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No Future

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 20th FEBRUARY 2011

EVENTS

MEDITATION FOR SOCIAL ACTIVISTS

February 25, 2011
1:00pm – 3:30pm
OISE/Centre for Women’s Studies in Education
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto (St. George subway stn.)

We can do more for the world when we are tending to our own wellbeing. Meditation can help to ground, centre, and rejuvenate you. In this workshop you will learn to meditate and will be empowered with tools to bring meditation into your daily life on an on-going basis. Hosted by Centre for Women’s Studies in Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto.

For more info, email: cwse@utoronto.ca

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SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE (OISE/UT) FEBRUARY LUNCHBOX SPEAKERS’ SERIES

“Community Foundations”

With Rosalyn Morrison – Community Initiatives, Toronto Community Foundation, and Betsy Martin – Community Foundations Canada

Wednesday, February 23, 2011
Noon – 1:30 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto
Room 12-199

Rosalyn Morrison will talk about how the Toronto Community Foundation mobilizes more than 300 individual and family donors, high-impact community organizations and cross-sector leaders to tackle complex, quality of life issues in creative and inspiring ways.

Betsy Martin will discuss how foundations in Canada can support social enterprise and how this is part of the evolution of the investment model of foundations around the world. She will give examples of what community foundations in Canada and the United States are doing, to give a sense of the potential for this kind of community foundation investing.

Moderator: Michael Hall, Primus

Bring your lunch and a mug.  Water, coffee and tea will be provided.

For more information, please contact: Lisa White: secspeakerseries@gmail.com This event will also be webcast live on the Internet.  Please see our website for detailed instructions: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO 2011 RESEARCH & POLICY ROUNDTABLE: WHO’S IN CHARGE?

Please join us for our Research & Policy Roundtable being held on February 24th, 2011. The theme of the 2011 roundtable is “Who’s in Charge? The impact of agencies, boards & commissions on public accountability & service delivery”.

Since the late 1970s, a transformative shift has taken place in how governments manage and administer public services in many democratic countries around the world. Influenced by neo-liberal ideologies, governments have been increasingly under pressure to reduce their size and control over public services. Governments were declared “too big” and “too bureaucratic” to be able to properly and promptly deliver services transparently and flexibly. Governments were encouraged to incorporate private sector management models to enhance efficiency and effectiveness of services and service-delivery. One central feature of this new model has been the creation of hundreds of decentralized and quasi-autonomous government agencies, boards and commissions (ABCs) to manage and administer public services. According to the Ontario Public Appointments Secretariat, there are approximately 630 of these agencies, boards and commissions operating in the province.

For more info: http://bit.ly/eJQeQv

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GIANT STEPS: RADICAL WOMEN IN THE BLACK FREEDOM STRUGGLE

A talk by Komozi Woodard, Esther Raushenbush Chair, Sarah Lawrence College
Author: Want to Start a Revolution?

7:00pm, Tuesday March 1, 2011
Ryerson University, Ted Rogers School, TRS 2109
55 Dundas Street West, Toronto

Sponsored by Socialist Project, Centre for Social Justice, New Socialists, No One Is Illegal – Toronto.

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CELEBRATE PEOPLE’S HISTORY AT TORONTO FREE GALLERY

Feb. 10 – March 19, 2011
Toronto Free Gallery
1277 Bloor Street West
Toronto
Free Admission

Hours of Operation: Wednesday-Friday 12-5pm, Saturday 12-6pm

Toronto Free Gallery and Groundswell present Celebrate People’s History!, a show of poster art created by over ninety artists – including many of Toronto’s own – to document the hidden history of social justice movements.

The posters make up a hidden history of people’s struggles, covering well known events and praising groups and leaders of prominence, but also bringing to light less known struggles. The set includes tributes to the AIDS activist group ACT UP, the 1969 Stonewall rebellion, the 1921 Appalachian miners strike at Blair Mountain, UFW co-founder Dolores Huerta, the anti-eviction battle at San Francisco’s International Hotel, the 1988 democratic uprising in Burma, the women leaders of Oaxaca’s 2006 civil uprising, the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, the 1804 Haitian Revolution, singer Paul Robeson, and heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali.

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NEWS & VIEWS

VANCOUVER MAYOR FINDS NEW RESPECT FOR SANITATION WORKERS WHEN HE WALKS A DAY IN THEIR SHOES

Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson found out what it’s like to work collecting and sorting garbage in Vancouver when he appeared on a recent episode of CBC series Make the Politician Work.

During the two days Robertson spent as a city sanitation worker he tried a number of jobs normally done by front line staff who are members of CUPE.

“What really struck me was how much people care about their work at the city, how concerned they are about the future and doing better and better. That’s great value for us at the city and it’s great value for taxpayers too,” said Robertson.

The episode aired on Feb. 13 and you can watch it here on the CBC website: http://www.cbc.ca/video/#/Shows/Make_the_Politician_Work/1747857163/ID=1795295084

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2010-2011 MIGRANT FARM WORKERS REPORT PUBLISHED

Report finds federal government complicit in Canada’s abuse of migrant farm workers

Canada’s most comprehensive annual report on the challenges facing migrant farm workers has been released. It confirms that abuse and exploitation of migrant farm workers are rampant in Canada’s agriculture industry. The 2010-2011 Status of Migrant Farm Workers in Canada report is published by UFCW Canada and the Agriculture Workers Alliance (AWA). For more than two decades UFCW Canada has been a leading advocate for farm workers’ rights, and in association with the AWA operates 10 agriculture worker support centres across Canada.  The latest report is the seventh released since 2003. The 25-page report exposes federally operated migrant farm worker programs as rife with human and labour rights violations — and those programs are expanding with the assistance of the Harper Conservative government.

Read more (.pdf): http://www.ufcw.ca/templates/ufcwcanada/images/awa/publications/UFCW-Status_of_MF_Workers_2010-2011_EN.pdf

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A NEW AMERICAN WORKERS MOVEMENT HAS BEGUN

By Dan La Botz, Solidarity

Thousands of workers demonstrated at the state capital in Madison, Wisconsin on Feb. 15 and 16 to protest plans by that state’s Republican Governor Scott Walker to take away the state workers’ union rights. Walker, cleverly attempted to divide the public workers by excluding police and firefighters from his anti-union law, and the media have worked to divide public employees against private sector workers. Yet, both firemen and private sector workers showed up at the statehouse to join public workers of all sorts in what has been one of the largest workers demonstrations in the United States in decades.

Read more: http://www.solidarity-us.org/current/node/3159

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WI GOVERNOR’S FAKE BUDGET CRISIS: GAVE TAX BREAKS TO WAL-MART TO FURTHER REAL AGENDA – UNION BUSTING

(Alternet)

There is no fiscal crisis in Wisconsin. Governor Walker reports a nearly 130 million dollar deficit, but doesn’t report that he caused it by giving a 140 million dollar tax break to large multinational corporations here in Wisconsin (e.g. WalMart). However, this cover story gives him an excuse to do the unthinkable.

Read more: http://act.alternet.org/go/4579?akid=6540.141253.1Sy7fn&t=39

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THE EGYPTIAN UPRISING AND WORKERS’ GRIEVANCES

By Nada Matta, The Bullet

It is too early to give an explanation for the Egyptian revolt. Much still needs to be understood about the character and the driving forces behind this sustained mass mobilization, as well as its dynamic and development. Some initial thoughts could still be entertained, however, especially with regards to the nature of the protestors’ demands. Though the revolt was caused by increasing economic hardship and insecurity, as well as by mounting political repression and authoritarianism, the demands of its youth organizers were solely focused on political democracy.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/465.php

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WORKERS BAND TOGETHER AS UNIONS ARE LEFT BEHIND

The AFL-CIO spent over $50 million worth of its members’ dues and deployed 250,000 workers to support Obama’s campaign. But three years later, workers say unions have failed to deliver on their promises and are struggling to defend their rights.

Raquel Rojas isn’t exactly union material – an immigrant, a seasonal worker, scraping by on multiple part-time, low-wage jobs. So when Raquel said she watched her managers at the Cheesecake Factory in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor disrespect workers and sexually harass their employees, she had little recourse – until United Workers knocked on her door.

Read more: http://rt.com/usa/news/usa-workers-unite-unions/

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VIDEO: BRENDA STOKELY – “A MOVEMENT TO CHANGE THE WORLD”

Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly Labour Conference: Building the Working Class Movement
Keynote speaker: Brenda Stokely

Toronto, January 30, 2011

“A Movement To Change the World”

Moderated by Kelly O’Sullivan

Brenda Stokely is a human rights activist dedicated to ending all forms of national oppression, racism, sexism and exploitation of workers. She co-found and built several key organizations, including the 2004 Million Worker March Movement, NY Labor Against the War (co-convener), founding member of Troops Out Now, Coalition to Save Harlem and many more.

Watch the video: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/ls91.php

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 27th MARCH 2010

NEWS & VIEWS

2010 FEDERAL BUDGET QUIZ – CANADIAN CENTRE FOR POLICY ALTERNATIVES

How much do you know about the 2010 Federal Budget and the state of Canada’s finances? Take this quiz written by the CCPA’s Senior Economist Armine Yalnizyan and Alternative Federal Budget Coordinator David Macdonald: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/multimedia/test-quiz

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FAST-TRACKING CANADA-COLOMBIA FREE TRADE AGREEMENT A BETRAYAL OF COMMITMENTS – CANADIAN LABOUR CONGRESS

The Canada-Colombia Free Trade Agreement appears to be moving toward reality in this session of Parliament unless Canadians speak out loudly and contact their Member of Parliament.

Read more: http://bit.ly/c0SHpM

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DRIVING THE POOR DEEPER INTO POVERTY – THE BULLET

Social assistance rates in Ontario today have a spending power that is a full 55% below what it was in the early 1990s. A single person on Ontario Works (OW) would need to get an increase of $300 a month to be back at 1993 levels…Food bank use is setting new records and far more people are experiencing economic evictions than during the days of Mike Harris. For the poor, the Common Sense Revolution of Harris has not ended or simply been consolidated. Dalton McGuinty has intensified it.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/329.php

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WHY UNIONS STILL MATTER – MONTHLY REVIEW

Michael D. Yates is Associate Editor of Monthly Review. His many publications include Cheap Motels and a Hotplate: An Economist’s Travelogue (2007), Naming the System: Inequality and Work in the Global Economy (2003), and Why Unions Matter (2009), all published by Monthly Review Press.

Read more: http://www.monthlyreview.org/090209yates.php

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WHAT PROGRESSIVES MUST LEARN FROM THE ACORN DEBACLE – COLORLINES

If we do our work well, we should expect similar attacks and know that long track records won’t protect us.

Read more: http://www.colorlines.com/article.php?ID=698&p=1

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SLAUGHTERHOUSE ’10: THE GUTTING OF STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT – THE HUFFINGTON POST

If we could just get over our blinding hatred of unions and public sector workers, we might see that we do in fact have the money we need to rebuild our infrastructure and create a new green economy.

Read more: http://huff.to/9s9wwm

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BUDGET WILL HIT LOW-WAGE WOMEN HARD – OPSEU

TORONTO, March 25 /CNW/ – Plans by the McGuinty government to freeze public-sector wages in Ontario will hit women workers the most, including many who already work in low-paid jobs, the president of the Ontario Public Service Employees Union says.

“The large majority of workers in the public sector are women, and scores of thousands of them work in service jobs at the low-end of the wage spectrum,” Warren (Smokey) Thomas said today after Finance Minister Dwight Duncan unveiled his 2010-11 Ontario budget.

Read more: http://bit.ly/bdCapF

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO, RESEARCH & POLICY FORUM – AUDIO CLIPS

Social Planning Toronto’s March 2009 Research & Policy Forum focused on issues relating to immigrant homeless and health & labour market outcomes for immigrants. Presenters include Dr. Stephen Hwang from St. Michael’s Hospital/ University of Toronto who presented findings from the report entitled “The Health of Homeless Immigrants” & Dr. John Shields from Ryerson University who presented findings from the latest publications released by the Toronto Immigrant Employment Data Initiative (TIEDI).

Listen to the clips here: http://bit.ly/aQHLLN

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CENTER FOR ECONOMIC AND POLICY RESEARCH (CEPR): UNIONIZATION SUBSTANTIALLY IMPROVES THE PAY AND BENEFITS OF IMMIGRANT WORKERS

A new report by the Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) documents a large wage and benefit advantage for immigrant workers in unions relative to their non-union counterparts.

The report, “Unions and Upward Mobility for Immigrant Workers,” found that unionized immigrant workers earned, on average, 17 percent more than their non-union peers. In addition, immigrant workers in unions were much more likely to have health insurance benefits and a pension plan.

Read more: http://www.commondreams.org/newswire/2010/03/25

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CALL FOR ABSTRACTS – ENHANCING LEARNING EXPERIENCES IN HIGHER EDUCATION: INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

December 2-3, 2010
Hong Kong

As an inaugural conference on teaching and learning in higher education hosted by the Centre for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning, HKU, the theme of the conference as suggested by its title is “Enhancing Learning Experiences in Higher Education”.  Submission of abstracts is invited which should embrace the conference theme and sub-themes of the following –

1. Transition and the first year experience
2. Literacy across the curriculum
3. Experiential learning and co-curricular
4. Outcomes-based approaches to student learning (OBASL)
5. Assessment and feedback
6. Diversity and multicultural experience
7. Enhancing learning through technology
8. Learning communities
9. Continuing education and professional development
10. Problem based learning (PBL)
11. Postgraduate student experiences
12. Generic skills in higher education

The deadline for abstract submission is on 31 May 2010.

For more information, visit: http://www.cetl.hku.hk/conference2010/

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MOVE TO CORPORATE UTILITY WOULD HURT PUBLIC INTEREST – PARKLAND INSTITUTE

The City of Winnipeg is currently poised to move forward with a plan which would severely hurt the interests of Winnipeggers, and potentially those of people in other communities, for the sake of making their bottom line look a little better.

Read more: http://bit.ly/9cx8bL

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OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 27th FEBRUARY 2010

EVENTS

HEALTH FOR ALL: FIXING A BROKEN HEALTHCARE SYSTEM FOR IMMIGRANTS AND REFUGEES, TORONTO

March 4th, 2010
6:30 PM
Bahen Centre, Room 1180
40 St. George Street

Speakers:
– Dr. Meb Rashid, Family Physician
– Jackie Esmonde, Immigration Lawyer
– Manavi Handa, Registered Midwife, WestEnd Midwifery Collective

The cost of healthcare has been established as a barrier for under and uninsured migrant communities in accessing healthcare for decades. Despite the talk, few affordable healthcare options have been made available to these communities.

In recent years, the midwifery model of care in Ontario has proved to be a cost effective, accessible option for uninsured populations in Ontario to access maternity care. Community Health Centres are another point of access to primary healthcare for underinsured populations in Ontario. Interdisciplinary staffing and coordination of care, with alternative payment structure arrangements from the Ministry of Health, seek to ensure that uninsured populations have access to primary care.  

This evening will look at the opportunities and barriers to ensuring health for all! The panelists will discuss the successes of these two models of care, and the victories won by various professionals and communities in providing healthcare for the uninsured.

For more information, please email healthforalltoronto@gmail.com

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO RESEARCH & POLICY FORUM

March 1st, 2010
9:00am-12:00pm
Social Planning Toronto
2 Carlton Suite, # 1001 (Carlton & Yonge)

Social Planning Toronto invites you to attend our March Research & Policy Forum. This month we will be looking at issues around immigrant homelessness and health & labour market outcomes for immigrants.

Presenters include:
– Dr. Stephen Hwang, St. Michael’s Hospital/ University of Toronto
– Dr. John Shields, Ryerson University/ Toronto Immigrant Employment Data Initiative (TIEDI)

A light breakfast will be provided

To register for this event, click here: http://socialplanningtoronto.org/social-planning-toronto-research-policy-forum-registration/

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RESOURCES FOR FEMINIST RESEARCH (RFR) BOOK SALE

March 8, 2010
Centre for Women’s Studies in Education
Rm. 2-227, OISE
252 Bloor St West, St. George Subway
Toronto,

Proceeds to RFR’s Legal Defense Fund (details at the sale)

For more info: Zoe Newman, email: znewman@yorku.ca

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THE CITY IS A SWEATSHOP

March 19-21
Toronto

No One Is Illegal-Toronto is organizing days of education, community building and idea sharing.

Look out for more details on the events coming soon: http://www.toronto.nooneisillegal.org/node/422

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THE POWER OF US: A CELEBRATION OF WOMEN

Monday, March 8, 2010
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.
Metro-Central YMCA
20 Grosvenor Street, Toronto
(East of Bay Street, north of College Street)

This year, on International Women’s Day, we’re celebrating: Women’s resilience and resistance. Women’s achievements and progress. Women’s voices and women’s spirit.

Join renowned youth activist Jessica Yee and celebrated Canadian artist and performer d’bi young for a special evening to celebrate International Women’s Day 2010.

Jessica Yee – youth activist indigenous hip-hop feminist, author of two books, founder and executive director of the Native Youth Sexual Network, recipient of the 2009 YWCA Young Woman of Distinction Award – and 24 years old.

d’bi young – musician, dub poet, actor, teacher and storyteller – and one of Canada’s most celebrated artists. She is currently playwright-in-residence at CanStage Theatre, author of two dub poetry collections and two plays, producer of five albums, and recipient of countless arts awards.

Tickets are $17.50 through UofTtix
416-978-8849
http://www.uofttix.ca/view.php?id=612

Tickets are also available at
Women’s College Hospital, Ankh Gift Shop for $15 (cash and pickup only).

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NEWS & VIEWS

NEW BOOK FROM THE CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK (CSEW)

“Challenging Transitions in Learning and Work: Reflections on Policy and Practice”

Edited by: Peter Sawchuk, University of Toronto, Canada and Alison Taylor, University of Alberta, Canada

In the past two decades, advanced capitalist countries have seen sustained growth in labour market participation along with a growth in the number of jobs workers tend to have in their working lives. Over a slightly longer period we also see that participation in both formal educational attainment and a range of non-compulsory learning/training has grown. However, labour market discrimination based on gender, age, disability and race/ethnicity remains a serious issue in virtually all OECD countries.

“Challenging Transitions in Learning and Work” presents a critical and expansive exploration of learning and work transitions within this context. These transitions are challenging for those enmeshed in them and need to be actively challenged through the critical research reported. The impetus for this volume, its conceptual framing, and much of the research emerges from the team of Canadian researchers who together completed case study and survey projects within the ‘Work and Lifelong Learning’ (WALL) network. The authors include leading scholars with established international reputations as well as emerging researchers with fresh perspectives. This volume will appeal to researchers and policy-makers internationally with an interest in educational studies and industrial sociology.

The Knowledge Economy and Education volume 2
ISBN 978-90-8790-887-4 paperback US$49 / €45
ISBN 978-90-8790-888-1 hardback US$99 / €90
February 2010, 340 pages
SensePublishers (http://www.sensepublishers.com)

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VIDEO: CRASH! OCAP VISITS LIBERAL PARTY FUNDRAISER

2010 Heritage Dinner
with special guest the Hon. Dalton McGuinty, MPP

The Liberals talk about ‘poverty reduction’ but the reality is that, well into their second term of office, people on social assistance live on incomes that have lost 55% of their spending power since 1995. We are even poorer today than we were under Mike Harris.

The one handhold that poor people have been able to use to limit their poverty, is a program known as the Special Diet. This provides up to $250 a month if a medical provider considers it necessary. In the last number of years, more and more poor people have become aware of the Special Diet. The misery and suffering that is being inflicted on those losing the Special Diet is enormous and OCAP is here to challenge it.

Watch the video: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/ls40.php

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CANADIAN WOMEN’S RIGHTS IN DECLINE, REPORT SAYS

Canada won’t be winning many medals next month when the United Nations takes stock of women’s equality around the world, according to a new report that charts “systematic erosion” in the status of Canadian women since 2004.

You can view this story at: http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/769954–canadian-women-s-rights-in-decline-report-says

You can download the whole Canadian Labour Congress report here: http://www.canadianlabour.ca/sites/default/files/2010-02-22-Canada-Beijing15-NGO-Report-EN.pdf

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CANADA’S MIGRATION POLICIES: FOR CHEAP LABOUR, AGAINST HUMAN FREEDOM

York University professor disputes the positive assessment of Canada’s migration policies in the UN Human Development Report 2009.

To read more: http://www.nupge.ca/node/2959

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HARPER’S ‘BUY AMERICAN’ PLAN BAD DEAL FOR CANADIANS

Last week the Council of Canadians, along with the Canadian Union of Public Employees, leaked a copy of the Canada-U.S. Agreement on government procurement (the “Buy American” deal) to the media. It was the first time the wide-sweeping deal, which will permanently constrain provincial spending options in many areas, had been put forward for public scrutiny.

To read more: http://www.canadians.org/trade/issues/NAFTA/buy_American.html

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POST-STRIKE MUSINGS: ASSESSING THE OUTCOME OF THE MUSEUM WORKERS’ STRUGGLE

by Priscillia Lefebvre, The Bullet

On December 15th, after a strike lasting 86-days, PSAC workers voted to accept the tentative agreement reached between Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC) Local 70396’s bargaining unit and the Canadian Museum of Civilization Corporation (CMCC). The strike occurred after weeks of stalled negotiations resulted in an offer deemed unacceptable by 92% of the voting membership. According to a communiqué released by the CMCC’s chief communications office, the agreement reached by them and the PSAC workers reflect its “commitment to face-to-face discussions, compromise and mutual understanding.” Looking back at their enduring struggle for job security and fair wages throughout negotiations, employees may greet this statement with a difference of opinion. The strike ended in what many consider as a relative victory with gains in the protection of employees against the contracting out of positions; however, the road to success was a long and arduous
one.

To read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/317.php

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JOB POSTINGS

* Executive Director

Organization: The Deepwater Experiential Education Project (DEEP)

Position Type: Part-time time contract (20 hours a week) with potential for full-time based on performance.

Job Region: Based in Toronto with potential need for fundraising- associated travel

Responsibilities:

We are a non-profit that provides scholarships based on need and merit for youth to attend experiential education wilderness programs. We are seeking a self-directed individual with an accomplished background in administration and fundraising for the position of Executive Director. This is an opportunity to take a leadership role in a small organization and operate with considerable discretion and flexibility.

To read more: http://www.deepwaterproject.org

(from Canada’s Green Job Site, http://www.GoodWorkCanada.ca)

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* Intake Support Worker, Working Skills Centre, Toronto

Key Responsibilities:

-Provide career assessment support to applicants for certificate and diploma skills training programs at Working Skills Centre, a non-profit community agency serving immigrants, primarily women.
-Conduct weekly information sessions (training will be provided)
-Provide support for students once enrolled, responding to inquires and helping to find solutions to settlement, family, housing, and workload concerns
-Work with the Graduate Services Coordinator to monitor internal volunteer placement opportunities and match candidates to these opportunities
-Mark assessment tests, provide information on results to clients, help clients to determine career paths based on competencies
-Assist WSC staff to monitor Essential Skills Portfolios with students enrolled in training programs

Qualifications:
-A keen interest in providing assistance to immigrants and helping them understand the Canadian labour market
-University or college degree or equivalent community work experience helping individuals in some HR capacity
-Strong computer skills (MS Office and Internet Search)
-Past experience using an Access Database an asset
-Ability to problem solve and work independently if needed

Position Details:
-Wage rate: $14.10/hr, 30/hr/wk (FTE $27,500/year)
-Start date: immediately
-Contact position for 11 months (46 weeks)
-Individual must meet Investing in Neighbourhoods criteria:
-Unemployed, client, spouse, dependent adult on Ontario Works
-Family in receipt of NCBS or OCB

How to Apply:
Send a resume to: Honey Crossley by email: mailto: hcrossley@workingskillscentre.com

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OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

This is a moderated list. To send postings to the list, please email them to rhonda_sussman@yahoo.ca  To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Work No More

Work No More

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 21st SEPTEMBER 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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RESOURCE AVAILABLE FROM CSEW: EDUCATION FOR CHANGING UNIONS

By B. Burke, J. Geronimo, D. Martin, B. Thomas, C. Wall

This book is destined to become a key work in popular education. Education for Changing Unions presents a rich, stimulating, and provocative storehouse of practical and structured activities, ideas, and debate about union education. Written in a clear and accessible style, the authors have created a book to inspire working people and teachers in many settings and locations. All the exercises and activities have been widely tested.

Between the Lines, 2003. Available online from publisher: http://www.btlbooks.com or on-line at http://www.amazon.ca

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FORUM: JOBLESS RECOVERY – BROKEN EI

Who is going to fix EI? As election fever starts to heat up, the Tories are desperate to pretend that they have dealt with the nagging issue of thousands of laid-off workers who can’t get EI benefits.

Monday, Sept. 21
Registration: 6:00 p.m.
Event starts: 6:30 p.m.

Location: Rogers Communications Centre, Ryerson University, 80 Gould Street (at Church Street), Room 204

Speakers:
Unemployed workers from the GTA;
Judy Rebick, CAW Sam Gindin Chair in Social Justice and Democracy; and
Gilles Paquette, Quebec Federation of Labour/Unemployed Coalition.

Contact: 416-441-3663 ext.224

Organised by the Good Jobs for all Coalition (http://www.goodjobsforall.ca)

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FORUM: SOLIDARITY. RESISTANCE. CHANGE: ORGANIZING WORKING CLASS COMMUNITIES

Public forum featuring: Steve Williams, Co-Director and co-founder of the California based group “People Organized to Win Employment Rights (POWER)” and co-author of the book “Towards Land, Work and Power”.

Friday October 2, 2009
7pm
Ryerson Student Centre
55 Gould Street, Room 115
Toronto

Directions: http://www.oakhamhouse.com/pages/directions.php

Co-sponsored by Socialist Project and Centre for Social Justice
Endorsed by Black Action Defence Committee (BADC), No One Is Illegal (NOII) and Ontario Coalition against Poverty (OCAP)

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TWITTER IS A MALL: WADE RATHKE, CHIEF ORGANIZER BLOG   

Author of Citizen Wealth: Winning the Campaign to Save Working Families (http://chieforganizer.org/citizen-wealth-the-book/)

Stephanie Ross from York University and Peter Sawchuk from University of Toronto had invited me to be the first speaker to discuss organizing with a group of academics and activists coming together on a 5-year project called APCOL:  Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning, a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. The project is fascinating and it will be interesting to see how it progresses and what conclusions it draws over the years, but right now it was interesting for the discussion it allowed about organizing and the challenges before us.

To read more: http://chieforganizer.org/2009/09/18/twitter-is-a-mall/

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DEBORAH BARNDT: POPULAR EDUCATION PHOTO EXHIBITS AVAILABLE

Over the past year, I produced two photo exhibits which are now available for use in conferences, community centres, and classes. They relate to popular education, community art, and social movements and are meant to stimulate the integration of these three.

“Cross-Pollinations: Photography and Social Change in the Americas – A Retrospective” is an exhibit of 18 photographs drawn from Deborah Barndt’s work in Peru, Nicaragua and Canada between 1976 and 1992.The photographs traces four key moments in Barndt’s photographic work – from creating foto-novelas and Freirean codes for literacy classes in Peru in the 1970s to making photo-stories and posters for ESL classes in Toronto in the 1980s, from teaching photo-journalism to adult educators in Nicaragua in the 1980s to coordinating collective photo-story production in the Moment Project in Toronto into the 1990s.

“If the Walls Could Speak…What Stories Would They Tell” is a traveling photo exhibit of community murals. Community murals are more than paintings on the wall – they encourage communities to dig into their histories, memorialize loved ones, express diverse identities, honour the land, name critical issues, brighten streets and alleys, tell stories of local people, envision a healthier community.

If you are interested in booking either one of them for an upcoming event or for display, please contact Andie Shabbar (andie13@yorku.ca), production and distribution assistant, and copy me at dbarndt@yorku.ca.

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JUST RELEASED: UNIONS, EQUITY AND THE PATH TO RENEWAL

Editors: Janice Foley and Patricia Baker

Trade unions in Canada are losing their traditional support base, and membership numbers could sink to US levels unless unions recapture their power. Advancing equity within an increasingly diverse membership has been identified as one important step in the union renewal process. This book shows that equity within unions is not simply one path among many — it is the path to union renewal.

Unions, Equity, and the Path to Renewal brings together a distinguished group of union activists and equity scholars to document how traditional union cultures, practices, and structures have eroded solidarity and activism and created an equity deficit in Canadian unions. Informed by a feminist vision of unions as instruments of social justice — and by an appreciation of the decades-long effort by labour and feminist activists to build union democracy, solidarity, and strength — the contributors propose the changes needed to encourage member participation and to reposition organized labour as a central institution in workers’ lives.

University of British Columbia Press, 2009. For more information or to order: http://www.ubcpress.ca/search/title_book.asp?BookID=299172753

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FROM SOCIAL JUSTICE TO POETIC JUSTICE: UN INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PEACE CELEBRATION

* Do you look at the world and feel that things need to change?
* Do you watch the news everyday in sadness and despair waiting for that one news item that would give you hope for the world you live in?
* Do you publicly laugh at beauty queens talking about world peace but secretly hope for the same?

Then come join The Transformative Learning Centre at OISE in observance of the UN International Day of Peace as we read, exhibit, and compose poems for peace. The Centre invites all those interested to come out and compose a peace poem or bring a poem/quote for peace from diverse traditions around the world. Everyone is invited!

Monday September 21, 2009
12:00 to 3 pm
7th Floor Peace Lounge
OISE, 252 Bloor St. W (at St. George)

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A NIGHT ON WATER JUSTICE: FILM AND DISCUSSION

with Susan Koppelman and Shawn Brant

Tuesday, September 22, 2009
7:30 – 9:30 p.m.
Koffler Auditorium, Room 108
569 Spadina Avenue, just north of College

First Nations peoples in Canada, and Palestinians, are facing similar challenges and systemic discrimination in obtaining their basic water needs. Join us for an evening of film screening and discussion on the challenges to obtain equity and justice in access to water, on how different communities are mobilising to obtain this basic right, and on how we can develop effective solidarity for these causes.

Organizers:  Bike Chain, GSU Social Justice Committee, Greenpeace, Science for Peace, the Really Free Market, Trinity College, Streets are for People, UTERN, OCAA, UTSU
Endorsers: OPIRG Toronto, SAIA

For more information:
http://www.opirguoft.org/index.php?cmd=ShowData&section=4&subsection=14&type=3

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2009 MAYTREE LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE – TELLING STORIES; CREATING CHANGE

Do stories matter to you and your organization?

Register now for the 2009 Maytree Leadership Conference – Telling Stories; Creating Change on Thursday, October 1.

This year’s Maytree Conference examines how organizational narrative and personal stories can become compelling and powerful catalysts for social change. John Cruikshank, publisher of the Toronto Star, kicks off the conference telling us why stories are so important to the media and what creates a story that “sticks.” Acclaimed author and filmmaker Nelofer Pazira closes the conference with the story of her own journey from Afghanistan to Canada and how she is rebuilding women’s lives in her native country.

You can choose from a range of workshops which give expert advice in the art of persuasion, communication and media skills, storytelling and much more.

Register now to avoid disappointment: http://www.maytree.com/training/2009-maytree-leadership-conference/registration

Become part of the conversation. Read our conference blog with daily posts on storytelling techniques, social change through storytelling, narrative as persuasion and other topics: http://www.maytree.com/2009-leadership-conference-blog/

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO SYMPOSIUM – BUILDING THE FUTURE WE WANT: FINDING OPPORTUNITY IN ADVERSITY

The symposium will bring together a broad range of individuals and organizations to explore the ways in which the current economic and social crisis may provide opportunities to rethink how government, the non-profit sector and business can renew our social safety net for the 21st century. Ratna Omidvar, president of Maytree, will be one of the speakers.

Friday, October 2, 2009, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
New College, University of Toronto
Cost: $50.00 (includes lunch and refreshments)

For more information and registration: http://www.socialplanningtoronto.org/symposium.

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CENTRE FOR SOCIAL INNOVATION TOUR AND INFORMATION SESSION – SEPTEMBER DATES!

September 24, 2009
Centre for Social Innovation
215 Spadina Avenue, Suite 400
Toronto

Are you interested in permanent or part-time work space at CSI? Are you curious about our model? Do you want to check out the space and learn more about ‘how we do what we do’?

Join us for our weekly Tour and Information Session! Every week, a member of our staff team will offer a brief tour and then answer any questions you have about the Centre, the work we do, and how you can get involved.

Visit our events list for a listing of times and additional dates: http://socialinnovation.ca/community/events/listing

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LABOUR RIGHTS WEBSITE: UFCW CANADA VS. WALMART

The United Food & Commercial Workers (UFCW) Canada created and has maintained an excellent labour rights website at http://www.walmartworkerscanada.ca for workers at Walmart stores.  It’s an excellent example of grass-roots organizing by using the internet. Supporters of the workers are urged to go to http://www.walmartworkerscanada.ca/freespeech to join them in sending protest letters to Walmart; they are also using Facebook to spread the word about their campaign.

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DO THE MATH!

The Stop Community Food Centre is engaged in grass-roots work in all their work.  An imaginative campaign to build support for the province to increase financial assistance for persons who receive inadequate assistance is to add a healthy food supplement to what people receive now. “Do the Math” is explained at http://dothemath.thestop.org/ to illustrate how much money is necessary for a person to live with dignity and in health.

Indeed, some people are meeting their own MPPs to “do the math” with them, and so lobby for change using the exercise to educate their MPP. Groups of people who want to do this can get help and advice from Jonah Schein at the Stop, and also they can inform Jonah afterwards how successful their meeting was. Jonah is available at (416) 652-7867 x235 or at civicengagement@thestop.org.

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LEARN AT WORK WEEK: THE POWER OF A COMMUNITY LEARNING NETWORK INSPIRING LEADERSHIP IN LEARNING INNOVATION

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009
6:00pm Light lunch and refreshments
6:30pm-7:20pm Speaker introduction, presentation, and Q & A
7:20pm- Networking

Royal Canadian Legion, 10425 Kingsway NW
Edmonton, Alberta
(FREE parking; license plate number sign-in)

Price:
Member price: $25.00+GST
Non-Member price: $30.00+GST

Payment Method:
VISA/MasterCard/AMEX only

The Canadian Society for Training and Development (CSTD) Edmonton chapter invites you to attend an interactive learning and networking event during Learn @ Work Week – Sept 21-25/09.

The Community Learning Network (CLN) is a provincial not-for-profit organization that supports community adult learning by providing leadership, resources and connections to Alberta’s 81 Community Adult Learning Councils who assist adults in the areas of ESL, literacy, general interest courses and courses that support the work environment.

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CANADIAN INDEX OF WELLBEING (CIW) FRONT AND CENTER AS A PICTURE OF CANADIAN WELLBEING

Sept 15 – Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/comment/article/695624

Sept 14 – National Post
http://www.nationalpost.com/news/world/story.html?id=1992691

Sept 13 – Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/comment/article/694584

Check out our website…
To find out more about the Institute, and look for our latest reports, please check out our website at http://www.ciw.ca. Everything produced by the Institute is available free of charge in both user-friendly and research-rich format.

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CANADIANS TO CLEAR UP HEALTH CARE MYTHS FOR AMERICANS
rabble.ca posts U.S. health care page debunking myths and posting health care testimonials

TORONTO – In the wake of President Obama’s health care speech, rabble.ca is asking Canadians to weigh in on the American health care debate by providing testimonials on a new section of their website that can be found at: http://rabble.ca/issues/healthcareUSA.

rabble.ca’s new “Health Care USA” section presents some simple facts about Canadian health care, links to resources on single-payer for Americans and testimonials from Canadians from all walks of life on the Canadian health system.

“Canadians are shocked and even angry that their health-care system, what we call ‘Medicare’, has been used to frighten Americans trying to make up their minds. Some of what has been said about our Medicare system are outright falsehoods, like the claim that we can’t choose our own doctors or that government ‘bureaucrats’ can deny us needed treatment,” said rabble Senior Contributing Editor Murray Dobbin. “These falsehoods would be laughable were it not for the fact that Americans might abandon the opportunity for excellent, less expensive health care because they believe these stories,” Dobbin said.

rabble will be posting testimonials from ordinary Canadians who have used our system and from the professionals, doctors, nurses, and administrators who provide the service.

rabble.ca is Canada’s most popular source of independent news and views, and features original news, opinion, book reviews, podcasts and live and pre-recorded video exploring issues facing Canadians. rabble.ca is in its 9th year of providing 100% free news content to Canadians.  rabble is a non-profit, community supported organization.

For more information contact:
Murray Dobbin, Contributing Senior Editor (604) 483-9667
Derrick O’Keefe, Editor (604) 803-6927
Kim Elliott, rabble.ca, Publisher (647) 477-8534
http://rabble.ca

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DOWN IN THE VALE: SUDBURY STEELWORKERS STRIKE AT VALE INCO

By Petra Veltri

For a valley so used to being torn up, spit out, and poisoned daily, everything is eerily quiet in and around Sudbury, Ontario these days. Beginning June 1st with a Vale Inco plant shutdown, that was then followed by a strike on July 13 when 3300 members of United Steelworkers of Canada (USW) Local 6500 rejected the concessionary demands of the Brazilian multinational subsidiary, the mines, smelter, mill, and refinery, and ‘superstack’ have all been closed. In addition, many mining supply and service companies are temporarily shuttered, idling thousands more usually employed in spin-off businesses.

To read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/253.php

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO FORUM: IMPACTS OF SCHOOL CLOSURES ON CHILDREN AND COMMUNITIES

Friday, September 25
9:30 am to 12:30 pm

Presenters:

* Dr. Ranu Basu, York University
* Dr. David Clandfield, University of Toronto
* Annie Kidder, People for Education

The forum will address issues of school closures and the impact on citizenship; the role public policy plays in determining school closures and the importance of community hubs; and the Toronto District School Board perspective from the Toronto Lands Corporation.

To register, click here: http://socialplanningtoronto.org/machform/view.php?id=1

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk