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i284008264513270570-_szw1280h1280_SOCIAL PATHOLOGIES OF CONTEMPORARY CIVILIZATION

7th CONFERENCE

CALL FOR PAPERS
Social Suffering in an Era of Resilience

October 19th & 20th 2017

Goethe-University Frankfurt, in co-operation with the Institute for Social Research
The seventh international conference on The Social Pathologies of Contemporary Civilization once again explores the nature of contemporary malaises, diseases, illnesses and syndromes in their relation to cultural pathologies of the social body. Usually these conditions are interpreted clinically in terms of individualized symptoms and framed in demographic and epidemiological profiles. They are represented and responded to discretely, as though for the most part unrelated to each other; each having their own professional discourses of etiology, diagnostics, therapeutics, as well as their task forces developing health strategy and policy recommendations and interventions. However, these diseases also have a social and cultural profile, one that transcends the particularity of their symptomology and their discrete etiologies. These pathologies are diseases related to cultural pathologies of the social body and disorders of the collective esprit de corps of contemporary society.
Multi-disciplinary in approach the conference addresses questions of how these conditions are manifest at the level of individual bodies and minds, as well as how the ‘bodies politic’ are related to the hegemony of reductive biomedical and psychologistic perspectives. Rejecting such a reductive diagnosis of contemporary problems of health and well-being, the central research hypothesis guiding the conference is that contemporary epidemics are to be analysed in the light of radical changes in our civilization and of the social hegemonization of the biomedical and psychiatric perspective. They arise from individual and collective experiences of profound and drastic social changes and cultural shifts.
More specifically – but not exclusively – this conference will focus on the social dynamics of suffering. In times where an increasing neglect of society is only asking for one’s resilience, we want to focus on the understanding how social and cultural conditions moderate the experience of suffering. Social Suffering as a concept comprises two things: first, collective suffering, for instance as a result of war or natural catastrophes; and second, individual suffering, insofar as it has primarily societal causes.

• The so called refugee crisis brings in also questions of morality: is the focus on resilience in light of collective suffering of any help? Could resonance as a concept on the other side help to a better understanding of the suffering?
• Psychic suffering and social inequality
• Due to the transformation of work and the psychosocial costs associated with these changes, as well as the increasing tendencies towards social exclusion, the issue of social suffering has entered the agenda of industrialized nations as well. The notion of social suffering highlights the fact, then, that the suffering in question is caused by structural conditions and remains embedded in them. It is suffering in society and because of it.
• Psychologization of Suffering. Is the notion of “social Pathologies” as well as the ongoing question for a diagnostic potential of the social sciences already part of an neglect of society itself and playing into the hands of psychology? What role plays therapy culture in this development?
• Common to all contributions to this field is both the interpretation of social suffering as an increasing effect of neoliberal capitalist socialization and its determination as a theoretical reference point for social critique. Whilst attending to the particular ways in which individuals struggle to make ‘the problem of suffering’ productive for thought and action, it also works to understand how, through to the level of collective experience, this contributes to wider dynamics of social change. Is the concept of resonance a starting point maybe?

The conference invites papers offering analyses, discussions and perspectives of the overall theme (and related themes) from faculty, students and researchers in fields such as psychiatry, philosophy, sociology, social theory, psychology, anthropology etc.

Abstracts (300 words) please, by Friday, December 23rd 2016, to: socialpathologies2017@gmx.de

Web: http://socialpath.simplesite.com/

screamy-2

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

 

 

Nanopolitics

Nanopolitics

POLITICS WITH AND THROUGH THE BODY: PRESENTING THE NANOPOLITICS HANDBOOK

Wednesday March 5th @ 3-5PM, Room 5B.202, University of Essex
http://www.essex.ac.uk/ebs/news_and_seminars/seminarDetail.aspx?e_id=6275

The invention of new modes of sensibility is vital to enriching and sustaining political engagements, labours and lives in the situated contexts of urban collectivity. The nanopolitics handbook investigates the neoliberal city and workplace, the politics of crisis and austerity, precarious lives and modes of collaboration – through bodies and their encounters. Starting from the exploration of what bodies can do – with curiosity, courage and care – nanopolitics is a proposal for producing new collective subjectivations. Based on the experiments and experiences of the Nanopolitics Group, this book proposes exercises, concepts and ideas as little maps and machines for action. Drawing on social movements, grassroots organizing, dance, theatre and bodywork, the reflections and practices here present strategies for navigating and reconfiguring the playing field of ‘nanopolitics’, activating its entanglement with the major politics of our time. 

In this session the group will present the handbook, drawing on its texts and exercises.

Sponsored by the Centre for Work, Organization, and Society, this seminar is part of an ongoing workshop series on artist collectives.
For more information contact Stevphen Shukaitis: sshuka@essex.ac.uk
— 
Stevphen Shukaitis
Autonomedia Editorial Collective
http://www.autonomedia.org
http://www.minorcompositions.info
“Autonomy is not a fixed, essential state. Like gender, autonomy is created through its performance, by doing/becoming; it is a political practice. To become autonomous is to refuse authoritarian and compulsory cultures of separation and hierarchy through embodied practices of welcoming difference… Becoming autonomous is a political position for it thwarts the exclusions of proprietary knowledge and jealous hoarding of resources, and replaces the social and economic hierarchies on which these depend with a politics of skill exchange, welcome, and collaboration. Freely sharing these with others creates a common wealth of knowledge and power that subverts the domination and hegemony of the master’s rule.” – subRosa Collective

 

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Food, glorious food

Food, glorious food

FOOD AND SOCIETY 2014

BSA Food Study Group Conference:

Food & Society 2014

Monday 30 June 2014, 09:00-19:30

British Library Conference Centre, London

Keynote speaker: Professor Lotte Holm, Institute of Food and Resource Economics, University of Copenhagen

 

Call for Abstracts

Poor diet, levels of food waste and intensification of agriculture are key themes in contemporary food research and policy making, yet they can appear disconnected from everyday social practices and the lived experiences of food and food systems. The fourth BSA Food Study Group conference will bring together researchers, practitioners and policy makers to explore this apparent disconnect and showcase the most cutting edge research and practice from within and beyond the sociology of food.

‘Why do people fail to comply with ‘healthy eating’ advice?’ is a central question for public health policy makers. However it is one which generally fails to acknowledge that for consumers, food is also about pleasure and plays an ideological role in constituting family life. What, therefore, can social science tell us about food and eating in everyday life? To what extent are individuals responsible for their unhealthy or unethical eating practices and is it reasonable for them to be ‘blamed’? What is the significance of the social contexts in which lives are lived? How do emotions and ideas about food, pleasure and commensality influence food practices, over and above official dietary advice? What criteria do different groups of consumers use in selecting foods; are issues of provenance, safety and ethics the preserve of the few? What part can and should be played by food policy makers, manufacturers and retailers in addressing food related health and environmental inequalities? And what can industry, policy and academia learn from each other about the so-called ‘gap’ between knowledge and individual ‘behaviour’ and practices? The conference will bring delegates together around these – and other – issues to discuss what is important in food research now.

Call for Abstracts, Symposia, Posters and Images

The conference will provide a forum for the presentation of rigorous research on food and eating from sociology and other disciplines, looking at experiences in both the Global South and North. The presentation of research from related disciplines and topics is welcomed. Particular focus will be placed on the conference themes:

– The enjoyment of food, consumption preparation and eating

– Food ethics including food insecurity and waste

– Production and consumption, including global dimensions

– Procurement and institutional food

– Food health, obesity, morality

– Children’s food and breastfeeding

– Food and related policy (responses and interventions)

– Food and Public Health

We invite abstracts for oral papers lasting 20 minutes, with 10 minutes to follow for questions, and for posters. As in previous years a prize will be awarded for the poster which delegates agree best communicates its aims, methods, findings and conclusions.

We also invite abstracts for symposia with a maximum of three connected papers of relevance to the conference theme.

Acknowledging the methodological diversity of delegates’ research, we also invite the submission of original fieldwork photographs which reflect a research project. These should be submitted with captions of no more than 30 words.

Abstract Submission Deadline: Friday 14 March 2014

Online abstract submission at: http://portal.britsoc.co.uk/public/abstract/eventAbstract.aspx?id=EVT10331

Please direct any academic enquiries to the Food Study Group co-convenors:

Hannah Lambie-Mumford: h.lambie-mumford@sheffield.ac.uk

Rebecca O’Connell: r.oconnell@ioe.ac.uk

Andrea Tonner: a.tonner@strath.ac.uk

For administrative issues please contact the BSA Events Team: events@britsoc.org.uk

 

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: http://wordpress.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The New Left Book Club: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/the-new-left-book-club-call-for-papers/

Harvesting

Harvesting

POLITICAL ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY

CALL FOR PAPERS: Political Ecology and Environmental Sociology: Towards Productive Engagement or Sustaining the Contract of Mutual Indifference?

DIMENSIONS OF POLITICAL ECOLOGY, CONFERENCE ON NATURE/SOCIETY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY February 27 – March 1, 2014 University of Kentucky Lexington, Kentucky, USA

Alan Rudy, Damian White, Christopher Oliver and Brian Gareau

The political ecologist Piers Blackie has observed in a stock-taking of political ecology that “a review of Environmental Sociology, a textbook by Hannigan, finds no mention of Political Ecology and yet most of its contents might well be claimed as Political Ecology” (Blackie, 2008: 772). One could similarly work through many political ecology textbooks and find little or no discussion of environmental sociology. Given the ritualistic appeals to “inter-disciplinarity” in the environmental social sciences, how can we account for the extra-ordinary disengagement between political ecology and environmental sociology? How can these seemingly overlapping and aligned sub-disciplines largely ignore each other? Why has political ecology taken socio-natural hybridity, post-human ethics and non-equilibrium ecologies so much more seriously than US environmental sociology has? Why is it that understandings of the relationship between capital and ecology are widely divergent between environmental sociologists and political ecologists? Are both fields increasingly disabled by their dis-engagement with each other?

Attempting to do justice to the diverse amalgam of movements, institutions and disciplines that have contributed to the many methods and foci involved, this panel will explore this strange contract of mutual indifference from a number of perspectives, e.g.

1.    Northern attitude and policy research relative to Southern development and ethnographic studies;

2.    Durkheimian empiricist, realist Marxist and neo-Malthusian approaches contrasted with relational Marxist, materialist feminist and post structuralist currents;

3.    Critical takes on risk society and the democratization of the state versus bureaucratic management derived from risk science-based policy;

4.     Local and lay knowledge leading in directions quite different than those of green neoliberalism;

5.    The primary roots of US environmental sociology in rural sociology versus political ecology’s founding of political ecology in European development geography.

The panel will consist of a series of short pieces (3000 words) en route to an open discussion. The aims of the panel will be to gain great understanding of the blockages that prevent broader engagements between political ecology and environmental sociology. It will also consider how we might imagine more productive relations between political ecology and environmental sociology.

Please submit proposed title and abstract to Alan Rudy alan.rudy@gmail.com Damian White dwhite01@risd.edu, Chris Oliver christopheroliver@uky.edu and Brian Gareau bgareau@gmail.com by December 1st 2013

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Work

Work

WORK, EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY – ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL ISSUE

The BSA journal Work, Employment and Society has just published an Anniversary Special Issue in honour of 25 years of publishing. 

It is freely available to all readers until 31 July 2013:  http://wes.sagepub.com/content/current

 

The issue features articles from the following leaders in the field:

Reflections on work and employment into the 21st century: between equal rights, force decides, by Mark Stuart, Irena Grugulis, Jennifer Tomlinson, Chris Forde and Robert MacKenzie

Unsustainable employment portfolios, by John Buchanan, Gary Dymski, Julie Froud, Sukhdev Johal, Adam Leaver and Karel Williams

Women and recession revisited, by Jill Rubery and Anthony Rafferty

The nature of front-line service work: distinctive features and continuity in the employment relationship, by Jacques Bélanger and Paul Edwards

Postfordism as a dysfunctional accumulation regime: a comparative analysis of the USA, the UK and Germany, by Matt Vidal

Financialization and the workplace: extending and applying the disconnected capitalism thesis, by Paul Thompson

Finance versus Democracy? Theorizing finance in society, by Sylvia Walby

Work, employment and society through the lens of moral economy, by Sharon C Bolton and Knut Laaser

Ethnographic fallacies: reflections on labour studies in the era of market fundamentalism, by Michael Burawoy

Review of Scott Lash & John Urry The End of Organized Capitalism. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1987, £18.00 pbk, (ISBN: 9780745600697), 248pp, Gibson Burrell, Miguel Lucio Martinez, Ian Greer Response to reviews, Scott Lash and John Urry

25 Favourite WES Articles chosen by WES readers, editors and authors

In October 2012, WES held a successful one-day conference exploring key themes for work and employment in honour of 25 years of publishing. Along with the special issue, we are happy to bring you the video from this event.  If you were not able to join us in October or would like to view the presentations again, you can access the videos here: http://wes.sagepub.com/site//video/25th.xhtml

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/work-employment-and-society-special-issue-free-until-31-july

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Education, Democracy and Development

Education, Democracy and Development

POLITICS, AGONISM AND DELIBERATION: THE PLACE OF CONFLICT AND CONSENSUS IN CONTEMPORARY DEMOCRACIES

Call for Papers

XI Conference Asociación Española de Ciencia Política

Universidad Pablo de Olavide de Sevilla

September 18-20, 2013

Workshop 1.7: Politics, Agonism and Deliberation: The Place of Conflict and Consensus in Contemporary Democracies

Convenor: Javier Franzé (ComplutenseUniversity of Madrid)
Discussant: Máriam Martínez Ramírez (AutónomaUniversity of Madrid)

 

Contemporary political theory praises liberal democracy both in its descriptive and normative sides. There is widespread consensus around the idea that context has totally transformed the place for democracy, but not its conclusions. We are likely to differentiate between two normative models of democracy, namely, either a liberal or enlightened one –Habermas, Rawls- or a postliberal one, being that critical to Enlightenment tenets – Mouffe, Rancière-. The former considers that the core liberal values are still valid, in concrete concerning the possibility to resolve political conflicts in a dialogical way, although an adjustment to new contexts is much needed. The latter rejects such arguments, in that they are meant to be good for democracy because it entails a conflict and struggle for incommensurables values.

This workshop aims at clarifying the conceptual map and the various categories of each of the models to examine their contributions and limits. It welcomes papers analyzing concrete cases, in an attempt to test the explicative capacity of both paradigms. Some of the inquiries this workshop poses are the following: It there any rationality permitting to overcome political differences or, otherwise, particularity is irreductable and universality means depolitization? Is language a communicative means or it is rather the only way actors have to build the world performatively? Is consensus the result of dialogical rationality or it is otherwise the consequence of certain struggle for values?

Paper proposals: http://aecpa.es/usuarios/usuario/cuenta/congress/papers/insert.php

Deadline: March 20

Further information: http://www.aecpa.es/presentacion/pages.41/

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Books

Books

NEW TITLES FROM HAYMARKET BOOKS AND CRITICAL SOCIOLOGY

 

Haymarket Books is proud to announce the publication of the five latest titles in the Studies in Critical Social Science Book Series:
Labor Regime Changes in the Twenty-First Century by Tom Brass
The Age of Knowledge by James Dziash and Henry Etzkowitz
Neoliberalism and National Culture by Cory Blad
The Cuban Revolution as Socialist Human Development by Henry Veltmeyer and Mark Rushton
The Entropy of Capitalism by Robert Biel

 This peer-reviewed book series, through the publication of original manuscripts and edited volumes, offers insights into the reality of 21st century Neoliberalism by exploring the content and consequences of power relationships under capitalism, by considering the spaces of opposition and resistance to these changes, and by articulating capitalism with other systems of power and domination—for example race, gender, culture—that have been defining our new age. For a full list of titles in the series visit www.haymarketbooks.org/category/scss-series 

For review, desk copies, or to request examination copies, contact John McDonald, john@haymarketbooks.org, 773-583-7884, www.haymarketbooks.org

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LABOR REGIME CHANGES IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

Unfreedom, Capitalism, and Primitive Accumulation

BY Tom Brass

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“Tom Brass, one of the United Kingdom’s leading Marxist scholars has written a brilliant, theoretically informed, comprehensive critique of past and present, Marxist and non-Marxist writers of capitalist labor regimes and puts forth an alternative theoretical-conceptual framework”

— James Petras, Science and Society

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This volume assesses the validity, through current economic developments, of different historical interpretations linking capitalism, unfreedom, and primitive accumulation. Conventional wisdom holds that Marxism takes its lead from Smith and others in viewing capitalism as based on free labor. Challenging this, it is argued that Marxism fully accepts the need, in certain contexts, for capital to exploit unfree labor.

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Released January 2013
Trade Paper $28.00 | 314 pages | ISBN: 9781608462407 
Click to buy and for more details: http://goo.gl/9wU5E

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THE AGE OF KNOWLEDGE

The Dynamics of Universities, Knowledge, and Society

BY James Dziash and Henry Etzkowitz

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This title emphasizes that the ongoing transformations of knowledge, both within universities and for society more generally, must be understood as a reflection of the larger changes in the constitutive social structures within which they are invariably produced, translated and reproduced. As the development of knowledge continues to be implicated in the habitual practices of the human social enterprise, visualizing these alterations requires the consideration of the social and materialistic contexts informing these transformations. This is necessary because the process of globalization has not only created new challenges for societies but has also unleashed a new political economy of knowledge within which different institutions mus re-affirm their identity and place.

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Released January 2013
Trade Paper $28.00 | 342 pages | ISBN: 9781608462414
Click to buy and for more details: http://goo.gl/1H9un

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NEOLIBERALISM AND NATIONAL CULTURE

State-Building and Legitimacy in Canada and Québec

BY Cory Blad

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This book argues that despite popular claims to the contrary, global capitalism requires state institutional authority, but the legitimation of this authority is incrasingly tied to cultural rather than economic means. Canada and Québec are presented as examples of how neoliberal states achieve integration wile relying on cultural legitimation to maintain social policies that mitigate social changes.

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Released January 2013
Trade Paper $28.00 | 270 pages | ISBN: 9781608462438 
Click to buy and for more details: http://goo.gl/cc1p4

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THE CUBAN REVOLUTION AS SOCIALIST HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

BY Henry Veltmeyer and Mark Rushton

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This re-reading of the Cuban Revolution from the perspective of socialist-humanism engages unresolved issues in the notion of human development popularized by the United Nations Development Programme. UNDP and other agencies of international cooperation for devleopment give a human face to ta capitalist development process that is anything but humane. This titles argues that understanding Cuba provides an alternative model.

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Released January 2013
Trade Paper $28.00 | 368 pages | ISBN: 9781608462445 
Click to buy and for more details: http://goo.gl/qDp6X


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THE ENTROPY OF CAPITALISM

BY Robert Biel

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Drawing on his experience in international systems and low-input agriculture, Biel explores the interactions of social and physical systems. In the process revealing the early twenty-first century as a period when capitalism starts parasiting on the chaos it itself creates, notably in the link between the two sides of imperialism: militarism (the ‘war on terror’) and speculative fiance capital.

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Released January 2013
Trade Paper $28.00 | 390 pages | ISBN: 9781608462421 
Click to buy and for more details: http://goo.gl/fKFr7

HaymarketBooks 

BOOKS FOR CHANGING THE WORLD

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-titles-from-haymarket-books-and-critical-sociology

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Paula Allman

Paula Allman

THE PEDAGOGY OF THE OPEN SOCIETY

The Pedagogy of the Open Society: Knowledge and the Governance of Higher Education

2012 – 142 pages

Michael A. Peters (University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand), Tze-Chang Liu (Graduate Institute of Education, Tunghai University, Taiwan) and David Ondercin (University of Illinois, Champaign, USA).

Sense Publishers

ISBN Paperback: 9789460919657 ($ 19.00)
ISBN Hardcover: 9789460919664 ($ 99.00)

Social processes and policies that foster openness as an overriding value as evidenced in the growth of open source, open access and open education and their convergences that characterize global knowledge communities that transcend borders of the nation-state. Openness seems also to suggest political transparency and the norms of open inquiry, indeed, even democracy itself as both the basis of the logic of inquiry and the dissemination of its results. Openness is a value and philosophy that also offers us a means for transforming our institutions and our practices. This book examines the interface between learning, pedagogy and economy in terms of the potential of open institutions to transform and revitalize education in the name of the public good.

For more on this book and how to order, see: https://www.sensepublishers.com/catalogs/bookseries/open-education/the-pedagogy-of-the-open-society/

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Capitalism

THE ELLEN MEIKSINS WOOD READER

Now Out! The Ellen Meiksins Wood Reader 

http://www.brill.com/ellen-meiksins-wood-reader

Edited by Larry Patriquin, NipissingUniversity

 

Volume: 40

Series: Historical Materialism Book Series

ISSN: 

1570-152

ISBN: 9789004230088

Publication Year: 2012

Edition info:  1

Version: Hardback

Publication Type: Book

Pages, Illustrations: xiii, 335 pp.

Imprint: BRILL

Language: English

Ellen Meiksins Wood is a leading contemporary political theorist who has elaborated an innovative approach to the history of political thought, the ‘social history of political theory’. She has been described as the founder, together with the historian Robert Brenner, of ‘Political Marxism’, a distinct version of historical materialism which has inspired a research program that spans a number of academic disciplines. Organized thematically, this Reader brings together selections from Wood’s groundbreaking scholarship, published over three decades, providing an overview of her original interpretations of capitalism, precapitalist societies, the state, political theory, democracy, citizenship, liberalism, civil society, the Enlightenment, globalization, imperialism, and socialism

Readership

All those interested in the history and theories of capitalism, socialism, imperialism, Marxism, liberalism, social classes, democracy, civil society, and citizenship.

 

Table of Contents

Preface

Acknowledgements

Introduction: The ‘Method’ of Ellen Meiksins Wood

1. Capitalism
The ‘economic’ and the ‘political’ in capitalism
Class-power and state-power
Feudalism and private property
Capitalism as the privatisation of political power
The localisation of class-struggle
England vs. the dominant model of capitalism
The bourgeois paradigm
Begging the question
Opportunity or imperative?
The commercialisation-model
Marx on the transition
Towns and trade
Agrarian capitalism
Market-dependent producers
A different kind of market-dependence?
Competitive markets

2. Precapitalist Societies
Class and state in China and Rome
Rome and the empire of private property
The city-states of Florence and Venice
Master and slave vs. landlord and peasant
Free producers and slaves
Slavery and the ‘decline’ of the Roman Empire
The ‘logic’ of slavery vs. the logic of capitalism
The ‘slave-mode of production’
Agricultural slavery and the peasant-citizen
The nexus of freedom and slavery in democratic Athens

3. The State in Historical Perspective
Class and state in ancient society
The emergence of the polis in ancient Athens
The ‘essence’ of the polis
Class in the democratic polis
Village and state, town and country, in democratic Athens
The rise and fall of Rome
The culture of property: the Roman law
From imperial Rome to ‘feudalism’
Absolutism and the modern state
The idea of the state
The peculiarities of the English state
Contrasting states: France vs. England

4. Social and Political Thought
The social history of political theory
Political theory in history: an overview
Plato
The Greek concept of freedom
Jean-Jacques Rousseau
John Locke
Revolution and tradition, c. 1640–1790

5. Democracy, Citizenship, Liberalism, and Civil Society
Labour and democracy, ancient and modern
From ancient to modern conceptions of citizenship
Capitalism and democratic citizenship
The American redefinition of democracy
A democracy devoid of social content
From democracy to liberalism
Capitalism and ‘liberal democracy’
Liberal democracy and capitalist hegemony
The idea of ‘civil society’
The civil-society argument
‘Civil society’ and the devaluation of democracy

6. The Enlightenment, Postmodernism, and the Post-‘New Left’
Modernity vs. capitalism: France vs. England
From modernity to postmodernity
Modernity and the non-history of capitalism
Themes of the postmodern left
Enlightenment vs. capitalism: Condorcet vs. Locke
Enlightenment-universalism
The periodisation of the Western left
Left-intellectuals and contemporary capitalism

7. Globalisation and Imperialism
Globalisation and the nation-state
Nation-states, classes, and universal capitalism
The indispensable state
Precapitalist imperialism
The classic age of imperialism
Globalisation and war
Globalisation and imperial hegemony
The contradictions of capitalist imperialism

8. Socialism
The end of the welfare-state ‘compact’
There are no social democrats now
Market-dependence vs. market-enablement
Left-strategies of market-enablement
The political implications of competition
The working class and the struggle for socialism
Class-conflict and the socialist project
Socialism and democracy
The state in classless societies
Liberalism vs. democracy
‘Universal human goods’
The self-emancipation of the working class
The socialist movement
Democracy as an economic mechanism

Bibliography of Works by Ellen Meiksins Wood, 1970–2012

References
Index

Originally published in: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/now-out-the-ellen-meiksins-wood-reader

**END**

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Karl Marx

RETHINKING MARXISM 2013

CALL FOR PAPERS

Rethinking Marxism 2013: Surplus, Solidarity, Sufficiency

RETHINKING MARXISM: a journal of economics, culture & society is pleased to announce its 8th international conference, to be held at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst on 19-22 September 2013.

RETHINKING MARXISM’s seven previous international conferences have each attracted more than 1000 students, scholars, and activists. They have included keynote addresses and plenary sessions, formal papers, roundtables, workshops, art exhibitions, screenings, performances, and activist discussions.

Among the confirmed keynote events for Rethinking Marxism 2013: SURPLUS, SOLIDARITY, SUFFICIENCY are Katherine Gibson giving the inaugural Julie Graham Memorial Lecture, a series of panels engaging with and celebrating the different aspects of the work of Steve Resnick and Richard Wolff and an installation of the late artist Susan Kleckner’s work at Greenham Common Women’s Peace Camp, along with a series of conversations and film screening organized by Susan Jahoda and Jesal Kapadia.

In 2013, 5 years into the greatest economic and social depression since the Great Depression, and 4 years after the last international conference convened, we want to invite participants to explore and interrogate three keywords: SURPLUS, SOLIDARITY and SUFFICIENCY. We find these keywords to be particularly useful in critically engaging with our historical conjuncture from different perspectives. Needless to say, fellow participants who would like to bring in other concerns, other concepts, other debates and engagements into the mix should definitely feel free to do so. Our international conferences have always functioned as pluralistic and open platforms that represent the vast richness of the Marxian tradition. When we propose these keywords, we only intend them as possible provocations for scrutiny and invitations for engagement.

The keyword SURPLUS, as in surplus labor (whether it takes the capitalist value-form or the various non-capitalist forms in our contemporary economies) and surplus laborers (especially with skyrocketing unemployment), enables us to approach the causes, consequences and solutions to the current economic crisis by deploying Marxian vocabularies and frameworks. The keyword SOLIDARITY, on the other hand, makes possible reflections on how to do things differently—together, collectively, communally, whether it is the organization of a democratically run workplace, a journal, a conference, a neighborhood association, a political party, a social movement, an international solidarity effort, or a revolutionary insurgence. And finally, the keyword SUFFICIENCY opens to investigation the bipolar convulsions of growth (fetishism) and austerity, various logics of invidious (over-)consumption, and the ecological and social destruction unleashed by the acephalous and endless movement of the circuits of capital.

Rather than uncritically endorsing these keywords, we would like them to be both utilized and rethought in investigating the current economic and ecological crises and articulating new revolutionary imaginaries and vocabularies that will enable the work of enacting communism here and now.

For more information on the proposed theme, visit: http://www.rethinkingmarxism.org/sss

We encourage, however, scholars and students in all disciplines, activists and artists working in areas that intersect with Marxism to submit proposals on themes other than those proposed above. Participants can present in areas such as critical race theory, feminism, political economy, anarchist studies, cultural and literary studies, art and art criticism, literature and literary studies, queer theory, working-class and labor studies, postcolonial studies, geography and urban studies, psychoanalysis, social and natural sciences, philosophy, history, and around issues of class, race, ethnicity, nationality, gender, sexuality, and disability. Historical analyses are especially welcome.

In addition to three plenary sessions, an art installation and screenings, there will be concurrent panels, workshops, and cultural events. We invite the submission of organized sessions that follow traditional or non-traditional formats (such as workshops, roundtables, and dialogue among and between presenters and audience) as well as individual presentations. Anyone engaging with Marxism in any discipline or form of activism is encouraged to submit paper and panel proposals. We also welcome video, poetry, performance, and all other modes of presentation and cultural expression.

SUBMISSION OF PROPOSALS

Proposals for papers, films, or other formats should include:
* Paper title
* Presenter’s name and contact information (mail, email, phone, affiliations)
* Brief abstract (no more than 200 words)
* Technology/spacial requirements for the presentation

Proposals for panels should include:
* Panel title
* Name, contact information, and paper title for each presenter
* Brief abstract (no more than 200 words) explaining the panel’s focus
* Brief abstract for each paper (no more than 200 words)
* Names and contact information for any discussant(s) or respondent(s)
* Technology required by the presenters
* Title, contact, and address for any sponsoring organization or journal

If your paper or panel proposal is intended for the track on the work of Steve Resnick and Rick Wolff, please indicate this in your submission.

The appropriate preregistration fee must be paid with all proposal submissions. Unfortunately, any proposal not accompanied by the appropriate preregistration fee cannot be considered. Proposals that are not accepted will have their preregistration fees returned in full. If you are submitting a proposal for an entire panel, please make sure the preregistration fee for all members of the panel is paid.

The deadline for proposal submission is July 1, 2013.

Submissions should be sent to Vincent Lyon-Callo at Vincent.lyon-callo@wmich.edu.

To submit a proposal and to pay the preregistration fee, follow the instructions on the conference website: http://www.rethinkingmarxism.org/RM2013

REGISTRATION RATES

______ Regular Rate $125

______ Low-Income Rate $60

PUBLICATIONS

Selected papers, poems, art, and other forms of presentation from the conference may be published in RETHINKING MARXISM and/or in separate edited volumes of contributions.

VENDORS AND ADVERTISEMENTS

Literature tables and display areas are available to groups, vendors, and publishers at reasonable rates. Ad space in the conference program is also available at reasonable rates. All ads must be camera-ready.

ORGANIZERS & SPONSORS

This conference is organized by a committee composed of the members of Association for Economic and Social Analysis and the editorial board of Rethinking Marxism and sponsored by Association for Economic and Social Analysis (AESA) and Rethinking Marxism.

For more information, visit the conference website: http://www.rethinkingmarxism.org/RM2013

All inquiries concerning the conference can be addressed to Vincent Lyon-Callo at Vincent.lyon-callo@wmich.edu.

 

Originally published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-rethinking-marxism-2013-surplus-solidarity-sufficiency-amherst-ma-19-22-sept-2013

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

 

 

Sociology

WORK, EMPLOYMENT & SOCIETY DAY CONFERENCE

Monday 22 October 2012

Venue and Host: British Library Conference Centre, London

This year, WES celebrates 25 years of publishing the best of the sociology of work and employment.  This conference reflects on key debates and looks forward to what the future might hold for the discipline and the journal. 

We warmly invite you to join us at our 25th Anniversary Event.

The event programme includes:

  • A welcome to the conference from WES Co-Editor, Irena Grugulis
  • A welcome to the British Library by Jude England, Head of Social Sciences
  • Catherine Hakim, Centre for Policy Studies, London
  • Richard Hyman, London School of Economics
  • Arne Kalleberg, University of North Carolina
  • Linda McDowell, University of Oxford
  • Ruth Milkman, City University of New York
  • Philip Taylor, University of Strathclyde
  • Karel Williams, ManchesterBusinessSchool

 

Registration

BSA Member: £95               

Non-Member: £125

BSA Concessionary Member: £45  

Non-Member Concession (Unwaged and Postgraduate Students): £60

 

Places for this event are allocated on a first come, first served basis. Lunch and refreshments are included. 

 

Visit www.britsoc.co.uk/events/wes-conference-2012 to register and for further event details.

Join the BSA: www.britsoc.co.uk/join

Enquiries to: events@britsoc.org.uk

 

Kind regards,

BSA Events Team

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Work

WORKING USA: THE JOURNAL OF LABOR AND SOCIETY (June 2012)

Working USA: The Journal of Labor and Society

June 2012

Volume 15, Issue 2

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/wusa.2012.15.issue-2/issuetoc

The Changing Shape of Unions and Working Class Organizations: Lessons from North America and Europe (pages 149–151)

Immanuel Ness

ROBERT J. ALEXANDER’S U.S. LEFT-WING INTERVIEW COLLECTION AND ARCHAEOLOGY OF DISSIDENT COMMUNISM (pages 153–175)

Victor G. Devinatz

A RENEGADE UNION: ORGANIZING IN THE SERVICE AND DISTRIBUTIVE INDUSTRIES, SOME LESSONS FROM THE PAST (pages 177–195)

Lisa Phillips

THE CHICAGO COURIERS UNION, 2003–2010: A CASE STUDY IN SOLIDARITY UNIONISM (pages 197–215)

Colin Bossen

WHY WE NEED A SURVEY OF UNIONS (pages 217–232)

Jack Fiorito and Gregor Gall

GERMANY AND IRELAND UNEMPLOYMENT COMPARED, OR WHY GERMANY PROFITED FROM THE WORLD ECONOMIC CRISIS (pages 233–265)

Ralf Jeremias

LABOR UNIONS IN CONTEMPORARY RUSSIA: AN ASSESSMENT OF CONTRASTING FORMS OF ORGANIZATION AND REPRESENTATION (pages 267–283)

Irina Olimpieva

JUDGING WORK: WHAT LAW SEES OR DOES NOT SEE (pages 285–296)

Ellen Dannin

Commentary and Review Essays

WHO IS THE UNION? TWO STUDIES IN LABOR PATRIOTISM AND SHOP-FLOOR DISSENT (pages 297–303)

Steve Early

“THE SKY IS FALLING!” (pages 305–308)

Steve Leberstein

Book Reviews

Wisconsin Uprising: Labor Fights Back – Edited by Michael D. Yates (pages 309–313)

Fernando Gapasin

With God on Our Side: The Struggle for Workers Rights in a Catholic Hospital – By Adam D. Reich (pages 313–315)

Samantha Winslow

Play, Creativity and Social Movements – By Benjamin Shepard (pages 315–318)

Heather Gautney

Policing Sexuality: Sex, Society and the State – By Julian C. H. Lee (pages 319–320)

Harri Sutherland-Kay

Power, Freedom, Compassion: Transformations for a Better World – By Richard Winter (pages 320–322)

John Green

Originally published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/announcing-summer-2012-issue-of-wusa-the-journal-of-labor-and-society  

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski