of future events in this series and to join the mailing list, please email nmanches@srhe.ac.uk

 

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit, Society for Research into Higher Education, 44 Bedford Row, London WC1R 4LL, tel: +44 20 7447 2525, fax: +44 20 7447 2526

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Higher Education Crisis

NEW ACTIVISM OR OLD POLITICS? SOUNDING STUDENT REACTION TO HIGHER EDUCATION’S CRISIS

Society for Research into Higher Education

Free Day Event

The Student Experience Network

New Activism or Old Politics? Sounding Student Reaction to HE’s Crisis

30th September 2010, 11am – 4:00pm

University of Aston, Birmingham

Room 404D, Main Building

This day event will discuss likely student reactions to the impending cuts and rising fees in higher education. It is free to staff and students in UK Higher Education/ anyone else interested, but please register below.

Timetable

10.30 Registration

11.00 Welcome by Patrick Ainley, Network co-coordinator and co-author of Lost Generation? Continuum 2010

11.15 Ben Little, University of Middlesex, talking on and around his free edited e-book: Radical Future – Politics for the Next Generation. Please read at http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/ebooks/radicalfuture.html

12.15 Jonathan Ward, Studentforce for Sustainable Development – Brown Dystopia or Green Hope?

1.15 Lunch

1.45 Jim Dickinson, Director of Campaigns and Strategy, NUS

2.45 Queen Mary College London University Countermappers and/or members of the Really Open University

3.45 Plenary discussion as and when.. tea and depart

Chairs am Joyce Canaan, Birmingham City University; pm Sarah Amsler, Aston University

A full guide to travelling to Aston, including campus maps, is available at http://www1.aston.ac.uk/about/directions/. The campus is a short walk from all Birmingham train stations. The university does not have visitor parking, but visitors with special needs can request a pass by emailing Dr Sarah Amsler (s.s.amsler@aston.ac.uk) and there is paid parking nearby.

Next meeting: 2 – 4 on November 24th November at University College London: Dr. R.T.Allen The Value of the Inexact, Michael Polanyi’s philosophy of tacit integration in relation to teaching and assessment (further details to follow).

New Activism or Old Politics is free, but please confirm attendance with Patrick at Patrickjdainley@aol.com

Nicola Manches, Administrative Assistant, Society for Research into Higher Education, 44 Bedford Row, London WC1R 4LL

Tel:  +44 (0) 20 7447 2525

Fax: +44 (0) 20 7447 2526

www.srhe.ac.uk

SRHE Annual Research Conference 2010

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Richard Alpert

PROBLEMATISING THE RELATIONS BETWEEN STUDENTS’ PASTS, PRESENTS AND FUTURES IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE)

Academic Practice Network

Problematising the relations between students’ pasts, presents and futures in higher education

SRHE 44 Bedford Row, London, WC1R 4LL

22 September 2010 1pm – 4pm

‘Using Habermas to evaluate pedagogic justice’: Dr Monica McLean, Reader in Higher Education, School of Education, University of Nottingham  — Drawing on Jurgen Habermas’ critical theory, Monica will present a conceptualisation of university pedagogy, which constructs students as future citizens and emphasises the development of ‘communicative reason’ as a goal of university teaching .   She will then discuss whether such a conceptualization has any resonance with student perceptions of teaching and learning in university sociology departments, which are the focus of an ESRC-funded project ‘Quality and Inequality in university undergraduate degrees’.

‘Conceptualising the first year student experience: the dominance of the ‘transitions’ metaphor’: Dr Paul Ashwin, Lecturer in Post-compulsory Education, Lancaster University — In this seminar, Paul will argue that the literature on the first year experience in higher education has tended to conceptualise the first year experience in terms of the transition to higher education. Whilst this conceptualisation has obvious strengths, he argues that it tends to separate students’ experiences within higher education from their experiences prior to higher education. He will show how the choice of lens that it used to characterise particular educational processes can have significant implications for the outcomes of research and the focus of recommendations for policy and practice that are made on the basis of this research.

Network Convenors: Prof. Paul Blackmore (KCL) and Prof. Joëlle Fanghanel (Thames Valley University)

22nd September 2010

Network Events are free to SRHE members as part of their membership package.

There is delegate fee for non-members is £25, and £20 for students

Details:

Email: srheoffice@srhe.ac.uk  Tel: 020 7447 2525 Fax: 020 7447 2526 Website: http://www.srhe.ac.uk

Nicola Manches

Administrative Assistant

Society for Research into Higher Education

44 Bedford Row

London WC1R 4LL

Tel:  +44 (0) 20 7447 2525

Fax: +44 (0) 20 7447 2526

www.srhe.ac.uk

SRHE Annual Research Conference 2010

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com/

Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 27th MARCH 2010

NEWS & VIEWS

2010 FEDERAL BUDGET QUIZ – CANADIAN CENTRE FOR POLICY ALTERNATIVES

How much do you know about the 2010 Federal Budget and the state of Canada’s finances? Take this quiz written by the CCPA’s Senior Economist Armine Yalnizyan and Alternative Federal Budget Coordinator David Macdonald: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/multimedia/test-quiz

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FAST-TRACKING CANADA-COLOMBIA FREE TRADE AGREEMENT A BETRAYAL OF COMMITMENTS – CANADIAN LABOUR CONGRESS

The Canada-Colombia Free Trade Agreement appears to be moving toward reality in this session of Parliament unless Canadians speak out loudly and contact their Member of Parliament.

Read more: http://bit.ly/c0SHpM

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DRIVING THE POOR DEEPER INTO POVERTY – THE BULLET

Social assistance rates in Ontario today have a spending power that is a full 55% below what it was in the early 1990s. A single person on Ontario Works (OW) would need to get an increase of $300 a month to be back at 1993 levels…Food bank use is setting new records and far more people are experiencing economic evictions than during the days of Mike Harris. For the poor, the Common Sense Revolution of Harris has not ended or simply been consolidated. Dalton McGuinty has intensified it.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/329.php

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WHY UNIONS STILL MATTER – MONTHLY REVIEW

Michael D. Yates is Associate Editor of Monthly Review. His many publications include Cheap Motels and a Hotplate: An Economist’s Travelogue (2007), Naming the System: Inequality and Work in the Global Economy (2003), and Why Unions Matter (2009), all published by Monthly Review Press.

Read more: http://www.monthlyreview.org/090209yates.php

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WHAT PROGRESSIVES MUST LEARN FROM THE ACORN DEBACLE – COLORLINES

If we do our work well, we should expect similar attacks and know that long track records won’t protect us.

Read more: http://www.colorlines.com/article.php?ID=698&p=1

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SLAUGHTERHOUSE ’10: THE GUTTING OF STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT – THE HUFFINGTON POST

If we could just get over our blinding hatred of unions and public sector workers, we might see that we do in fact have the money we need to rebuild our infrastructure and create a new green economy.

Read more: http://huff.to/9s9wwm

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BUDGET WILL HIT LOW-WAGE WOMEN HARD – OPSEU

TORONTO, March 25 /CNW/ – Plans by the McGuinty government to freeze public-sector wages in Ontario will hit women workers the most, including many who already work in low-paid jobs, the president of the Ontario Public Service Employees Union says.

“The large majority of workers in the public sector are women, and scores of thousands of them work in service jobs at the low-end of the wage spectrum,” Warren (Smokey) Thomas said today after Finance Minister Dwight Duncan unveiled his 2010-11 Ontario budget.

Read more: http://bit.ly/bdCapF

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO, RESEARCH & POLICY FORUM – AUDIO CLIPS

Social Planning Toronto’s March 2009 Research & Policy Forum focused on issues relating to immigrant homeless and health & labour market outcomes for immigrants. Presenters include Dr. Stephen Hwang from St. Michael’s Hospital/ University of Toronto who presented findings from the report entitled “The Health of Homeless Immigrants” & Dr. John Shields from Ryerson University who presented findings from the latest publications released by the Toronto Immigrant Employment Data Initiative (TIEDI).

Listen to the clips here: http://bit.ly/aQHLLN

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CENTER FOR ECONOMIC AND POLICY RESEARCH (CEPR): UNIONIZATION SUBSTANTIALLY IMPROVES THE PAY AND BENEFITS OF IMMIGRANT WORKERS

A new report by the Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) documents a large wage and benefit advantage for immigrant workers in unions relative to their non-union counterparts.

The report, “Unions and Upward Mobility for Immigrant Workers,” found that unionized immigrant workers earned, on average, 17 percent more than their non-union peers. In addition, immigrant workers in unions were much more likely to have health insurance benefits and a pension plan.

Read more: http://www.commondreams.org/newswire/2010/03/25

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CALL FOR ABSTRACTS – ENHANCING LEARNING EXPERIENCES IN HIGHER EDUCATION: INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

December 2-3, 2010
Hong Kong

As an inaugural conference on teaching and learning in higher education hosted by the Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning, HKU, the theme of the conference as suggested by its title is “Enhancing Learning Experiences in Higher Education”.  Submission of abstracts is invited which should embrace the conference theme and sub-themes of the following –

1. Transition and the first year experience
2. Literacy across the curriculum
3. Experiential learning and co-curricular
4. Outcomes-based approaches to student learning (OBASL)
5. Assessment and feedback
6. Diversity and multicultural experience
7. Enhancing learning through technology
8. Learning communities
9. Continuing education and professional development
10. Problem based learning (PBL)
11. Postgraduate student experiences
12. Generic skills in higher education

The deadline for abstract submission is on 31 May 2010.

For more information, visit: http://www.cetl.hku.hk/conference2010/

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MOVE TO CORPORATE UTILITY WOULD HURT PUBLIC INTEREST – PARKLAND INSTITUTE

The City of Winnipeg is currently poised to move forward with a plan which would severely hurt the interests of Winnipeggers, and potentially those of people in other communities, for the sake of making their bottom line look a little better.

Read more: http://bit.ly/9cx8bL

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OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

***END***

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

 

Cambridge

Cambridge

EDUCATION IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT: CRITICAL VOICES, CRITICAL TIMES

 

 

CONFERENCE

Is the Student Really at the Heart of Higher Education? Critical Voices, Critical Times

The 5th Education in a Changing Environment Conference will be held at the University of Salford, 15-16 September 2009.

The conference will focus on four main themes that are key aspects of the changes affecting higher education:

* Giving Voice to the Student Experience: methods, approaches and evidence

* Emerging Technologies, the Curriculum and Student Engagement

* Student Diversity, Internationalisation and Managing Change

* Scholarship as Critical Pedagogy

The conference will provide a forum for colleagues involved in research in these areas to present papers, workshops and posters and to discuss the implications of change in relation to their findings.

For further information contact Eamon O’Doherty: E.N.ODoherty@Salford.ac.uk Tel: +44 (0) 161 295 2899

ECE website: http://www.ece.salford.ac.uk

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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UCAS RESEARCH FORUMS

Please forward the details of the UCAS Research Forums http://www.ucas.ac.uk/about_us/policyservices/forums to anyone who may be interested in attending, or having their name put on our mailing list for future forums (see titles and abstracts below).

 

We are now taking bookings for the forum being held at UCAS, Cheltenham, on 21st May, when Miriam David will be giving a presentation on diversity and widening participation in higher education.

Email: policy@ucas.ac.uk to book your free place.

 

 

21st May, 14:00-16:00: Miriam David, ESRC Teaching & Learning Research Programme, Institute of Education

Diversity and widening participation in HE

This talk will be based upon Miriam David’s forthcoming edited book entitled Improving Learning by Widening Participation in HE (Routledge), which is based upon the findings from the seven projects funded through ESRC and TLRP on this topic, which ran from 2005 to 2008.

UCAS research forums aim to provide:

* Increased understanding of the UK’s education policy context

* Greater appreciation of the admissions experiences of UCAS’ stakeholders (applicants, higher education institutions (HEIs), schools and colleges)

* Robust approaches to research in the area of admissions and widening participation.

There is no charge for attending the forums, but places will be allocated on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Please contact policy@ucas.ac.uk to book a place at any of the forums and/or to be added to the research forum mailing list

 

 

Future forums:

 

30 June, 14:00-16:00: Clare Holdsworth, University of Liverpool

‘They just change the bus route’: Students’ mobility decisions and orientation to Higher Education

One of the most anticipated, and at times regretted, outcomes of the recent expansion of higher education (HE) in England is the concomitant shift towards local recruitment of students, as opposed to the ‘traditional’ pattern of leaving home to go to university. While students’ mobility choices may be considered an outcome of their financial concerns, empirical research on students’ mobilities reveals a more complex reasoning. In particular it demonstrates the differential attitudes to and expectations of HE associated with mobility choices. This paper will review the evidence of changing patterns in students’ mobility and how mobility choices are associated with distinct orientations towards HE. In particular I consider how the decision to study local is associated with vocational/skill-enhancement approaches to HE rather than embracing Liberal Arts ideals.

 

17 September, 14:00-16:00: Bahram Bekhradnia, Higher Education Policy Institute

The experience of students into and within university

This seminar will address issues to do with access to university and the experience of students with different types of qualification when at university. It will draw in particular on the HEPI studies of the different experiences of students with vocational and academic level 3 qualifications, and the HEFCE research on ‘Who does best at university’.

 

4 November, 14:00-16:00: Matthew Williamson and Giles Martin, Queen Mary, University of London

Transitions to higher education: research into students’ expectations and experiences of learning and teaching

The seminar will be given by Dr Matthew Williamson and Dr Giles Martin of Queen Mary, University of London and will be presenting results of their research into student transition into higher education. This research, which focuses on expectations and experiences of learning and teaching and the ways in which students negotiate the transition from the teaching they have experienced before entering higher education and the methods they are exposed to, and skills they have to develop, once they start at university. The project used a survey of all new undergraduates, together with a series of interviews with selected students and visits to schools and colleges in the local area for observation and interviews. The seminar suggests ways in which students and staff can be better prepared for the transition into higher education.

 

 

Please contact policy@ucas.ac.uk to book a place at any of these forums.

Kind regards,

Harriet

Dr. Harriet Dunbar-Goddet, Senior Research Officer, Policy and Communications, UCAS, T 01242 223723, F 01242 544954; http://www.ucas.com

UCAS, Rosehill, New Barn Lane, Cheltenham, GL52 3LZ

 

 

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