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Tag Archives: Sociology of Gender

Sociology

Sociology

GENDER AND BOURDIEU

Forthcoming BSA Bourdieu Study Group event: Gender and Bourdieu, “Is doing gender unavoidable?”

Thursday 13th December 2012, School of Law and Social Science, University of East London

Online booking: http://portal.britsoc.co.uk/public/event/eventBooking.aspx?id=EVT10252

 

Bourdieu first entered the sociological discussion of gender relationships in the 1990s. In 1998 he published  La Domination masculine . Bourdieu argues that the relations between men and women are tied to masculine domination and that this masculine domination or habitus gives men and women a specific role in society.

Bourdieu’s work often causes divisions between feminists. Many argue that although he explored gender relations in his work he paid very little attention to feminist theory, focusing instead on gendering of taste or how structured sexual division of labour generates a sexually differentiated perspective on the world. However, others dispute this insisting that  his contribution has scarcely been recognized by feminists. They claim that one of Bourdieu’s most important insights is that gender is present in all social relationships.  Furthermore, Bourdieu’s work is valuable to feminist approaches because theoretical frameworks and political programmes are always embedded in social relations.

There has been a range of responses to Bourdieu from feminists and this event will aim to bring together different perspectives for discussion with key note speakers: Dr Catherine Hakim,  Dr Lisa Mckenzie and Professor Derek Robbins.

Dr Catherine Hakim is renowned for coining the term ‘erotic capital‘, referring to a person’s  combination of physical and social attractiveness and its power in all social interactions; in the workplace, politics and in public life generally, as well as in the invisible negotiations of private relationships. Her publication Honey-Money: The Power of Erotic Capital  has received large scale mainstream media attention. She has published extensively on changing patterns of employment, women’s employment and women’s position in society, occupational segregation and the pay gap. She sits on the Editorial Boards of several academic journals, including  the European Sociological Review and International Sociology

Dr Lisa Mckenzie’s research has focused upon class inequalities of men and women living on council estates within the UK, using a collaborative ethnographic approach whilst applying the work of Pierre Bourdieu, with particular influence relating to symbolic violence, capital exchange, and power relationships with neo-liberal structures. She currently holds an Early Years Leverhulme Research Fellowship at the University of Nottingham within the school of sociology and social policy. Her current research is a re-study of the 1970 Coates and Silburn St Anns ‘Poverty’ study, focusing upon the changing shapes of community, family, and belonging in contemporary Britain.

Prof Derek Robbins has long been one of the leading exponents of Pierre Bourdieu’s theories in the fields of sociology and is a favourite with the Bourdieu study group. He is Professor of International Social Theory at the University of East London, where he also is Director of the Group for the Study of International Social Science in the School of Law and Social Science. He is the editor of the four-volume collection of articles on Bourdieu in the Sage Masters of Contemporary Social Thought series (2000).

His most recent publication: French Post-War Social Theory sets up a Bourdieusian investigation of the habitus of the five French social thinkers; Aron, Althusser, Foucault, Lyotard, Bourdieu.

As a study group, we’re always very interested in the new ways Bourdieu’s concepts can be applied and hope you will join us for what is likely to be a lively discussion.

The event will take place at the University of East London, Docklands Campus on Thursday 13th December 2012.

Online booking: http://portal.britsoc.co.uk/public/event/eventBooking.aspx?id=EVT10252

 

BSA members £20.00

Non BSA members £30.00    

Please note that our last study group event sold out with a few days. To avoid disappointment please book early.

 

Timetable:

10-30-11.00: Registration and tea and coffee

11.00-12.15: Dr Catherine Hakim key note speech

12.15-13.15: Lunch

13.15-14.30: Dr Lisa Mckenzie key note speech

14.30-14.45: Refreshments

14.45-16.00: Prof. Derek Robbins Key note speech: “La domination masculine and social constructionism”.

16.00-17.00: Discussions with key note speakers

17.00-17.30: Wine reception.

 

Jenny Thatcher

PhD Candidate and Sociology Lecturer

Co-convenor of the BSA Bourdieu Study Group j.thatcher@uel.ac.uk University of East London School of Law and Social Science Docklands Campus University Way, E16 2RD

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

Gender and Education

TEACHING GENDER SERIES – CALL FOR BOOK PROPOSALS

Sense Publishers

Series Editor, Patricia Leavy, PhD

The Teaching Gender Series will publish approximately three books annually. We are looking for books that deal centrally with gender and are intended to be used in college classes. Books should be of significant value to the teaching of gender. The series aims to promote social justice perspectives and will be published by Sense Publishers, leaders in educational research.

 

The International Editorial Advisory Board for the Series includes:

Tony E. Adams, Northeastern Illinois University, USA

Paula Banerjee, University of Calcutta, India

Nitza Berkovitch, Ben Gurion University, Israel

Cheryl Dellasega, Penn State University, USA

Máiréad Dunne, University of Sussex, UK

Mary Holmes, Flinders University, Australia

Laurel Richardson, Ohio State University, Emerita, USA

Sophie Tamas, Queen’s University in Kingston, Canada

  

Books on any gender-related topic will be considered; however, we are presently most interested in proposals for books on the following topics (please note we are looking to publish slim volumes and not very large textbooks- approximately 200 printed pages with an estimated 450 words per page when tabulated using Sense’s style guidelines):

  

Introduction to Gender Studies

International Perspectives on Gender

Women, Work & Family

Feminist Pedagogies

Feminist Research Methods or Research Methods for Gender Studies

  

Please send queries or full proposals for monographs or edited volumes to Series Editor, Patricia Leavy at pleavy7@aol.com.

Visit Sense Publishers at: www.sensepublishers.com

  

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

Feminism

DISSIDENT FEMINISMS

Announcing a New Series: Dissident Feminisms

Series Editor: Piya Chatterjee, University of California, Riverside

The University of Illinois Press is pleased to announce a new series, Dissident Feminisms, which seeks new feminist writing that traverses the fault lines of epistemology and power, particularly the relationship between social action, activism and theory. Featuring work by scholar-activists with critical and praxis-oriented methods, this interdisciplinary series seeks to intervene in conversations of critical import in a number of fields. We plan to foster rigorous feminist engagement with the enduring, intractable problems of our time: racisms; genocides; war and occupation; heteronormative, communitarian and state violence; militarism; and struggles for livelihood and basic human rights.

Dissident Feminisms seeks writing that breaks taboos. We will feature feminist analyses that combine radical critique with work towards progressive social change. The series is particularly interested in bridging the gaps between transnational and postcolonial feminist scholars, activists, and organizers and the work of U.S., immigrant, and native women of color. It will create space for radically plural critiques that combine analytic rigor with accessibility. The series will feature lucid and compelling academic monographs, edited collections that bring together a number of voices in focused, critical, and timely dialogue, and other writings that pointedly intervene in these urgent feminist conversations.

Please direct all questions and submissions to:

Larin McLaughlin
Senior Acquisitions Editor
University of Illinois Press
1325 South Oak St.
Champaign, IL 61820-6903
larinmc@uillinois.edu

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Man in Black

COUNTERFEIT ASYLUM: THE GIFT OF GENDER IN CONFINEMENT

Professor Daniel Moshenberg, Director of the Women’s Studies Program and co-convener of Women in and Beyond the Global, George Washington University in Washington, DC

Tuesday 05 April 2011
Time: 5:00 – 7:00 pm
Venue: FB4.26 (4th Floor Francis Bancroft Building, Mile End Campus), Queen Mary University of London

In the last half-century, the so-called `strong passport’ so-called democracies have turned the application for asylum into a criminal justice procedure. In so doing, these nation-States have redefined citizenship as they have redrawn the maps of national sovereignty. Take, for example, the Lindela Repatriation Centre in Krugersdorp, South Africa. It is a prison filled with people who have committed no crimes but rather are deemed unworthy of citizenship. Seen from the perspective of asylum seekers, the overwhelming majority of whom are Zimbabweans, there is no South Africa, there is no Zimbabwe. There is rather South Africa/Zimbabwe, bound and separated by punctuation, by power, but not by a border. For Zimbabwean women, the life in Lindela, a private prison opened initially by the African National Congress Women’s League, is particular and particularly dire.

A consideration of the political economy of asylum in the UK, US, Canada, South Africa, Australia in the current neoliberal global Moment finds variants of this narrative repeated endlessly. Asylum has come to mean detention. But what is asylum and how has it become part of the global carceral fabric?

Asylum has become part of a political economy of worthy and unworthy citizens. When processed through the prison industrial complex, scholars have tended to use a Foucault – Agamben frame of control and discipline, of bio-politics and bare life. This paper suggests not so much an alternative as a supplementary reading. Historically, asylum was not about states of exception, but rather exceptional states, states capable of responding to a plea of mercy, states capable of bestowing the gift of citizenship on otherwise unworthy people.

Professor Moshenberg proposes to re-read the political economy of worth and unworthy in asylum procedures, when seen from a perspective that centers on Black women asylum seekers. A somewhat Derridean reading of debt cycles, gift cycles, violence, national sovereignty, is merged with a reading, via Marx and Negri (and their readers), of labor, accumulation, surplus, and value. In the end, he argues that Black women asylum seekers are global precarious citizens, are, more precisely, citizens of global precarity.

If you would like to attend please email: a.alele@qmul.ac.uk

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com