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Protest

MOVEMENTS, NETWORKS, PROTEST: NEW AGENDAS FOR SOCIETY AND POLITICS

European and International Studies
3rd Annual Postgraduate Conference 2012
15th June 2012
The Council Room, Strand Campus, King’s College London

MOVEMENTS, NETWORKS, PROTEST
NEW AGENDAS FOR SOCIETY AND POLITICS

09.00-9.30 – Registration and coffee
09.30-9.45 – Welcome address by Professor Christoph Meyer (Head of European and International Studies, King’s College London)
09.45-10.30 – Keynote speech from Lord Allan of Hallam (House of Lords, Liberal Democrats, and Director of Policy in Europe for Facebook)

10.45-12.00 – Panel I. New agendas in social movement research (Chair: Christos Kourtelis, King’s College London)
Hugo Leal – Social Movement Network Studies: From Theory to Tahrir (European University Institute, Italy)
Brais Alvarez-Pereira – Information Technologies and the Fight for Freedom, a Complex Networks Approach (European University Institute, Italy)
Rose Erin Holyoak – The Political is Personal: Exploring Young Women’s Gendered Experiences of Social Movement Activism (University of Leicester, UK)

12.10-1.25pm – Panel II. Networks, borders and (trans)national movements (Chair: Paolo Chiocchetti, King’s College London)
Rosalind Greig – Success for Transnational Advocacy Networks: A Feminist Challenge (University of Strathclyde, UK)
Sofiane Ouaret – The construction and the management of a ‘transnational extreme left-wing network’ in Europe (King’s College London, UK)
Colombina Schaeffer – A Matter of Movement: How Patagonia Made Energy Politics Visible in Chile (University of Sydney, Australia)

2.30pm – 3.45pm – Panel III. Dynamics of local protest across the neoliberal world (Chair: Professor Alex Callinicos, King’s College London)
Barbara Audycka –  Tenants’ movement in Poland (University of Warsaw, Poland)
Samantha Fletcher –  These grievances are not all inclusive: the occupy movement in the age of austerity  (Liverpool John Moores University, UK)
Daniela Bressa Florentin – Exploring the (re)emergence of Buen Vivir in contemporary Bolivia and Ecuador: a Cosmopolitical approach (University of Bath, UK)

4.00pm – 5.15pm – Panel IV. Capitalism, culture and resistance (Chair: Dr Nagore Calvo, King’s College London)
Luke Cooper and Simon Hardy – Capitalist realism: challenges for the radical left (University of Sussex, UK)
Aude De Caunes – Créer c’est résister: autonomy, emancipation, and musical practices of protest in postcolonial France (King’s College London, UK)
Mike Foden – Anti-consumerist activism? Exploring the motivations of grassroots reuse groups (Sheffield Hallam University, UK)
5.15 – 5.30 – Conclusions and closing statements

Registration: the conference is free and open to all but registration is required.
Please fill in the registration form at http://sites.google.com/site/kclesgrc/registration-form
A light lunch and refreshments will be provided.
For more information: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/europeanstudies/index.aspx
Contact details: Julia (julia.feilen@kcl.ac.uk) or Simon (simon.mcmahon@kcl.ac.uk)

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Archive

BEYOND 2.0: NEW MODELS OF INFORMATION

A Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) in Sussex Event

Thursday 19th May, 4-6pm – University of Brighton

As the web matures and Web 2.0 and social media services become embedded in our everyday lives the information world is entering a new phase. The vast quantities of data being generated by these new services, the challenges posed to traditional publishers and the plethora of new devices such as iPads and smart phones will change the work of information professionals over the coming decade.

This talk, by Dr Martin De Saulles of the University of Brighton, will outline some of the challenges as well as the opportunities for those who work with information. It will be followed by an opportunity for questions and discussion. 

Venue: Watts Building, University of Brighton, Lewes Rd, Brighton BN2 4GJ

Cost: £5 for CILIP members, £10 for non-members

Light refreshments will be available.

To book your place, contact Audrey Marshall by email: a.m.marshall@brighton.ac.uk

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Mute

NEW BLOG ON SOCIAL NETWORK UNIONISM

Social Network Unionism Blog: http://snuproject.wordpress.com/

About the SNU Project

Social Network Unionism Project is not only about the rise in the recent developments in P2P technology, the phenomenon called Web 2.0, and conceptualising the transformatory impact of these technical developments on unions at national and international levels, and labour movement in general. Besides defining the concept of SNU, by looking closely to the existing practices within and without established unions and labour organisations, the project also aims at promoting a new type of working class organisation that takes online and real world social, peer to peer networking principles into the core of its existence.

The idea is based on the premise that the development in the mentioned communication and media technology since 2004 onwards has created new organisational capacities for networks. There are already astonishing experiments taking place in the field, from whose successes and failures we can learn and upon them we can build new models; not only to grow in members and fight back stronger but also to form wider alliances and start building new social, economic and political norms and cultures bottom up.

Based on these insights our objective is to explore further on the potential of SNU concept, in terms of reaching out the unorganisible, activating organised rank and file, making direct democracy a reality, and bridging as much transformatory social forces as possible through this blog. We hope to such concept and effort would contribute to the global process of union revitalization and may be further to the general emancipation of labour from ‘work’, as feed for the greed for private profit and power.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Co-operation

THE TELEKOMMUNIST MANIFESTO

Dmytri Kleiner

Institute of Network Cultures, October 2010

Complete text here: http://www.networkcultures.org/_uploads/%233notebook_telekommunist.pdf

Excerpt: Peer-to-Peer Communism vs. The Client-Server Capitalist State

Society is composed of social relations. These form the structures that constitute it. Computer networks, like economic systems, then may be described in terms of social relations. Advocates of communism have long described communities of equals; peer-to-peer networks implement such relations in their architecture. Conversely, capitalism depends on privilege and control, features that, in computer networks, can only be engineered into centralized, client-server applications. Economic systems shape the networks they create, and as networks become more integral to every day life, they are in turn shaped by them. It is then essential to produce a critical understanding of political economy in order to comprehend emerging trends in network topology and their social implications.

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

The Island

GLOBAL ALLIANCE FOR IMMEDIATE ALTERATION

GAIA – Global Alliance for Immediate Alteration
New Transnational Social Network Union to Crack Capitalism and Protect Life, Peace and Justice on Earth

http://openfsm.net/projects/gaia/summary

This space is an experiment for constructing a new type of transnational social network union that aims at bringing individual industrial and non-industrial workers in the Global North, the precariat in the Global South; peasants, domestic, immigrant and jobless workers together with social movement activists from other struggle fields, activist/researchers and many others who has to work in order to reproduce his/her life and to provide an open space where we can connect our networks and struggles to each other.

GAIA project is an open invitation for inventing a world wide, common, grassroots, wiki social movement union that will aim an immediate alteration of capitalist social, cultural, and political order. Hundreds of millions not if billions of workers in the world are out of reach for the established trade union mechanisms and structures, they do not have any protection at all. Peter Waterman calls them ‘Labour’s others’, for some others they are the new working class; the precariat composed of people who hold  no property and even secure job.

What kind of trade union structure will be able to go beyond the ongoing problems, and the crisis of unionism that had been born out of those well known problems, and will become the change maker of our time? Can an open space online social networking ensemble become a model for such future union organisation through the internet?

There are already many good examples of action and organising taking place via the net and incredible results are getting reached, as it happened in 2007 when financial support has been mobilized from the wealthier segments of the Western working classes for the Ford worker’s first ever strike organised in Russia since the beginning of the 20th Century.

For already some times online social networking is gaining ground as an important and dynamic form of communication and collective action tool. Many activists are involved today in one or another social networks on the net, as well as on the real world. Time has come to transform this tool into a new generation social movement union. Therefore we need comprehensive discussion on how can this happen, would it work, how would we build and gain legal ground for such a union, is it possible, or necessary? How would such union look like, be governed and function against the offensive coming from the employer and the state?

‘Social Network Unionism’ working group has recently been created with the aim of promoting such discussion and providing space for comprehensive work in order to experiment with Social Network Union idea by utilizing the opportunity created by UnionBook. With the creation of GAIA space within Open WSF, I would like to invite all who involved one way or other in labour and trade union movements, environmental justice activists, women rights activists, immigrants’ rights activists, water justice activists, information activists, activist students and others from other struggle fields to join and contribute to build GAIA space together as network of networks that can stop capitalism and save the peoples and the mother earth.

Please join GAIA, invent discussion groups on below or any other relevant topics and lead the experiment to save our common future:
Principles of GAIA:
Objectives of GAIA:
Demands of GAIA:
Ethics of the GAIA:
Management and decision making for GAIA:
Fellowship of GAIA:
Applications/tools that are needed for functioning of GAIA as a genuine transnational grassroots union:

Please join and contribute GAIA and spread the word.

In solidarity!

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Utopia

ALTERNATIVE WORLDS

Alternative Worlds: A retrospective of the last 111 years

Call for Papers / Art Presentations

Seminar in Visual Culture 2011
Deadline for proposals: 13 December 2010

Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies, Room ST 274 (School of Advanced Study, Stewart House, 32 Russell Square, WC1B 5DN London)

This series of seminars acts as a forum for practicing artists, researchers, curators, students, and others interested in visual culture who are invited to present, discuss and explore a given theme within the broad field of Visual Culture.

In an attempt to escape the doom and gloom of the economic crisis the theme for 2011 is ‘Alternative Worlds’. The aim is to examine the dreams, plans and hopes, but also the nightmares and fears reflected in utopian thinking since 1900 in the Western hemisphere. What has become of all those possible worlds? How do they reflect their contemporary culture and society and what, if anything, do or can they mean for our present, or indeed, our future? What alternative worlds are engendered by our own times, by the world of 2011 itself? This is, hence not only a retrospective of past utopias and their after-lives but also an invitation to look towards our possible futures.

Looking backwards, we could revisit the Futurist utopia of a mechanical universe based on the principles of speed and technology, or look at the somewhat similar proposals of the American Technocratic Society for a world based on the laws of engineering. Or we could examine the repercussions of Hermann Sörgel’s plan for Atlantropa, a merger of Europe and Africa created by damming the Strait of Gibraltar, meticulously worked out in the late 1920s and promoted by Sörgel until his death in 1952. Or we could look at the architectural utopias of Modernism, at Le Corbusier’s Plan Voisin, or at GM’s 1939 Futurama exhibit of the ‘City of the Future’ with its intricate congestion-free road systems. We could look at the social housing projects of the 1950s and ’60s – those that were built and those that were imagined. We could look at the many futures inspired by the space age, or at the alternative lives and societies envisaged in reaction to the Cold War and the nuclear threat. We could revisit the multiple Ballardian worlds or the various projects for the future proposed by the architects and artists who contributed to “This is Tomorrow”, the exhibition held at London’s Whitechapel Gallery in 1956 and restaged in 2006 at Tate Britain. We could look at the social utopias of the 1960s, the communes, sex and free love as a basis for a new society. We could look at the alternative worlds inspired by the possibilities of robotics, cybernetics or genetics; or at virtual worlds, like Second Life or all those parallel lives made possible by social networking sites. We could look backwards and at the same time look forwards.

Contributions on any of the above topics or on other alternative worlds of the past and the present are invited from individuals working in the fields of art history, philosophy, literary, cultural and visual studies, fine arts, film and media studies, theatre, history, etc.

Artists are also invited to present new (and existing) work on the theme.

Please send proposals for art presentations (200 words plus images) or academic papers (200 words) to Ricarda Vidal: ricarda.vidal@sas.ac.uk ||| by 13 December 2010.

Please indicate which date you would prefer for your talk.

Dates and times:

Wednesday 26 Jan. 2011, 6.30pm – 8.00pm

Wednesday 23 Feb. 2011, 6.30pm – 8.00pm

Wednesday 30 March 2011, 6.30pm – 8.00pm

Wednesday 27 April 2011, 6.30pm – 8.00pm

Wednesday 25 May 2010, 6.30pm – 8.00pm

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Uncertainty in Higher Education

UNIVERSITIES AS KNOWLEDGE INSTITUTIONS IN THE NETWORKED AGE

CALL FOR PAPERS FOR SPECIAL ISSUE

Universities as Knowledge Institutions in the Networked Age

Guest Editors: PHILIPPE AIGRAIN, JUAN CARLOS DE MARTIN & URS GASSER

The journal Policy Futures in Education (PFIE) – available online at www.wwwords.co.uk/PFIE – will publish a special issue on the impact of information technology and the Internet on universities: to keep and develop their role as knowledge institutions, how should universities reshape in this new environment? Sub-topics, such as open access to scientific literature and distance learning, have an established track of studies and proposals. However, it has not been common so far to aim at an integrated analysis of how universities will and should change to accommodate the changes brought by cyberspace in their specific role of knowledge user, processor, producer and disseminator.

One topic to be addressed is how the process of learning within universities will change because of the Internet and digital devices. For centuries, college student were educated by listening to their professor read aloud selected books taken from the university library (‘lesson’ comes, in fact, from ‘lectio’, Latin for ‘reading session’). Gutenberg changed that by making books cheaper and therefore more amenable to individual ownership and private reading, but the typical university lesson ended up not changing much anyway. Thanks to technology, we are now experiencing, at least potentially, a Renaissance of learning methods: from e-books to podcasts, from virtual worlds classrooms to streaming, from computer-assisted learning to videogames, the avenues of learning have increased dramatically. Are we heading towards purely technology-mediated learning strategies? Is the old Socratic professor-student direct approach completely obsolete? Doesn’t the wider spectrum of approaches offer the opportunity to educate those students who have always been uncomfortable with the traditional approach? What about the impact on lifelong learning?

A second topic is how research will be affected by the Internet. A major potential impact will be on the way research results will be communicated in the future. The scientific paper as a rhetorical device is increasingly under pressure in favour of more flexible, digitally-enabled forms of communication, mostly based on semantic web technologies. How would the decline of the scientific paper affect science? What about the role of search engines in the future of research? Will the Internet enable new forms of evaluation of scientific results? How would that change the centuries-old mechanism of recognition and promotion within the scientific community? Moreover, the transition towards digital knowledge seem to affect trends towards commercialization of knowledge at universities and knowledge institutions, and the impact those trends have on knowledge generation. Additionally, the Internet seem to be increasing the tension between the growing specialization of research activities and the aspiration towards increased interdisciplinarity.

The third topic regards how should universities use cyberspace to best implement their mission with respect to society. In recent years society has been asking universities to do more than simply – albeit crucially – educate students and produce new academic knowledge. The list of new demands include life-long education, open access to scientific papers and educational resources, and encouragement and support for spin-offs and start-ups. But is that it? Of course not. Public education, at all levels, was born with a clear mandate to educate citizens and to increase social mobility, not simply provide students with marketable skills and bookshelves with new scientific journals. Moreover, in our age the increasingly complex problems that we are facing as society, from global warming to water supplies, from the environment to energy issues, from the challenges (and opportunities) presented by bio-genetics and nanotechnology, don’t call for a renewal of the concept of University as Public Institution? In other words, don’t universities – as institutions as well as through their individual researchers – have a duty to engage more frequently in the public sphere, placing their super skills and knowledge at the service of citizens – and their representatives – to allow them to properly deliberate? If so, how? What would be appropriate and what would, instead, constitute a deontological breach of professorial decorum and integrity? If it is indeed important, shouldn’t universities allow/favour internal organizational changes to better implement such social role? How is that social role linked to freedom of research? Is the growing need of universities in many countries to court potential private investors (or governments) affecting it? If so, what could the consequences be for our societies? Doesn’t the Internet offer extraordinary tools to empower the public sphere presence of universities, professors and students, and to help to reduce social and cultural divides?

The special issue builds upon the COMMUNIA 2010 Conference on University and Cyberspace – Reshaping Knowledge Institutions for the Networked Age, held at Turin, 28-30 June 2010.

Submitters can visit the conference site and access material originating from the conference at http://www.communia2010.org

Possible issues relating to the above topics include:

– Digital Natives: how will the characteristics of the new generations of students, faculty and staff shape the future of universities?
– The Spatial Infrastructure: physical and virtual spaces for higher education
– The Use of Digital Technology in the Classroom
– Open Access to Scientific Results (papers, data, software)
– Open Educational Resources
– Educational Videogames
– Digital Devices as Platform for Learning
– Non-formal Education via the Internet
– Digital Divide and Higher Education
– Long-term Knowledge Preservation in a Digital Age
– Academic Production and the Knowledge Commons
– Digital and Physical Social Networks
– Intellectual Property and Academic Production
– Physical and Digital Library
– Semantic Web Technologies Applied to Scientific Results and Educational Resources

Papers should be sent as email attachments: pfie-specialissue@nexa.polito.it

Deadline for submissions: 15 January 2011

All papers submitted will be evaluated using the PFIE’s normal peer review process. Please also see the Journal’s information for authors: www.wwwords.co.uk/pfie/howtocontribute.asp

EDITORIAL CONTACTS

Dr Philippe Aigrain
CEO, Sopinspace
4, passage de la Main d’Or
F-75011 Paris
France
philippe.aigrain@sopinspace.com

Professor Juan Carlos De Martin
Co-Director, NEXA Center for Internet & Society
Politecnico di Torino – DAUIN
Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24
I-10129 TORINO
Italy
demartin@polito.it

Urs Gasser
Executive Director
Berkman Center for Internet & Society
23 Everett Street, 2nd Floor
Cambridge, MA 02138
USA
ugasser@cyber.law.harvard.edu

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com/