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Capitorg

THE ETHICS OF WIDENING PARTICIPATION SEMINAR SERIES

UALL Widening Participation and Social Inclusion Network

Convenor: Annette Hayton, Head of Widening Participation, Goldsmiths, University of London

SRHE: Access and Widening Participation Network

Convenor: Penny-Jane Burke, Roehampton University

 

Venue: SRHE, 44 Bedford Way London WC1R 4LL

Date: Thursday 14th July 2011

From 1pm- 4pm (lunch available from 12:30pm)

 

The Ethics of Widening Participation Seminar Series

 

Ethical dilemmas in widening participation: issues of pedagogy and identity

Dr Jacqueline Stevenson, Leeds Metropolitan University

For more than a decade various governmental policy initiatives have been implemented in the UK to increase the number of students attending higher education. However, whilst these initiatives have been widely critiqued there has been almost no consideration as to the ethical implications of widening participation. This is a significant omission since both WP policy and practice give rise to serious ethical concerns, not least being whether we should continue to increase access to HE at all knowing that many widening participation students are more likely to drop out, get worse degrees, graduate with higher levels of debt and be less employable post-graduation than their peers. Drawing on issues of pedagogy, student support and both staff and student identities, this presentation will act as a ‘think-piece’ offering an opportunity to consider the implications of widening participation from both an ‘ethics of justice’ and ‘ethics of care’ perspective. 

 

Widening Participation and the Capability Approach

Dr Michael F. Watts, University of Cambridge

This paper uses the capability approach to address the ethics of the widening participation agenda.  The capability approach de-emphasises the significance of commodities (including educational commodities) in favour of the opportunities they enable in pursuit of the good life.  It demands a context-based understanding of how the socio-cultural circumstances of young people influence the real opportunities they have to recognise the value of and engage with higher education.  This more nuanced engagement with the concept of well-being recognises that the inevitability of human diversity generates different realisations of the good life.  It also enables engagement with the adaptation of preferences that continue to bedevil attempts to increase access to higher education.  The focus on freedom, illustrated here with reference to a number of empirical studies, frames a more just approach to widening participation that is concerned with what young people have rather than what they lack. 

 

 

Event booking details

To reserve a place at this seminar please email Nicola Manches at: nmanches@srhe.ac.uk or telephone +44 (0) 207 4472525.   Please include the name of your institution and whether you are an SRHE or UALL member.

Cost:

SRHE members: free

UALL members: £25

All Non members: £40

Payment can be made by cheque (made payable SRHE and sent to SRHE, 44 Bedford Way London WC1R 4LL ) or phone through with credit card details.  Please note that places must be booked in advance and that a £25 for non attendance if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non attendance given by 7 July 2011.

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit

Society for Research into Higher Education

44 Bedford Row

London WC1R 4LL

Tel: +44 20 7447 2525

Fax: +44 20 7447 2526

 

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Big Society

DEVELOPMENTS IN CONTEMPORARY CITIZENSHIP

CENTRE FOR EUROPEAN STUDIES POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH GROUP
KING’S COLLEGE LONDON
CALL FOR PAPERS
DEADLINE: MAY 2nd 2011

The European Studies Postgraduate Research Group at King’s College London is pleased to announce a call for papers for their forthcoming research seminar, Developments in Contemporary Citizenship.

The institution of citizenship is undergoing a period of intense scrutiny in academia and political practice. The widening and deepening of the European Union, the social inclusion of migrant populations and the economic inequalities emphasised by the repercussions of the financial crisis are just a few examples of processes which today urge a renewed assessment of citizenship as a normative ideal and a political project.

The seminar is free and open to all. We hope to engage a range of speakers from interdisciplinary backgrounds in debate over theoretical conceptualizations of citizenship (Panel One) as well as case studies of the forms of and provisions for modes of citizenship in dynamically changing societies (Panel Two). The discussions will be chaired by Dr Stathis Kouvelakis and Dr Nagore Calvo of King’s College London. 

Key areas include (but are not limited to):
– The theoretical and social relevance of the concept of citizenship
– Citizenship, nationhood and the State
– Citizenship as inclusion: immigration, race, ethnicity
– Citizenship beyond national borders: the European Union and global rights
– Crisis, recession and economic rights
– Inclusion and exclusion on the local level: citizenship ‘from below’?

We aim to create a space for open discussion and critical development of original work. Papers should be of around 15 minutes’ duration, followed by discussion from the audience. Academics, researchers and postgraduate students are encouraged to send abstracts of no more than 250 words proposing articles, working papers, discussion pieces on theoretical debates or empirical case studies that can offer a new perspective to the debate.

Date: 10th June 2011
Place: King’s College London, Waterloo Campus

Abstracts should be sent to Simon McMahon at simon.mcmahon@kcl.ac.uk by Monday 2nd May at the latest. Speakers will be contacted during the following week.

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The Man in Black

MIGRATION AND EDUCATION

CALL FOR PAPERS
A Special Issue on MIGRATION AND EDUCATION

The journal Power and Education (www.wwwords.co.uk/POWER) is publishing a special issue on Migration and Education. Papers should address the role education can and should play in the context of migration and/or what migration reveals and conceals about power and education. Migration should be considered as means of empowerment as well as disempowerment. Papers are welcome from all educational disciplines.

The International Organization for Migration estimates that nearly 200 million people across the world are currently living outside their place of birth and that about 3% of the global population are therefore migrants. The mass movement of people in the 21st Century has significant implications for education – from the need to meet legal obligations to educate the children of migrants to the internationalisation of the academic marketplace. Moreover, the legacies of historic migrations continue to impact on education – from the subjugation (and the occasional post-colonial resurrection) of indigenous practices and knowledges to the ethnic lines that still fracture the socio-economic structures of education. If migration presents ‘problems’ then education has a part to play in their resolution – education is widely recognised as a key element of social integration and whilst intolerance can be learned tolerance and mutual respect can be taught.

Power runs through all these issues. It can also be discerned in the on-going debate between multiculturalism and assimilation and the question of whether migrants should be taught the culture of their host countries. Other questions saturated with power include: What histories of migration should be taught? How is the commercialisation of education in an increasingly globalised world driving migration? What is the proper and just approach to the distribution of (typically limited) educational resources to migrants? To what extent can migration be harnessed to empower intercultural education and education for global citizenship?

This special issue of Power and Education will address the complexities of migration from a range of educational disciplines and theoretical frameworks. Contributions are invited that engage with all aspects of migration, including voluntary and forced migration and intra-country migration (e.g. from rural to urban areas) as they impact on children and/or adults and on students and/or teachers. Historical perspectives on the educational legacies of previous migrations are welcome as are considerations of the transition from immigration to integration. Education should be considered in its broadest terms to include all stages of formal education, lifelong learning and informal education. Contributions should specifically address issues of power and/in education and the journal will consider papers engaging with all power paradigms.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:
• the Bologna Process
• the ‘brain drain’ and its consequences
• children and language learning
• cultural capital and countries of origin
• displaced children and the inclusion agenda
• global citizenship
• immigration and integration
• refugee academics
• social constructions and interpretations of migration
• teaching and learning diversity in schools

Papers should be no longer than 7000 words and should be submitted by 31 July 2011. Reviews of relevant books are also encouraged. Information on how to submit papers can be found at www.wwwords.co.uk/POWER/howtocontribute.asp

Questions about this special issue and the journal should be sent to the editor, Michael F. Watts, via the journal’s website.

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Global Economy

MIGRANT WORKERS’ RIGHTS IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY

ESRC Seminar

Thursday September 2nd 2010 International Slavery Museum, Liverpool, UK

This one-day seminar, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, is the second in the Middlesex University series examining emerging issues of global labour regulation. The seminar will be held at the International Slavery Museum (http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/ism/) in Liverpool’s dockside on Thursday September 2nd 2010 from 10am until 5.30pm.

Migration is an integral part of an increasingly internationalised economy. Around 3 per cent of the world’s population, just less than 200 million people, now live and work outside of their own country. This number has been growing at just less than 3 per cent in each year. The increased tendency for people to migrate to work and live has been spurred by changes in the world economy and the effects of structural economic change, or through war and civil upheaval, or environmental damage. Trade liberalisation and market de-regulation has also increased the propensity to migrate, as new geographical patterns of production have emerged. Yet labour migration is not a central concern of international agencies such as the WTO, the IMF or the World Bank. Migrant workers and their families are vulnerable to exploitation and racism, and labour market imbalances can result from migration in both sending and receiving countries.

The purpose of this seminar is to examine migration from a rights –based perspective. We hope to explore aspects of civil, human and social rights of migrant workers as well as labour and economic rights. Migrant labour is thus viewed from within perspectives of forced, slave and child labour as well as economic labour. As such the seminar welcome the participation of those academics, practitioners and migrant worker activists who wish to develop new agendas for regulating migrant labour through a variety of agency and policy initiatives.  

The seminar will be divided into two sessions. The first, thematic session, will examine alternative perspectives on migrant workers’ rights. The second session will present case studies from different world regions. Speakers/Participants will include: 

Marion Hellmann (Assistant General Secretary, Building and Wood Workers International, Geneva) – overview of migrant workers in the world economy

Professor Joshua Castellino (Law Department, Middlesex University) – A Rights Based Approach to Migration

Svetlana Boincean (International Union of Food, Farm and Hotel Workers ) -on eliminating Child Labour in agriculture and tobacco growing 

Heather Connolly and Professor Miguel Martinez Lucio (Manchester University)- Welfare Systems, Social Inclusion and Migrant Worker-Union Relations in the EU

Steve Craig (UCATT building workers’ union, UK) –  Vulnerable Work and Migration in the UK construction industry

Nick McGeehan (director of Mafiwasta www.mafiwasta.com , an organisation for migrant workers in the Gulf).

And case study representations from migrant worker activists in Ireland, the Gulf Region, Italy, and India.

If you are interested in participating in the seminar please register your interest with Denise Arden at d.arden@mdx.ac.uk. Lunch and refreshments are provided and the seminar is free to attend, but registration in advance is necessary. More information can be obtained from the seminar organisers, Professor Martin Upchurch (m.upchurch@mdx.ac.uk) and Professor Miguel Martinez Lucio (Miguel.MartinezLucio@mbs.ac.uk).

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Jammin for Inclusion: Benefit Concert for Communities Empowerment Network

Ms Dynamite, Bashy, Linton Kwesi-Johnson and Maroon Town come together at Brixton’s ‘Jamm’ on March 25th to celebrate and raise funds for the work of Communities Empowerment Network (CEN), a London based charity.
 
CEN has spent the last 10 years reintegrating excluded pupils back into mainstream education.  CEN deals with an average of 500 exclusion cases a year and has a virtually 100% success in reintegration.

In 2001, Martin Narey, then Director of the Prison Service, stated that ‘the 13,000 children being excluded from school each year might as well be given a ticket to join the prison system somewhere down the line’.  In just about every urban area in Britain, young black people are disproportionately represented in the prison system relative to their numbers in the local population.

Ms Dynamite, Bashy  and Linton Kwesi-Johnson
have put their name to this event because they want to highlight the success of CEN in getting permanently excluded pupils back into mainstream, full-time education as well as acknowledge the immense potential that exists in today’s youth by being on hand to meet and chat to young people.

 Ms Dynamite: R&B and hip song singer-rapper, Mercury Music Prize, double Brit Award and three times MOBO Awards winner. Currently back in business with a new track ‘Bad Gyal’ 2009 is setting up to see a lot more of one of the UK’s finest

 Ashley Thomas AKA BASHY is the hottest artists to emerge in a brand new wave of fresh and exciting British UK musical talent. With over I million hits on youtube for both tracks released independantly in 2008,  an appearance at last years Glastonbury, 2009 promises to be a huge year for this outstanding talent with the release of his first album ‘Catch Me If You Can’

Linton Kwesi-Johnson: is known and revered as the world’s first reggae poet and has recorded several classic reggae albums. He recently became only the second living poet and the first Black poet to have his work published in Penguin’s Modern Classics series under the title ‘Mi Revalueshanary Fren’

Maroon Town: 9 piece globe trotting ska barnstormers who amongst normal band activities also play in high security prisons from Jamaica to Kazakhstan. In May they are off to Tajikisan to perform and collaborate with local artists.

DJ Gerry Lyseight co-founded Brixton’s mythical Mambo Inn; DJed around the world; at festivals such as Glastonbury, Womad and The Big Chill; with everyone from Tito Puente to King Sunny Ade; compiled many albums; hosted radio programmes featuring everyone from Charlie Watts to Rufus Wainwright to Mr. Scruff to Bebel Gilberto to the late Kirsty MacColl.

Some of the young people CEN has supported and reintegrated back into full time education will also perform.

The evening’s compere will be Eugene Skeef composer, poet, percussionist and workshop leader.

Event: ‘Jammin for Inclusion’
Date:    Wednesday 25th March 2009       
Time:   7 till late
Venue: Jamm, 261 Brixton Road, Brixton SW9 2LH 
Price:   £8.00

Note to Editors
For further information contact Deuan German at CEN:  020 8432 0530 or 07958 546 113. Email: deuangerman@hotmail.com

For tickets:  http://www.ticketweb.co.uk/user/?region=gb_london&query=detail&event=313684&interface=

 

 

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