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Education Crisis

ANALYSES FROM THE ANTIPODES

Friday 7th September, 2012

SRHE, 73 Collier Street, London N1 9BE

11.30-4.30 (lunch served after the first presentation)

 

There is a perception among the continental European academic community that a single Anglo-Saxon intellectual world exists, united by a common language and culture. This seminar contributes towards putting that assumption to the test. Is Australasian research into higher education in fact distinct from that carried out in other Anglophone contexts? Do Australasian researchers bring to their work culturally- and geographically-influenced perspectives that elude or challenge their UK-based colleagues? To address these – and other – questions about ‘Antipodean’ analyses, the SRHE’s International Research and Researchers Network is pleased to host a seminar in which three Australasian-based academics talk about their current work, and UK-based Australian, Professor Susan Robertson from the University of Bristol, responds as discussant.

 

The rise and rise of higher education and research in East Asia, and some implications for comparative analysis

Professor Simon Marginson, University of Melbourne, Australia

Investment in research and development in East Asia and Singapore now exceeds that of the UK and Europe. The rate of growth in science is astonishing, and many ‘World class universities’ have emerged. East Asian developments (and potential developments in other geo-spatial regions) suggest that the universal templates for comparative education need to be rethought. Global modernisation is associated with convergent political economies that are nonetheless articulated through distinctive political-cultural configurations. This presentation will address these, and other, related, issues.

 

Research into doctoral pedagogy, practice and process-towards-product

Dr Susan Carter, Centre for Academic Development, University of Auckland, New Zealand

Research on doctoral pedagogy focuses on a range of intriguing aspects: personal experience; institutional policy and rhetoric; pedagogy; and product. In this presentation, Dr Carter critiques the changing nature of the social negotiations that the doctorate makes. Her perspective on the social and personal representation of the thesis is generic: she shows the tensions between the generic requirements for a thesis, the discipline/epistemological demands, and the authorial desire for an authentic voice.

 

Do we want to overcome the failure of feedback? New analyses for new times

Professor David Boud, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia

Criticism by students about feedback has long dominated student surveys. Poor perceptions of feedback have generated many simplistic exhortations and prescriptions. Less visibly, research literature now offers increasingly well-founded advice about what might be done to improve feedback in courses. The problem, though, is that this research points not to incremental change but to challenges to cherished assumptions about what HE teachers do. This presentation will address what are these new ways of thinking about feedback, and what implications they have for how HE teaching and learning is organised.

 

Event booking details

To reserve a place at this seminar please register at: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/, or telephone +44 (0) 207 427 2350.  

SRHE events are open to all and free to SRHE members as part of their membership package. The delegate fee for non-members is £25 up until 31 July and £45 from 1 August. Non-members wishing to join the Society may do so at the time of registration and the delegate fee will be waived. Please note that places must be booked in advance and that a £45 fee for non-attendance will be charged if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non-attendance has been given in advance.

 

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit

SRHE Event Manager

Society for Research into Higher Education

73 Collier Street

London N1 9BE

Telephone 0207 427 2350

Fax number 0207 278 1135

srheoffice@srhe.ac.uk

http://www.srhe.ac.uk

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Knowledge

Knowledge

STRUCTURING KNOWLEDGE: NEW VISIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION

Structuring knowledge: New visions of higher education

Monday 25th and Tuesday 26th June 2012

Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford.

 

We have managed to secure some additional places for this event. Please register as soon as possible if you wish to attend.

This year the Higher Education Theory Group Symposium focuses on the topic of knowledge, specifically on the structuring of knowledge within contemporary higher education. It will also explore the ways in which different disciplines construct knowledge nowadays and the shift of traditional disciplinary boundaries, particularly within the context of open knowledge and interdisciplinary environments.

 

Keynote Speakers:

Ron Barnett: Emeritus Professor of Higher Education, Institute of Education, University of London

Tina Besley: Professor, Policy, Cultural and Social Studies in Education, University ofWaikato

Gert Biesta: Professor of Education, University ofStirling

Michael Peters: Professor Emeritus ,University of Illinoisand Professor, Policy, Cultural and Social Studies in Education, University of Waikato

Michael Young: Professor of Education, Institute of Education, University of London

 

The symposium will examine a number of discussion points which are set out on our webpage.There will be contributions from keynote speakers and opportunity for extensive plenary discussions on the issues raised. The overall aim of the symposium is to explore different perspectives and open up theoretical, methodological and pedagogical questions for debate. The main speakers will each produce a short synopsis of their contribution for participants to consider in advance of the seminar. It is intended to prepare a book for publication based on the seminar proceedings. The symposium will be of interest to a wide range of practitioners drawn from all disciplines and institutions: academics, research students, undergraduates and administrative personnel.

Cost: £168 members, £198 non-members (until 22 May); £200 members, £237 non-members (after 22 May)  

The cost covers 1 night’s accommodation at LMH and dinner on 25th June, tea coffee lunch on both days.

To register please visit http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

If you have any queries please contact me at fsmit@srhe.ac.uk     

 

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit, SRHE Event Manager, Society for Research into Higher Education, 73 Collier Street, London N1 9BE, Telephone 0207 427 2350, Fax number 0207 278 1135, srheoffice@srhe.ac.uk, http://www.srhe.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Ben Linus

Ben Linus

PEDAGOGIC LEADERSHIP IN POST-COMPULSORY EDUCATION

 The Centre for Leadership andEnterprise,SchoolofEducation,UniversityofGreenwich

SRHE Post-Compulsory and Higher Education Research Network and

BERA Post-Compulsory and Lifelong Learning SIG

Invite you to a Research Event on

Pedagogic Leadership in Post-Compulsory Education: Does it Exist?

Keynote Speech: Emeritus Professor Denis Gleeson

Friday 11 May 2012 at 10.00 (refreshments) until 2.00 pm

Venue: University of Greenwich, Devonport House

King William Walk, Greenwich

London SE10 9JW

 

To book please visit http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

 

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit, SRHE Event Manager, Society for Research into Higher Education, 73 Collier Street, London N1 9BE, Telephone 0207 427 2350, Fax number 0207 278 1135, srheoffice@srhe.ac.uk, http://www.srhe.ac.uk

**END**

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

The Assault on Universities

AT THE HEART OF A HEARTLESS SYSTEM, THE NEW STUDENT EXPERIENCE? SHAPING RELATIONSHIPS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

SRHE Student Experience Network

Thursday 23rd February 2012

Registration 11.00am – 11.30am

Seminar 11.30am – 4.30pm

SRHE, 73 Collier St, London N1 9BE

At the Heart of a heartless system, the new student experience? Shaping relationships in Higher Education

A one-day SEN seminar discussing partnerships, relationships and generations

A number of current terms for student are often criticised for their ideological baggage. Monetized labels such as ‘client’ and ‘customer’ implicitly reframe academics as providers and producers, reducing the student experience to the status of product. Such thinking establishes not only fixed identity roles, but also the flow of the process governing transactions between them. One way of disturbing, or at least questioning, this logic is to focus on the quality and nature of the relationships between the actors.

This one-day Student Experience Network seminar examines the relationships between HEIs, academics and students. It questions how they are conceived and suggests ways to enact them. What, for example, is the tension between generational politics and notions of partnership? If there is a new ‘radical’, ‘lost’ or ‘jilted’ generation forming (to name three recent books), how should HEIs and practitioners pursue partnership with them and vice versa?

Structured around four speakers, the day will provoke practical and useful discussion for anyone with an interest in student engagement, staff/student relationships, and the way in which the student experience is framed around them.

Dr Paul Ashwin, Senior Lecturer in HE in here@lancaster, the HE Research and Evaluation Centre in the Department of Educational Research, Lancaster University.

Colin Bryson, Director of Combined Honours Centre, Newcastle University.

Dr Ben Little, Lecturer in Media and Cultural Studies,University of Middlesex.

Dr Sabine Little, Editor of Staff-Student Partnerships in Higher Education (Continuum, 2011), University of Sheffield.

Professor Valerie Hey, Head of Education, Professor of Education,University of Sussex. (Discussant)

Graeme Wise, Assistant Director (Policy), National Students’ Union (Discussant)

Event booking details

To reserve a place at this seminar please register at http://www.eventdotorg.co.uk/events.asp or telephone +44 (0) 207 427 2350.   SRHE events are open to all and free to SRHE members as part of their membership package. The delegate fee for non-members is £25 [full time students £20]. Non-members wishing to join the Society may do so at the time of registration and the delegate fee will be waived. Please note that places must be booked in advance and that a £25 for non-attendance will  be charged if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non-attendance has been given in advance.

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

Education Crisis

GLOBAL DISRUPTIONS AND HIGHER EDUCATION

Occupy: A New Pedagogy of Space and Time?

Professor Mike Neary, Dean of Teaching and Learning, Director of Centre for Educational Research and Development,University ofLincoln

Dr Sarah Amsler, Senior Lecturer, Centre for Educational Research and Development,University ofLincoln

Friday 9th March 2012, 15.00 – 16.30, Room 120, Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol, 35 Berkeley Square

Dear All

Welcome to the first SRHE Southwest Higher Education Network Seminar of 2012!  

Full details of the event are attached to this email.

Booking: To book a place or for further information, please contact:  Richard.Budd@bristol.ac.uk

Look forward to seeing you there.

Dr Lisa Lucas

Co-Director Teaching, Learning and Assessment DirectorMPhil/PhD Programme Graduate School of Education University of Bristol, 35 Berkeley Square, Bristol, BS8 1JA, Tel: +44 (0)117 331 4351 (internal number 14351)

Email: Lisa.Lucas@bristol.ac.uk

Webpage: http://www.bris.ac.uk/education/people/person/lisa-lucas/overview.html

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Posthuman

SRHE DIGITAL UNIVERSITY NETWORK

SRHE Digital University Network

Friday 2 March 2012

9.30 – 12.30 followed by lunch

 

Digital Disaggregation:  Assessing the Uncanny Posthuman

Dr Sian Bayne, School of Education, University of Edinburgh

To learn and teach across multiple digital spaces can be to experience uncertainty, disorientation and fragmentation in both generative and disturbing ways. This presentation will draw on notions of the uncanny and of the posthuman in theorising the ‘strangeness’ of these new modes of being in education. In particular, it will discuss the ways in which assessment practices in online learning can explicitly engage with disaggregation, spectrality and posthuman pedagogy, as critical moves in re-thinking teaching, learning and assessment for the digital mode.

Dr Bayne’s research focuses on the impact of the digital on higher education, museum education and lifelong learning. Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at the University of Edinburgh, she has held awards from the British Academy, the Higher Education Academy, the AHRC and the Royal Society of Edinburgh for a range of projects concerned with the ways in which technological change prompts us to re-think what education is and can be. Dr Bayne is a member of the University of Edinburgh Digital Cultures and Education research group (http://www.education.ed.ac.uk/dice/), Programme Co-Director of the University of Edinburgh MSc in E-learning (http://www.education.ed.ac.uk/e-learning/), and Associate Dean (digital scholarship) for the College of Humanities and Social Sciences at Edinburgh (http://www.digital.hss.ed.ac.uk/).

 

Education as Sociomaterial Practices – Posthuman Frontiers for Educational Technology

Professor Tara Fenwick, School of Education, University of Stirling
The materiality of everyday interaction is too often ignored, dismissed, or isolated in educational research. Objects and technologies are often assumed to be separate and distinct from human desire and action, in ways that lead to other unhelpful distinctions between virtual and real, designers and users, and knowledge and action. In this presentation I argue for a different configuration, showing how the social and material not only are entangled in assemblages of the human and nonhuman, but also constitute the practices and knowings that comprise education. Sociomaterial analyses trace how and why particular practices and knowledges in educational processes become naturalized or stabilised, what is holding them together, what is excluded and what inequities are created. Capacities for action are more-than-human, they are relational, distributed, and enacted through particular dynamic assemblages. This is a posthuman, not anti-human approach – a sociomaterial sensibility opens radical new questions and imaginative possibilities for education and educational technology.
Professor Fenwick has written extensively about theories of learning and gender in relation to work practices and education, most recently focusing on what some call ‘socio-material’ theories, particularly actor-network theory and complexity sciences. Her book Learning Through Experience: Troubling Assumptions and Intersecting Questions (Krieger, 2003) was granted the 2004 Cyril Houle Award of the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education for Outstanding Contribution to Adult Education Literature. Recent large projects funded by Canada’s Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council include (1) an examination of older professionals’ informal learning and its relation to aging and generational issues; (2) a study exploring knowledge networks and practices of ‘portfolio’ workers (independent and mobile professionals who work with multiple employers and organizations simultaneously); and (3) a participatory research project studying social responsibility learning among small business owners, including professional firms. Her current project with Canadian colleagues Kathryn Church, Elizabeth Lange, Taylor Webb is comparing knowledge-creation practices of nurses, social workers and teachers in changing organizations, using an activity theory framework.

 

Event booking details

To reserve a place at this seminar please register at: www.eventdotorg.co.uk/events.asp

Or telephone +44 (0) 207 4472525.  SRHE events are open to all and free to SRHE members as part of their membership package. The delegate fee for non-members is £25 [full time students £20]. Non-members wishing to join the Society may do so at the time of registration and the delegate fee will be waived. Please note that places must be booked in advance and that a £25 for non-attendance will be charged if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non-attendance has been given in advance.

 

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit, SRHE Event Manager

PLEASE NOTE THAT SRHE HAS MOVED TO NEW OFFICES. OUR NEW TELEPHONE NUMBER

OUR NEW OFFICE DETAILS ARE: Society for Research into Higher Education, 73 Collier Street, London N1 9BE

Telephone 0207 427 2350; Fax number 0207 278 1135; srheoffice@srhe.ac.uk; http://www.srhe.ac.uk

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Mountain Walk

PROBLEMATIZING STUDENT SUPPORT: THE AFFECTIVE AND ACADEMIC DIMENSIONS

SRHE, 73 Collier Street, London N1 9BE

7 February 2012 1pm – 4.30pm

 

Helping and Supporting Students: A case for the development of collegiality, dialogue and ‘practice’

Dr Jan Huyton, Senior Lecturer and PDP/Personal Tutoring Co-ordinator, Cardiff Metropolitan University.

In the higher education context, support work with students often occurs in private space, behind the closed doors of a tutor’s office. Using Goffmanesque dramaturgical imagery I have described such interactions as frequently taking place ‘off-stage’. It is essential that the manner in which tutors approach this challenge is theorised as a form of academic or pedagogical practice. This paper will draw on research which demonstrates that many tutors are working in a supportive capacity with students, without a clear sense of the boundaries of their role, and without discussing their work with colleagues. I will argue that the promotion of dialogue facilitated by more collegial forms of working offers the most constructive way forward. This would address the need to develop a notion of ‘practice’ (MacIntyre, 2007) for supporting students based on academic, pedagogical and ethical principles, and would also offer the opportunity to explore practice via peer supervision.

 

Helping and supporting students: analysing the concept of need 

Dr Janette Myers, Senior Lecturer in Student Learning and Support, St George’s, University of London

This paper will argue for a critical examination of the concept of student need. To this end a model of need and its relationship to another key concept in higher education, the development of autonomy, will be explained and discussed. A comparison of the cases of two similar institutions with very different approaches will be used to show how the idea of the student contains constructions of need that have implications for academic practice. The Medical Schools of King’s College London and St George’s, University of London both have schemes which are designed to extend entry to medical degrees to students who are currently under-represented. Both Medical Schools are part of the University of London, located in South London, nine stops apart on the London Underground and have the aim of attracting similar students. The schemes have similar objectives but in other respects are very different. These striking differences serve as a way of considering the question of the construction of student need and its implications that is applicable to other forms of student support and academic practice.

 

Affective dimensions of supporting doctoral students and implications for academic development for doctoral supervisors 

Jannie Roed, Principal Lecturer at the University of West London

Doctoral education is not only about the production of new knowledge. It is also about the development of individuals and the shaping of new identities. Green (2005:154) has described doctoral supervision as a ‘field of identification’, arguing that the transformational processes taking place in the supervisory space is about negotiating and re-positioning identities between students and supervisors, and Crossouard (2010) has shown how the doctoral learning experience has a powerful impact on how individuals view themselves both during their studies and after completion. However, in the process, supervisors, too, develop their professional identities (Halse 2011).Using a conceptual framework based on Margaret Archer’s work on agency and structure (Archer 2000; Archer 2003) and Judith Butler’s theories around accounting for oneself (Butler 2005), the paper draws on findings from 14 in-depth interviews with doctoral supervisors to explore how affective dimensions of the doctoral supervisory process shape professional identities.

 

Network Convenors: Professor Paul Blackmore (KCL) and Prof. Joëlle Fanghanel (Universityof West London)

 

Event booking details

To reserve a place at this seminar please register at http://www.eventdotorg.co.uk/events.asp or telephone +44 (0) 207 427 2350.   SRHE events are open to all and free to SRHE members as part of their membership package. The delegate fee for non-members is £25 [full time students £20]. Non-members wishing to join the Society may do so at the time of registration and the delegate fee will be waived. Please note that places must be booked in advance and that a £25 for non-attendance will  be charged if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non-attendance has been given in advance.

 

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit

SRHE Event Manager

PLEASE NOTE THAT SRHE HAS MOVED TO NEW OFFICES. OUR NEW TELEPHONE NUMBER

OUR NEW OFFICE DETAILS ARE:

Society for Research into Higher Education

73 Collier Street

LondonN1 9BE

Telephone 0207 427 2350

Fax number 0207 278 1135

srheoffice@srhe.ac.uk

http://www.srhe.ac.uk

 

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Higher Education Identities

HIGHER EDUCATION IDENTITIES, CULTURES AND PRACTICES

SRHE Higher Educational Policy Network

Tuesday 11th October 4-6.30pm, Room T1-20, London Metropolitan University

Higher education identities, cultures and practices: a changing policy context

The higher education sector in the UK is experiencing dramatic change. The financial crisis, a change of government and ongoing developments in the positioning and role of higher education institutions present new challenges for those who work in universities. This seminar will explore the implications of these changes for academic and professional identities, cultures and practices.

 

Dr Celia Whitchurch, Institute of Education, University of London    

Reconstructing Identities in Higher Education – Expanding the Parameters of Academia

In a context in which academics are increasingly working across multiple constituencies and with internal and external partners, this paper explores the factors that influence individuals to take on such work. It considers the impact on academic identities and career paths and the implications for institutions of more complex roles and relationships.

Dr Jill Jameson, University of Greenwich

Changing Leadership Identities: the Role of Trust and Organisational Cultures in a Recessionary UK Higher Education Policy Context

This paper considers how changing leadership values, trust and organisational cultures impact upon the identities of academic, professional and corporate leaders in HE. It also explores how the academic and intellectual aspects of HE leadership identities can be strengthened and trust rebuilt to fulfil the complex purposes of universities.

Tea and coffee will be available at 4pm and the event will start at 4.15. After each paper there will be time for questions and discussion, followed by an opportunity to discuss issues raised in both papers over a glass of wine or juice.

For further details about the Higher Education Policy Network, please contact the network convenor, Professor Carole Leathwood, Institute for Policy Studies in Education, London Metropolitan University, c.leathwood@londonmet.ac.uk.

Event booking details

To reserve a place at this seminar please register at http://www.eventdotorg.co.uk/events.asp or telephone +44 (0) 207 4472525.  SRHE events are open to all and free to SRHE members as part of their membership package. The delegate fee for non-members is £25 [full time students £20]. Non members wishing to join the Society may do so at the time of registration and the delegate fee will be waived. Please note that places must be booked in advance and that a £25 for non-attendance will  be charged if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non-attendance has been given in advance.

Interested in joining the HEP Network – but not able to attend this event? To receive details of future events in this series and to join the mailing list, please email nmanches@srhe.ac.uk

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit, Society for Research into Higher Education, 44 Bedford Row, London WC1R 4LL, Tel: +44 20 7447 2525, Fax: +44 20 7447 2526

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Capitorg

THE ETHICS OF WIDENING PARTICIPATION SEMINAR SERIES

UALL Widening Participation and Social Inclusion Network

Convenor: Annette Hayton, Head of Widening Participation, Goldsmiths, University of London

SRHE: Access and Widening Participation Network

Convenor: Penny-Jane Burke, Roehampton University

 

Venue: SRHE, 44 Bedford Way London WC1R 4LL

Date: Thursday 14th July 2011

From 1pm- 4pm (lunch available from 12:30pm)

 

The Ethics of Widening Participation Seminar Series

 

Ethical dilemmas in widening participation: issues of pedagogy and identity

Dr Jacqueline Stevenson, Leeds Metropolitan University

For more than a decade various governmental policy initiatives have been implemented in the UK to increase the number of students attending higher education. However, whilst these initiatives have been widely critiqued there has been almost no consideration as to the ethical implications of widening participation. This is a significant omission since both WP policy and practice give rise to serious ethical concerns, not least being whether we should continue to increase access to HE at all knowing that many widening participation students are more likely to drop out, get worse degrees, graduate with higher levels of debt and be less employable post-graduation than their peers. Drawing on issues of pedagogy, student support and both staff and student identities, this presentation will act as a ‘think-piece’ offering an opportunity to consider the implications of widening participation from both an ‘ethics of justice’ and ‘ethics of care’ perspective. 

 

Widening Participation and the Capability Approach

Dr Michael F. Watts, University of Cambridge

This paper uses the capability approach to address the ethics of the widening participation agenda.  The capability approach de-emphasises the significance of commodities (including educational commodities) in favour of the opportunities they enable in pursuit of the good life.  It demands a context-based understanding of how the socio-cultural circumstances of young people influence the real opportunities they have to recognise the value of and engage with higher education.  This more nuanced engagement with the concept of well-being recognises that the inevitability of human diversity generates different realisations of the good life.  It also enables engagement with the adaptation of preferences that continue to bedevil attempts to increase access to higher education.  The focus on freedom, illustrated here with reference to a number of empirical studies, frames a more just approach to widening participation that is concerned with what young people have rather than what they lack. 

 

 

Event booking details

To reserve a place at this seminar please email Nicola Manches at: nmanches@srhe.ac.uk or telephone +44 (0) 207 4472525.   Please include the name of your institution and whether you are an SRHE or UALL member.

Cost:

SRHE members: free

UALL members: £25

All Non members: £40

Payment can be made by cheque (made payable SRHE and sent to SRHE, 44 Bedford Way London WC1R 4LL ) or phone through with credit card details.  Please note that places must be booked in advance and that a £25 for non attendance if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non attendance given by 7 July 2011.

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit

Society for Research into Higher Education

44 Bedford Row

London WC1R 4LL

Tel: +44 20 7447 2525

Fax: +44 20 7447 2526

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

European Union

THE EUROPEAN HIGHER EDUCATION AREA: KEY ISSUES AND WAYS FORWARD

Monday 11th July 2011

12.00-4.00pm (lunch inclusive)

Venue: SRHE, 44 BedfordRow, London, WC1R  4LL

Programme:

The French university at the crossroads: between bureaucratic accountability and the quest for excellence

Dr Romuald Normand & Professor Jean-Louis Derouet, Institut Français de l’Education, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon

French higher education institutions, beyond official rhetoric, remain profoundly divided between the elitism that provides excellence for the few, and the democratisation that is reflected in the massification of higher education. This is illustrated by the expanse between the prestigious and highly selective grandes écoles (the Oxbridge or Ivy League of the French system) and the ‘fac’ – the ordinary universities. Moreover, the paucity of French research and scholarship on higher education means that there is no persistent analytical and potentially critical voice coming from the academy, nor any relevant empirical findings. Changes have, however, occurred within the system with theBolognaprocess, the creation of the National Research Agency, and legislation on university autonomy. Romuald Normand and Jean-Louis Derouet will examine and analyse current tensions and propose ways forward.

The Strange Saga of Policy as Success

Guy Neave, Scientific Director of the Centre for Research in Higher Education Policies (CIPES)Porto,Portugal, and Professor Emeritus of the Centre for Higher Education Policy Studies atTwenteUniversity, theNetherlands

This presentation is not concerned with the Bologna Process so much as an exemplar to examine a broader issue of HE policy as a multi-level process. Who defines success? And at what level – inter-governmental, system or institutional level?  Does success at one inevitably mean success at another?  How is the Bologna Process perceived less by reformers – by the pays politique – as by those who have reform done to them – that is, at institutional level by the pays réel, academics, students and administrators. This presentation draws on findings across seven higher education establishments in four EU member states:Norway,Portugal,ItalyandGermany. It suggests optimism is best when heavily diluted with caution.

The European Higher Education Area (EHEA): is there a future?

Noël Vercruysse, Director, Higher Education Policy Unit, Flemish Belgian Ministry of Education

The implementation of the Bologna Process in the first decade of the 21st century has had a significant impact on European higher education at levels of the system: the government, higher education institutions, academic staff and students. Much has been achieved, but it is certainly an exaggeration to say that we are living in a vibrant and dynamic EHEA. After theLeuvenconference in 2009 the Bologna Process and the EHEA are losing momentum. Why is this, and what can be done about it? Is there still a future for the EHEA, and, if so, what kind of future? Noël Vercruysse will discuss these issues as well as focus on what he considers a main policy priority for the coming years: differentiation and diversity in higher education and the consequent need of good transparency tools.

Event booking details

To reserve a place at this seminar please email Nicola Manches at: nmanches@srhe.ac.uk or telephone +44 (0) 207 4472525. SRHE events are open to all and free to SRHE members as part of their membership package. The delegate fee for non-members is £25 [full time students £20]. Non members wishing to join the Society may do so at the time of registration and the delegate fee will be waived.

Please note that all places–for SRHE members and non members-must be booked in advance and that we have to charge £25 for non-attendance if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non-attendance given in advance of the day of the event.

(Interested in joining the IIR Network but not able to attend this event? To receive details of future events in this series and to join the mailing list, please email nmanches@srhe.ac.uk)

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit, Society for Research into Higher Education, 44 Bedford Row, London WC1R  4LL, Tel: +44 20 7447 2525, Fax: +44 20 7447 2526

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Education Crisis

HIGHER EDUCATION AS A PUBLIC GOOD: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES

SRHE Higher Education Theory Group Seminar

Higher Education as a Public Good: Critical Perspectives

Monday 4 July –Tuesday 5 July 2011

New College, Oxford

The Society for Research into Higher Education Theory Group invites you to participate in a 2-day symposium examining issues underlying the concept of higher education as a public good. This is a topic much discussed in the light of recent policy developments in the UK and in many other countries. The seminar will explore its theoretical underpinnings from several disciplinary perspectives. There will be inputs from keynote speakers and participative discussions on the issues raised. The main speakers will each produce a short synopsis of their contribution for participants to consider in advance of the seminar. It is intended to prepare a book for publication based on the seminar proceedings.

Keynote Speakers:

Nick Barr: Professor of Public Economics. LSE London

Bob Cowen: Emeritus Professor of Education. IOE London

David Dill: Emeritus Professor of Public Policy. University of North Carolina

Jon Nixon: Honorary Professor.University of Sheffield

Paul Standish: Professor of Philosophy of Education. IOE London

Registration

This symposium will take place at New College Oxford and the fee of £125 (£155 for non members of SRHE) covers the cost of accommodation for one night in ensuite rooms and all meals, including dinner in the College on Monday evening. Rooms at the College are limited so delegates are advised to make an early registration to attend this symposium.

The closing date for bookings is 4 June 2011.

To attend this event please e-mail: Nicola Manches (nmanches@srhe.ac.uk) to reserve your place and arrange payment. Please address all enquiries about this or other SRHE events to Nicola Manches at the SRHE Offices.

Society for Research into Higher Education, 44 Bedford Row, London WC1R  4LL, Tel +44 (0) 20 7447 2525, Fax +44 (0) 20 7447 2526, http://www.srhe.ac.uk

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Higher Education

HIGHER EDUCATION AND THE MARKET

Higher Education Policy Network

Book launch and seminar: ‘Higher Education and the Market’

Monday 8th November 2010, 4.00-6.30 pm

Room GCG-08, London Metropolitan University, 166-220 Holloway Road, London, N7 8DB

Market forces are increasingly central to the higher education sector and this event marks the launch of a very timely new book: ‘‘Higher Education and the Market’ edited by Professor Roger Brown. The book examines the role and impact of the market in HE in a number of countries across Europe as well as in the USA and Japan, and this event offers an opportunity to discuss the issues raised in the context of major challenges to the future of the higher education sector.

The event will take the form of a presentation by the editor and key author:

Professor Roger Brown, Co-Director for the Centre of Higher Education Research Development (CHERD) at Liverpool Hope University. 

Followed by responses from:

David Palfreyman, Fellow and Bursar New College Oxford and Director of the Oxford Centre for Higher Education Policy Studies

Dr Kelly Coate, Lecturer in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, National University of Ireland, Galway and a member of the SRHE Governing Council

There will be plenty of time for questions and discussion and a wine reception.

For further details about the Higher Education Policy Network, please contact the network convenor, Professor Carole Leathwood, Institute for Policy Studies in Education, London Metropolitan University, c.leathwood@londonmet.ac.uk.

Higher Education Policy Network – 8th November

Network Events are free to SRHE members as part of their membership package.

Delegate fees for non members: £25 (students £20)                                                                                                                   

To register for this event please contact nmanches@srhe.ac.uk

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com
Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski