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WAGES OF WHITENESS & RACIST SYMBOLIC CAPITAL

Racism Analysis – Yearbook 1 – 2010: Edited by Wulf D. Hund, Jeremy Krikler, David Roediger

219 pp., 24.90€, ISBN 978-3-643-10949-1 threadstiching, softcover with flaps Lit Verlag | Berlin – Münster – London – Wien – Zurich

CONTENTS:

DAVID ROEDIGER: ACCOUNTING FOR THE WAGES OF WHITENESS: U.S MARXISM AND THE CRITICAL HISTORY OF RACE. 

ANJA WEISS: RACIST SYMBOLIC CAPITAL: A BOURDIEUIAN APPROACH TO THE ANALYSIS OF RACISM. 

WULF D. HUND: NEGATIVE SOCIETALISATION, RACISM AND THE CONSTITUTION OF RACE.

STEFANIE AFFELDT: A PAROXYSM OF WHITENESS: WHITE LABOUR, WHITE NATION 
AND WHITE SUGAR IN AUSTRALIA.

JEREMY KRIKLER: RE-THINKING RACE AND CLASS IN SOUTH AFRICA: SOME WAYS FORWARD. 

DAGMAR ENGELKEN: A WHITE MAN’S COUNTRY? THE CHINESE LABOUR CONTROVERSY IN THE TRANSVAAL.

ELIZABETH ESCH: RACIALIZING TRANSNATIONALISM: THE FORD MOTOR COMPANY AND WHITE SUPREMACY FROM DETROIT TO SOUTH AFRICA.

The essays assembled in this volume shed light on the complex of class and race from which W.E.B. Du Bois saw originating “a sort of public and psychological wage” of whiteness. David Roediger (University of Illinois) preliminarily addresses the evolution of whiteness as a category of critical social analysis. Anja Weib (Universität Duisburg-Essen) explains that the perspective of whiteness studies can be expanded by a modification of Bourdieu’s category of symbolic capital. Wulf D. Hund (Universität Hamburg) pleads for the generalisation of this concept and for its application to an analysis of racism as negative societalisation. Stefanie Affeldt (Universitat Hamburg) specifies the analytic dimensions of the categories ‘racist symbolic capital’ and ‘wages of whiteness’ using the example of the white sugar campaign in Australia. Jeremy Krikler (University of Essex) explores some missing dimensions in the study of race and class in South Africa. Dagmar Engelken (University of Essex) investigates the Chinese Labour Question in South Africa. Elizabeth Esch (Columbia University) examines the ways in which corporate initiatives of the Ford Motor Company in the U.S. and South Africa imagined the assembly line worker as a white citizen and consumer.

Racism Analysis is a research series that explores racial discrimination in all its varying historical, ideological and cultural patterns. It examines the invention of race, the dimensions of modern racism and inquires into racism avant la lettre. The series brings together scholars from various disciplines and schools of thought. A key aim is to contribute to the conceptualisation of racism and to identify the practices of dehumanisation intrinsic to it.

The Racism Analysis Studies will publish monographs as well as anthologies, proceedings and textbooks, thereby assembling contributions committed to various perspectives of a critical research into society. The contributions will delve into examples of racist inclusion and exclusion, or outline specific aspects of the different fields of research into racism.

The Racism Analysis Yearbook will be issued by varying teams of special editors. Each volume will deal with key topics in the debates over racism and will focus on illuminating such topics through the investigation of particular subjects and will refer to the state of scholarly discussion on them.

Check out the book at Lit Verlag’s site: (http://www.lit-verlag.de/isbn/3-643-10949-1)

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Culture

WAGES OF WHITENESS & RACIST SYMBOLIC CAPITAL

(Racism Analysis – Yearbook 1 – 2010) Edited by Wulf D. Hund, Jeremy Krikler, David Roediger

Mike Cole

AFROMODERNISMS

CALL FOR PAPERS:

Afromodernisms 2

What’s really new? Blackness and Atlantic Modernism, 1907–61

Symposium: University of Liverpool, UK

Confirmed Keynote: Professor Tyler Stovall, University of California, Berkeley

30 June–2 July 2011

Afromodernisms 2 focuses on the relationship between the Afro-Atlantic and the modernist canon.  Specifically, the symposium seeks to address the ways in which current configurations of modernism—the art and literature of the new—may be inflected, expanded, or even called into question by either localized or transnational Africanist interventions into the politics and culture of the first half of the twentieth century.

Call for Papers:

* What constitutes a ‘modernist’ response to the experience of the modern? What categories underpin the aesthetic category ‘modernism’? 

* How might emphasis on black diapora subject positions, representations, and artistic and political interventions, inflect current canonical configurations of modernism?

* To what extent might black feminist positions revise or even reject the totalizing tendencies of the male voice in canonical works of black modernism, for example, Négritude?

The aims of the conference are the following:

* To debate the tenets of modernism (its newness, breaks with tradition, interest in the exotic and the primitive, its sense of fragmentation and displacement, and the way it conceives of the individual subject) in two contexts: first in terms of the work produced by African diaspora artists and writers; second, in relation to the symbolic presence of representations of blackness in the work of Anglo-American, Caribbean and European modernists.

* To consider the degree to which a variety of actors operating from what might be termed ‘alternative’ or ‘displaced’ metropoles interacted to produce, in Jameson’s terms, an ‘active sense’ of the history of modernity, one in which a black presence was of key aesthetic, political and cultural importance.

* To expand Perry Anderson’s claim, directed primarily at European modernist movements, that one of the indispensible co-ordinates for locating modernism is its ‘proximity to social revolution,’ to include a range of Afro-Atlantic revolutionary positions. We therefore welcome papers that consider the range of anti-colonial and/or feminist responses to the experience of modernity operating across the Atlantic in the inter- and post-war years.

*To reconsider the emergence of literary and artistic avant-gardes in the context of black anti-colonial, feminist, and (pan)nationalist movements, the two world wars, and, in the interwar period, against the backdrop of fascism and communism.

Individual papers and proposals for panels, in English, are invited, addressing, but not limited to the following circumatlantic themes:

* Gender
* Black performance/performance of blackness
* blackness and/in visual art
* modernism and primitivism
* modernist landscapes and/or the city
* science, technology and the machine
* narrative, subjectivity, psychoanalysis
* the politics of history
* blackness and genre
* island modernisms (e.g. Antillean, Irish, Cape Verdian)
* tradition and experimentation
* modernism, politics and the metropole (Paris, London, Mexico, Dublin, Marseille, Berlin, Hamburg, Moscow, DC, New York)
* modernist soundscapes
* black writers/artists in/and Europe
* modernism and ideology
* modernism and the canon, including the Harlem Renaissance, Négritude, and Paris Noir
* formal innovation/ the language of modernism
* informal networks
* the work of ‘high’ and not-so-high modernists, for example, Eliot, Faulkner, McKay, Beckett, Pound, Stevens, Williams, Hughes, Joyce, Hurston
* responses to revolution: Easter 1916, November 1918, Spain 1936

For individual papers, please send a working title, abstract of 250–350 words, and a biographical note to: Fionnghuala Sweeney: fsweeney@liv.ac.uk  or Kate Marsh: clmarsh@liv.ac.uk

Proposal for panels should contain a panel title, working titles for individual papers, with individual abstracts of 250 words each, and brief biographical notes on the chair and/or speakers to: Fionnghuala Sweeney: fsweeney@liv.ac.uk or Kate Marsh: clmarsh@liv.ac.uk.

Proposals on teaching and curating are also welcomed, as are offers to act as chair or respondent.

Closing date for call: 11 April, 2011.

Kate Marsh
Fionnghuala Sweeney

Afromodernisms2: http://www.liv.ac.uk/soclas/conferences/Afromodernism

Dr Kate Marsh
Senior Lecturer in French
School of Cultures, Languages and Area Studies
University of Liverpool
L69 7ZR

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com
Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com