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Tag Archives: Soviet History

Yehoshua Yakhot

YEHOSHUA YAKHOT – ‘THE SUPPRESSION OF PHILOSOPHY IN THE USSR (THE 1920s & 1930s)’

New from Mehring Books
Yakhot’s history of early Soviet philosophy
19 June 2012
See: http://wsws.org/tools/index.php?page=print&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwsws.org%2Farticles%2F2012%2Fjun2012%2Fmehr-j19.shtml

Mehring Books is proud to announce the publication of Yehoshua Yakhot’s The Suppression of Philosophy in the USSR (The 1920s & 1930s). Originally published in Russian in 1981, this unique history of early Soviet philosophy is now available for the first time in English, translated by Frederick Choate.

Yehoshua Yakhot (1919-2003) was a professor of philosophy in the Soviet Union until forced to emigrate to Israel in 1975. While in emigration, he finished writing the book begun in Moscow years before.

Yakhot’s book is essential reading for an understanding of the counter-revolutionary role of Stalinism and its devastating impact on every aspect of Soviet thought. Rare among works dealing with this period, Yakhot presents an objective account of the theoretical role of the major figures in the early Soviet Union – including, most significantly, that of Leon Trotsky, co-leader with Lenin of the Russian Revolution of October 1917.

The book describes the flourishing of philosophical discussion after the revolution and ensuing Civil War. By 1922, the major theoretical journal Under the Banner of Marxism had been founded at Trotsky’s urging. The first two issues contained letters from Trotsky and Lenin that constituted the program of the journal.

By the mid-1920s, two contending camps had formed in philosophy: the mechanists and dialecticians. The relatively free debate between them on many complex issues was followed by Stalin’s intervention in December 1930. In a ferocious reaction against the theoretical foundations of the October Revolution, Stalin sent countless genuine Marxists to their deaths during the Great Terror of 1936-1938.

Prior to the opening of the archives in the late 1980s and early 1990s, Yakhot presents the largely unknown history of many of the Marxist philosophers victimized by Stalinism.

The subjects covered in the book include: the subject matter of Marxist philosophy; the problem of contingency; the principle of partisanship in philosophy; Hegel and Marxist dialectics; Spinoza’s place in the discussions of the 1920s and 1930s; the rejection of ideology by Marx and Engels; the influence of Bogdanov’s ideas; the inevitable crisis of Soviet ideology; and continued attempts to conceal the crimes of Stalinism in the USSR.

This new English edition contains photographs, biographical information, an index and two letters by Trotsky and Lenin.

To order your advance copy, click here: http://mehring.com/index.php/the-suppression-of-philosophy-in-the-ussr-1920s-and-1930s.html

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

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Russian Revolution

THE OCTOBER REVOLUTION IN PROSPECT AND RETROSPECT

A new book in the Historical Materialism Book Series

http://www.brill.nl/october-revolution-prospect-and-retrospect

The October Revolution in Prospect and Retrospect: Interventions in Russian and Soviet History
John Eric Marot, Keimyung University, Korea

In a series of probing analytical essays, John Marot tracks the development of Bolshevism through the prism of pre-1917 intra-Russian Social Democratic controversies in politics and philosophy. For 1917, the author presents a critique of social historical interpretation of the Russian Revolution.

Turning to NEP Russia, the author applies Robert Brenner’s analysis of pre-capitalist modes of production and concludes that neither Bukharin nor Trotsky’s NEP-premised programs of economic transformation and advance toward socialism were feasible. At the same time, he rejects the view thatStalinism was pre-destined to supplant NEP. Instead, he hypothesises that the superior alternative to Stalinism was NEP without collectivization and the Five-Year Plans – a outcome that would have been possible had Bukharin and Trotsky joined forces to stop Stalin.

Biographical note
John Eric Marot, Ph.D. (1987), University of California, Los Angeles, teaches History at Keimyung University in Korea. He has published many articles on Russian and Soviet History, notably ‘Class Conflict, Political Competition, and Social Transformation: Critical Perspectives on the Social History of the Russian Revolution’ (Revolutionary Russia, 1994) and ‘Trotsky, the Left Opposition, and the Rise of the Stalinism: Theory and Practice’ (Historical Materialism, 2006).

Readership
This work will appeal to those interested in the fate of the October Revolution.

Table of contents
Acknowledgements
Introduction

1. The Peasant-Question and the Origins of Stalinism: Rethinking the Destruction of the October Revolution

2. Trotsky, the Left Opposition and the Rise of Stalinism: Theory and Practice

3. Class-Conflict, Political Competition and Social Transformation: Critical Perspectives on the Social History of the Russian Revolution

4. Political Leadership and Working-Class Agency in the Russian Revolution: Reply to William G. Rosenberg and S.A. Smith

5. A ‘Postmodern’ Approach to the Russian Revolution? Comment on Ronald Suny

6. Alexander Bogdanov, Vpered, and the Role of the Intellectual in the Workers’ Movement

7. The Bogdanov Issue: Reply to Andrzej Walicki, Aileen Kelly and Zenovia Sochor

8. Marxism, Science, Materialism: Toward a Deeper Appreciation of the 1908-1909 Philosophical Debate in Russian Social Democracy

9. Politics and Philosophy in Russian Social Democracy: Alexander Bogdanov and the Socio-theoretical Foundations of Vpered

References
General Index

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

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