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Faith Agostinone-Wilson

Faith Agostinone-Wilson

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 4th AUGUST 2013

EVENTS

CHARLIE ANGUS AT WORD ON THE STREET

Attention Toronto book fans! Charlie Angus, author of the 2013 book “Unlikely Radicals: The Story of the Adams Mine Dump War” will be speaking at the Toronto Word on the Street Festival, Sunday, September 28th. Time TBA. Admission is free.

About the book: For twenty-two years politicians and businessmen pushed for the Adams Mine landfill as a solution to Ontario’s garbage disposal crisis. This plan to dump millions of tonnes of waste into the fractured pits of the Adams Mine prompted five separate civil resistance campaigns by a rural region of 35,000 in Northern Ontario. Unlikely Radicals traces the compelling history of the First Nations people and farmers, environmentalists and miners, retirees and volunteers, Anglophones and Francophones who stood side by side to defend their community with mass demonstrations, blockades, and non-violent resistance.

Watch the Unlikely Radicals video book trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=133R4jUiXQ4

Order the book: http://www.btlbooks.com/book/unlikely-radicals

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HEALTHIER CITIES AND COMMUNITIES SYMPOSIUM

October 23-24, 2013
Dalla Lana School of Public Health
155 College Street
Toronto, ON

Call for Participation

We will hold a one-day symposium to learn about and celebrate community action, education, and research, oriented to improving health and well-being in cities and communities, locally and beyond. The keynote speaker is Trevor Hancock, a scholar and advocate on healthier cities for over 20 years and we seek to have a mix of presentations on exciting research and practice, and open space time for discussion.

We seek your input to contribute to shaping the symposium. Through the symposium, you will have the opportunity to:
– identify and address ‘burning questions’ arising from your work and mutual interests in solutions-focused research and practice for healthier cities and communities
– interact with and learn from others engaged in work aimed at improving urban and community health
– shape the development, priorities and focus of the Healthier Cities and Communities thematic concentration in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health
– join or initiate new ‘constellations’ of focused interest on specific topics and/or burning questions (subgroups driven by the interest and enthusiasm of members)

We are currently requesting proposals for participation in the symposium in the form of presentations. If you are interested in learning more about this process, please contact us by filling out the contact form here: http://healthiercitiessymposium2013.wordpress.com/

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AN EVENING WITH PULITZER PRIZE JOURNALIST, AUTHOR AND ACTIVIST CHRIS HEDGES

Friday September 20th, 2013
Doors: 7:00pm
Event: 7:30pm
Bloor United Church
300 Bloor Street W—Toronto

Introductions by Simon Black and CAW Economist Jim Stanford
Q & A moderated by Punam Khosla
This is an accessible event.

Pulitzer prize-winning journalist and writer Chris Hedges will be speaking about his experience with the on-the-ground reportage and writing of days of destruction, days of revolt as he travelled to depressed pockets of the United States to report on recession-era America. What follows is a terrifying glimpse of the future for America and the nations that follow its lead — a future that will be avoided with nothing short of revolution. This publication addresses occupy Wall Street in Hedges’s first book since the international protests began.

Tickets $20. Available online now at: Canadian Dimension: http://canadiandimension.com/store/item/5394/
Eventbrite: http://chrishedges.eventbrite.ca/

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BOOK LAUNCH: “FEAR OF A BLACK NATION: RACE, SEX, AND SECURITY IN SIXTIES MONTREAL”

Thursday, August 8, 2013
7:00pm
A Different Booklist
746 Bathurst Street
Toronto, ON

Join us on August 8 as David Austin launches his new book “Fear of a Black Nation: Race, Sex and Security in Sixties Montreal”.

In the 1960s, for at least a brief moment, Montreal became what seemed an unlikely centre of Black Power and the Caribbean left. In October 1968 the Congress of Black Writers at McGill University brought together well-known Black thinkers and activists from Canada, the United States, Africa, and the Caribbean—people like C.L.R. James, Stokely Carmichael, Miriam Makeba, Rocky Jones, and Walter Rodney. Within months of the Congress, a Black-led protest at Sir George Williams University (now Concordia) exploded on the front pages of newspapers across the country—raising state security fears about Montreal as the new hotbed of international Black radical politics.

David Austin is the editor of You Don’t Play with Revolution: The Montreal Lectures of C.L.R. James. He is a community organizer and teaches in the Humanities, Philosophy, and Religion Department at John Abbott College, Montreal.

For more info: http://adifferentbooklist.com/i/1188585/fearblacknation.jpg

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NEWS & VIEWS

THE WAR ON PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS: NEW UNIONS, NEW ALLIANCES, NEW POLITICS

By Michael D. Yates, The Bullet

The U.S. working-class was slow to respond to the hard times it faced during and after the Great Recession of 2007-2009. Finally, however, in February, 2011, workers in Wisconsin began the famous uprising that electrified the country, revolting in large numbers against Governor Scott Walker’s efforts to destroy the state’s public employee labour unions.

A few months later, the Occupy Wall Street movement, which supported many working-class efforts, spread from New York City to the rest of the nation and the world. Then, in September 2012, Chicago’s public school teachers struck, in defiance of Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s attempt to destroy the teachers’ union and put the city’s schools firmly on the path of neoliberal austerity and privatization.

These three rebellions shared the growing awareness that economic and political power in the United States are firmly in the hands of a tiny minority of fantastically wealthy individuals whose avarice knows no bounds. These titans of finance want to eviscerate working men and women, making them as insecure as possible and wholly dependent on the dog-eat-dog logic of the marketplace, while at the same time converting any and all aspects of life into opportunities for capital accumulation.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/854.php

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DEMOCRATIC AND ECONOMIC RIGHTS: TRAINING THE TRAINER WORKSHOP MANUAL

The Ontario Federation of Labour has produced a handy training manual for running workshops on democratic and economic rights through the prism of labour activism. The workshop aims to give interested labour activists the tools to teach people in their networks and communities about their rights and, what is more, participants will also learn how they can organize their own seminars. We can only nurture our communities and foster progressive change is we all take on the challenge of being both teachers and students. Knowledge sharing and popular education are invaluable. Thanks to this OFL workshop those of us without teaching experience can get in on the game!

Download the manual: http://ofl.ca/wp-content/uploads/DemocraticRights-TrainingNotesSpring2013.pdf

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IN NATIONAL DAY OF ACTION TO RAISE MINIMUM WAGE, NEW YORKERS STAGE STEALTH
SIT-IN

By Sarah Jaffe, In These Times

A group of about 20 well-dressed people huddled on a street corner at lunchtime in Midtown Manhattan, receiving last-minute instructions from a tattooed organizer in a Restaurant Opportunities Center United (ROC) shirt.

They were about to take part in a national day of action for a higher federal minimum wage, with rallies in 15 states and 22 cities. Targets include low-wage employers such as Wal-Mart, fast food restaurants, car washes, airports and other restaurants. The actions are focused on a push for the Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2013, introduced by Rep. George Miller (D-Calif.) and Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa). This bill would raise the minimum wage to $10.10 and index it to inflation, and raise the subminimum wage for tipped workers as well.

But many of the worker organizations that joined today’s [July 24] action are interested in moving beyond just a minimum-wage increase—like Fast Food Forward, New York’s wing of the national fast-food worker organizing campaign, which has consistently called for a $15-an-hour wage and union recognition for the workers.

Read more: http://inthesetimes.com/working/entry/15353/in_national_day_of_action_to_raise_minimum_wage_new_yorkers_stage_sit_in/

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DAVID ROVICS UPDATE: INTO A PRISM

American singer-songwriter David Rovics has just released Into a Prism, a collection of 15 new songs. It’s named after the NSA global spying program revealed by whistleblower Edward Snowden. In addition to the title song (“Prism”)  Rovics skewers Barack Obama and other bought-off politicians, attacks (with characteristic wit) American chauvinism and cultural imperialism, and celebrates heroes like exiled African-American activist Assata Shakur and Vasili Arkhipov, the Soviet submarine commander who literally saved the world during the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis. Rovics has an impressive ability to balance righteous indignation with compassion and ironic humour. He excels at incorporating historical events into his songs and making them relevant. Into a Prism is an acoustic album, and the artist’s voice and guitar work are in fine form. Why is this guy not headlining the summer folk festivals? For info: http://davidrovics.bandcamp.com

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CANADA: BILLIONS IN PROFIT, CUTS FOR LOCAL WORKERS, SCAB-BREWED BEER FOR NEWFOUNDLANDERS AND LABRADORIANS!

By LabourStart

The war to set global labour standards in the brewing industry is being fought in the Canadian city of St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador.

On one side, the Canadian division of the world’s largest (and very profitable) brewing corporation, Anheuser-Busch InBev (AB InBev). On the other, one of the global giant’s smallest and most vulnerable local unions in what appears to be an attempt to establish a pattern of concessions and roll-backs that the corporation could then try to impose on all of its other unionized workers around the world.

The workers, who are members of the Newfoundland and Labrador Association of Public Employees (NAPE/NUPGE), have been on strike since April 10. Before they were in a legal position to exercise their right to strike, the company attempted to force the workers to train the scabs who are now doing their jobs.

Please write to AB InBev and demand that they treat their workers, and their workers’ communities, with fairness and respect. To send a message to AB InBev, visit: http://www.labourstartcampaigns.net/show_campaign.cgi?c=1867&src=derekmailing

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JOBS/INTERNSHIPS

PROFESSOR, SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT AND LABOR RELATIONS, RUTGERS UNIVERSITY

Labor Studies and Employment Relations Department
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Rutgers University, School of Management and Labor Relations, has one of the world’s leading faculties in the field of Labor Studies and Employment Relations (LSER). The LSER Department is soliciting applications for one or two tenure-track professor positions. One position will be at the assistant and the other, which depends on available funding, is at the assistant or associate professor level. While we are particularly interested in scholars with a specialization in the labor market and work experiences of ethnic and racial minorities, Latin American employment relations, employment relations in sports and entertainment, social movements or political economy/institutional labor economics, we are open to other areas of study in the broad fields of labor studies and employment relations. We are seeking a broadly trained scholar who is an excellent researcher and can teach graduate and undergraduate level courses – both on and off campus in the relevant field of Labor Studies and Employment Relations, and who can contribute to our continuing education and/or online courses. The positions are expected to begin September 2014.

For more info, visit http://smlr.rutgers.edu/labor-and-employment-relations
Applications should be submitted no later than October 15, 2013 to Ms. Laura Walkoviak at law@work.rutgers.edu; however, the positions will remain open until filled.

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MAYWORKS FESTIVAL JOB OPENING: FUNDRAISER POSITION

Mayworks Festival of Working People and the Arts is a multi-disciplinary arts festival that celebrates working class culture. Founded in 1986 by the Labour Arts Media Committee of the Toronto and York Region Labour Council, Mayworks is Canada’s largest and oldest labour arts festival. The Festival was built on the premise that workers and artists share a common struggle for decent wages, healthy working conditions and a living culture. Mayworks’ goal is to promote the interests of cultural workers and trade unionists, and to bring working-class culture from the margins of cultural activity onto centre stage.

Mayworks Festival is seeking a Fundraiser for 9 months beginning October 1, 2013, who will have the following responsibilities:
– Work with the Festival Director, board and Fundraising Committee to implement a fundraising plan and strategy
– Responsible for the production of the yearly private donor (labour movement and individual/membership) fundraising campaigns
– Act as the liaison with private donors and do follow-up telephone calls to potential contributors
– Create, with assistance from the staff and board, private donor prospect lists
– Sell program advertising in the Mayworks program guide
– Keep clear records of all donations and responses and provide these to the Festival Director as requested
– Submit a final fundraising report to the board including accounts receivable and an updated version of the fundraising database
– Other related duties as assigned

Start Date: October 1, 2013, training ongoing

Rate of pay: $25.90 per hour

Term Position: 9 months for a total of 275 hours, temporary replacement and non-permanent, with contract ending June 30, 2014

Union Membership:  Mayworks is a unionized workplace as a sublocal of CUPE 1281.  This temporary position is in the bargaining unit for 9 months, and the person hired will become a dues-paying member who is eligible for all of the rights, benefits and protections included in the Collective Agreement.

Please send in your application by August 31, 2013, end of business day via email to applicants.mayworks@gmail.com

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Red

THE ROUGE FORUM 2012

Dear Friends,

The Rouge Forum Dispatch is updated here  http://www.richgibson.com/blog/

And please note fhe Announcement of the 2012 Rouge Forum Conference and call for proposals. Join us!

Call for Proposals

Rouge Forum 2012
OCCUPY EDUCATION! Class Conscious Pedagogies for Social Change
June  22-24, 2012
Miami University
Oxford, OH

Proposals Due April 15, 2012

The Rouge Forum 2012 will be held at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. The University’s picturesque campus is located 50 minutes northwest of Cincinnati. The conference will be held June 22-24, 2012.

Proposals for papers, panels, performances, workshops, and other multimedia presentations should include title(s) and names and contact information for presenter(s). The deadline for sending proposals is April 15.  The Steering Committee will email acceptance notices by May 1.

Bringing together academic presentations and performances (from some of the most prominent voices for democratic, critical, and/or revolutionary pedagogy), panel discussions, community-building, and cultural events, this action-oriented conference will center on questions such as:
* How are we bringing the principles and actions of the Occupy Wall Street movement into the classroom and other venues such as unions and workplaces?
* In what ways are our classrooms, schools, universities, unions, etc. occupied by capitalism, the military, racism, and inequality? And what do these occupations demand from us pedagogically?
* How do (or can) we occupy our classrooms, schools, universities, and unions in an effort to create education that is in the public interest? How do we, as educators, resist imperialist wars, rising inequalities, racism, capitalist greed? How do we support and foster students’ critical analysis of the world and their agency to act and change the world?
* What can we learn from ongoing and past popular protest movements (e.g., OWS, Arab Spring, Wisconsin 2011, Paris 1968; 1971 May Day Protests) that will strategically and tactically advance efforts to create education for a more equitable and just world?
* How do we take the Occupy metaphor and actions to the next level? What would it mean to TAKE or SEIZE rather than OCCUPY?
* Do we want to “save our schools” as they are now? Indeed: Are the current public schools “our” schools? How can we transform so-called public schools into schools that serve the interests and needs of the majority?
* What does teaching and learning for an equitable and democratic society look like? What are the obstacles that must be overcome to achieve democratic education?

SUBMISSIONS

Proposal Formats

Individual Proposal: (30 minutes)
The Rouge Forum welcomes individual paper proposals, with the understanding that those accepted will be grouped together around common or overlapping themes, Presenters will have approximately 45 minutes to present or summarize their individual papers.  Individual paper submissions will be considered for panels with the same topic/theme. If you would prefer to present your paper/research individually you should consider the alternative format proposal. A 200-500 word abstract of the paper will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Symposium Proposal: (90 minutes)
Presenters are also welcomed to submit proposals for a symposium. A symposium is typically composed of a chair and discussant and three to five participants who present or summarize their papers.  Each symposium is organized around a common theme.  Each participant will have between 15 and 45 minutes to present their papers, depending upon the number of participants involved in the symposium. A 200-500 word abstract of the symposium will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference

Panel Proposal: (90 minutes)
A panel discussion is another venue available presenters. A panel discussion is typically composed of three to six participants who discuss their scholarly work within the context of a dialogue or conversation on a topic or theme related to the conference theme. Typically, each panelist is given 10-15 minutes to discuss the topic, present theoretical ideas, and/or point to relevant research. A chair should be identified who introduces the panel and frames the issues and questions being addressed.  In addition to the chair, we encourage (but do not require) organizers of panels to name a discussant to the comments of the panelists. Individual proposal submissions will be combined into panels with the same theme/topic. A 200-500 word abstract of the panel discussion will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Alternative Format and Special Interest Groups (90 minutes)
Alternative proposals that do not fit into the above categories, such as workshops, performances, video and multimedia presentations, and round-table dialogues, are encouraged.  We also welcome proposals for the organization of special interest groups. A 150-250 word abstract of the panel discussion will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Email proposals to Joe Wegwert (Joe.Wegwert@nau.edu) by April 15, 2012.

Good luck to our side,
RICH GIBSON

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Lockdown High

LOCKDOWN HIGH – ANNETTE FUENTES

Lockdown High: When the Schoolhouse Becomes a Jailhouse

By Annette Fuentes

This book is a riveting report on the overblown fear of violence that turns American schools into prisons and students into suspects.

In the dozen years since the shootings at Columbine High School, hysteria has distorted the media’s coverage of school violence and American schools’ responses to it. School violence has actually been falling steadily throughout the last decade, and yet schools across the country have never been more preoccupied with security.

This climate of fear has created ripe conditions for the imposition of unprecedented restrictions on young people’s rights, dignity, and educational freedoms. In what many call the school-to-prison pipeline, the policing and practices of the juvenile justice system increasingly infiltrate the schoolhouse. These “Zero tolerance” measures push the most vulnerable and academically needy students out of the classroom and into harm’s way.

Investigative reporter Annette Fuentes visits schools across America and finds metal detectors and drug tests for aspirin, police profiling of students with no records, arbitrary expulsions, teachers carrying guns, increased policing, and all-seeing electronic surveillance. She also reveals the many industries and “experts” who have vested interests in perpetuating the Lockdown High model. Her moving stories will astonish and anger readers, as she makes the case that the public schools of the twenty-first century reflect a society with an unhealthy fixation on crime, security and violence.

Verso Books: http://www.versobooks.com/books/555-lockdown-high

Reviews

“[The] penetration of prison culture into daily life and particularly schools has been brilliantly traced by USwriter Annette Fuentes in Lockdown High” –– Bidisha, Guardian

“[A] well-argued book … packed with the anecdotally eye-catching and hard, persuasive data. Fuentes’s detailed and daunting investigation … is a wakeup call.” –– Publishers Weekly

“Examples of zero-tolerance policies taken to absurd levels are attention-grabbing, but the real story, spelled out [in Lockdown High] with clarity and a touch of anger, is a disturbing one that should concern members of school boards, principals, teachers and parents. ” –– Kirkus Reviews

“[A] chilling report … extremely well-written.” — Library Journal

“Lockdown High is a wake up call for Americans who care about how schools treat children and young people … This book is a must read for school boards, school administrators and parents.” –– Rodney Skager

“Fuentes’ style is smart and accessible, her material both revelatory and relevant—it’s not only parents who will stay up late reading Lockdown High, but anyone interested in where we are headed.” –– Nell Bernstein

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 26th MARCH 2011

EVENTS

CKLN JAZZ ZONE PRESENTS: PAUL ROBESON DOCUMENTARY “HEAR I STAND”

Wednesday, March 30
6:30pm – 10:00pm
Trane Studio
964 Bathurst Street, Toronto

Program includes a panel discussion ifeauring Professor Lee Lorch from 6:45-7:45 pm and a performance by singer Henry Nowick at 7:45 pm. Screening
at 8 pm.

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LOOKING BACK AT NAC: CANADIAN FEMINISM AND THE POLITICS OF WHITENESS

Sunday, March 27
4:00pm – 6:00pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), Room 8201
252 Bloor St. West (at St. George subway), Toronto

Introduced by: Mary-Jo Nadeau, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto (Mississauga).

Background reading: “Troubling Herstory: Unsettling White Multiculturalism in Canadian Feminism”, Mary-Jo Nadeau, Canadian Woman Studies; Spring 2009; 27, 2/3.

Organized by Ideas Left Out: ideasleftout@gmail.com

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NO HEALTH IN OCCUPATION, NO HEALTH IN APARTHEID: AT THE INTERSECTION OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND THE ISRAEL-PALESTINE CONFLICT

March 30, 2011
6:30pm – 8:30pm
FitzGerald Building, Room 103
150 College St., University of Toronto

The Public Health Social Justice Collective is proud to announce a special panel discussion on the politics of health and disease and its impact on the Palestinian body, nation and land. The Israel-Palestine conflict offers an important site of analysis for the various uses and misuses of public health to legitimize competing ideologies. More importantly, it reveals our tendency to overlook sociopolitical complexities and power differentials when intervening in health systems and their processes. This panel will explore the dangers associated with this approach and highlight those public health efforts which have mobilized to alleviate the social suffering faced by Palestinians living within Israel and the Occupied Territories of West Bank, East Jerusalem and the Gaza Strip.

Please contact us at socialjusticecollective@gmail.com for questions and further information. Alternatively, you can RSVP with us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=130041070401860

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UP AGAINST THE TEMP SHOP: MAY DAY ASSEMBLY ON IMMIGRANT RIGHTS

April 4, 2011
6:30pm – 9:00pm
72 Lib, Ryerson University
350 Victoria Street, Toronto

Come join the people’s assembly on immigrant rights, undocumented, temporary and precarious work and the fight for status in Toronto and beyond!

Migrant Justice organizers in Toronto and across Turtle Island have fought to create workplace protections and benefits, access to services, and full status for undocumented and precarious status workers. In the face of cutbacks, privatization, and forced displacement around the globe, and anti-immigrant policies in Canada, this assembly is a space to build a community-labour vision for immigrant rights and justice, and ensure that the rights of the most vulnerable and precarious parts of the working class continue to be fore-fronted during May Day, and within all struggles for justice.

Speakers:
– Ai-Jen Poo, National Co-chair of Domestic Workers’ Alliance, USA
– David McNally, Political Science professor, author, and active supporter of numerous social justice movements
– Farrah Miranda, immigrant rights and feminist organizer

For more information: No One Is Illegal – Toronto nooneisillegal@riseup.net

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO’S MARCH RESEARCH & POLICY FORUM: THE VIEW FROM HERE

Tuesday, March 29
9:30am – 12:00pm
NEW LOCATION: The 519 Church Street Community Centre Auditorium
519 Church Street, Toronto

Join us for a discussion of the most current housing research and ideas for improving housing in Toronto.

Speakers:
– Dr. David Hulchanski, U of T Cities Centre – “Toronto’s Tower Neighbourhoods: A Housing and Neighbourhood Renewal Agenda” and a discussion on privatization and Toronto Community Housing Corporation
– Jamie Robinson, United Way Toronto – “Poverty by Postal Code 2: Vertical Poverty”
– Nicole Stewart, City of Toronto – “Toronto Regional Housing Data Bank”

All are welcome. As space is limited, please register at: http://www.eventbrite.com/event/1426947037/efbevent or call Mary at (416) 351-0095 x251

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NEWS & VIEWS

NEW YORK – 100 YEARS AFTER TRIANGLE FIRE, HORROR RESONATES

It was a warm spring Saturday when dozens of immigrant girls and women leapt to their deaths — some with their clothes on fire, some holding hands — as horrified onlookers watched the Triangle Shirtwaist factory burn.

The March 25, 1911, fire that killed 146 workers became a touchstone for the organized labor movement, spurred laws that required fire drills and shed light on the lives of young immigrant workers near the turn of the century.

The 100th anniversary comes as public workers in Wisconsin, Ohio and elsewhere protest efforts to limit collective bargaining rights in response to state budget woes. Labor leaders and others say one need only look to the Triangle fire to see why unions are crucial.

Read more: http://www.vosizneias.com/79225/2011/03/22/new-york-100-years-after-triangle-fire-horror-resonates

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SAVING PUBLIC EDUCATION: WHY TEACHERS MATTER

By Rick Salutin, Toronto Star

Teachers are often the focus of anger when we ponder problems in our school system. In the first of a series, Rick Salutin says the best fix may be the easiest: leave teachers alone.

Read more: http://www.thestar.com/news/insight/article/960546–saving-public-education-why-teachers-matter

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BUDGET 2011: SMELLS LIKE 1995

By Armine Yalnizyan, Progressive Economics Forum

Back in 1995 Finance Minister Paul Martin introduced a budget that reshaped fiscal federalism and retrenched the scope of the welfare state in Canada. It envisioned a dramatically smaller role for the federal government, a role that was permanently in question through the process of ongoing program review. It was Paul Martin’s permanent revolution, for the federal public service.

Today’s federal budget, the sixth tabled by Finance Minister Jim Flaherty, brings back the revolution.

Read more: http://www.progressive-economics.ca/2011/03/22/budget-2011-smells-like-1995/

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KOCH INDUSTRIES REGISTERS TO LOBBY ALBERTA GOVERNMENT

By Geoff Dembicki, The Hook

Koch Industries, a powerful American energy conglomerate which helped found the Tea Party movement, has now registered to lobby the Alberta government.

Records show the company hired Global Public Affairs, one of the most influential lobby firms in Canada, to represent its interests.

Read more: http://thetyee.ca/Blogs/TheHook/Environment/2011/03/24/koch-lobby-government/

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ECONOMIC INEQUALITY IS NOT ‘REALISTIC’

By Linda McQuaig, rabble.ca

“Greed is good and I love money.”

There was a time when such a lip-smacking declaration of personal gluttony would have been dismissed as boorish and anti-social.

Yet today this bombastic declaration by wealthy arch-capitalist Kevin O’Leary is treated as reasonable, even given copious airtime by our public broadcaster. (O’Leary currently figures prominently in two CBC TV programs and is soon to add another.)

Read more: http://rabble.ca/columnists/2011/03/economic-inequality-not-realistic

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VIDEO: CANADA’S GROWING GAP

From Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

The income gap between the rich and the rest of us grew, in good times and in bad. Learn more about it with this video.

Watch the video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JrjIBbMPQw0

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(END)
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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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