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Religion

Religion

BSA SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION STUDY GROUP ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2014

Wednesday 2 – Friday 4 July 2014

(Postgraduate Workshop: Tuesday 1 July 2014)

University of Sussex, Brighton, UK

Keynote speakers: Professor Manuel Vásquez, Professor Sophie Watson and Professor John Wolffe

A long-standing assumption in the sociology of religion is that there is a correlation between religious resurgence and intense moments of political, economic and socio-cultural crisis. We are living at such a moment of crisis now. A crisis of trust between experts, leaders, elites and emergent publics has led to a moment of profound disjuncture and given rise to possibilities for new religious and spiritual solidarities and connectivities as well as conflict. This conference call seeks papers engaged in empirical, theoretical and methodological research in the sociology of religion and related disciplines that address, in innovative and imaginative ways, the following themes:

Religion and austerity * Religion and debt * Religion and money * Religion and the gift * Religion and capitalism/neo-liberalism * Religion and the state * Religion and the environment * Religious resurgence, religious decline * Religion and critical theory * Religion, citizens and publics * Religion and social movements * Religion and media * Religion, space and place.

We invite proposals for conference papers (300 words), panels (3-4 papers on a shared theme, 750 words) and posters (200 words). Alternative formats will also be considered. Abstracts must be submitted by FRIDAY 31 JANUARY 2014 to Dr Marion Bowman and Dr Paul-François Tremlett at Arts-SocrelReligionandCrisis2014@open.ac.uk.

Bursaries are available for postgraduate/early career scholars.

For further details, visit the Socrel website: http://www.socrel.org.uk.

For further details about the BSA visit http://www.britsoc.co.uk.

Contact the BSA Events Team, Email: events@britsoc.org.uk Tel: +44 (0)191 383 0839

See: http://www.britsoc.co.uk/media/60830/SocRel_CFP_2014.pdf

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The New Left Book Club: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/the-new-left-book-club-call-for-papers/

North Atlantic Oscillation

North Atlantic Oscillation

MARXISM, ORIENTALISM AND COSMOPOLITANISM

From Gilbert Achcar:

My book The People Want: A Radical Exploration of the Arab Uprising has been released this month in the US (available since July in the UK). I am happy to inform you of the publication of yet another book of mine, which is a collection of essays.

Recently released in the UK: http://www.saqibooks.co.uk/ book/marxism-orientalism- cosmopolitanism/

Next month in the US: http://www.haymarketbooks.org/ pb/Marxism-Orientalism- Cosmopolitanism

Below, FYI, is the Table of Contents.

Foreword 7

Religion and Politics Today from a Marxian Perspective 10
Marx’s view of religion 12
Religion and radicalism today: liberation theology 16
Religion and radicalism today: Islamic fundamentalism 23
For a Marxian comparative sociology of religions 28
Political conclusions 35

Orientalism in Reverse:
Post-1979 Trends in French Orientalism 40
“Orientalism in reverse” 41
Post-1979 French Orientalists 45
French “Orientalism in reverse” 47
The meanderings of French “Orientalism in reverse” 56

Marx, Engels and “Orientalism”:
On Marx’s Epistemological Evolution 68
Said’s Orientalism and its Marxist critique 68
Orientalism, essentialism and idealism 73
Marx and Engels’ radical break with historical idealism 78
Were Marx and Engels Eurocentric? 82
The political/epistemological evolution
of Marx and Engels 88
Critical Marxism and Orientalism 96

Marxism and Cosmopolitanism 103
Four conceptions of cosmopolitanism 103
Marx and Engels’ initial conception of cosmopolitanism 107
The maturation of Marx and Engels’
conception of cosmopolitanism 116
Cosmopolitanism and internationalism 123
“Cosmopolitanism” after Marx and Engels:
Kautsky, Gramsci and the Comintern 128
“Cosmopolitanism” as anathema: the Stalinist perversion 134
Cosmopolitanism and “globalisation” 144

Bibliography and References 165

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Religion

CRITICAL RESEARCH ON RELIGION

SAGE Publications is pleased to announce a new journal:

Critical Research on Religion is a peer-reviewed, international journal focusing on the development of a critical theoretical framework and its application to research on religion.

First issue to be published April 2013

We invite you to submit an article to this journal and encourage you to get your libraries to subscribe to it.

Benefits of this Journal

Critical Research on Religion provides:

* A unique venue for those engaging in critical research on religion not only in religious studies and theology but in the sub-disciplines of the other social sciences and humanities which focus on religion

* International and interdisciplinary journal scope – helping to set the direction for this new interdisciplinary critical discussion of religion

* High quality peer review provided via an international board of experts

* High visibility and increased usage – CRR will be hosted on SAGE Journals, powered by HighWire.

* Articles will sit alongside more than 50% of the world’s most cited journals, attracting more than 53 million users monthly.

 

Register now for free online access to the first volume of Critical Research on Religion.

 

About the Journal

Critical Research on Religion provides a common venue for those engaging in critical analysis in theology and religious studies, as well as for those who critically study religion in the other social sciences and humanities such as philosophy, sociology, anthropology, psychology, history, and literature. 

A critical approach examines religious phenomena according to both their positive and negative impacts. It draws on methods including but not restricted to the critical theory of the Frankfurt School, Marxism, post-structuralism, feminism, psychoanalysis, ideological criticism, post-colonialism, ecocriticism, and queer studies.

The journal encourages submissions of theoretically guided articles on current issues as well as those with historical interest using a wide range of methodologies including qualitative, quantitative, and archival. It publishes articles, review essays, book reviews, thematic issues, symposia, and interviews.

 

For further information, please see:

SAGE Press Release

Journal Homepage

 

We look forward to hearing from you. Please don’t hesitate to contact us with any questions.

Co-Editors: 
Roland Boer, Jonathan Boyarin and Warren S. Goldstein

For further inquires, please contact: 
goldstein@criticaltheoryofreligion.org

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com  

 

Taweret

BSA SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION STUDY GROUP (SOCREL) ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2012

Religion and (In)Equalities 

University of Chester, UK

28 – 30 March 2012

 

Plenary Speakers:

Professor Tariq Modood (University of Bristol)

Professor Elaine Graham (University of Chester)

Professor Sean McCloud (University of North Carolina)

 

Also featuring:

A roundtable discussion with Professor Linda Woodhead, Dr Rebecca Catto (Lancaster University), Professor Kim Knott (University of Leeds), Professor Hugh McLeod (University of Birmingham), Professor Gordon Lynch (University of Kent) and Dr Shuruq Naguib (Lancaster University) on the forthcoming volume Religious Change in Modern Britain (Routledge)

Dr Karen Jochelson and Dr David Perfect (Equality and Human Rights Commission)

This interdisciplinary conference gathers academics and practitioners to discuss the complex ways religion interacts with systems of power and/or categories of difference that affect experiences of equality and/or inequality in individuals, groups and spaces. The intersections of gender, race and class are typically part of the mutually constitutive ‘matrix’ of social categories that contribute to identities and power relations, however religion is often overlooked. Such oversight can only result in limited analyses and leaves pathways to social inclusion and exclusion concealed. Through this conference we seek to bring together research that explores the ways religious beliefs, identities, practices, communities and institutions can contribute to both experiences of belonging and marginalization.

The Conference programme will include papers and posters on the conference theme, especially on the interaction of religious beliefs, traditions, practices and identities with: 

v     Class

v     Dis/abilities

v     Economics

v     Education

v     Gender

v     Healthcare and Well-being

v     Multicultural politics

v     Public policy

v     Race

v     Sexuality

v     Social justice

 

Further information and online conference registration is available from http://www.socrel.org.uk.

Please direct any administrative enquiries to: conference@britsoc.org.uk or academic enquiries to: Dr Dawn Llewellyn (University of Chester) and Dr Sonya Sharma (Durham University) at: religionandinequalities@gmail.com

SOCREL is the British Sociological Association’s study group on Religion. For more details about the study group and conference please visit www.socrel.org.uk.

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Taweret

RELIGION AND (IN)EQUALITIES

Sociology of Religion Study Group (SOCREL) Annual Conference

28 – 30 March 2012

University of Chester

 

Plenary Speakers:

Professor Tariq Modood (University of Bristol)

Professor Elaine Graham (University of Chester)

Professor Sean McCloud (University of North Carolina)

 

Also featuring:

* A roundtable discussion with Professor Linda Woodhead, Dr Rebecca Catto (Lancaster University) and contributors to the forthcoming volume Religious Change in Modern Britain (Routledge)

* Dr Karen Jochelson and Dr David Perfect (Equality and Human Rights Commission)

 

This interdisciplinary conference gathers academics and practitioners to discuss the complex ways religion interacts with systems of power and/or categories of difference that affect experiences of equality and/or inequality in individuals, groups and spaces. The intersections of gender, race and class are typically part of the mutually constitutive ‘matrix’ of social categories that contribute to identities and power relations, however religion is often overlooked. Such oversight can only result in limited analyses and leaves pathways to social inclusion and exclusion concealed. Through this conference we seek to bring together research that explores the ways religious beliefs, identities, practices, communities and institutions can contribute to both experiences of belonging and marginalization.

Abstracts are invited on the conference theme, especially on the interaction of religious beliefs, traditions, practices and identities with: 

Class                                                

Gender             

Multicultural politics                   

Education                  

Race                                         

Dis/abilities               

Economics                                 

Sexuality           

Healthcare and Well-being                   

Social justice

Public policy                              

Please submit abstracts by 28 October 2011 to Dr Dawn Llewellyn (Universityof Chester) & Dr Sonya Sharma (DurhamUniversity) at: religionandinequalities@gmail.com

Abstracts for 20 minute papers (300 words max.), panel proposals (750 words max.) and alternative formats (750 words max.) are welcomed.

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

John Locke

CRITICAL ENTHUSIASM: CAPITAL ACCUMULATION AND THE TRANSFORMATION OF RELIGIOUS PASSION

 Jordana Rosenberg
Critical Enthusiasm: Capital Accumulation and the Transformation of Religious Passion
Oxford University Press, April 2011

The Atlantic world of the long eighteenth century was characterized by two major, interrelated phenomena: the onset of capital accumulation and the infusion of traditions of radical religious rapture into Enlightenment discourses. In exploring these cross-pollinations, Critical Enthusiasm shows that debates around religious radicalism are bound to the advent of capitalism at its very root: as legal precedent, as financial rhetoric, and as aesthetic form. To understand the period thus requires that we not only contextualize histories of religion in terms of the economic landscape of early modernity, but also recast the question of secularization in terms of the contradictions of capitalism.

Critical Enthusiasm contributes to new directions of scholarship in literary and legal history, secularization studies, and economic criticism. It is unique in producing a model for literary and cultural study that is simultaneously attuned to economic and religious forces. By approaching the history of capitalism through religious debates, Critical Enthusiasm discloses significant intersections of aesthetic form and of financial flows that have been hitherto ignored.

Through chapters that highlight moral philosophy, religious prophesy, early modern statute law, poetry, and political theory, Rosenbergshows that the contested nature of enthusiastic rapture is crucial to understanding the major institutional transformations of early modernity. These transformations–colonial plunder, the rise of finance, the administration of racialized labor, and the legal reform that justified such practices–shaped the period; they also laid the foundation for our contemporary world.

See: http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/general/subject/ReligionTheology/HistoryofChristianity/ReformationCounterReformation/?view=usa&ci=9780199764266

Jordana Rosenberg is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Revolt

REPETITION AND REVOLT

The Theory Reading Group at Cornell University invites submissions for its seventh annual interdisciplinary spring conference:

Repetition and Revolt

Featuring keynote speaker Rebecca Comay (University of Toronto)

Cornell University
Ithaca, New York
April 14-16, 2011

Wavering between the occurrence of the novel and the recurrence of the routine, the concept of revolution often divides along a line suggested by its etymology.  Thus, even as Copernicus upset the world system of his time, he did so by describing an orbit, a stable circle.  Put simply, this legacy reminds us that every proposed overturning might yield nothing more than a mere return, a tendency that threatens to undermine radical upheavals in domains ranging from the political to the aesthetic to the scientific.  As Robert Frost suggests, it may well be in the nature of “total revolution” to put “the same class up on top.”

This critical ambiguity can emerge whenever we attempt to account for the possibility of change or difference.  Does this division reveal something essential about revolution, or does it indicate a fault in the ways in which we think about revolution?  In what ways has contemporary thought attempted to reckon with or reconcile the competing meanings of this term?  How do philosophical and theoretical discourses account for change and difference, not only in the realms of politics, literature, art, and science, but also within philosophy and theory themselves?  What forms of critique, resistance, or action can we find in contemporary thought, and what do these forms disclose about the potential or limits of the concept of revolution?

Suggested topics:

* Paradigm shifts and epistemic breaks

* Theories of literary innovation

* Copernican revolution or Ptolemaic counterrevolution

* Theories of the event

* Aesthetics and politics

* The figure of the genius

* Repetition and difference

* Revolution and globalization

* The finite and the infinite

* Secularization, the post-secular, the new atheism

* The future of critique

* Collapse, catastrophe, and crisis

* Evolution and Darwinism

* Eternal return

* Utopia and dystopia

* Revolutionary violence and messianism

* Law and exception

* Theories of transgression

* Ruptures critical and diacritical

* Revolutions in media/social mediation

* Turns: political, linguistic, ethical, (anti)social, comic

Please limit the length of abstracts to no more than 250 words.

The deadline for submission of 250-word abstracts for 20-minute presentations is February 15, 2011.

Please include your name, e-mail address, and phone number.  Abstracts should be e-mailed to repetitionrevolt@gmail.com

Notices of acceptance will be sent no later than February 25, 2011.

For more information about the Cornell Theory Reading Group, visit: http://www.arts.cornell.edu/trg  

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Utopia

BSA SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION STUDY GROUP ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2011 

Religion and Social Theory: Developing a New Agenda for the Sociology of Religion

Monday 11th – Wednesday 13th April 2011         

Woodbrooke Conference Centre, Birmingham

** EARLY BOOKING DEADLINE APPROACHING – 24 Feb 2011 **

Keynote Speakers:

Professor Bryan Turner (City University of New York)

Professor Steve Bruce (University of Aberdeen)

An engagement with sociological theory holds great promise for the study of religion. The founders of sociological thought gave a great deal of attention to the questions of religion in modernity; after this golden age for the sociology of religion, mainstream sociology and sociological theorising seemed to lose interest in these questions. Of late, religion seems to be back on the agenda, although often such reflections are not well informed by the kinds of substantive expertise that sociologists of religion are able to offer. This presents sociologists of religion with real opportunities to engage in new ways with the core of the sociological enterprise. This conference will begin to develop a new agenda for sociology of religion and its engagement with social theory, both in its more abstract and concrete empirical forms. As such, the conference aims to promote an engagement with theory-which by no means suggests a wish to neglect empirical concerns.

SOCREL is the British Sociological Association’s study group on Religion.

To register and for further Conference details please visit: http://www.socrel.org.uk/conferences/Birmingham%202011/index.html

For Conference booking enquiries please contact: gillian.rae@britsoc.org.uk  Telephone: (0191) 383 0839

For further details about the study group please visit www.socrel.org.uk

Please direct any enquiries to Andrew McKinnon (andrew.mckinnon@abdn.ac.uk) or Marta Trzebiatowska (m.k.trzebiatowska@abdn.ac.uk)

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Taweret

RELIGION AND THE NEW ATHEISM

Religion and the New Atheism: A Critical Appraisal

Edited by Amarnath Amarasingam

This is the first book a new book series: Studies in Critical Research on Religion SCRR I (Studies in Critical Social Sciences SCSS 25)

http://www.brill.nl/default.aspx?partid=210&pid=33849

——————————————————————

Warren S. Goldstein, Ph.D.

Visiting Fellow

Committee on the Study of Religion

Harvard University

Center for Critical Research on Religion

17 Richfield Rd.

West Newton, MA 02465 USA

Voice: (407) 782-8064

E-mail: goldstein@criticaltheoryofreligion.org

http://www.criticaltheoryofreligion.org

Book Series Editor

Studies in Critical Research on Religion

Brill Academic Publishers and Haymarket Books

http://www.brill.nl/scrr

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski