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BRUCE LEE

BRUCE LEE

MARTIAL ARTS STUDIES

Cardiff University, 10-12 June 2015

Organiser: Paul Bowman

BowmanP@cardiff.ac.uk

Martial Arts Studies: An International Interdisciplinary Conference

 

What is martial arts studies?

What could it be?

Is it a specific new field or is it always going to be a subsection of other disciplines?

What are the possibilities and limitations of creating or developing martial arts studies?

What are its key concerns, problematics, theories, orientations, and methodologies, and why?

 

Building on recent work, such as the 2014 special issue of JOMEC Journal on martial arts studies, this conference invites proposals for 20minute papers that engage with key questions about the field, as well as papers that present current work in any aspect of martial arts studies

JOMEC Journal: Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies

Special issue on ‘Martial Arts Studies’: http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/jomec/research/journalsandpublications/jomecjournal/5-june2014/index.html

 

Martial Arts Studies Conference (Registration, Speakers, Abstracts and much more): http://martialartsstudies.blogspot.co.uk/

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

 

Time and Space in the Social Universe of Capital’ – by Michael Neary and Glenn Rikowski, now at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/10545768/Time_and_Speed_in_the_Social_Universe_of_Capital

CLR James

CLR James

CONFERENCE ON THE LIFE AND LEGACY OF C.L.R. JAMES

We are pleased to announce that the C.L.R James Legacy Project, in partnership with the Workers’ Educational Association (WEA) will be hosting a conference on the Life & Legacy of C.L.R. James in London Saturday 13th April 2013. The format for the day is still to be planned and we invite anyone interested to:

– Send suggestions for presentations, papers and speakers. We already have some high profile speakers that have said they will present..more news to follow. We will also be showing films and launching some exciting new projects. We hope to document the conference by producing a book after the event. If you want to get involved then please let us know. 

– Volunteer time to help organise and publicise the conference.  

– Donate and/or help raise money to help make the conference a success. We currently have no funding to put on this event but are committed to it going ahead. If you would like to donate personally or help fundraise then please get in touch.
 
If you think you can help in any way to make this conference the success it deserves to be then please email: andrea@hackneyunites.org.uk.

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/conference-on-the-life-and-legacy-of-c.l.r.-james-london-saturday-13th-april-2013

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

C.L.R. James

C.L.R. James

THE LEGACY OF C.L.R. JAMES – CONFERENCE

We are pleased to announce that the C.L.R James Legacy Project, in partnership with the Workers’ Educational Association (WEA) will be hosting a conference on the Life & Legacy of C.L.R. James in London Saturday 13th April 2013. The format for the day is still to be planned and we invite anyone interested to:

– Send suggestions for presentations, papers and speakers. We already have some high profile speakers that have said they will present … more news to follow. We will also be showing films and launching some exciting new projects. We hope to document the conference by producing a book after the event. If you want to get involved then please let us know. 

– Volunteer time to help organise and publicise the conference.  

– Donate and/or help raise money to help make the conference a success. We currently have no funding to put on this event but are committed to it going ahead. If you would like to donate personally or help fundraise then please get in touch.
 
If you think you can help in any way to make this conference the success it deserves to be then please email: andrea@hackneyunites.org.uk.

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/conference-on-the-life-and-legacy-of-c.l.r.-james-london-saturday-13th-april-2013

 

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‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Christmas

Christmas

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

CLR James

C.L.R. JAMES’ ‘BEYOND A BOUNDARY’

C.L.R. James’ Beyond a Boundary 

50th Anniversary Conference 
University of Glasgow. 
Friday 10th and Saturday 11th May, 2013.

Regularly cited as one of the great sports books of the twentieth century, C.L.R. James’ Beyond a Boundary (1963) is, by his own famous definition, about far more than cricket. Developing a concern to understand sport as part of a much wider social and political context (a concern first articulated in his earlier writings for the Glasgow Herald), James’ study is part-autobiography, part-historical study and part-political-call-to-arms written against the backdrop of the decolonisation struggles. His reflections thus reach out into a critical account of racism and imperialism, into wider questions of aesthetics and popular culture, and into the struggle for revolutionary social change which was the enduring concern of his life. Crucially, James insisted that such questions were not simply of concern to academics or to experts, but were also a central part of what drew ordinary men and women to sport. 
 
Much loved, and widely read, James’ study has also been the subject of searching criticism: he has been accused, among other things, of a failure of critical judgement in relation to cricket’s role in the moral framework of empire, of a lack of attentiveness to gendered inequalities, and of a naïve faith in the spontaneity of popular political resistance. 
 
This conference is convened on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the publication of Beyond a Boundary, with the intention of both celebrating and questioning, drawing out the book’s intellectual legacies and identifying the issues it leaves unanswered. We would welcome original papers dealing with any aspects of Beyond a Boundary. These might include:
 
– critical engagement with or reinterpretation of James’ arguments; 
– studies of the production and reception of the book itself;
– interpretations, via James, of contemporary sport;
– reflections on the transnational responses to James’ text;
– discussion of Beyond a Boundary within James’ wider corpus and in relation to his political practice;
– papers reporting on the use of James’ insights and methods in social research, in teaching, in journalism or in political activism.
 
Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be sent to Andy Smith:  andrew.smith.2@glasgow.ac.uk In keeping with James’ own practice, we would ask potential speakers to avoid unnecessary technical jargon, and to prepare papers intended for a general audience. 
 
Abstracts should be submitted by the end of October, 2012.
 
Already confirmed keynote speakers for the conference are Mike Brearley (former England Test captain and previously President of the British Psychoanalytic Society), and Wai Chee Dimock (Department of English, Yale) and Robert A. Hill (History, UCLA and C.L.R. James’ Literary Executor). We expect also to have contributions from Selwyn Cudjoe, Selma James and Mike Dibb.

Further keynotes to be announced; to be added to the conference mailing list, please e-mail the address given above. 

 

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-clr-jamess-beyond-a-boundary-50th-anniversary-conference-glasgow-10-11-may-2013

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

Equality

HOW FAIR IS BRITAIN? REFLECTIONS ON EQUALITY OVER THE PAST 12 YEARS – FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

 

Saturday 19th March 2011

10.00 – 4.00pm

Park Campus

University of Northampton

Northampton NN2 7AL

Registration:

Full fee: £35 (early payment by March 1st £30)

Non-waged / Students: £10

SPEAKERS:

Anna Henry (Head of Social Analysis & Foresight, Equality & Human Rights Commission)

Professor Andy Pilkington (Professor of Sociology at the University of Northampton)

Lystra Hagley-Dickinson (Senior Lecturer in Criminology, University of Northampton)

Manny Barot (Ex-Police Officer with Leicestershire Police. Researcher into equality and human rights within the criminal justicesystem)

Dr. Fionna Warner-Gale (Senior Visiting Fellow. Children, Young People and Mental Health. University of Lincoln)

Surinder Sharma (Director for Equality and Human Rights with the Department for Health)

Dave Coppock (Director, AimHigher Nottinghamshire)

Dr. Jane Callaghan (Senior Lecturer, Psychology, University of Northampton. Course Leader for Child and Adolescent Mental Health)

Martin Pratt (Corporate Director, Children & Learning, Luton Borough Council)

Floyd Douglas (Children’s Services, Northamptonshire County Council)

Dr. Daniel Burdsey (Senior Lecture in the Sociology of Sport at Brighton University)

Cyrille Regis MBE (Ex-professional footballer and England International)

Ben Cohen (Ex-England and Northamptonshire Saints rugby player. Now playing for Sale. Campaigns against homophobia in sport)

How Fair is Britain?

This is the question posed by the Equality and Human Rights Commission in its 700-page anatomy of disadvantage in the 21st century published in 2010. In the context of the new Equality Act 2010, and also the Government’s proposals around the “Big Society” and the future for public services in particular, this conference could not be more timely. The aim of this conference is to engage with these issue by drawing together academics and professionals/practitioners to look at challenges, and outline solutions, to make Britain fairer, based on how far we have come over the past 12 years.

Conference Themes:

  • Fairness and the Criminal Justice System
  • Fairness and Education
  • Fairness in Social Care / Local Government
  • Fairness in Health
  • Fairness in Sport

 

For further information about the conference, please email: equality@northampton.ac.uk

Visit the website at: http://www.northampton.ac.uk/equality

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Karl Marx

NEW PROPOSALS: JOURNAL OF MARXISM AND INTERDISCIPILINARY INQUIRY

New Proposals: Journal of Marxism and Interdisciplinary Inquiry has just published its latest issue at http://ojs.library.ubc.ca/index.php/newproposals. We invite you to review the Table of Contents here and then visit our web site to review articles and items of interest.

We encourage you to consider submitting an article, comment, photo essay for consideration. The types of engaged progressive research that we publish extends across the many disciplines of social science and humanities research. Upcoming issues include an anthropological analysis of neo-liberal social movements, a reassessment of the relationship between feminism and Marxism, and the publication of a new revised edition of a great introductory anthropology collection, Anthropology for a Small Planet.

Thanks for the continuing interest in our work
Charles R. Menzies
University of British Columbia
cmenzies@interchange.ubc.ca

New Proposals: Journal of Marxism and Interdisciplinary Inquiry
Vol. 4, No. 1 (2010)
Table of Contents
http://ojs.library.ubc.ca/index.php/newproposals/issue/view/96

Introduction
——–
Retrospection and Hope in a Democratic Socialist Alternative (5-6)
Charles R. Menzies

Feature Article
——–
Social Movements and Counter-Hegemony: Lessons from the Field (7-22)
William K. Carroll, R. S. Ratner

Comments and Arguments
——–
Base, Superstructure, Aesthetic Level: notes on a theory (23-28)
Gary Tedman

Articles
——–
Learning a lesson: An anarchist’s defence of Marxism based socialism
(29-34)
Arpad Kovacs

Sports Commentators and Late Monopoly Capitalist Indoctrination in the United States (35-47)
Kirk Packwood

Lohas and The Indigo Dollar: Growing The Spiritual Economy (48-60)
Joseph Gelfer

Complete Printable Version
——–
Complete Printable Version (1-60)
NP Editorial Collective

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Olympic Games

SOCIAL SCIENCES AND THE OLYMPIC GAMES

A joint Event Series hosted by the BSA Sociology of Sport and the BSA Leisure & Recreation Study Groups

The first event will take place on Tuesday 11th January 2011. Further information and online booking is available now at: www.britsoc.co.uk/events/olympics

Event 1: Beyond the Leisure Dome

The British Library Conference Centre London

Tuesday 11th January 2011, 10.00am–4.30pm

Confirmed speakers include:

Maurice Roche, University of Sheffield – ‘The Olympic Games, Mega-events and Modernity’

Martin Polley, University of Southampton – ‘‘Olympick, Olympian and Olympic’: Alternative British Histories’

Garry Whannel, University of Bedfordshire – ‘Are the Olympics popular, really?’

Alan Tomlinson, University of Brighton – ‘Olympic Sport and Modern European Identity’

Plus:

Olympic Futures 1: The Olympics and the Athlete – A Roundtable Discussion including: Barrie Houlihan (Loughborough University); Elizabeth Pike (University of Chichester); Dominic Malcolm (Loughborough University)

Book your place online now: www.britsoc.co.uk/events/olympics

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Battle of Ideas Festival, an annual event organised by the Institute of Ideas and taking place at the Royal College of Art, London on October 30-31. Over the course of a weekend over 2,000 people will be taking part in over 75 different debates involving hundreds of incisive and thought-provoking speakers.

Hilton reading Postone

 

This year’s festival includes strands of debates on medical ethics, social policy, scientific evidence and the battle for the past, and keynote debates on trust in an age of cynicism, whether the public is engaged or imagined, the economic and cultural future of the West, the promise and risks of engineering the future, the rights and wrongs of social justice, and what it means to be a liberal today, as well as many more discussions on current themes in the arts, science, health, parenting, education, design, fashion, international relations, religion and secularism, sport and everyday life.

Speakers include: David Aaronovitch columnist; Sarah Churchwell academic; Frank Furedi professor of sociology, University of Kent, Canterbury; Anil Gupta professor, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad; John Harris professor of bioethics; Bettany Hughes broadcaster; Virginia Ironside agony aunt; Wendy Kaminer US-based writer on liberty; Irma Kurtz writer; Norman Lebrecht cultural commentator; Paul Mason broadcaster; Gáspár Miklos Tamás Hungarian philosopher and dissident; Brendan O’Neill editor, spiked; Tim Parks novelist; Fred Pearce author; Anthony Seldon author and master, Wellington College; Roger Scruton philosopher; Dr Richard Smith author; Tarun J Tejpal Indian journalist and novelist; Professor Sir Mark Walport director of the Wellcome Trust; David Willetts MP Science Minister; David Yelland former editor, The Sun; Peter York cultural commentator; and many more. Click here for a full list.

Martin Wolf, chief economics commentator at the Financial Times, said the Battle of Ideas is: ‘a unique opportunity to learn from vigorous exchanges among some of the world’s best-informed and most provocative people’ and the neuroscientist Professor Colin Blakemore called his experience, ‘adrenaline for the mind. A chance for intellectual fisticuffs with some of the best-known and most stimulating thinkers in the world.’

Visit: http://www.battleofideas.org.uk to view this year’s entire festival programme, including an expanded programme of national and international Satellite events, as well as carefully selected readings for each session, specially commissioned Battle in Print essays on selected themes, and videos of previous years’ sessions. The festival brochure can also be downloaded as a PDF document.

** School students aged 16-18 are able to attend a day of the festival for free (the second day costing only £10). There are also a limited number of HALF PRICE Student Champion tickets, allowing university students full access to the weekend festival for just £25. Click here to purchase discounted tickets.**

Tickets are available through online booking, or by phone: 0207 269 9220.

If you know anyone who you think would be interested in this, please do forward this email on to friends and colleagues.

Best wishes

Claire

BATTLE OF IDEAS FESTIVAL

Claire Fox: Director, Institute of Ideas, Signet House, 49-51 Farringdon Road, London EC1M 3JP, 020 7269 9220, 020 7269 9223 (direct): www.instituteofideas.com; www.battleofideas.org.uk; www.debatingmatters.com

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‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com
Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

CLR James

SAVE THE CLR JAMES LIBRARY

The CLR James Library, in Hackney, east London, is being ‘renamed’. History is being re-written, and a proud tradition and a significant historical figure are being downgraded and hope for the future marginalized on the alter of managerialism.

Sign the petition here: http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/saveclrjameslibrary/

At the Rendezvous of Victory

September 22, 2010

By Scott McLemee

http://www.insidehighered.com/views/mclemee/mclemee307

One of the turning points in my life came in 1988, upon discovery of the writings of C.L.R. James. The word “discovery” applies for a couple of reasons. Much of his work was difficult to find, for one thing. But more than that, it felt like exploring a new continent.

James was born in Trinidad in 1901, and he died in England in 1989. (I had barely worked up the nerve to consider writing him a letter.) He had started out as a man of letters, publishing short stories and a novel about life among the poorest West Indians. He went on to write what still stands as the definitive history of the Haitian slave revolt, The Black Jacobins (1938). His play based on research for that book starred Paul Robeson as Toussaint Louverture. In 1939, he went to Mexico to discuss politics with Leon Trotsky. A few years later — and in part because of certain disagreements he’d had with Trotsky — James and his associates in the United States brought out the first English translation of Karl Marx’s Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844. (By the early 1960s, there would be a sort of cottage industry in commentary on these texts, but James planted his flag in 1947.)

He was close friends with Richard Wright and spoke at Martin Luther King, Jr.’s church. At one point, the United States government imprisoned James on Ellis Island as a dangerous subversive. While so detained, he drafted a book about Herman Melville as prophet of 20th century totalitarianism — with the clear implication that the U.S. was not immune to it.

Settled in Britain, he wrote a book on the history and meaning of cricket called Beyond a Boundary (1963). By all accounts it is one of the classics of sports writing. Being both strenuously unathletic and an American, I was prepared to take this on faith. But having read some of it out of curiosity, I found the book fascinating, even if the game itself remained incomprehensible.

This is, of course, an extremely abbreviated survey of his life and work. The man was a multitude. A few years ago, I tried to present a more comprehensive sketch in this short magazine article, and edited a selection of his hard-to-find writings for the University Press of Mississippi.

In the meantime, it has been good to see his name becoming much more widely known than it was at the time of his death more than two decades ago. This is particularly true among young people. They take much for granted that a literary or political figure can be, as James was, transnational in the strongest sense — thinking and writing and acting “beyond the boundary” of any given national context. He lived and worked in the 20th century, of course, but James is among the authors the 21st century will make its own.

So it is appalling to learn that the C.L.R. James Library in Hackney (a borough of London) is going to be renamed the Dalston Library and Archives, after the neighborhood in which it is located. James was there when the library was christened in his honor in 1985. The authorities insist that, in spite of the proposed change, they will continue to honor James. But this seems half-hearted and unsatisfying.

There is a petition against the name change, which I hope readers of this column will sign and help to circulate.

Some have denounced the name change as an insult, not just to James’s memory, but to the community in which the library is located, since Hackney has a large black population. I don’t know enough to judge whether any offense was intended. But the renaming has a significance going well beyond local politics in North London.

C.L.R. James was a revolutionary; that he ended up imprisoned for a while seems, all in all, par for the course. But he was also very much the product of the cultural tradition he liked to call Western Civilization. He used this expression without evident sarcasm — a remarkable thing, given that he was a tireless anti-imperialist. Given his studies in the history of Africa and the Caribbean, he might well have responded as Gandhi did when asked what he thought of Western Civilization: “I think it would be a good idea.”

As a child, James reread Thackeray’s satirical novel Vanity Fair until he had it almost memorized; this was, perhaps, his introduction to social criticism. He traced his ideas about politics back to ancient Greece. James treated thefuneral oration of Pericles as a key to understanding Lenin’s State and Revolution. And there is a film clip that shows him speaking to an audience of British students on Shakespeare — saying that he wrote “some of the finest plays I know about the impossibility of being a king.” As with James’s interpretation of Captain Ahab as a prototype of Stalin, this is a case of criticism as transformative reading. It’s eccentric, but it sticks with you.

Harold Bloom might not approve of what James did with the canon. And Allan Bloom would have been horrified, no doubt about it. But it helps explain some of James’s discomfort about the emergence of African-American studies as an academic discipline. He taught the subject for some time as a professor at Federal City College, now called the University of the District of Columbia — but not without misgivings.

“For myself,” he said in a lecture in 1969, “I do not believe that there is any such thing as black studies. There are studies in which black people and black history, so long neglected, can now get some of the attention they deserve. … I do not know, as a Marxist, black studies as such. I only know the struggle of people against tyranny and oppression in a certain political setting, and, particularly, during the past two hundred years. It’s impossible for me to separate black studies from white studies in any theoretical point of view.”

James’s argument here is perhaps too subtle for the Internet to propagate. (I type his words with mild dread at the likely consequences.) But the implications are important — and they apply with particular force to the circumstance at hand, the move to rename the C.L.R. James Library in London.

People of Afro-Caribbean descent in England have every right to want James to be honored. But no less outspoken, were he still alive, would be Martin Glaberman — a white factory worker in Detroit who later became a professor of social science at Wayne State University. (I think of him now because it was Marty who was keeping many of James’s books in print when I first became interested in them.) James was the nexus between activists and intellectuals in Europe, Africa, and the Americas, and his cosmopolitanism included a tireless effort to connect cultural tradition to modern politics. To quote from the translation he made of a poem by Aimé Cesaire: “No race holds the monopoly of beauty, of intelligence, of strength, and there is a place for all at the rendezvous of victory.”

Having C.L.R. James’s name on the library is an honor — to the library. To remove it is an act of vandalism. Please sign the http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/saveclrjameslibrary/.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Socialism and Hope

INTERNATIONAL SOCIALIST REVIEW 72

ISSUE 72:
July-August 2010

¡Todos Somos Arizona!

Letter from the editors

http://www.isreview.org/index.shtml

ANALYSIS IN BRIEF

Sharon Smith
Laws that need breaking: It’s impossible to avoid comparing Arizona today to the South in the era of Jim Crow

PLUS: plus Nicole Colson on abortion rights in peril; Giles Ji Ungpakorn on the Red Shirt revolt in Thailand; John Pilger on the modern class war in Greece

COLUMN

Phil Gasper • Critical thinking

Economic crisis and class struggle: Are recessions better for the left or the right?

FEATURES

Orlando Sepúlveda
¡Todos somos Arizona!
The revival of the immigrant rights movement since the passage of SB1070

Noam Chomsky, interviewed by David Barsamian
The new imperialism

Tikva Honig-Parnass
Apartheid Israel and the contradictions of left Zionism

Dave Zirin
Women, gender, and sports

Eric Kerl
Contemporary anarchism

Chris Williams
Marxism and the environment
The real track record, from Marx and Engels to the Bolsheviks and beyond: An excerpt from the New Ecology and Socialism

Frances Fox Piven
The working class in the Great Depression
A celebrated left sociologist introduces new editions of Irving Bernstein’s The Lean Years and The Turbulent Years

BOOK REVIEWS

Michael Steven Smith and Paul Le Blanc
Learning from a revolutionary
Review of Peter Camejo’s memoir, North Star

Sherry Wolf
Are men really better athletes?
Review of Playing with the Boys: Why Separate is Not Equal

PLUS: Greg Love on the business of capturing and transporting Africans to be slaves; Ashley Smith on Dilip Hiro’s After Empire: Helen Redmond on why surgical errors are no accident; Paul D’Amato on Lenin’s Marxism

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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