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Tag Archives: Sociology of Work

Working to Death

Working to Death

WORKING US TO DEATH: ALIENATED LABOR UNDER CAPITALISM

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2015

6:30-9:30 PM

Westside Peace Center

3916 Sepulveda Blvd., near Venice Blvd. (free parking in rear)

Suite 101-102, press #22 at door to get into building

Culver City (LA area)

 

SPEAKERS:

Stephan Hammel, Marxist musicologist

Kevin Anderson, author of Marx at the Margins

Mansoor M., Iranian computer engineer and cultural worker

 

Since the 19th century, capitalism has radically transformed work, making the worker, in Marx’s language, a mere “appendage to the machine.”  This deepened under 20th century assembly lines and has been extended globally today, as seen in places like China or Bangladesh.  In recent years, alienated labor has begun to spread from the factory floor into white collar and professional work in the U.S. and other developed countries. All of this is fueled by fear in a system wherein ever-larger sectors of the population face permanent unemployment and precarity.

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Suggested readings:

Recent New York Times article on Amazon (white collar and professional workers) http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/16/technology/inside-amazon-wrestling-big-ideas-in-a-bruising-workplace.html?_r=0

New York Times article on suicides of Apple workers in China from 2012 (factory workers) http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/26/business/ieconomy-apples-ipad-and-the-human-costs-for-workers-in-china.html

Marx: Alienated (Estranged) Labor essay from 1844: https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1844/manuscripts/labour.htm

Marx: Fetishism section from Capital https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1867-c1/ch01.htm#S4

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Sponsored by the West Coast Chapter, International Marxist-Humanist Organization

More information: arise@internationalmarxisthumanist.org

http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/

Here is URL for meeting for Facebook, Twitter, etc.: http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/events/los-angeles-working-us-to-death-alienated-labor-under-capitalism

Join our Facebook page: “International Marxist-Humanist Organization” https://www.facebook.com/groups/imhorg/

download (6)

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

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The Failure of Capitalism

The Failure of Capitalism

CYBER-PROLETARIAT: GLOBAL LABOUR IN THE DIGITAL VORTEX

NEW FROM PLUTO PRESS:

Cyber-Proletariat: Global Labour in the Digital Vortex

By Nick Dyer-Witheford

http://bit.ly/1AeNq5z

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Praise for CYBER-PROLETARIAT:

‘Cyber-Proletariat tracks the eddies and flows of the perfect storm that is contemporary capitalism. This panoramic work reveals the relentless force of material destruction and brutal violence concealed by the sleek surfaces of digital culture’ – Benjamin Noys, Professor of Critical Theory, University of Chichester and author of Malign Velocities: Accelerationism and Capitalism

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Coltan mines in the Congo; electronics factories in China; devastated neighbourhoods in Detroit. Cyber-Proletariat shows us the dark-side of the information revolution; an unsparing analysis of class power and computerisation.

Nick Dyer-Witheford reveals how technology facilitates growing polarisation between wealthy elites and precarious workers. He reveals the class domination behind everything from expanding online surveillance to intensifying robotisation. At the same time he looks at possibilities for information technology within radical movements; contemporary struggles are cast in the blue glow of the computer screen.

Cyber-Proletariat brings heterodox Marxist analysis to bear on modern technological developments. The result will be indispensable to social theorists and hacktivists alike and essential reading for anyone who wants to understand how Silicon Valley shapes the way we live today.

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ON THE PLUTO BLOG: http://bit.ly/1HsH55Z

READ THE BOOK ONLINE: http://bit.ly/1K0fr0B

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Want an inspection copy for your course? Visit www.plutobooks.com/lecturers.asp for more details.

Want a book for review? Email our publicity team at publicity@plutobooks.com.

Sign up to our newsletter for special offers, news and events: www.plutobooks.com/subscribe.asp.

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Flickr: flickr.com/photos/95999817@N02/

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Paperback | 9780745334738 | £18.99 / $30 / €23
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Even Bigger Data

Even Bigger Data

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Labour

Labour

WORK & CONSUMPTION – CALL FOR PAPERS

Call for Papers for an ephemera Special Issue on:

Consumption of work and the work of consumption
Deadline for submissions: 30 September 2014
Issue editors: Ekaterina Chertkovskaya, Rashné Limki, Bernadette Loacker

Work and consumption have always been intertwined, their interaction shaped by social and historical circumstances. The ‘consumer society’ (Baudrillard, 1998/1970) that we arguably live in is often associated with a fading interest in work. On this view, wage labour is seen simply as a way of funding consumption during leisure time (Berger, 1964; Gorz, 1985). However, the boundaries between consumption and work have become increasingly blurred. Consumption is no longer confined to leisure, having become central to the employment relationship (Korczynski, 2007; Dale, 2012), but also transcending it. At the same time, some consumption has become productive in the circuits of capital (Arvidsson, 2005). While both the themes of work and consumption have been discussed separately (including in ephemera, e.g. Beverungen et al., 2011; Dunne et al., 2013; Egan-Wyer et al., 2014), this special issue aims to bring them together by exploring consumptive aspects of work and productive aspects of consumption within and beyond organizations.

Since the 1990s customer service and corporate branding have become central elements of organizational production processes (du Gay, 1996; Kornberger, 2010). In this context, concepts such as immaterial work and affective labour have gained in importance (Lazzarato, 1996; Virno, 2005; Dowling et al., 2007). Indeed, customer focus and branding tend to spread to all practices within organizations, from training and development to organizational decor and artefacts (Russell, 2011), while employees are encouraged to ‘live the brand’ (Pettinger, 2004; Land and Taylor, 2010). This tells us that consumption now takes place at work. For example, images of work have themselves become objects to be consumed (Dale, 2012; Chertkovskaya, 2013). These consumptive aspects of work are promoted via employer branding practices, which emphasise the symbolic characteristics of work (Backhaus and Tikoo, 2004). For example, skyscrapers often appear on the covers and pages of recruitment brochures in the banking sector, which can be seen as a sign-value of status. Such ‘opportunities’ for consumption are not only created within large organizations with distinctive hierarchies. ‘Fun cultures’ (Butler et al., 2011), self-management (Lopdrup-Hjorth et al., 2011) and the rhetoric of authenticity (Murtola and Fleming, 2011) may also facilitate the consumption of work-related sign-values as well as engagement in hedonist consumption (Campbell, 1987).

While consumption has certainly entered into the heart of the employment relationship (Korczynski, 2007; Dale, 2012), it also goes beyond it as work increasingly happens outside traditional organizational boundaries. For example, the rhetoric of personal branding (Lair et al., 2005) is becoming increasingly prominent and the ability to ‘sell oneself’ is in many cases now a condition for employment (Chertkovskaya et al., 2013). Moreover, when addressing modern modes of consumptive work, we should also reflect on how consumption can inform the meanings of work and work relations. For instance, we cannot lose sight of critiques of the degradation of work as the effect of consuming (other’s) vital capacities (cf. Barrett, 1999; Moten, 2003; Federici, 2004). Indeed, this ‘depletion’ (Rai, 2010) seems to be the condition of possibility not only for contemporary modes of production but also for conspicuous forms of consumption. Given the condition of precarity that increasingly structures global labour markets (Standing, 2010), we are thus asked to also think through the complex of worker/consumer relations and subjectivities; most notably the increasing debasement of selves into commodity forms.

However, consumption is not necessarily destructive but may also have productive elements to it. We can now talk of working consumers, who act according to their own interests and principles, and thereby serve themselves and other customers (Rieder and Voß, 2010). While drawing on co-creation and participation rhetoric, organizations often also build their brands on the ideas, creativity and work of their consumers or ‘brand communities’ (Arvidsson, 2005). Online social media, like ‘Facebook’, is a good example here: while the organization provides a (usually free) online platform for individuals and groups, their communication within it creates market value for the organization, for example via targeted advertising based on online user behaviour. The consuming employees, as long as they consume in line with the image and values of the organizational brand, may also contribute to the maintenance and strengthening of the organization and its brand, with their personal lives being mobilized for it (Land and Taylor, 2010).

In this special issue, we are looking for conceptual and empirical contributions that critically discuss consumptive aspects of work and productive aspects of consumption. We welcome studies that explore these issues within and beyond organizational boundaries, and in various forms and contexts of work. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

• Forms and meanings of consumptive work/productive consumption
• History of the relationship between consumption and work
• Consumption through work processes within and beyond the employment relationship
• Roles and use of (personal) branding in consumptive work/productive consumption
• Employer branding and the image of work in organizational self-presentations
• Depicting work through consumption
• Marketing and marketization of work
• Commodification of work and working subjects
• Consumption and production of affective/embodied labour
• Value creation/destruction trough consumptive work/productive consumption
• Ethical and political questions associated with consumptive work/productive consumption
• Implications of blurring boundaries between consumption and work for worker-consumer relations and worker/consumer subjectivities
• Work-life (im)balance of consuming employees/producing consumers
• Resisting consumptive work/productive consumption

Deadline for submissions: 30 September 2014

All contributions should be submitted to one of the issue editors:
Ekaterina Chertkovskaya (ekaterina.chertkovskaya@fek.lu.se), Rashné Limki (rashne.limki@gmail.com) or Bernadette Loacker (bernadette.loacker@fek.lu.se). Please note that three categories of contributions are invited for the special issue: articles, notes, and reviews. Information about these types of contributions can be found at:
http://www.ephemerajournal.org/call-for-papers.

The submissions will undergo a double blind review process. All submissions should follow
ephemera’s submission guidelines, which are available at: http://www.ephemerajournal.org/how-submit. For further information, please contact one of the special issue editors.

References:

Arvidsson, A. (2005) ‘Brands: A critical perspective’, Journal of Consumer Culture, 5(2): 235-258.

Backhaus, K. and S. Tikoo (2004) ‘Conceptualizing and researching employer branding’, Career Development International, 9(5): 501-517.

Barrett, L. (1999) Blackness and value: Seeing double, Cambridge, New York: Cambridge UP.

Baudrillard, J. (1998/1970) The consumer society. Myths and structures. London: Sage.

Berger, P. (1964) ‘Some general observations on the problem of work’ in P. Berger (ed.) The Human Shape of Work. New York: Macmillan.

Beverungen, A., B. Otte, S. Spoelstra and K. Kenny (eds.) (2013) ‘Free work’, ephemera: theory & politics in organization, 13(1).

Butler, N., L. Olaison, M. Sliwa, B. M. Sørensen and S. Spoelstra (eds.) (2011) ‘Work, play and boredom’, ephemera: theory & politics in organization, 11(4).

Campbell, C. (1987) The romantic ethic and the spirit of modern consumerism. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.

Chertkovskaya, E. (2013) ‘Consuming work and managing employability: Students’ work orientations and the process of contemporary job search’. Unpublished PhD thesis, Loughborough University.

Chertkovskaya, E., P. Watt, S. Tramer and S. Spoelstra (eds.) (2013) ‘Giving notice to employability’, ephemera: theory & politics in organization, 13(4).

Dale, K. (2012) ‘The employee as “dish of the day”: The ethics of the consuming/consumed self in human resource management’, Journal of Business Ethics, 111(1): 13-24.

Dowling, E., B. Trott and R. Nunes (eds.) (2007) ‘Immaterial and affective labour: Explored’, ephemera: theory & politics in organization, 7(1).

Du Gay, P. (1998) Consumption and identity at work. London: Sage.

Federici, S. (2004) Caliban and the witch. Autonomedia.

Dunne, S., N. Campbell and A. Bradshaw (eds.) (2013) ʻThe politics of consumptionʼ, ephemera: theory & politics in organization, 13(2).

Egan-Wyer, C., S. L. Muhr, A. Pfeiffer and P. Svensson (2014) ‘The ethics of the brand’, ephemera: theory & politics in organization, 14(1).

Gorz, A. (1985) Paths to paradise: On the liberation from work. London: Pluto.

Korczynski, M. (2007) ‘HRM and the menu society’ in S. Bolton and M. Houlihan (eds.) Searching for the human in human resource management. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Kornberger, M. (2010) Brand society: How brands transform management and lifestyle. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lair, D. J., K. Sullivan and G. Cheney (2005) ‘Marketization and the recasting of the professional self: The rhetoric and ethics of personal branding’, Management Communication Quarterly, 18(3): 307-343.

Land, C. and S. Taylor (2010) ‘Surf’s up: Life, work, balance and brand in a New Age capitalist organization’, Sociology, 44(3): 395-413.

Lazzarato, M. (1996) ‘Immaterial labor’ in P. Virno and M. Hardt (eds.) Radical thought in Italy: A potential politics. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Lopdrup-Hjorth, T., M. Gudmand-Høyer, P. Bramming and M. Pedersen (eds.) (2011) ‘Governing work through self-management’, ephemera: theory & politics in organization, 11(2).

Moten, F. (2003) In the break: The aesthetics of the black radical tradition. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Murtola, A.-M. and P. Fleming (eds.) (2011) ‘The business of truth: Authenticity, capitalism and the crisis of everyday life’, ephemera: theory & politics in organization, 11(1).

Patsiaouras, G. and J. Fitchett (2010) ‘The wolf of Wall Street: Re-imagining Veblen for the 21st century’, European Advances in Consumer Research, 9(6): 214-218.

Pettinger, L. (2004) ‘Brand culture and branded workers: Service work and aesthetic labour in fashion retail’, Consumption, Markets and Culture, 7(2): 165-184.

Rai, S. (2010) ‘Depletion and social reproduction’, Working Paper 274/11, Centre for the Study of Globalisation and Regionalisation, Department of Politics and International Studies, University of Warwick.

Rieder, K. and G. Voß (2010) ‘The working customer – an emerging new type of consumer’, Psychology of Everyday Activity, 3 (2): 2-10.

Russell, S. (2011) ‘Internalizing the brand? Identity regulation and resistance at Aqua-Tilt’ in M. Brannan, C. Priola and E. Parsons (eds.) Branded Lives: The production and consumption of identity at work. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

Virno, P. (2005) Grammar of the multitude. New York: Semiotext.

 

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

An Industrial Sewing Machine

An Industrial Sewing Machine

MATERIALITY AT WORK

BSA Work, Employment and Economic Life Study Group

‘It’s not immaterial’ – Materiality at work

The BSA WEEL group is holding a half day seminar/workshop on materiality at work on Friday 24th January 1pm – 5pm.

How does the material environment of work matter? How are working lives and the organisation of the workplace impacted by the spaces, size, weight, smells, sounds and other material characteristics of particular jobs? In what ways do workers physically interact with the material world in order to perform work? How do instruments or tools mediate this interaction? Are interactions with organic materials different from interactions with non-organic materials? To what extent can we understand interactions with technology as material, rather than immaterial?

Generally, what can an understanding of work as material contribute to the sociology of work and employment?

The event will be held in the BSA meeting room, Imperial Wharf, London. Costs to participants £20 BSA Members, £25 Non-members, free unwaged/student.

We are especially keen for attendees who wish to do so to contribute five minute micro-presentations in which they explore the role of materiality in their research. These are *not* expected to be fully developed papers but instead should raise ideas that have come out of research and suggest issues that may be of interest to others.

If you are interested in contributing to the seminar in this way please submit a two sentence (max 50 word) proposal for a five minute overview of how your research relates to the materiality of work to Ben at b.m.fincham@sussex.ac.uk

See: http://www.britsoc.co.uk/media/61490/WEEL_240114.pdf

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The New Left Book Club: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/the-new-left-book-club-call-for-papers/  

Work

Work

JOURNAL OF LABOR SCIENCES

I would  like to divulge the table of contents of the first number of the Labor Sciences Journal, a new academic/activist journal founded by DIEESE – the Inter-Union Department of Statistics and Socioeconomic Studies in Brazil. The titles of the articles are below, in Portuguese and English, as well as the link to access them. It’s an excellent resource for scholars of labor in Latin America.

Cordially, Professor Dr. Sean Purdy
Departamento de História
Universidade de São Paulo

CONTENTS:

-Strikes and the gender question: a panorama of the work stoppages motivated by questions related to women between 1983 and 2011

-Apprenticeship as an instrument for the implementation of the fundamental human right to professionalization

-Gender Assymmetries In The Brazilian Labor Market: Crisis And Public Policies

-Juridical Forms of the Reduction of the Workweek in Brazil

-Labor As Seen By Social Anthropology

-Labor, industry and strategies of development

-Modern Times: a reading of labor through images

-The recent evolution of the Brazilian labor market from the perspective of the concept of the industrial reserve army

Barbara Weinstein: The Discourse of Technical Competence: Strategies of Authority and Power
in Industrializing Brazil

http://rct.dieese.org.br/rct/index.php/rct/issue/view/2/showToc

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Knowledge

Knowledge

THE DYNAMICS OF VIRTUAL WORK: THE TRANSFORMATION OF LABOUR IN A DIGITAL GLOBAL ECONOMY

Sponsored by COST (European Co-operation in Science and Technology), Work Organisation Labour and Globalisation, Competition and Change and Triple C

To be held at the University of Hertfordshire, UK, September 3-5, 2014

Globalisation and technological change have transformed where people work, when and how. Digitisation of information has altered labour processes out of all recognition whilst telecommunications have enabled jobs to be relocated globally. But ICTs have also enabled the creation of entirely new types of ‘digital’ or ‘virtual’ labour, both paid and unpaid,  shifting the borderline between ‘play’ and ‘work’ and creating new types of unpaid labour connected with the consumption and co-creation of goods and services.  The implications of this are far-reaching, both for policy and for scholarship. The dynamics of these changes cannot be captured adequately within the framework of any single academic discipline. On the contrary, they can only be understood in the light of a combination of insights from fields including political economy, the sociology of work, organisational theory, economic geography, development studies, industrial relations, comparative social policy, communications studies, technology policy and gender studies

COST Action IS1202 brings together an international network of leading experts from 29 European Countries with researchers from other parts of the world to develop a multi-faceted approach to understanding these phenomena. This international conference will open up an interactive dialogue between scholars both inside and outside the network.

Papers drawing on theoretical, methodological or empirical research are welcomed on the following topics:

The new international division of labour
Restructuring of value chains – theoretical perspectives
Relocation or Global sourcing? New patterns of spatial mobility
Does ‘place’ still matter, and why?
Interactions between the gender division of labour and the spatial division of labour.
Changes in skills and occupational identities in the digital economy
The creation of new occupational identities and the disintegration of old ones
Reskilling or deskilling? New forms of Taylorisation or new opportunities for creativity?
Changing patterns of working time, work-life balance and gender division of labour
New forms of organisation inside and outside the workplace
Value creation in the Internet Age
The monetisation of the Internet – theoretical and methodological challenges
Commodification and value creation in online activities
‘Prosumption’, ‘co-creation’ and ‘playbour’: conceptualising the shifts between labour, consumption and leisure activities
Virtual work and immaterial production (including crowdsourcing, goldfarming and other forms of online work)
Policy implications of virtual work
Implications of virtual work for employment in creative industries
User-generated content – threat or opportunity for employment?
Implications of virtual work for work-life balance and equality
Regulation of work and industrial relations in virtual work environments (the global context)
Implications of virtual work for work-life balance and equality
Effects of virtual work on occupational profiles, skills and HR practices

The conference will be organised in four streams, with plenary sessions on each day.

All submissions will be subject to peer review.
Deadline for submission of extended abstracts: January 31st, 2014
Confirmation of acceptance: April 30th, 2014
Some scholarships may be available for attendees from Developing Countries.

The Dynamics of Virtual Work: http://dynamicsofvirtualwork.com/

The Conference website and Call for Papers: http://dynamicsofvirtualwork.com/call-for-papers/

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/virtual-work-conference-registrati200bon-now-open

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo   

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Work

Work

WORK, EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY – ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL ISSUE

The BSA journal Work, Employment and Society has just published an Anniversary Special Issue in honour of 25 years of publishing. 

It is freely available to all readers until 31 July 2013:  http://wes.sagepub.com/content/current

 

The issue features articles from the following leaders in the field:

Reflections on work and employment into the 21st century: between equal rights, force decides, by Mark Stuart, Irena Grugulis, Jennifer Tomlinson, Chris Forde and Robert MacKenzie

Unsustainable employment portfolios, by John Buchanan, Gary Dymski, Julie Froud, Sukhdev Johal, Adam Leaver and Karel Williams

Women and recession revisited, by Jill Rubery and Anthony Rafferty

The nature of front-line service work: distinctive features and continuity in the employment relationship, by Jacques Bélanger and Paul Edwards

Postfordism as a dysfunctional accumulation regime: a comparative analysis of the USA, the UK and Germany, by Matt Vidal

Financialization and the workplace: extending and applying the disconnected capitalism thesis, by Paul Thompson

Finance versus Democracy? Theorizing finance in society, by Sylvia Walby

Work, employment and society through the lens of moral economy, by Sharon C Bolton and Knut Laaser

Ethnographic fallacies: reflections on labour studies in the era of market fundamentalism, by Michael Burawoy

Review of Scott Lash & John Urry The End of Organized Capitalism. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1987, £18.00 pbk, (ISBN: 9780745600697), 248pp, Gibson Burrell, Miguel Lucio Martinez, Ian Greer Response to reviews, Scott Lash and John Urry

25 Favourite WES Articles chosen by WES readers, editors and authors

In October 2012, WES held a successful one-day conference exploring key themes for work and employment in honour of 25 years of publishing. Along with the special issue, we are happy to bring you the video from this event.  If you were not able to join us in October or would like to view the presentations again, you can access the videos here: http://wes.sagepub.com/site//video/25th.xhtml

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/work-employment-and-society-special-issue-free-until-31-july

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Work

Work

NETWORKED LABOUR

Networked Labour: Rethinking labour in an age of networks and movements

See: http://www.networkedlabour.net

The upcoming international seminar, titled Networked Labour is initially supported by Networked Politics, Transform! Europe, Transnational Institute and IGOPNET (Institut de Govern the Polítiques Públiques) and it will be held in Amsterdam between 7-9 May 2013.

Networked Politics have been an open project promoted by Transform! Italia, Transnational Institute – New Politics and IGOP, and developed in co-operation with Euromovements.  To provide a space for exchange between activists, researchers and activist-researchers there were several seminars and debates held between 2006 and 2009.  Most of the encounters organised in parallel to the important movement-network gatherings like European and World Social Forums and preparatory meetings that were linked to the Forum processes. Several printed and on-line books, an on-line library, and an on-line  ’New Politics Dictionary’ were among the concrete outcomes of the Network Politics debate; along side the founding of initiatives like the annually held Free Culture Forums.

Our current work will be focusing on the changing worlds of labour and production, and emerging new movements, political actors and their politics. We will mainly be discussing these topics in relation to the accelerating developments in the ICTs. Our hope is to create new synergies by bringing together many contributors and observers of the recent changes, movements, protests, and mobilisations. We hope this will enable us to increase our collective understanding of the new possibilities emerging in front of us for a radical social change.

If you are interested in joining or following this open discussion and exchange simply register to the networked labour weblog. We are looking forward to explore the change together!

Örsan Şenalp, Marco Berlinguer, Mayo Fuster Morell, Hilary Wainwright

First published in: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/networked-labour-seminar-7-9-may-2013-amsterdam

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Work

Work

THE POLITICS OF WORKERS’ INQUIRY CONFERENCE

May 2-3, 2013 @ University of Essex

http://ephemeraweb.org/conference/index.htm

Workers’ inquiry is an approach to and practice of knowledge production that seeks to understand the changing composition of labor and its potential for revolutionary social transformation. It is the practice of turning the tools of the social sciences into weapons of class struggle. Workers’ inquiry seeks to map the continuing imposition of the class relation, not as a disinterested investigation, but rather to deepen and intensify social and political antagonisms.

This conference brings together various aspects of workers’ inquiry, from its historical origins and development to contemporary mutations and adaptations of it within contemporary struggles. It will expand the terrain and form of workers’ inquiry, focusing on topics including inquiries into cultural labor and the service economy, geographies of class conflict, transformation in value production, and the limits to workers’ inquiry as a political/research method.

Presentations from:
Anna Curcio (University of Messina) 
Bianca Elzebaumer & Caterina Giuliani (Cantiere per pratiche non-affermative) 
Heidi Hasbrouck (Goldsmiths) 
Tolga Hepdincler (Bahcesehir University)
Funda Kaya (Bahcesehir University)
Asli Kayhan (Kocaeli University)
Michał Kozłowski, Janek Sowa, Kuba Szreder (Free/Slow University of Warsaw)
Alan W. Moore (ABC No Rio / Squatting Europe)
Frederick H. Pitts (University of Bath)
Kasparas Pocius (Lithuanian Culture Research Institute)
Gigi Roggero (University of Bologna)
M. Nedim Süalp (Marmara University)
Zeynep Tul Akbal Sualp (Bahcesehir University)
Jamie Woodcock (Goldsmiths)

For more information and to register send a message to conference@ephemeraweb.org.

Sponsored by ephemera and the Essex Centre for Work, Organization, and Society

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Work

THE MEANINGS OF WORK

Now Out!

The Meanings of Work: Essay on the Affirmation and Negation of Work
Ricardo Antunes

The Meanings of Work aims to explore some dimensions of the changes taking place in the labour-world, as well as looking at the consequences, theoretical and empirical, entailed by these transformations, such as the relevance and pertinence of the category of labour in the contemporary world. Billions of men and women depend exclusively on their labour to survive and encounter increasingly unstable, precarious or casual workers and the unemployed. As the contingent of workers has grown, there have been a vast reduction in jobs, rights have been corroded and the gains of the past have been eroded. The Meanings of Work starts with a wider conception of work and seeks to understand this new condition of labour today. 

Biographical note
Ricardo Antunes is Professor of Sociology at University of Campinas (UNICAMP/Brazil). He was Visiting Research Fellow at Sussex University and his books and articles has been published in France, Italy, England, Swiss, Spain, Portugal, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, among other countries.

Readership
It will be of interest to sociologists, economists, social workers, psychologists and for all those interested in recent changes in the global configuration of work.

Table of Contents

Foreword by István Mészáros
Preface to the English edition
Preface to the second edition
Preface to the first edition

Introduction

1. Capital’s Social-Metabolic Order and its System of Mediations
The system of first-order mediations
The emergence of the system of second-order mediations

2. Dimensions of the Structural Crisis of Capital
The crisis of Fordism and Taylorism as the phenomenal expression of the structural crisis

3. The Responses of Capital to its Structural Crisis: Productive Restructuring and its Repercussions in the Labour-Process
The limits of Taylorism/Fordism and of the social-democratic compromise
The emergence of mass worker-revolts and the crisis of the welfare-state

4. Toyotism and the New Forms of Capital-Accumulation
The fallacy of ‘total quality’ under the diminishing utility-rate of the use-value of commodities
The ‘lyophilisation’ of organisation and labour in the Toyotist factory: new forms of labour-intensification

5. From Thatcher’s Neoliberalism to Tony Blair’s ‘Third Way’: the Recent British Experience
Neoliberalism, the world of work and the crisis of unionism in England
Elements of productive restructuring in Britain: ideas and practice
British strikes in the 1990s: forms of confrontation with neoliberalism and the casualisation of work
New Labour and Tony Blair’s ‘Third Way’

6. The Class-that-Lives-from-Labour: the Working Class Today
Towards a broader notion of the working class
Dimensions of the diversity, heterogeneity and complexity of the working class
The sexual division of labour: transversalities between the dimensions of class and gender
Wage-earners in the service-sector, the ‘third sector’ and new forms of domestic labour
Transnationalisation of capital and the world of work

7. The World of Labour and Value-Theory: Forms of Material and Immaterial Labour
The growing interaction between labour and scientific knowledge: a critique of the thesis of ‘science as primary productive force’
The interaction between material and immaterial labour
Contemporary forms of estrangement

8. Excursus on the Centrality of Labour: the Debate between Lukács and Habermas
1. The centrality of labour in Lukács’s Ontology of Social Being
Labour and teleology
Labour as the model of social practice
Labour and freedom

2. Habermas’s critique of the ‘paradigm of labour’
The paradigm of communicative action and the sphere of intersubjectivity
The uncoupling of system and lifeworld
The colonisation of the lifeworld and Habermas’s critique of the theory of value

3. A critical sketch of Habermas’s critique
Authentic and inauthentic subjectivity

9. Elements towards an Ontology of Everyday Life

10. Working Time and Free Time: towards a Meaningful Life Inside and Outside of Work

11. Foundations of a New Social-Metabolic Order

Appendices

Appendices to the second edition
1. Ten Theses and a Hypothesis on the Present (and Future) of Work
2. Labour and Value: Critical Notes 

Appendices to the first edition
1. The Crisis of the Labour-Movement and the Centrality of Labour Today
2. The New Proletarians at the Turn of the Century
3. The Metamorphoses and Centrality of Labour Today
4. Social Struggles and Socialist Societal Design in Contemporary Brazil

References

See: http://www.brill.com/meanings-work

 

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/now-out-the-meanings-of-work.-essay-on-the-affirmation-and-negation-of-work-ricardo-antunes

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

 

Sociology

WORK, EMPLOYMENT & SOCIETY DAY CONFERENCE

Monday 22 October 2012

Venue and Host: British Library Conference Centre, London

This year, WES celebrates 25 years of publishing the best of the sociology of work and employment.  This conference reflects on key debates and looks forward to what the future might hold for the discipline and the journal. 

We warmly invite you to join us at our 25th Anniversary Event.

The event programme includes:

  • A welcome to the conference from WES Co-Editor, Irena Grugulis
  • A welcome to the British Library by Jude England, Head of Social Sciences
  • Catherine Hakim, Centre for Policy Studies, London
  • Richard Hyman, London School of Economics
  • Arne Kalleberg, University of North Carolina
  • Linda McDowell, University of Oxford
  • Ruth Milkman, City University of New York
  • Philip Taylor, University of Strathclyde
  • Karel Williams, ManchesterBusinessSchool

 

Registration

BSA Member: £95               

Non-Member: £125

BSA Concessionary Member: £45  

Non-Member Concession (Unwaged and Postgraduate Students): £60

 

Places for this event are allocated on a first come, first served basis. Lunch and refreshments are included. 

 

Visit www.britsoc.co.uk/events/wes-conference-2012 to register and for further event details.

Join the BSA: www.britsoc.co.uk/join

Enquiries to: events@britsoc.org.uk

 

Kind regards,

BSA Events Team

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Work

Work

MSc IN LABOUR, SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND DEVELOPMENT

MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development

SOAS, University of London

This new programme is concerned with labour conditions and relations, social movements of labour and their contributions to development processes and changes in the Global South.

 It is the first MSc programme of its kind in the UK dedicated to Labour, Social Movements and Development. Students will have the opportunity to experience policy-making and labour campaigns in practice. They will participate in our interactive sessions to devise policies; and design and implement regional, national and international labour campaigns.

The MSc draws on the expertise of staff in the Department of Development Studies, specialising in Latin America, Africa and Asia. It benefits from our contacts within the field, including with NGOs and international organisations.

The MSc degree will focus on:

  • Labour process and organisations in the South
  • A comparative history of labour and social movements in countries such asChina,Korea,India,South Africa, Brazil and the Middle East
  • The impact of neoliberalism and globalisation on workers in the South 
  • Informalisation of labour, casualisation and precarious work
  • Feminisation of labour
  • Forced labour and child labour 
  • Rural labour, migrant labour and labour in Export Processing Zones
  • Household and reproductive labour
  • The International Labour Organisation, international labour standards and decent work
  • Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives, codes of conduct and anti-sweatshop campaigning
  • Theories and practices of local, national and international labour campaigns

For further information please visit the following link: http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/

**END**

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog