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Tag Archives: Struggle

Andrew Kliman

RADICAL INTERPRETATIONS OF THE PRESENT CRISIS

November 14th, 2012

8-10:30PM

WollmanHall
Eugene Lang Building, 6th floor
65 W 11th St
New York, NY10011

WITH: LOREN GOLDNER | DAVID HARVEY | ANDREW KLIMAN | PAUL MATTICK

The Present Crisis

The present moment is arguably one of unprecedented confusion on the Left.  The emergence of many new theoretical perspectives on Marxism, anarchism, and the left generally seem rather than signs of a newfound vitality, the intellectual reflux of its final disintegration in history.  As for the politics that still bothers to describe itself as leftist today, it seems no great merit that it is largely disconnected from the academic left’s disputations over everything from imperialism to ecology. Perhaps nowhere are these symptoms more pronounced than around the subject of the economy.

As Marxist economics has witnessed of late a flurry of recent works, many quite involved in their depth and complexity, recent activism around austerity, joblessness, and non-transparency while quite creative in some respects seems hesitant to oppose with anything but nostalgia for the past the status quo mantra, “There is no Alternative.”  At a time when the United States has entered the most prolonged slump since the Great Depression, the European project founders on the shoals of debt and nationalism.  If the once triumphant neoliberal project of free markets for free people seems utterly exhausted, the “strange non-death of neo-liberalism,” as a recent book title has it, seems poised to carry on indefinitely.  The need for a Marxist politics adequate to the crisis is as great as such a politics is lacking.

And 2011 now seems to be fading into the past.  In Greece today as elsewhere in Europe existing Left parties remain largely passive in the face of the crisis, eschewing radical solutions (if they even imagine such solutions to exist).  In the United States, Occupy has vanished from the parks and streets, leaving only bitter grumbling where there once seemed to be creativity and open-ended potential. In Britain, the 2011 London Riots, rather than political protest, was trumpeted as the shafted generation’s response to the crisis, overshadowing the police brutality that actually occasioned it.  Finally, in the Arab world where, we are told the 2011 revolution is still afoot, it seems inconceivable that the revolution, even as it bears within it the hopes of millions, could alter the economic fate of any but a handful.

While joblessness haunts billions worldwide, politicization of the issue seems chiefly the prerogative of the right.  Meanwhile, the poor worldwide face relentless price rises in fuel and essential foodstuffs. The prospects for world revolution seem remote at best, even as bankers and fund managers seem to lament democracy’s failure in confronting the crisis. In this sense, it seems plausible to argue that there is no crisis at all, but simply the latest stage in an ongoing social regression. What does it mean to say that we face a crisis, after all, when there is no real prospect that anything particularly is likely to change, at least not for the better?

In this opaque historical moment, Platypus wants to raise some basic questions:

* Do we live in a crisis of capitalism today and, if so, of what sort — political? Economic? Social?

* Why do seemingly sophisticated leftist understandings of the world appear unable to assist in the task of changing it?

* Conversely, can the world be thought intelligible without our capacity to self-consciously transform it through practice?

* Can Marxism survive as an economics or social theory without politics?

* Is there capitalism after socialism?

From: Radical Interpretations of the Present Crisis: http://newyork.platypus1917.org/11-14-2012-radical-interpretations-of-the-present-crisis/

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Thanks to Ross Wolfe for alerting me to this important event: Glenn Rikowski

**END**

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David Harvey

Revolt

WHAT WE ARE FIGHTING FOR: A RADICAL COLLECTIVE MANIFESTO

 

Visions of a different society run in the interests of the 99%. Leading activist voices answer the question the media loves to ask the protesters

 

What We Are Fighting For: A Radical Collective Manifesto 

Edited by Federico Campagna and Emanuele Campiglio 

Contributors include David Graeber, John Holloway, Nina Power, Mark Fisher, Ann Pettifor, and Owen Jones

Released October 29th 

PB / £ 14.99 / 9780745332857 / 198mm x 129mm / 224 pp 

“Here are the first flowers of spring: the beginning of an epochal dialogue about the human future. Inspired by the Occupy movements across the world, What We Are Fighting For should inspire all of us to join the conversation.” — Mike Davis, author of Planet of Slums and City of Quartz 

“This collection provides a rallying point for all those who resist the dogmas of contemporary politics and seek a fresh set of alternatives. What We Are Fighting For is a manifesto full of urgent, articulate responses to the current situation.” — Simon Critchley, Hans Jonas Professor of Philosophy at the New School, New York, and author of The Faith of the Faithless (2012). 

The age of austerity has brought a new generation of protesters on to the streets across the world. As the economic crisis meets the environmental crisis, millions fear what the future will bring but also dare to dream of a different society. 

What We Are Fighting For tries to answer the question that the mainstream media loves to ask the protesters. The first radical, collective manifesto of the new decade, it brings together some of the key theorists and activists from the new networked and creative social movements. Contributors include Owen Jones, David Graeber, John Holloway, Nina Power, Mark Fisher, Franco Berardi Bifo and Marina Sitrin. 

Chapters outline the alternative vision that animates the new global movement – from ‘new economics’ and ‘new governance’ to ‘new public’ and ‘new social imagination’. The book concludes by exploring ‘new tactics of struggle’. 

Federico Campagna is a writer and activist. He is one of the founders of the journal Through Europe and contributes to a number of magazines and radio programmes in Italy and the UK. He organised the ‘What are we struggling for?’ conference at the ICA, London, and is the editor of Franco Berardi Bifo’s forthcoming reader. 

Emanuele Campiglio is a Researcher at the New Economics Foundation. 

For further information, to request a review copy or to speak to the author please contact Jon Wheatley at jonw@plutobooks.com or on 0208 374 6424 

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/what-we-are-fighting-for-a-radical-collective-manifesto-new-from-pluto-press

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

I ♥ Transcontinental: http://ihearttranscontinental.blogspot.co.uk/

 

 

Historical Materialism Sixth Annual Conference – Update

Due to overwhelming demand, the deadline for the Call for Papers and Panels for the 2009 HM Conference has been extended one FINAL time to 1st July 2009. There will be NO further extensions and all proposals must be registered here: http://mercury.soas.ac.uk/hm/confsubform.htm

Historical Materialism Sixth Annual Conference, 27-29 November 2009, Central London

Another World is Necessary: Crisis, Struggle and Political Alternatives

Co-sponsored by Socialist Register and the Isaac and Tamara Deutscher Memorial Prize Committee

The world economy is traversing a sweeping crisis whose outcomes are still uncertain, but whose scope is undeniable. The name of Marx is now occasionally, if nervously, invoked in the financial press. The neo-liberal project is being reconfigured, and some have even rushed to pronounce it dead. Imperial strategies are being redrawn, while ecological and food crises deepen on a global scale. This situation of instability and uncertainty unquestionably lends itself to incisive analyses drawing upon and critically innovating the traditions of historical materialism. Critical Marxist theorists have already shed considerable light on the mechanisms and tendencies underlying the current crises and emphasised the conflicts and contradictions that are emerging as they develop.

Following upon previous annual conferences which worked towards a recomposition of an international Marxist intellectual sphere, this year’s Historical Materialism conference hopes to serve as a forum for papers and debates that will gauge the capacity of contemporary Marxism to confront this critical conjuncture and its multiple facets, both analytically and politically. We hope that the conference will serve not only as a collective investigation into the numerous global scenarios of capitalist crisis, but also as the opportunity to inquire – drawing on the political and conceptual reservoir of many Marxist traditions – into the class formations, political forces and organisational forms capable of responding combatively and inventively to the current situation. While the hegemony of a one-dimensional neo-liberalism demanded the affirmation that other worlds were possible, the current crises require arguments to demonstrate how we might achieve the other world that is now more than ever necessary.

In keeping with the multi-disciplinary and exploratory character of the journal, we welcome abstracts on any matter of relevance to critical Marxist theory, but will especially welcome papers responding directly to the call, or dealing with some of the following issues:

    • Theories of crisis, and their history
    • Neo-liberalism in retreat?
    • Histories of class struggle, crisis, and revolution
    • Socialist Feminist Responses to Crisis
    • The future of the new imperialism
    • ‘Neo-Keynesian’ responses to the crisis
    • Environmental crisis and eco-socialism
    • Left interventions in the crisis
    • Utopian and non-utopian Marxisms
    • Political agency and subjectivity
    • Theories of political organisation
    • Political economy and labour in contemporary cultural theory
    • Class struggle and class composition today
    • The geography and urbanisation of contemporary capitalism
    • Non-Marxist traditions on the Left
    • Marxist perspectives on contemporary art and visual culture
    • Displacing crisis onto the Global South
    • War, militarism, insecurity, and violence
    • Immigration, migrant labour, and anti-racism
    • Socialism in the Twenty-First Century

Preference will be given to subscribers to the journal.

Please note also that participants are expected to attend the whole conference – special arrangements for speaking on certain days only cannot be made, except for very extreme circumstances.

Deadline for abstracts: 1 July 2009.

http://mercury.soas.ac.uk/hm/confsubform.htm

Update 14th April 2010:

For details on the Historical Materialism Conference 2010, see: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2010/03/30/crisis-and-critique-historical-materialism-annual-conference-2010/ 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Historical Materialism Sixth Annual Conference

 

27-29 November 2009, Central London

Another World is Necessary: Crisis, Struggle and Political Alternatives

Co-sponsored by Socialist Register and the Isaac and Tamara Deutscher  Prize

The world economy is traversing a sweeping crisis whose outcomes are still uncertain, but whose scope is undeniable. The name of Marx is now occasionally, if nervously, invoked in the financial press. The neo-liberal project is being reconfigured, and some have even rushed to pronounce it dead. Imperial strategies are being redrawn, while ecological and food crises deepen on a global scale. This situation of instability and uncertainty unquestionably lends itself to incisive analyses drawing upon and critically innovating the traditions of historical materialism. Critical Marxist theorists have already shed considerable light on the mechanisms and tendencies underlying the current crises and emphasised the conflicts and contradictions that are emerging as they develop.


Following upon previous annual conferences which worked towards a recomposition of an international Marxist intellectual sphere, this year’s Historical Materialism conference hopes to serve as a forum for papers and debates that will gauge the capacity of contemporary Marxism to confront this critical conjuncture and its multiple facets, both analytically and politically. We hope that the conference will serve not only as a collective investigation into the numerous global scenarios of capitalist crisis, but also as the opportunity to inquire – drawing on the political and conceptual reservoir of many Marxist traditions – into the class formations, political forces and organisational forms capable of responding combatively and inventively to the current situation. While the hegemony of a one-dimensional neo-liberalism demanded the affirmation that other worlds were possible, the current crises require arguments to demonstrate how we might achieve the other world that is now more than ever necessary.

In keeping with the multi-disciplinary and exploratory character of the journal, we welcome abstracts on any matter of relevance to critical Marxist theory, but will especially welcome papers responding directly to the call, or dealing with some of the following issues:

    • Theories of crisis, and their history
    • Neo-liberalism in retreat?
    • Histories of class struggle, crisis, and revolution
    • Socialist Feminist Responses to Crisis
    • The future of the new imperialism
    • ‘Neo-Keynesian’ responses to the crisis
    • Environmental crisis and eco-socialism
    • Left interventions in the crisis
    • Utopian and non-utopian Marxisms
    • Political agency and subjectivity
    • Theories of political organisation
    • Political economy and labour in contemporary cultural theory
    • Class struggle and class composition today
    • The geography and urbanisation of contemporary capitalism
    • Non-Marxist traditions on the Left
    • Marxist perspectives contemporary art, art history and visual culture
    • Displacing crisis onto the Global South
    • War, militarism, insecurity, and violence
    • Immigration, migrant labour, and anti-racism
    • Socialism in the Twenty-First Century

Note to all those who wish to propose papers and panels: instructions will follow shortly on the procedure for proposals. PLEASE DO NOT SEND THEM UNTIL THESE INSTRUCTIONS HAVE BEEN CIRCULATED.

Preference will be given to subscribers to the journal.

Please note also that participants are expected to attend the whole conference – special arrangements for speaking on certain days only cannot be made, except for very extreme circumstances.

Deadline for abstracts: 1 May 2009.

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flows of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski