Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Speed of Life

Mediation

JOURNEYS ACROSS MEDIA 2011

Friday 6th May 2011

SPACE IN OUR TIME: EXPLORING THE FRONTIERS OF SCREEN AND LIVE PERFORMANCE SPACE

Journeys Across Media (JAM) 2011 is the 9th annual international conference for postgraduate students, organized by postgraduates working in the Department of Film, Theatre & Television at the University of Reading. It provides a discussion forum for current and developing research in film, theatre, television and new media. Previous delegates have welcomed the opportunity to gain experience of presenting their work at different stages of development in the active, friendly and supportive research environment of Film, Theatre & Television at the University of Reading. This year JAM will be guest-editing the Autumn issue of Intellect’s Journal of Media Practice and in 2012 an associated journal to the conference will be launched, providing further opportunities for new researchers to publish their work and interact with established scholars.

Non-presenting delegates are also very welcome.

The 9th JAM conference seeks to address issues of space in performance, media and wider society and instigate discussions about space across disciplines, practices and fields of research.

Space in performance and media is constantly shifting. Emerging technologies and new models of physical spaces have radically shaped our conceptions and experiences of performing, the world and our performing within that world. Artistic experimentation in live performance tests and contests space as a neutral/political/liminal/active zone.

Through innovative spatial delineations and/or site specific work, contemporary theatre and performance challenge conventions of text and space, performance and institution and performance and audience. Issues of space are increasingly central to performance studies and the experience of live performance. The growing popularity of companies such as Secret Cinema reflect the importance of the exhibition site for cinema and possibilities for cross-media events. The organisation and handling of space on screen can reveal the conceptual reality of a time, rather than just function as background. Studies of the cinematic screen continue to focus on ideological articulations through oppositions, such as on-screen/off-screen space, interior/exterior, centre/periphery, inclusion/exclusion in space. Meanwhile, televisual spaces continue to change both in terms of on-screen representation and how the television as an object inhabits space, particularly in relation to its online dissemination and the proliferation of products which facilitate its access.

This is a call for postgraduates engaging in contemporary discourses around space to submit papers for the JAM 2011 conference; topics may include, but are not restricted to:
Cross-disciplinary/inter-disciplinary spaces
National/International space; Globalisation
Centrality – Marginality of/in space
Gendered spaces
Space and memory
Critical masses (people in space)
Space as a character
Absence/non-place
Time and Space in performance
Architecture and performance
Immersion and illusion in contemporary performance spaces
Space in Contemporary art
Ownership and accountability
Ontology of space

CALL FOR PAPERS deadline: Friday 30th January 2011

Please send a 250-word abstract and a 50-word biographical note for a fifteen-minute paper to Amanda Beauchamp, Becki Hillman, Tonia Kazakopoulou, Martin O’Brien and James Rattee, at jam2011@reading.ac.uk. Proposals for practice-as-research presentations/performances are warmly invited; these have to conform to the 15-minute format.

We would appreciate the distribution of this call for papers and wider promotion of this conference through your networks. Journeys Across Media is supported by the Standing Committee of University Drama Departments (SCUDD) and the Graduate School in Arts and Humanities, University of Reading.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Time

THE REVOLUTION OF TIME AND THE TIME OF REVOLUTION

The Philosophy, Interpretation, and Culture Student Alliance at Binghamton University (S.U.N.Y.) Presents:
*The Revolution of Time and the Time of Revolution*
*A conference*
The 25th – 26th of March, 2011

Keynote Speaker:  Dr. Peter Gratton, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, University of San Diego, CA

What sense of time is produced through radical politics? Is the understanding of time as future part of a radical imagination? If the commitment to radical social change involves looking forward into the future, will that leave us with a sense of futurity that depends on the linearity of yesterday, today, and tomorrow?

To interrogate the emergence of radical creations and socialities, we welcome submissions that theorize time as it relates broadly to politics, cultural conflicts, alternative imaginaries, and resistant practices. Time has historically been thought and inhabited through a variety of frameworks and styles of being. At times the present repeats or seems to repeat the past. There are actions that seem to take place outside of time, to be infinite or instantaneous.

Theories of emergence view time as folding in on itself. Indigenous cosmologies and Buddhist philosophers put forward the possibility of no-time or of circular and cyclical time.

The radical question of time is one around which the work of many scholars has revolved: Derrida on the to-come [*a-venir*] of democracy, Negri’s work on *kairos*, Agamben on kairology, Santos on the expansive notion of the present, Deleuze and Guattari on becoming. This heterological list is far from exhaustive, while hinting at the depth of the theme that our conference cultivates. A central political concern, time invokes our most careful attention and the PIC conference provides the setting for this endeavor. We must find the time for time.

At its core, this conference seeks to explore the relationship between time and revolution. Time here may mean *not just *simple clock and calendar time but rather a way of seeing time as part of a material thread that can go this way and that, weaving* *together* *the fabric of political projects producing the world otherwise. Ultimately, the question of time fosters a critical engagement with potentiality, potency, and power; as well as with the virtual and the actual, of the to be and the always already.

We seek papers, projects, and performances that add to the knowledge of time and revolution, but also ones that clear the way for new thinking, new alliances, new beings.

Some possible topics might include:

  – Radical notions of futurity, historicity, or the expansive present.

  – Conceptions on the right moment of action.

  – The political reality of time as stasis or cyclical.

  – The colonial creation of universal time, and decolonial cosmologies of time.

  – Work on thinkers of time and revolution.

  – Work on potentiality, the virtual, and the actual.

  – Capital and labor time.

In keeping with the interdisciplinary emphasis of Binghamton University’s Program in Philosophy, Interpretation and Culture, we seek work that flourishes in the conjunction of multiple frames of epistemological inquiry, from fields including, but not limited to:  postcolonial studies, decolonial studies, queer and gender studies, ethnic studies, media and visual culture studies, urban studies, science and technology studies, critical theory, critical animal studies, continental philosophy, and historiography.

Workers/writers/thinkers of all different disciplinary, inter-disciplinary, and non-disciplinary stripes welcome, whether academically affiliated or not. Submissions may be textual, performative, visual.

Abstracts of 500 words maximum due by Feburary 1, 2011.  In a separate paragraph state your name, address, telephone number, email and organizational or institutional affiliation, if any.

Email proposals to: pic.conference2011@gmail.com with a cc: to clawren1@binghamton.edu

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Speed of Life

THE REVOLUTION OF TIME AND THE TIME OF REVOLUTION

Time

THE SPEED OF LIFE

Ten years ago, Michael Neary and I wrote a paper for the British Sociological Association Annual Conference 2000 called The Speed of Life: The significance of Karl Marx’s concept of socially necessary labour time. The paper was selected by the BSA’s Publications Committee for inclusion in the annual ‘book of the conference’ for 2000.

We revised and edited our paper, and it came out as Time and Speed in the Social Universe of Capital, in Social Conceptions of Time: Structure and Process in Work and Everyday Life, edited by Graham Crow and Sue Heath (Palgrave Macmillan, 2002).

See Amazon.co.uk: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Social-Conceptions-Time-Explorations-Sociological/dp/0333984994/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1292087985&sr=1-1

And

Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Social-Conceptions-Time-Structure-Everyday/dp/0333984994/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1292088141&sr=1-1

In addition, our original paper was also put out on The Flow of Ideas website on 13th May 2006. It is in two parts.

Recently, the journal Principia Dialectica has alerted folks to our original paper at The Flow of Ideas on their blog. The relevant post is called ‘Marx, Einstein, Postone…’ and was posted to the Principia Dialectica blog on 1st December 2010. This has led to a lot of traffic going to the original paper posted to The Flow of Ideas in 2006. However, the link provided there does not work, so people have been coming to the paper by other means (including a general link given for The Flow of Ideas in the Principia Dialectica blog’s ‘Links’ section).

Thus, to make it easier for people to get to our original paper I have included the working link (and full reference) here, as:

Neary, M. & Rikowski, G. (2000) The Speed of Life: The significance of Karl Marx’s concept of socially necessary labour-time, a paper presented at the British Sociological Association Annual Conference 2000, ‘Making Time – Marking Time’, University of York, 17 -20 April:
http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Speed%20of%20Life%20-%20Part%20One

The Principia Dialectica blog home page is at: http://www.principiadialectica.co.uk/blog/

The page with their blog about our paper, ‘Marx, Einstein and Postone…’ is at: http://www.principiadialectica.co.uk/blog/?author=1&paged=2

Glenn Rikowski

 The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk