Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Spinoza

Spinoza

Spinoza

THINKING THROUGH SPINOZA: A RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM

Thinking through Spinoza: A research symposium

Friday 24 May, Room 3.20 Arts 2 Building
School of Politics and IR, Queen Mary, University of London

Spinoza’s philosophy continues to be an important reference point for scholars working within the Humanities. The symposium reflects this diversity of engagements with Spinoza, and brings together scholars working within political theory, philosophy, architecture, and the visual cultures. The symposium asks ‘How might we think with/through Spinoza today? The speakers’ responses reflect some of the most exciting and innovative approaches being developed through Spinoza’s thought today.

PROGRAMME

9.30-10.00:        Arrival, coffee, and registration

10.00-10.15:      Opening Remarks: Thinking, through Spinoza – Dr Caroline Williams (SPIR, QMUL)
10.15-11.30:      ‘Vital materialism: Spinoza after Deleuze’, Professor Rosi Braidotti (Director, Centre for the Humanities, Utrecht)
Chair:                Professor Diana Coole, (Politics, Birkbeck)

11.30-11.45        Coffee

11.45-1.15:        ‘Spinoza’s concept of equality’: Dr Beth Lord (Philosophy, Aberdeen); and ‘Spinoza’s Geometric Ecologies’, Dr Peg Rawes (Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL)
Chair:                Dr Filippo del Lucchese (Politics, Brunel)

1.15-2.15           LUNCH (Arts Two Senior Common Room, 4th floor)

2.15-3.45           ‘Jura communia as anima imperii: the symptomatic relationship between law and conflict in Spinoza’ Dr Filippo del Lucchese (Politics, Brunel); and ‘Spinoza and the Production of Subjectivity (or, the Three Kinds of Knowledge, and the Passage Between)’ Dr Simon O’Sullivan (Department of Visual Cultures, Goldsmiths)
Chair:                Dr Beth Lord (Philosophy, Aberdeen)

3.45-4.00    COFFEE

4.00-5.15           ‘Spinoza and Art’, Professor Moira Gatens (Philosophy, Sydney)
Chair:                Dr Caroline Williams (SPIR, QMUL)

5.15-6.30    Closing Remarks (Dr Caroline Williams (SPIR, QMUL) followed
by a wine reception for all participants (ArtsTwo SCR)

To register for the event, or for further information, click on the following link:
http://www.eventbrite.com/event/6258000849#

Best Wishes,
Caroline

Dr Caroline Williams
School of Politics & International Relations Queen Mary, University of
London
327 Mile End Road
London E1 4NS
United Kingdom
Email: c.a.williams@qmul.ac.uk
Webpage: http://www.politics.qmul.ac.uk/staff/drcarolinewilliams.html

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Critique

Critique

LONDON CONFERENCE IN CRITICAL THOUGHT 2013

Royal Holloway, University of London

6-7 June 2013
Call for Papers

Summary – : full version here: http://londonconferenceincriticalthought.wordpress.com

The second annual London Conference in Critical Thought (LCCT) will offer a space for an interdisciplinary exchange of ideas for scholars who work with critical traditions and concerns. It aims to provide opportunities for those who frequently find themselves at the margins of their department or discipline to engage with other scholars who share theoretical approaches and interests. Participation is free (though registration is required).

The conference is divided into thematic streams, each coordinated by different researchers and with separate calls for papers, included in this document. We welcome paper proposals that respond to the particular streams below, as well as papers for inclusion in a general stream.

Central to the vision of the conference is an inter-institutional, non-hierarchal, and accessible event that makes a particular effort to embrace emergent thought and the participation of emerging academics, fostering new avenues for critically orientated scholarship and collaboration.

Thematic Streams:

Concerning Bodies
Futures of Deconstruction
Pragmatism and Political Criticism
Feedback Loops of Feminist Thought and Activism
Beyond Identity and Critique
Spinozan Politics
The Soul at Work and in Debt
New Sensibilities in the Everyday
Sociocultural Criticism After Lehman Brothers
Critical Theory and Psychoanalysis
Critique, Action, Ethics
On Representation/Non-representation
The New Amateur
New Materialisms
Three Questions for the Emancipation of Latin America
Jean-Luc Nancy in Fragments
Higher Education in Crisis

Please send papers/presentations proposals with the relevant stream indicated in the subject line to londoncriticalconference@gmail.com

Submissions should be no more than 250 words and be received by the 25th March 2013.

