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Impact

DISCOURSE POWER RESISTANCE 12

DPR Conference 2012

+++IMPACT+++

2 – 4 April 2012, Plymouth College of Art, UK

The conference considers what ‘Impact’ means for us, our work, our understandings and future developments. Governments, international agencies, funding bodies and policy-makers increasingly use this term. What does it mean?

The social sciences, creative arts, education and humanities are currently under attack on a global scale as funding is concentrated on STEM related subjects; but the threatened fields of scholarship are themselves evolving new ways of thinking and practice and new sites and methods of enquiry.

Practitioners and academics in the threatened areas are responding to the situation with vitality and determination: experimental, adventurous, playful, but serious in redefining boundaries and finding new ways forward. DPR 12 maps these emerging knowledge regimes, their impacts, the imagined futures they enable and the implications for practice, research, learning and teaching.

DPR and PCA have joined forces for this conference. DPR is deeply engaged in the critical interrogation of contemporary culture as it plays out in the academy in research, learning and teaching. Similarly, PCA is working with energy and passion to implement a vision of high quality education for life in contemporary arts practice. Bringing the two together is an adventure in creative synergy.

The conference explores the potential impact on each other of the creative arts and social sciences in terms of theory and practice.

All conference streams are designed to encourage contributions from across the creative arts, social sciences and humanities. Click here http://www.dprconference.com/conference/streams for details.

Conference streams:

Language, materiality, theory, silence, speaking

International, intercultural, transcultural impact

Research, learning, teaching: impact

Social Science, social work, community, wellbeing

Art Poetics: Practice as Learning, Learning in Practice

Sustainable impact

Open

 

The conference website is http://www.dprconference.com

For further information contact: enquiries@dprconference.com

 

Call for Papers: http://www.dprconference.com/conference/call-for-papers

Registration: http://www.dprconference.com/conference/registration

 

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Higher Education Crisis

HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE LIQUID MODERN ERA

 BSA Regional Postgraduate Day School Event 2011

Higher Education in the Liquid Modern Era: Swirling Down the Drain?

The Bauman Institute, University of Leeds, Friday 9 September, 2011

Last remaining places! Book now: http://www.britsoc.co.uk/events/postgrad.htm

The metaphor of liquidity is used in Zygmunt Bauman’s work to represent the loss of security felt as more the ‘solid’ institutions and ‘traditional’ patterns of social relations of modernity break down/dissolve in the contemporary world. A striking example of this can be found to exist in the situation facing contemporary participants – students, teachers and researchers – in higher education (HE), especially those working in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences.

The ‘traditional’ pursuits of academia are being increasingly undermined by changes which are aimed at subordinating free enquiry to the shifting demands of the marketplace. The proposed changes to HE funding outlined by the current UK coalition government seem likely to further exacerbate the tendency towards instrumentalism in HE, while simultaneously destabilizing employment in both the knowledge and the culture industries in the UK for many years to come.

In light of these recent proposals, and the likely assault on non-STEM subjects that will ensue, we feel that it would be productive to consider as postgraduate students the likely landscape which we are about to enter. We aim to do this by drawing on Bauman, who has written and recently lectured on the role of sociologists and higher education in contemporary society (‘Education in Liquid Modernity’, 2005; Sociology – Whence and Whither?: Speech from the Bauman Institute Launch Conference, 2010), as well as others, in order to produce a written statement in defence of social science.

Whilst this will be a collaborative effort, with input predominantly from sociology postgraduates, we envisage inviting a small number of postgraduates and academics from other disciplines to contribute their ideas and efforts. Through this, we suggest that a more comprehensive understanding of the common problems facing those across the social sciences, at different stages in their academic lives, can help us to produce a justification of sociology’s continuing value and importance beyond narrow, mechanistic definitions of ‘impact’.

The aim of the event is to provide a space for postgraduate social scientists to engage in critical reflection on the proposed changes to higher education funding in the UK and their implications for our so-called ‘knowledge’ society, particularly through drawing on the insights provided in the work of Zygmunt Bauman on the insecurities and uncertainties of life in liquid modern times.

The event will consist of a mix of papers from postgraduate students, three keynote speakers, panel discussion, and collaborative workshop sessions. Postgraduate students will receive first preference for places.

Registration fees: BSA Members: Free Non-members: £25

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk  

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Hack IT

EXPANDING THE FRONTIERS OF HACKING

Expanding the Frontiers of Hacking: Bio-punks, open hardware, and hackerspaces
A special issue of Critical Studies in Peer Production
Edited by: Johan Soderberg and Alessandro Delfanti

Call: 500-word abstract
Both theoretical and empirical contributions accepted

During the past two decades, hacking has chiefly been associated with software  development. This is now changing as new walks of life are being explored with a hacker mindset, thus bringing back to memory the origin of hacking in hardware development. Now as then, the hacker is characterised by an active approach to technology, undaunted by hierarchies and established knowledge, and finally a commitment to sharing information freely.

In this special issue of Critical Studies in Peer Production, we will investigate how these ideas and practices are spreading. Two cases which have caught much attention in recent years are open hardware development and garage biology. The creation of hacker/maker-spaces in many cities around the world has provided an infrastructure facilitating this development. We are looking for both empirical and theoretical contributions which critically engage with this new phenomenon. Every kind of activity which relates to hacking is potentially of interest.

Some theoretical questions which might be discussed in the light of this development include, but are not restricted to, the politics of hacking, the role of lay expertise, how the line between the community and markets is negotiated, how development projects are managed, and the legal implications of these practices. We welcome contributions from all the social sciences, including science & technology studies, design and art-practices, anthropology, legal studies, etc.

Interested authors should submit an abstract of no more than 500 words by July 10, 2011. Authors of accepted papers will be notified by July 31. All papers will be subject to peer review before being published.

Abstracts should be sent to delfanti@sissa.it.

Critical Studies in Peer Production (CSPP) is a new open access, online journal  that focuses on the implications of peer production for social change. http://cspp.oekonux.org/

 

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The Lamp Post

6TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE IN INTERPRETIVE POLICY ANALYSIS

Call for papers or proposals:
6TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE IN INTERPRETIVE POLICY ANALYSIS: DISCURSIVE SPACES. POLITICS, PRACTICES AND POWER
http://www.ipa-2011.cardiff.ac.uk/

I am soliciting papers for the panel:

Panel 20: Globalizing Technology and Innovation Policies: Interpretative and Critical Approaches Chair: Jeremy Hunsinger, Center for Digital Discourse and Culture, Virginia Tech
Send proposals to: jhuns@vt.edu

This panel addresses technology and innovation policies as politico-ethico-juridico- technical systems comprised of arrangements of things and peoples. Through it, we are particularly interested in the transitions these systems undergo as they migrate from local and national applications to transnational and global systems. These systems undergo significant translations, modifications, and reorganizations as they come to match the sensemaking practices of global and transnational interests and their policymaking regimes. Examples of such transitions and translations ongoing now are: questions of information technology, intellectual property, genetically modified organisms, internet governance, STEM education funding, Mode 2 centered research funding and many, many others.

Given the plurality of possibilities for this panel, it is important to maintain two themes in your submissions: 1. center on technology, innovation, or research policy, 2. the trend from local to global in the application of these policies.    As fitting with the core concepts of the conference, this panel will consider critical and interpretive approaches with those two themes

Submissions due 5 February, 2011

Jeremy Hunsinger
Center for Digital Discourse and Culture
Virginia Tech

http://www.tmttlt.com

Whoever ceases to be a student has never been a student.
-George Iles

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com