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Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

AFTER NEOLIBERALISM? THE KILBURN MANIFESTO

Marx Memorial Library

37a Clerkenwell Green

London EC1R 0DU

Coming up on Thursday 20 February, we have our fifth seminar of the series: “Is young the new poor? Class and generation under neoliberalism” to discuss the chapter written by Soundings co-editor Ben Little on the role of generational politics emerging as a response to the material effects of neoliberalism on the lives of young people.

Ben will present his manifesto chapter “A growing discontent: class and generation under neoliberalism”, with responses from Shiv Malik (co-author Jilted Generation) and Mevan Babakar (Head of Digital, Bite the Ballot). The seminar will be chaired by Doreen Massey (Emeritus Professor of Geography at the Open University and founding editor of Soundings).

Tickets for this seminar are available online and cost £5 / £3 (concessions) / free (Soundings subscribers). Previous chapters of the Kilburn Manifesto, as well as the Manifesto framing statement are all available for download for free from the Lawrence & Wishart website.

The success of our previous seminars have been due to the quality of the discussions – both from the panelists and the audience. We hope you will join us again to make the future ones similarly engaging.

Yours
Becky and the rest of the Soundings team

 

**END**

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Antonio Gramsci

RETHINKING GRAMSCI

Rethinking Gramsci
Edited by Marcus E. Green
New York: Routledge, 2011
ISBN: 9780415779739
Details: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415779739/

Contents

Introduction Marcus E. Green, Rethinking Marxism and Rethinking Gramsci

I. Culture and Criticism

1. Stuart Hall. Race, Culture, and Communications: Looking Backward and Forward at Cultural Studies

2. Paul Bové. Dante, Gramsci and Cultural Criticism

3. Daniel O’Connell. Bloom and Babbitt: A Gramscian View

4. Marcia Landy. Socialist Education Today: Pessimism or optimism of the intellect?

II. Hegemony, Subalternity, Common Sense

5. Derek Boothman. The Sources for Gramsci’s Concept of Hegemony

6. Marcus E. Green. Gramsci Cannot Speak: Presentations and Interpretations of Gramsci’s Concept of the Subaltern

7. Cosimo Zene. Self-consciousness of the Dalits as ‘subalterns’: Reflections on Gramsci in South Asia

8. Evan Watkins. Gramscian Politics and Capitalist Common Sense

9. Frank R. Annunziato. Gramsci’s theory of trade unionism

10. Nelson Moe. Production and Its Others, Gramsci’s ‘Sexual Question’

11. Adam David Morton. Social Forces in the Struggle over Hegemony: Neo-Gramscian Perspectives in International Political Economy

12. Richard Howson. From Ethico-Political Hegemony to Post-Marxism

III. Political Philosophy

13. Richard D. Wolff. Gramsci, Marxism and Philosophy

14. Carlos Nelson Coutinho. General Will and Democracy in Rousseau, Hegel, and Gramsci

15. Wolfgang Fritz Haug. From Marx to Gramsci, from Gramsci to Marx: Historical Materialism and the Philosophy of Praxis

16. Steven R. Mansfield. Gramsci and the Dialectic

17. Esteve Morera. Gramsci’s Critical Modernity

IV. On Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks

18. David F. Ruccio. Unfinished Business: Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks

19. Joseph W. Childers. Of Prison Notebooks and the Restoration of an Archive

20. Peter Ives. The Mammoth Task of Translating Gramsci

21. William V. Spanos. Cuvier’s Little Bone: Joseph Buttigieg’s English Edition of Antonio Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks

22. Joseph A. Buttigieg. The Prison Notebooks: Antonio Gramsci’s Work in Progress

Antonio Gramsci

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Karl Marx

KARL MARX’S ‘GRUNDRISSE’ 150 YEARS LATER – OUT IN PAPERBACK

Karl Marx’s Grundrisse
Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later

Edited by Marcello Musto

Hardback 2008. Price: € 82.00, £70.00, $ 130.00, CAD$ 135.00

Paperback 2010. Price: € 27.00, £ 22.50, $ 32.95, CAD$ 35.00

Written between1857 and 1858, the Grundrisse is the first draft of Marx’s critique of political economy and, thus, also the initial preparatory work on Capital. Despite its editorial vicissitudes and late publication, Grundrisse contains numerous reflections on matters that Marx did not develop elsewhere in his oeuvre and is therefore extremely important for an overall interpretation of his thought.

In this collection, various international experts in the field, analysing the Grundrisse on the 150th anniversary of its composition, present a Marx in many ways radically different from the one who figures in the dominant currents of twentieth-century Marxism. The book demonstrates the relevance of theGrundrisse to an understanding of Capital and of Marx’s theoretical project as a whole, which, as is well known, remained uncompleted. It also highlights the continuing explanatory power of Marxian categories for contemporary society and its present contradictions.

With contributions from such scholars as Eric Hobsbawm, Moishe Postone, Ellen Meiksins Wood, Terrell Carver, John Bellamy Foster, Enrique Dussel and Iring Fetscher, and covering subject areas such as political economy, philosophy and Marxism, this book is likely to become required reading for serious scholars of Marx across the world.

Table of Contents

1. Prologue

2. Foreword, Eric Hobsbawn

Part I. Grundrisse: Critical Interpretations

3. History, Production and Method in the 1857 ‘Introduction’ to the Grundrisse, Marcello Musto

4. The Concept of Value in Modern Economy. On the Relationship between Money and Capital in ‘Grundrisse’, Joachim Bischoff and Christoph Lieber

5. Marx Conception of Alienation in ‘Grundrisse’, Terrell Carver

6. The Discovery of the Category of Surplus value, Enrique Dussel

7. Historical Materialism in ‘Forms which precede Capitalist Production’, Ellen Meiksins Wood

8. Marx’s ‘Grundrisse’ and the Ecological Contradictions of Capitalism, John Bellamy Foster

9. Emancipated Individuals in an Emancipated Society. Marx’s Sketch of Post-Capitalist Society in the ‘Grundrisse’, Iring Fetscher

10. Rethinking ‘Capital’ in Light of the ‘Grundrisse’, Moishe Postone 

Part II. Marx at the time of Grundrisse

11. Marx’s life at the time of the ‘Grundrisse’. Biographical notes on 1857-8, Marcello Musto

12. The First World Economic Crisis: Marx as an Economic Journalist, Michael R. Kratke

13. Marx’s ‘Books of Crisis’ of 1857-8, Michael R. Kratke

Part III. Dissemination and reception of Grundrisse in the world 

14. Dissemination and Reception of the ‘Grundrisse’ in the world. Introduction, Marcello Musto

15. Germany and Austria and Switzerland, Ernst Theodor Mohl

16. Russia and Soviet Union, Lyudmila L. Vasina

17. Japan, Hiroshi Uchida

18. China, Zhongpu Zhang

19. France, Andre Tosel

20. Italy, Mario Tronti

21. Cuba and Argentina and Spain and Mexico, Pedro Ribas and Rafael Pla

22. Czechoslovakia, Stanislav Hubik

23. Hungary, Ferenc L. Lendvai

24. Romania, Gheorghe Stoica

25. USA and Britain and Australia and Canada, Christopher J. Arthur

26. Denmark, Birger Linde

27. Yugoslavia, Lino Veljak

28. Iran, Kamran Nayeri

29. Poland, Holger Politt

30. Finland, Vesa Oittinen

31. Greece, John Milios

32. Turkey, E. Ahmet Tonak

33. South Korea, Hogyun Kim

34. Brazil and Portugal, Jose Paulo Netto

Author Biography

Marcello Musto teaches at the Department of Political Science at York University, Toronto – Canada.

Reviews:

“Nothing Marx wrote has better illustrated the complexity of his thought and the enormous array of the world’s appreciation of it than the Grundrisse. This collection of essays gives one an indispensable entry into understanding better what Marx has to offer the world today and the social bases of the multiple Marxisms” — Immanuel Wallerstein, Yale University

“In this edited collection of essays by international scholars, Marcello Musto has helped to chart the recognition and influence of one of Marx’s most important, methodologically rich – and most neglected – texts: the Grundrisse. The volume is the fruit of many years of sustained and devoted scholarship, his chapter on the ‘1857 Introduction’ is one of the finest in the collection” — Stuart Hall, Open University

“Karl Marx’s Grundrisse is a magnificent volume, which also serves as a global map of world Marxist theory” — Fredric Jameson, Duke University

“Over the last two decades, Marx’s Grundrisse has increasingly been seen as the key text to the understanding his work. An up-to-date discussion of the Grundrisse is therefore much to be welcomed. And when it is of the consistently high quality that Marcello Musto has here put together, scholars of Marx can only rejoice” — David McLellan, Goldsmiths College, University of London

“Karl Marx’s Grundrisse represents a major resource for studies on Marx. It is a key text for understanding his critique of political economy; but also – and no less importantly – it makes visible the questions that Marx did not develop later in Capital, such as capitalism as a global system, ecology, and the contours of a post-capitalistic society. This volume is required reading for all serious students of Marx” — Samir Amin, Third World Forum

“At a time when Marx’s writings are once again attracting ever-wider circles of readers seeking to understand yet another global capitalist crisis, Marcello Musto has produced an edited volume devoted to Marx’s Grundrisse. The essays of interpretation as well as the studies of both the production of this great work and its reception across many different societies and social contexts make this book an especially timely and valuable contribution to Marx’s current ascendancy” — Richard D. Wolff, New School University, New York

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Ben Linus

THE CONDEMNED

By Paul Bowman 

Jacques Rancière once lamented the loss of the word “proletarian” from common political language. Without the use of this term, a really important conceptual and political category is lost, and with it, an ability to mobilize and act politically is lost too.

This term has never really worked in the UK anyway. But clearly, the UK needs a new political term that can act as a banner to unite all of those who will bear the brunt of the political violence being wreaked by the pantomime-villain coalition government. The people that need to be united include social services (from all areas of social services, and that is A LOT), teachers, lecturers, students, Northerners, etc.

The term needs to ‘work’ in the way that Stuart Hall argued the word “black” came to *work* at a certain point in history: namely, to connect diverse ethnic identities in terms of their shared experience of racism in the UK. It needs to be a rallying point, a point of and for identification and the establishment of political identity.

We can’t have anything ‘left-wing-sounding’, as this is clearly too partisan. It isn’t going to work in Britain. It just isn’t. So we need to be creative and discursive and not obviously party political. No one wants to be obviously party political. But remaining single-interest is a dead end.

So may I suggest that the term we adopt to name (and rally) all who suffer under the obscene acts of this shocking government is “The ConDemned”.

And may I suggest that we use this term to try to forge links and alliances and chains of equivalence with all areas of UK society, rather than singling out “the students” as if they are some single interest exception to the norm. We need to show that The ConDemned are the norm – are becoming the norm.

But – and this is the crucial thing – we need to be clear that this is not a group or an entity who even want to exist. We certainly don’t want to continue to exist as a group. We desire not to exist. We want to be dissolved. We are being created by the negative political energies of the Coalition government. We have been ConDemned. We will go away when they do. When their actions are stopped and reversed, redressed, rectified.

Paul Bowman at: http://ranciere.blogspot.com/2010/11/condemned.html

Just a thought:

Maybe the Coalition Government should be known as ‘The ConDemned’, rather than us. They are ConDemned (and will be consigned to history) by us.

Do we want to take on this label?

Glenn Rikowski

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A World To Win

SOUNDINGS 45

Soundings 45 is now out

Although the cuts are coming, there has been an eerie political calm and sense of inevitability about all that is in store for us (carefully nurtured by the Coalition and their allies in the media). But the storm will break – people are going to start seriously suffering and we need to ensure that there is a political battle against the assault planned by the government. Can Labour lead this battle?

CONTENTS

The political struggle ahead
Doreen Massey

Labour in a time of coalition
Sally Davison, Stuart Hall, Michael Rustin, Jonathan Rutherford

What comes after New Labour?
Gerry Hassan

The SNP and the ‘new politics’
Richard Thompson

Rebuilding social democracy
George Irvin

Greek myths
Duncan Weldon

Money manager capitalism and the global financial crisis
L. Randall Wray

Carbon trading: how it works and why it fails
Oscar Reyes and Tamra Gilbertson

Why I am a socialist
Ruth Levitas

Smile till it hurts
Laurie Penny

Lives on the line
Vron Ware

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Lost

LABOUR’S FUTURE

Labour’s Future
Edited by Jonathan Rutherford and Alan Lockey
© Soundings 2010

CONTRIBUTORS: Philip Collins, Sally Davison, Jeremy Gilbert, Stuart Hall, David Lammy, Neal Lawson, Doreen Massey, Anthony Painter, James Purnell, Michael Rustin, Jonathan Rutherford, Marc Stears, Allegra Stratton, Heather Wakefield, Stuart White

http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/ebooks/laboursfuture.html

In May, Soundings and the Open Left project at Demos organised a seminar with Jon Cruddas and David Miliband. The aim was to explore both differences and common ground, and the prospects for cross-party political renewal.

This e-book offers a series of short essays from participants that we hope broadly reflects the debate, and offers some of the groundwork for developing a wider discussion about Labour’s future.

Published jointly by Soundings and Open Left at Demos

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An Encounter with Stuart Hall

 

Part of the Spaces of Democracy Network, The Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, would like to invite you to:


An Encounter with STUART HALL on Friday 6th February 2009.

This year’s Encounter focuses on the influential works of cultural theorist Stuart Hall. The schedule for the day’s events are as follows:

10:30 am – 12:30 pm Roundtable on “Politics, Culture and Globalisation” with the participation of Doreen Massey, Martin Jacques, Larry Grossberg and Jonathan Rutherford.


2:00 pm – 4:00 pm Roundtable on “Cultural Practices and Political Identities” with the participation of Francoise Verges, Angela McRobbie, Isaac Julien and Bill Schwarz.

 

5:00 pm Lecture by Stuart Hall: ‘Cultural Studies and Radical Politics’

Followed by a reception.

 

For further details of the programme please visit http://www.wmin.ac.uk/sshl/page-100

 

All events take place in Fyvie Hall, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2UW.

 

If you could contact charlotte.regan@my.westminster.ac.uk to indicate your attendance to help us keep check on numbers, it would be much appreciated.

 

We look forward to seeing you there.

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