Full call for papers with details of the streams can be found here: LCCT 2013 Call for Papers: http://londonconferenceincriticalthought.wordpress.com/call-for-papers-2013/

PDF full details: http://londonconferenceincriticalthought.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/lcct-2013-call-for-papers.pdf

 

All the best,

The LCCT organising collective.

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-london-conference-in-critical-thought-2013-rhul-6-7-june

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Spinoza

SPINOZA IN SOVIET PHILOSOPHY 2012 – CALL FOR PAPERS

Dear Colleagues,

The Aleksanteri Institute of the University of Helsinki is going to organize in May 18–19, 2012 an international symposium on “Spinoza in Soviet Philosophy”.

Please consult the description of the symposium focus in the address: http://www.helsinki.fi/aleksanteri/english/news/events/2012/spinoza.html (take a look at the seminar invitation letter, too, which is in PDF format!)

The dead-line for the paper proposals is December 31, 2011.

 

The final programme of the symposium will be published during January 2012. A symposium volume is intended. Language of the symposium is English.

With best regards
Vesa Oittinen
——————————-
Vesa Oittinen
Professor, Ph. D., Docent
——————————-
Aleksanteri Institute
P.O.Box 42 (Unioninkatu 33)
FI – 00014 UNIVERSITY OF HELSINKI
Fax +358-9-191 23615
vesa.oittinen@helsinki.fi
http://www.helsinki.fi/aleksanteri/

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

Baruch Spinoza

BEYOND SPINOZA

Beyond Spinoza invite proposals for 30 minute presentations which trace or explore the presence of Early Modern philosophical concepts in contemporary philosophy and psychoanalysic theory. These could include, but are not limited to:

Spinoza and French philosophy (Badiou, Deleuze), Spinoza and psychoanalysis (Freud, Lacan), Spinoza and politics (Balibar, Macherey), Spinoza and self-transformation (Foucault, Lacan), Spinoza and schizoanalysis (Guattari, Deleuze), Leibniz and French philosophy (Deleuze, Gueroult), Leibniz and contemporary art, Leibniz and maths.

Beyond Spinoza is a collective of London-based postgraduate students who wish to enrich and deepen their understanding and enjoyment of contemporary philosophy by exploring its historical and conceptual roots.

The series will run once a week, for three consecutive weeks, at Goldsmiths College in July 2011. Each session will comprise two 30 minute presentations followed by discussion and drinks. The series will be followed later in the year by a publication of revised papers.

Please submit proposals of around 300 words to beyondspinoza@gmail.com on or before the 1st June 2011

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Radical Thinkers

RADICAL THINKERS SET 5 & RADICAL THINKERS CLASSIC EDITIONS

OUT NOW

————————————–
RADICAL THINKERS SET 5

Verso presents Set 5 of the highly popular Radical Thinkers series,
continuing its commitment to bring classic works of philosophy to a new
audience readership through affordable, attractively designed new editions.
—————————————-
LAUNCH EVENT with TARIQ ALI and PETER OSBORNE

MEDITATIONS ON SPINOZA: THE APOSTLE OF REASON
http://www.tate.org.uk/modern/eventseducation/film/22966.htm

Part of the ‘In Defense of Philosophy’ series at Tate Modern

Friday 25th February 2011, 18.30
Tate Modern, Bankside London SE1 9TG

Christopher Spencer’s SPINOZA: THE APOSTLE OF REASON (1994) is the second film to be shown in the In Defense of Philosophy series. Written by Tariq Ali, the film presents the life and thought of Baruch Spinoza against the turmoil of seventeenth-century Europe. A fascinating modern man, Spinoza challenged orthodoxy in both religion andpolitics, angering his traditional contemporaries. Spinoza’s remarkable intellectual legacy has influenced thinkers as varied as Ludwig Wittgenstein, Gilles Deleuze, Albert Einstein and John Berger.

The film will be followed by a conversation with Tariq Ali and Peter Osborne.

Tate Modern Starr Auditorium
£10 (£8 concessions), booking recommended

For tickets book online here: http://www.tate.org.uk/modern/eventseducation/film/22966.htm or call 020 7887 8888.
—————————————-
RADICAL THINKERS SET 5

OUT NOW

ALL BOOKS / PAPERBACK / ONLY ?8.99/$15.95
BUY THE FULL SET FOR THE DISCOUNT PRICE OF ?85
—————————————
Louis Althusser – MACHIAVELLI AND US, 978 1 84467 675 0
“Althusser, poised between modernism and postmodernism, meets Machiavelli, poised between the Middle Ages and modernity.”–Antonio Negri.
—————————————
Etienne Balibar and Immanuel Wallerstein – RACE, NATION, CLASS: AMBIGUOUS
IDENTITIES, 978 1 84467 671 2
The modernity of racism and its relationship to contemporary capitalism.
—————————————
Jean Baudrillard – PASSWORDS, 978 1 84467 676 7
In the spirit of Deleuze’s Abécédaire, PASSWORDS offers twelve entry
points into Baudrillard’s thought.
—————————————
Jeremy Bentham – THE PANOPTICON WRITINGS, 978 1 84467 666 8
A definitive collection of Bentham’s work on the model prison, key to Foucault’s theory of power
—————————————
Guy Debord – COMMENTS ON THE SOCIETY OF THE SPECTACLE,
978 1 84467 672 9
“Guy Debord is a time bomb, and a difficult one to defuse.” – Michael Löwy
—————————————
Hal Foster – DESIGN AND CRIME, 978 1 84467 670 5
“DESIGN AND CRIME is cool, measured, and steady, like a Gunsmoke shootout.”–Greil Marcus
—————————————
André Gorz – CRITIQUE OF ECONOMIC REASON, 978 1 84467 667 5
“Gorz’s greatest work, and a crucial book for our time” — LE MONDE

—————————————
Fredric Jameson – BRECHT AND METHOD, 978 1 84467 677 4

“Elegant dissection of Brecht’s method, from estrangements to allegory and beyond”– MODERN DRAMA
—————————————
Peter Osborne – THE POLITICS OF TIME: MODERNITY AND AVANT-GARDE, 978 1
84467 673 6
Elaborates a dialectics of modernity, eternity and tradition.
—————————————
Edward W. Soja – POSTMODERN GEOGRAPHIES: THE REASSERTION OF SPACE IN
CRITICAL SOCIAL THEORY, 978 1 84467 669 9
“One of the most challenging and stimulating books ever written”—David Harvey
—————————————
Sebastiano Timpanaro – FREUDIAN SLIP: PSYCHOANALYSIS AND TEXTUAL
CRITICISM, 978 1 84467 674 3
“A firework display of erudition.”–Perry Anderson
—————————————
Slavoj Žižek, Ernesto Laclau, and Judith Butler – CONTINGENCY, HEGEMONY,
UNIVERSALITY, 978 1 84467 668 2
The Hegelian legacy, Left strategy, and post-structuralism versus Lacanian psychoanalysis
—————————————
RADICAL THINKERS SET 5 (full set) 978 1 84467 678 1
—————————————–
Praise for RADICAL THINKERS:

“An extremely pleasant surprise: a new imprint from Verso called Radical Thinkers, and a pile of white-covered paperbacks by the likes of Theodor Adorno, Fredric Jameson, Guy Debord and Walter Benjamin. Not only do they have nifty cover designs, they are ridiculously cheap.” Nick Lezard, GUARDIAN:  http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2009/aug/15/jean-baudrillard-transparency-of-evil

“A compendium of left-wing philosophical and political thought, inoculating it against the ‘great idea’ of philosophy-as-self-help. As a way of transforming… formless disgust into educated critique, these books are a fine, cheap and decidedly elegant starting point.” —  Owen Hatherley http://www.3ammagazine.com/3am/radical-thought/

“A golden treasury of theory” — Eric Banks, BOOKFORUM

“Verso’s beautifully designed Radical Thinkers series, which brings together seminal works by leading left-wing intellectuals, is a sophisticated blend of theory and thought. The 12 authors whose writings are included in the series have worked tirelessly to expose the mechanisms by which culture and knowledge are manufactured, managed and controlled” — Ziauddin Sardar, NEW STATESMAN http://www.newstatesman.com/200604170041
—————————————-
For more information & to buy the books visit: http://www.versobooks.com/series_collections/5-radical-thinkers
—————————————-
RADICAL THINKERS CLASSIC EDITIONS
—————————————-
To celebrate 40 years of radical publishing, Verso is reissuing four of the most popular and seminal titles from previous Radical Thinkers series in beautiful new hardback editions with black and red foil-embossed covers.
—————————————-
RADICAL THINKERS CLASSIC EDITIONS:

HARDBACKS (EACH) ?14.99/$24.95
BUY THE FULL SET FOR THE DISCOUNT PRICE OF £45
—————————————-
Theodor Adorno – MINIMA MORALIA: REFLECTIONS FROM DAMAGED LIFE, 978 1 84467 661 3

“A classic of twentieth century thought…whose translation is by far the best yet done of any work of Critical Theory.” – TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT

“A volume of Adorno is equivalent to a whole shelf of books on literature.” – Susan Sontag
—————————————–
Louis Althusser – FOR MARX, 978 1 84467 662 0

“Louis Althusser influenced so many discourses, actions and existences by the radiant and provocative voice of his thought” –– Jacques Derrida
———————————–
Raymond Williams – CULTURE AND MATERIALISM, 978 1 84467 663 7

“The left’s foremost cultural historian and critic” – COMMENT
————————————-
Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Ernst Bloch, Bertold Brecht, Georg Lukács
– AESTHETICS AND POLITICS, 978 1 84467 664 4

“They are key texts in the study of modernism, of expressionist drama and of realism, and of many closely related general questions … It is genuinely an indispensable volume” — Raymond Williams
———————————–
Radical Thinkers Classic Editions (full set) 978 1 84467 665 1
————————————
For more information and to buy the books visit: http://www.versobooks.com/series_collections/14-14-radical-thinkers-classic-editions
————————————
Become a fan of Verso on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Verso-Books-UK/122064538789
And get updates on Twitter too: http://twitter.com/VersoBooksUK

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Autonomia

POST/AUTONOMIA – CALL FOR PAPERS

Post/autonomia – Call for Papers

Amsterdam, 19-22 May 2011

University of Amsterdam/SMART Project Space

Keynote speakers include:

Franco Berardi (‘Bifo’)

Vittorio Morfino

Stevphen Shukaitis (to be confirmed)

Immaterial labour; multitude; the communism of capital; commons; precarity; biopolitics: autonomist thought has undoubtedly provided contemporary critical theory with some of its major concepts and/or allowed for an important reconsidering of these. Most importantly, autonomist thought has been at the forefront of thinking the crucial shifts in contemporary capitalism and its effects in both the social and cultural sphere. Autonomism’s impact on current critical theory in both European and American academia can therefore hardly be underestimated. Moreover, today we witness a resurgence of autonomist models of activism and thought in social movements in for example Italy, Greece, the UK and California.

What can ‘post/autonomia’ mean today?’ therefore is one of the pivotal questions in contemporary critical theory and activism. Rather than packaging it as ‘Italian Theory’, we would like to explore the international dissemination of autonomous thought and activism today and their possible futures; in particular we would like to explore critical engagements and uses of autonomist ideas that shape what we might call post/autonomia. It is precisely the dynamics, tensions and ruptures between autonomia and its possible futures (or ‘posts’) that we would like to investigate. What are the effects of autonomia, as a thought and a movement, in a variety of domains: from critical theory to cinema, from activism to academic practice?

Crucial questions raised by the notion of post/autonomia are:

* How did autonomist thought move from what was in fact a specific local context to the global activist and intellectual sphere?

* What are the possible connections between (post)autonomia and other contemporary conceptualizations of ‘communism’?

* What is the role of (post)autonomist thinking in current efforts to reassemble and reconstitute the militant left?

* What are possible connections/convergences between (post)autonomism and post-situationism, anarchism or the green movement?

* How can post/autonomia be situated in the aftermath or even afterlife of the ‘no global’ moment?    * How is post/autonomia taking shape in diverse cultural and artistic interventions?

* What is the significance of autonomist thought in non-western/global contexts (e.g. the debates concerning precarious labour in China)?

* How does the current the interest in autonomism and its relevance relate to political discourses concerning the ‘heritage’ of 68/77 and their alleged ‘liquidation’ (by Berlusconi/Sarkozy); to what extent does it encourage or block these debates?

* What elements of autonomism remain unaddressed today (e.g. the feminist heritage)?

* What particular nexus between theory/militant practice takes shape in post/autonomia (e.g. in media activism and precarity-movements)?

* What new perspectives/connections can be created: e.g. post/autonomia and queer, the metropolis, bioeconomy, etc. etc.

The conference will provide a platform for addressing these and other important questions. Papers may address the following topics (but are by no means bound to these):

Post/autonomia and:

–       contemporary activism

–       conceptualizations of bio-politics

–       the neo-liberal state

–       precarity

–       media activism

–       academic activism and new student movements (L’Onda che viene etc)

–       post-situationism

–       queer autonomy

–       feminism

–       the work of individual theorists (e.g. Negri, Virno, Berardi, Guattari, Lazzerato, Marazzi etc)

–       semiocapitalism

–       artistic and cultural activism

–       political/cultural memories of autonomia

–       the metropolis and the social factory today

–       the new communism

–       transversality

–       new spinozisms

–       (the lessons of) Genoa 2001

–       strategies of resistance

–       populism

–       the law, the state of exception and legitimacy

We welcome both academic and practice-oriented contributions in English. Papers should not exceed 20 minutes. Please send abstracts (350 words) before March 15 to postautonomia@gmail.com. For further information, please contact postautonomia@gmail.com.

This conference is the first of a series within the project Precarity and Post-autonomia: the Global Heritage funded by NWO (Dutch Organisation for Scientific Research).

Organizing committee:

–       Vincenzo Binetti, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA)

–       Joost de Bloois, University of Amsterdam

–       Silvia Contarini, Université Paris Ouest, Nanterre La Défence

–       Monica Jansen, Utrecht University

–       Federico Luisetti, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA)

–       Frans-Willem Korsten, Leiden University/Erasmus University Rotterdam

–       Gianluca Turricchia, University of Amsterdam

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Feminism

DIMINISHING RETURNS? FEMINIST ENGAGEMENTS WITH THE RETURN TO ‘THE COMMONS’

_____________________

An international workshop hosted by the Kent Centre for Law, Gender, and Sexuality and Kent Law School

Wednesday 23 March 2011
Kent Law School
Canterbury, UK*
12-6pm

With presentations by:

Rosemary Coombe (York University, Canada)
Radhika Desai (University of Manitoba, Canada)
Denise Ferreira da Silva (Queen Mary, UK)
Nina Power (Roehampton, UK)

Discussed by:

Donatella Alessandrini (Kent, UK)
Brenna Bhandar (Kent, UK)

The day will consist of two sessions, broken up with a light lunch (provided) and followed by dinner (not provided). Please join us for part or all of the day. More information about the theme of the workshop can be found below.

The event is free but spaces are limited. To book a spot please register by emailing Stacy Douglas at: S.M.Douglas@kent.ac.uk before 1 March 2011.

*There are some funds available for postgraduate students who wish to travel to Kent for the workshop. If you are interested please email Stacy Douglas at S.M.Douglas@kent.ac.uk with a brief case for support as well as an estimated cost for your train travel. Information about traveling to Kent can be found here.

_____________________

Background:

Garrett Hardin’s now infamous essay “Tragedy of the Commons” (1968) stands as a Hobbesian analogy for what he claims are the inherent destructive capacities of human beings that perpetually stand in the way of realizing a free community of individuals with shared resources. Hardin’s essay suggests that, when faced with the responsibility of sharing the commons, individual human self-interest – or fear of it – will win out over practices of collectivity, sharing, and mutual aid.

More recently, there has been a resurgence in political theory and political philosophy in addressing the concept of “the commons”. Some of the most popularly cited references to the idea can be found in the work of Slavoj Žižek (2009) and Hardt and Negri (2009). This work has further been expounded upon in international conferences devoted to the “Idea of Communism” in London (2009) and Berlin (2010).  Steeped in the philosophy of Spinoza, Hardt and Negri use a notion of the common that “…does not position humanity separate from nature, as either its exploiter or its custodian, but focuses rather on the practices of interaction, care, and cohabitation in a common world, promoting the beneficial and limiting and detrimental forms of the common” (2009). For Žižek, the commons is comprised of culture (“primarily language, our means of communication and education, but also shared infrastructure such as public transport, electricity, post, etc…”), external nature (“from oil to forests and the natural habitat itself”), and internal nature (“the biogenetic inheritance of humanity”), and are all increasingly enclosed by the forces of global capital. It is the process of our exclusion from these commons (“our own substance”) that Žižek argues should effectively proletarianize us into fighting for something more than capitalist liberal democracy – a system whose laissez-faire violence is justified through the empty gesture of “universal inclusion” without any material bite. Žižek’s answer to this political conundrum is a call for communism.

And yet, the past century has seen vast and varied critical feminist engagements with historically changing concepts of communism and “the commons”. Struggles for universal suffrage, critiques of universality, denouncements of the hollowing out of the welfare state as a result of neoliberalisation, and challenges to the concept of the human, are all examples of a rich and diverse feminist tradition of engagement with the concept of “the commons”. Given the popular return to the idea of the commons, what more does feminist analysis have to give to this conversation? Does the concept still have potential for future feminist projects? If so, what is this potential and what do these projects look like? How do they resonate – or not – with those of the past? Further, given the broader theme of the workshop series, what role – if any – does the “the state” play in these imaginings?

The Kent Centre for Law, Gender, and Sexuality (KCLGS) and Kent Law School invite you to participate in a workshop exploring the contemporary feminist work of Rosemary CoombeRadhika DesaiDenise Ferreira da Silva, and Nina Power as it resonates or clashes with these questions. For more information or to register, email S.M.Douglas@kent.ac.uk or visit www.kent.ac.uk/law/kentclgs/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Philosophy

MIDDLESEX PHILOSOPHY SEMINAR SERIES 2010-11

This seminar series is open to the public. Seminars will mostly be held on Thursdays, at 6.30pm, but three (30 November, 25 January and 15 February) will be held on Tuesdays at 5.30pm.

Thursday 14 October
Alex Callinicos (Kings College London): ‘Slavoj Žižek and the Critique of Political Economy’

Thursday 28 October
Nina Power (Roehampton): ‘Intellectual Equality: Rancière and Education’

Wednesday 3 November
Workshop: ‘The Humanities and the Idea of the University’

Thursday 11 November
Susan James (Birkbeck): ‘Spinoza, Rembrandt and Suspicion’

Thursday 18 November
Sean Sayers (Kent): ‘Marx’s Concept of Communism’

Tuesday 30 November
Christopher Norris (Cardiff): ‘Aesthetic Ideology Revisited’

Thursday 9 December
Gary Lachman (London): ‘What is Cosmic Consciousness?’

Tuesday 25 January
Robin Le Poidevin (Leeds): ‘The Beginning of Time’

Thursday 3 February
Keith Ansell Pearson (Warwick): ‘Beyond Compassion: On Nietzsche’s Moral Therapy in Dawn’

Tuesday 15 February
Dylan Evans (University College Cork): ‘Is Lacanian Psychoanalysis Wrong, Or Not Even Wrong?’

Thursday 3 March
Marcus Boon (York University, Toronto): ‘The Politics of Just Intonation: Music, Mathematics and Philosophy after La Monte Young’

Thursday 17 March
Martin Liebscher (Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies, London): ‘Sigmund Freud and his Philosophical Mediators’

Thursday 31 March
David Lapoujade (Paris-I Panthéon-Sorbonne): Title to be announced.

Thursday 5 May
Workshop: ‘Hegel Now?’ Including Slavoj Žižek on ‘Is it still possible to be a Hegelian today?’ Further speakers to be confirmed.

All seminars will take place in the Saloon (M004), Mansion Building, Middlesex University, Trent Park campus, Bramley Road, London N14 4YZ. 
Tube: Piccadilly line to Oakwood station, free bus to campus.

Please note that the workshop on Wednesday 3 November, ‘The Humanities and the Idea of the University’, will take place between 11am and 6pm, in the Saloon, Mansion Building. The ‘Hegel Now?’ workshop on 5 May 2011 will take place from 2pm – 8.30pm (room to be announced).

In addition, this semester we will be running two short courses open to the general public. These will take place on Friday afternoons in the Green Room (M009), Mansion Building, between 4-6pm. From 15 October to 12 November,

Meade McCloughan will present a course on Marx’s Capital, and from 26 November to 10 December, Rosa Nogues will present an introduction to French feminist philosophy.

Please direct enquiries to c.kerslake@mdx.ac.uk

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Gilles Deleuze

Gilles Deleuze

DELEUZE & RACE

 

Jason Adams

While the relevance of Gilles Deleuze for a materialist feminism has been amply demonstrated in the last two decades or so, what this key philosopher of difference and desire can do for the theorization of race and racism has received surprisingly little attention. This is despite the explicit formulation of a materialist theory of race as instantiated in colonization, sensation, capitalism and culture, particularly in Deleuze’s collaborative work with Félix Guattari.

Part of the explanation of why there has been a relative silence on Deleuze within critical race and colonial studies is that the philosophical impetus for overcoming eugenics and nationalism have for decades been anchored in the conventional readings of Kant and Hegel, which Deleuze laboured to displace. Through the vocabularies of psychoanalysis, deconstruction, and moral philosophy, even the more sophisticated theorizations of race today continue the neo-Kantian/neo-Hegelian programme of retrieving a cosmopolitan universality beneath the ostensibly inconsequential differences called race.

Opposing this idealism, Deleuze instead asks whether the conceptual basis for this program, however commendable, does not foreclose its political aims, particularly in its avoidance of the material relations it seeks to change. The representationalism and oversimplified dialectical frameworks guiding the dominant antiracist programme actively suppress an immanentist legacy which according to Deleuze is far better suited to grasping how power and desire differentiate bodies and populations: the legacies of Spinoza, Marx and Nietzsche; biology and archeology; Virginia Woolf and Jack Kerouac; cinema, architecture, and the fleshy paintings of Francis Bacon. It is symptomatic too, that Foucault’s influential notion of biopolitics, so close to Deleuze and Guattari’s writings on the state, is usually taken up without its explicit grounding in race, territory and capitalist exchange. Similarly, those (like Negri) that twist biopolitics into a mainly Marxian category, meanwhile, lose the Deleuzoguattarian emphasis on racial and sexual entanglement. It would seem then, that it is high time for a rigorous engagement with the many conceptual ties between Foucault’s lectures on biopolitics, Deleuze and Guattari, and Deleuze-influenced feminism, to obtain a new materialist framework for studying racialization as well as the ontopolitics of becoming from which it emerges. While it will inevitably overlap in a few ways, this collection will differ from work done under the “postcolonial” rubric for a number of important reasons.

First, instead of the mental, cultural, therapeutic, or scientific representations of racial difference usually analyzed in postcolonial studies, it will seek to investigate racial difference “in itself”, as it persists as a biocultural, biopolitical force amid other forces. For Deleuze and Guattari, as for Nietzsche before them, race is far from inconsequential, though this does not mean it is set in stone.

Second, as Fanon knew, race is a global phenomenon, with Europe’s racism entirely entwined with settler societies and the continuing poverty in the peripheries. The effects of exploitation, slavery, displacement, war, migration, exoticism and miscegenation are too geographically diffuse and too contemporary to fit comfortably under the name “postcolonial”. Rather, we seek to illuminate the material divergences that phenotypical variation often involves, within any social, cultural or political locus.

Third, again like Nietzsche, but also Freud, Deleuze and Guattari reach into the deep recesses of civilization to expose an ancient and convoluted logic of racial discrimination preceding European colonialism by several millennia. Far from naturalizing racism, this nomadological and biophilosophical “geology of morals” shows that racial difference is predicated on fully contingent territorializations of power and desire, that can be disassembled and reassembled differently. That race is immanent to the materiality of the body then, does not mean that it is static any more than that it is simple: rather what it suggests is that its transformation is an always already incipient reality.

Possible themes:

CIVILIZATION AND ITS DISCONTENTS – Oedipus and racialization – fascist desire – civilization, savagery and barbarism – earth and its peoples – delirium and hallucination as racial – miscegenation

CAPITALISM – faciality – colonization and labor migration as racializing apparatuses of capture – urban segregation – environmental racism

POLITICS – hate speech and law as order-words – D&G, May ’68 and the third world – Deleuze and Palestine – Guattari and Brazil – terrorist war machines and societies of control – Deleuzian feminism and race

SCIENCE – neuroscience and race – continuing legacies of racist science and the “Bell Curve” debate – kinship, rhizomatics and arboreality – animals, plants, minerals and racial difference – miscegenation – evolutionary biology and human phenotypical variation – vitalism and Nazism

ART – affects of race (sport, hiphop, heavy metal, disco…) – primitivism (Rimbaud, Michaux, Artaud, Tournier, Castaneda, etc.) – vision, cinema and race – music, resonance and bodies

PHILOSOPHY – geophilosophy: provincializing canonical philosophy – race and becoming – decolonizing Spinoza, Leibniz, Hume, Schelling… – the effect of criticisms of Deleuze (Badiou, Zizek, Hallward) on antiracism Chapters will be between 4000 and 7000 words long.

Arun Saldanha will write the introduction and a chapter called “Bastard and mixed-blood are the true names of race”.

Jason Michael Adams will write the conclusion.

For more details on this project, contact Jason Adams at: adamsj@HAWAII.EDU

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

IMMANENCE AND MATERIALISM CONFERENCE

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICS
QUEEN MARY, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

CALL FOR PAPERS

Date: 23 June 2009
Venue: Queen Mary, University of London
Call for papers deadline: 22 May 2009
All papers and enquiries to: s.j.choat@qmul.ac.uk

Keynote speakers:

Professor James Williams (University of Dundee)
Dr Ray Brassier (American University of Beirut)
Dr Alberto Toscano (Goldsmiths, University of London)


The concepts of immanence and materialism are becoming increasingly important in political philosophy. This conference seeks to analyse the connections between these two concepts and to examine the consequences for political thought. It is possible, as Giorgio Agamben has done, to make a distinction within modern philosophy between a line of transcendence (Kant, Husserl, Levinas, Derrida) and a line of immanence (Spinoza, Nietzsche, Deleuze, Foucault). If we follow this distinction, then ‘the line of immanence’ might include Spinozist interpretations of Marx, Althusser’s aleatory materialism, and Deleuze’s superior empiricism. But what is the value of this work and is it useful to distinguish it from ‘transcendent’ philosophies? Distinctions between materialism and idealism are equally complex: Derrida, for example, might as easily be classed a materialist as an idealist. And where can we place more recent work like the critiques of Deleuze by Badiou and Zizek, or Meillassoux’s speculative materialism?

Papers may wish to consider the following questions:
* What is materialist philosophy? How can it be distinguished from idealist philosophy, and is it useful to do so? Are all philosophies of immanence necessarily materialist?
* Is it legitimate or useful to make a clear distinction between philosophies of immanence and philosophies of transcendence?
* How have the concepts of immanence and materialism traditionally been conceived within political philosophy?

* What, if any, are the political consequences of pursuing a philosophy of immanence?

 

Paper titles and a 300-word abstract should be sent by Friday 22 May 2009 to Simon Choat at: s.j.choat@qmul.ac.uk, Department of Politics, Queen Mary College, University of London.

Graduate papers welcome.


Dr Simon Choat
Lecturer in Politics
Queen Mary, University of London
Office: Hatton House 1B
Email: s.j.choat@qmul.ac.uk
Tel: 020 7882 8592
http://www.politics.qmul.ac.uk/staff/choat/index.html

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk