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Aesthetics

Aesthetics

THE POETICS OF FASCISM – ACLA 2014

American Comparative Literature Association

ACLA 2014: “Capitals”

NYU, New York City, March 20-23, 2014

DEADLINE November 15, 2013

The Poetics of Fascism

Fascist ideology comprises a multifaceted aesthetic-theoretical register. Due to its semantic density, fascism poses a challenge when we try to define it or map its spatial and temporal boundaries. While there are multiple and disparate fascist movements, as in the case of Italy, Germany, Japan, Romania, Spain and Latin-America, this panel inquires whether it is possible to identify a common mental and aesthetic structure among these instances as expressions of a “generic” fascism.
Walter Benjamin, for example, has defined the aestheticization of politics as the crux of the discursive and aesthetic structure of fascism. This, however, raises many questions. Is all aesthetic staging of politics necessarily fascist; or are alternate aestheticizations of politics possible? Conversely, can we identify instances of fascism that escape this definition of aesthetic form?
In addition, this panel invites commentaries on the utilization of post-fascist motives in political and literary theory today. Although discourses of biopolitics, posthumanism, and affect theory often overtly express their aversion towards fascism, it can be argued that they display elements which present striking similarities with the constitutive components of fascist ideology itself, such as the utopian dream of a new future species, the privileging of affective energies over cognitive and rational faculties, or the fusion of biological existence and political existence. What are the implications of these uncanny after-images of fascist ideology with and in contemporary theory? What are potential problems and incompatibilities in these theories? Can they, nevertheless, be effectively mobilized against fascist ideology today?

Topics include, but are not limited to:

–       Literature and Fascism
–       Cinematography and Fascism
–       Architecture and Fascism
–       the Dialectic of Enlightenment and Fascism
–       Capitalism and Fascism
–       Colonialism and Fascism
–       Gender and Fascism

Keywords: aestheticization of politics, aesthetics of resistance, capitalism, fascist imperialism, generic fascism, mass ornament, monumental politics

Please submit paper proposals (max. 250 words) via the ACLA 2014 website —

http://www.acla.org/acla2014/    
Deadline: November 15, 2013.

For questions concerning the panel please contact the organizers of the panel directly:
Esther Edelmann: eedelma2@jhu.edu and Jennifer Kang: kangx267@umn.edu

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-the-poetics-of-fascism-acla-2014

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo   

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Janine Booth

Janine Booth

GUILTY AND PROUD OF IT! POPLAR’S REBEL COUNCILLORS AND GUARDIANS 1919-25

By Janine Booth

Merlin Press

In the aftermath of the First World War, thirty Labour councillors went to prison rather than accepting inequitable taxes.

With unemployment rising in 1921 in Bow, Limehouse, Millwall and Old Ford, Poplar Borough Council could not help provide relief drawing only on the limited wealth of one poor London borough. 

Poplar councillors, including future labour leader George Lansbury, demanded that rates from richer areas should help. Rich Kensington had a hugely greater rateable value and fewer jobless people; it could afford to pay more. So Poplar refused to pay over rates to the London County Council, and thus began the Poplar Revolt.

Drawing on archive research and on newspaper reports, this book tells the story of the support mobilised by Poplar Council. 

The story begins when newly-enfranchised working-class voters elected Labour to run the Council in 1919. For the next two years, it improved life for Poplar residents, coming into ever-increasing conflict with the central authorities and the local government funding system. 

The crisis came in 1921, when Poplar Council refused to levy a portion of its rates. Poplar’s fight took its Councillors to prison in September 1921. Released after one month, they continued to battle but the struggle lost momentum. The book ends with a survey of outcomes and considers how this story has meaning today. 

“In the 1920s, Poplar’s Councillors and Guardians chose to fight. Had they chosen differently, we would not even remember them.”

Booth has done Poplar proud with her immensely well researched, lively and readable account… The book is especially good at bringing to light many of the lesser known characters in the struggle. It also reflects critically on the lessons of Poplar, which still resonate today.’ — Labour Research.

ISBN. 9780850366945
2009 Paperback
Contents here …
Price:£12.95

Janine Booth

Janine Booth

Merlin Press: http://www.merlinpress.co.uk

Janine Booth lives in Hackney, east London. She is a member of the RMT trade union and of Workers’ Liberty. She contributes to the socialist feminist Stroppyblog and has been a socialist candidate for Hackney Council and the Greater London Authority.

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Work

Work

WORK AND COMPULSION

Call for Papers

Work and Compulsion: Coerced Labour in Domestic, Service, Agricultural, Factory and Sex Work, ca. 1850-2000s

The International Conference of Labour and Social History (ITH), Austria, announces the 50th Linz Conference, 25-28 Sept. 2014.

Preparatory group:

Prof. em. Dirk Hoerder (Salzburg, Austria)
Prof. Marcel van der Linden (International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam)
Dr. Magaly Rodríguez García (Vrije Universiteit Brussel)
Dr. Elise van Nederveen Meerkerk (Wageningen University)
For the ITH: Univ.-Doz. Dr. Berthold Unfried (Institute of Economic and Social History, University of Vienna), Mag. Eva Himmelstoss

Objectives

The conference focuses on the exploitation of human labour in the range of forced labour and debt bondage, which contrary to chattel slavery, have received little scholarly attention. In spite of the gradual abolition of slavery (understood as the legal ownership of humans) in the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, other forms of coerced labour persisted in most regions of the world. Indeed, while most nations increasingly condemned the maintenance of slavery and slave trade, they tolerated labour relationships that involved violent control, economic exploitation through the appropriation of labour power, restriction of workers’ freedom of movement and fraudulent debt obligations. Hence the conference deals with historical situations of coerced labour worldwide.

The aims of this conference are five-fold:

 1.  To write a global and comparative history of the political-institutional and gender structures, the economics of and working conditions within coerced labour, as well as the evolution of forced labour (internal or cross-border) migration of male and female workers and the role played by intermediaries. In short, the whole praxis of coerced labour in colonized segments of the world, core countries, post-imperial states, new industrial economies and other low-income countries.
 2.  To problematize (the increasing) forced labour and labour mobility in colonial territories, in Africa and Asia in particular, and to relate them to developments in intra-European labour regulation and regimentation and to the expansion of North Atlantic capital across the world.
 3.  To deal with the twentieth-century forms of coerced labour, whether through confinement to labour camps or debt bondage of individual production and service workers to creditors (for the costs of the voyage) or to individual employers (for the duration of their stay).
 4.  To question whether the application of the forced-labour model to systemic employer-employee relations under constraining circumstances is justified, or whether the ILO’s differentiation between forced labour and sub-standard or exploitative working conditions can/should be maintained. These issues are related to the naming and conceptualization of “force”, “coercion” and “consent”, as well as to the utility of the notions of “human trafficking” and “modern-day slavery”.
 5.  To explore the experiences and aspects of human agency or resistance by forced/bonded workers, organizing initiatives and the silence or activity of non-state actors such as trade unions and NGOs.

Programme structure and themes

Keynotes:

 1.  Agency of men and women under coercion.
 2.  A historical overview of the definitions of “slavery”, “forced labour”, “trafficking” and “modern slavery”, and their evolution within the realm of international governmental and non-governmental organisations.

Section I – Coerced labour in the colonial and non-colonial world (ca. 1850-1940):
Working conditions, employee-employer relationships and migration patterns (who was transported in which direction) within systems of indentured labour, debt bondage, peonage, servitude, compulsory labour and so on. Examples are the twentieth-century credit-ticket migrations from Southern China; the British (and other) empire-imposed indentured labour involving long-distance migration in the macro-regions of the Indian Ocean and the Plantation Belt from the 1830s to the 1930s; European forced-labour regimes imposed on men, women and children within particular colonies; forced labour migration from the colonies to Europe during the First World War (the so-called “colonial auxiliaries”); and forms of involuntary (child) servitude in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the United States.

Section II – Politically imposed labour on home territories: The labour relations, working conditions and agency of workers sent to concentration camps, remote labour colonies or industrial camps under Fascism or Stalinism, in Japan during the Second World War, as prisoners or under peonage in the (southern) United States, in communist China, in Cuba, or as persecuted minorities like the Roma as well as, in the present, use of forced labour from political and other prisoners from dictatorial or authoritarian regimes by Western companies, require further study.

Section III – Coerced labour since the end of the Second World War: The phenomenon of coerced labour – often called “modern slavery” since the last decades – concerns questions of global divisions of labour, economic, gender and racial inequality. While numbers and definitions are contested by academic, UN and ILO experts, official and unofficial data range from 17 to 27 million women, men and children worldwide. This section aims to include papers with empirical information on the extent to which debt, power relationships and poverty lead to the virtual “enslavement” of people through systematic recruitment by means of intimidation or threat of violence, aggressive control by labour intermediaries such as “coyotes”, “snakes” or procurers, and/or brutal enforcement of debt collection after arrival. The experiences and resistance strategies of the workers concerned will be fundamental to better understand the degree of labour constraints and/or the consent to so-called “3D jobs” (dirty, dangerous and demeaning).

Concluding discussion:
General debate on the accuracy of the current definitions used by state and non-state actors, the impact that new research can have on policies and the development or adjustment of analytical methods that can further the knowledge of coerced labour from past and present.

Call for Papers

Proposed papers need to address the conference topics mentioned above in section I, II or III and should include:

 *   An abstract (max. 300 words)
 *   The targeted thematic section
 *   A biographical note (max. 200 words)
 *   Full address and email-address

Sessions will be reserved for ongoing research on the level of doctoral dissertations and of postdoctoral research (depending on high-quality abstracts being submitted).
A special effort will be made to include paper presenters from all regions of the world and both senior and beginning researchers. The conference language will be English.

The organizers will not be able to reimburse costs for travel or hotel accommodation. However, we will establish a limited fund to which scholars with insufficient means of their own may write a motivated application for (partial) reimbursement of travel costs. Grants will be contingent on sufficient funding.

The conference fee includes accommodation (in shared double rooms provided by the ITH) and meals. Participants taking responsibility for their own accommodation will pay a reduced fee.

Proposals to be sent to Magaly Rodríguez García: mrodrigu@vub.ac.be

Time schedule:

Deadline for submission of proposals: 1 November 2013
Notification of acceptance: 1 December 2013
Deadline for full papers: 1 August 2014

A publication of selected conference papers is planned; final manuscripts due 1 April 2015.

 

First published in: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-work-and-compulsion-coerced-labour-in-domestic-service-agricultural-factory-and-sex-work-ca.-1850-2000s

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Labour

Labour

LABOUR HISTORY CONFERENCE – EDMONTON

Labour History Conference — Edmonton, June 2014

Call for Papers

The Labour Movement has a long history of working alongside or against a wide variety of other social and political movements: from the anti-Fascist popular front to the Latin American solidarity campaigns of the 1970s and 1980s, from the women’s movement to LGBTQ movement today, from anti-nukes to environmental movements, from human rights campaigns in the 1940s and 1950s to Idle No More today. The Alberta Labour History Institute (ALHI) conference of 18-21 June, 2014, wants to investigate this past, present and future of labour’s interaction with other social movements in Canada and beyond.

ALHI seeks to share academic and people’s own histories with the broader community. It draws its members from organised labour, activist communities and the academy, and its conferences seek to build links between academic and non-academic history. Panels featuring “traditional” academic papers will be interspersed with group oral histories featuring people on-stage and in the audience telling their own stories. All of the presentations are filmed in high definition video and transcribed for archival purposes, with low-res versions uploaded onto our YouTube channel (search “Alberta Labour
History” on YouTube).

Our last conference included a concert by Maria Dunn and friends, a film festival, museum displays and keynote addresses from both historians and labour leaders. About one third of the conference participants were academics, and two thirds current and retired trade unionists and other activists. The 2014 conference will be similarly structured and seek a similar audience.

We are looking for people or groups interested in taking part in one of four categories on the theme labour’s interaction with other social movements, past, present and future. We encourage papers and presentations from any perspective, including those that may be critical of labour in the past or present.

We also encourage potential presenters to take a broad view of social movements, defining them as you like.
1)      Academic presentations of 15-20 minutes of length by students, established academics or others.
2)      Oral history participants who want to tell their own story on the theme in 10 minutes.
3)      Films up to 20 minutes in length.
4)      Museum-style displays that can be shipped to Edmonton and put up for public display during the length of the conference.
Interested presenters should send a statement of interest or abstract and brief bio or c.v. to <ALHI@labourhistory.ca> by 15 Ocotober, 2013 (to be considered for any possible travel funding) or by 15 November, 2013 for inclusion in the programme. All proposals will be peer-reviewed by a panel of academics and labour activists, and selected presenters will be informed by either the end of September or the end of November.

In the past we received grants and donations sufficient to subsidise many of our presenters. We will be fundraising again, but cannot promise support at this time

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-labour-history-conference-edmonton-june-2014

*****END*****

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Karl Marx

Karl Marx

BEYOND MARX

Confronting Labour-History and the Concept of Labour with the Global Labour-Relations of the Twenty-First Century

Edited by Marcel van der Linden, International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Karl Heinz Roth in collaboration with Max Henninger

Capitalism has proven much more resilient than Marx anticipated, and the working class has, until now, hardly lived up to his hopes.
The Marxian concept of class rests on exclusion. Only the ‘pure’ doubly-free wage-workers are able to create value; from a strategic perspective, all other parts of the world’s working populations are secondary. But global labour history suggests that slaves and other unfree workers are an essential component of the capitalist economy.
What might a critique of the political economy of labour look like that critically reviews the experiences of the past five hundred years while moving beyond Eurocentrism? In this volume twenty-two authors offer their thoughts on this question, both from a historical and theoretical perspective.

Contributors include: Riccardo Bellofiore, Sergio Bologna, C. George Caffentzis, Silvia Federici, Niklas Frykman, Ferruccio Gambino, Detlef Hartmann, Max Henninger, Thomas Kuczynski, Marcel van der Linden, Peter Linebaugh, Ahlrich Meyer, Maria Mies, Jean-Louis Prat, Marcus Rediker, Karl Heinz Roth, Devi Sacchetto, Subir Sinha, Massimiliano Tomba, Carlo Vercellone, Peter Way, Steve Wright.

http://www.brill.com/beyond-marx

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-from-the-hm-book-series-beyond-marx

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Eric Hobsbawm

Eric Hobsbawm

ERIC HOBSBAWM: HISTORIAN, TEACHER AND CRITIC

PUBLIC MEETING

All welcome

Eric Hobsbawm: Historian, Teacher and Critic

 

This special seminar from the Socialist History Society will seek to assess the late Eric Hobsbawm’s enduring contribution to the study of history.

 

Panel Discussion

Willie Thompson, formerly Professor of Contemporary History at Glasgow Caledonian University;

Malcolm Chase, Professor of Social History, University of Leeds;

David Parker, Emeritus Professor, University of Leeds.

 

Tuesday 1st October 2013, 7.00 pm.

At Bishopsgate Institute, 230 Bishopsgate, London EC2M 4QH.

Near Liverpool Street station/underground.

Space is limited -please book early to ensure your place

To book, contact the Bishopsgate Institute on 020 7392 9200

For further information: http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/Events

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/eric-hobsbawm-historian-teacher-and-critic-bishopsgate-institute-1-october

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Plebs League

The Plebs League

INDEPDENDENT WORKING CLASS EDUCATION

Saturday, 24 August, 11.30am

Radical Manchester: Reform, Riots and Revolution

Meeting point: Cooperative  Bank, corner of Balloon Street and Corporation Street

 

This walk is an introduction to Manchester’s radical history and will include the Co-operative movement, the Clarion newspaper, Marx and Engels, the Siege of Manchester, the Manchester Guardian, the Jacobite risings, the radicals of the 1790s, the American Civil War and the Cotton Famine, the International Brigade, and riots in Albert Square. £6/£5

Advance booking recommended : redflagwalks@gmail.com.

More information: http//: redflagwalks.wordpress.com

The walks will be led by Michael Herbert who has been researching, writing and speaking about Manchester’s radical history for many years. His latest book “Up Then Brave Women; Manchester’s Radical Women 1819-1918 was published in October 2012.  In June 2013 he was filmed with Maxine Peake  and Miranda Sawyer for the BBC programme The Culture Show: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01cx83y

IWCE: http://iwceducation.co.uk/

 

About IWCE

The Independent Working Class Education Project aims to learn the lessons of history to inform current class struggle. Inspired by the Ruskin Students strike of 1909, we organise open informed discussions and look at how interesting presentations can be used in a variety of circumstances.

We offer materials and contacts and always try to operate in a non-sectarian way; we are not committed to any particular political current.

IWCE Project hopes to:

* Respect the role of the working class in making history, and in making the future

* Seek to offer a diverse range of education materials and approaches for trade union and other working class and progressive movement groups

We want to rebuild the tradition of independent working-class education (IWCE) that used to exist across many parts of England, Scotland and Wales.

This tradition goes back to the industrial revolution and the growth of a modern working class. Attempts by the employers to use adult education to buy workers off go back almost as far.

Educational initiatives by and for workers themselves probably reached their high point in the early 1900s, with the setting-up of the Plebs’ League (1908), the ‘strike’ by students at Ruskin College (1909), and the founding of the Scottish Labour College. (1916). By the General Strike, more than 30,000 workers were studying regularly in classes run by the National Council for Labour Colleges, which took over from the Plebs League in 1921. But from 1926 onwards decline set in.

Both the Plebs’ League and the Scottish Labour College believed that activists should learn about the history of workers’ attempts to organise, about economics seen from the workers’ side, and about how to think out complex issues for yourself. They were against trusting the bosses to provide education in these areas, and they rejected attempts by the Oxford University Extension Delegacy and the Workers’ Educational Association to foster class collaboration.

Between the 1950s and 2010 the powers-that-be extended university education to wider and wider circles of people. Some of this was to do with producing scientists and technical personnel for industry but some of it, especially in the humanities and social sciences, was about trying to cream off and neutralise sections of the working class; in short, an expanded version of the strategy that goes back to 1909 and beyond.

When it came to power in 2010 the Coalition began to move decisively away from that strategy. It has abolished state funding for all university teaching other than in science, technology and maths, and raised by 300 per cent the level of fees brought in under Tony Blair. Meanwhile, the need of working-class people in general, and activists in particular, for valid education in such areas as history, economics and philosophy is greater than ever.

We can’t deal with this situation by copying what people did in the past. We need to base ourselves on the same principles as them, but also to take account of the changed situation. This includes the export of industrial production to lower wage economies overseas, and the destruction of jobs – and hence of union power bases – for example, in coalmining, steel, shipbuilding, engineering, car-making, the docks and printing – and all the demoralisation that goes with this. It also includes terrifying damage to the environment. We need urgently to redefine IWCE for the present day and the future, and rebuild it accordingly.

‘Working-class’ now must mean wage earners – and those who desperately need to become wage earners – in every field, including the service and public sectors, and many of those who are nominally self-employed, plus their dependents. ‘Education’ must mean workers helping one another to become aware of the whole truth and nothing but the truth about how things are and how they might be. And ‘independent’ must mean controlled by working people themselves. In the world today, effective working-class self-organisation demands IWCE.

Do you share this perspective? If so, we want to work with you, both to think these ideas through further and to start rebuilding valid workers’ education.

Please contact us

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

 

Economics

Economics

LABOR AND WORKING-CLASS HISTORY SEMINAR

CALL FOR PAPERS

2013–2014 Academic Year
Call for Papers

The Labor and Working-Class History Seminar at Roosevelt House, Hunter College, City University of New York seeks proposals for seminar papers that explore the rich and diverse spectrum of labor history and working-class life. Essays may focus on workers’ agency, culture, and lived experiences; class dynamics as informed by other social categories and identities; changes in political economy and their effects on workers’ lives; the expansion and reduction of governmental policies promoting economic security and other forms of social welfare; and other related topics.

The Labor and Working-Class History Seminar will be an on-going colloquium for a broad academic audience, including graduate students, faculty members, and independent scholars. We will meet at the historic Roosevelt House twice a semester during the 2013–2014 academic year, on selected Tuesdays from 6:00–8:00 p.m. At each meeting, an invited presenter will offer an overview of a scholarly work, pre-circulated electronically to all participants, and a commentator will provide constructive feedback. The exchange between the presenter and commentator will be followed by a discussion among all seminar attendees.

The Labor and Working-Class History seminar, while focused on history, welcomes scholars from a wide range of disciplines, including human rights studies, public policy studies, sociology, anthropology, literature, law, and environmental studies. We encourage cross-disciplinary discussion, and invite proposals from diverse subject areas and approaches.

Interested scholars who would like to present a portion of their current research on labor and/or class should submit a one page abstract and a brief cv to: Donna Haverty-Stacke and Eduardo Contreras at laborsem@hunter.cuny.edu by August 1, 2013. Decisions will be communicated by September 1, 2013 to all those who have submitted abstracts.

We have a limited fund to support regional travel but are unable to provide funding for long-distance travel or lodging. If you would like to be placed on the email list to receive announcements of upcoming presentations, please write to: laborsem@hunter.cuny.edu.

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-labor-and-working-class-history-seminar-at-roosevelt-house-hunter-college-cuny

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Match Women

The Match Women

MATCHWOMEN’S STRIKE 2013 FESTIVAL

Bishopsgate Institute

London

6th July 2013

11.00am – 11.00pm

Admission Free (but register for tickets)

Family Friendly

Celebrate the 125th anniversary of the Matchwomen’s victory, and the beginning of the modern labour movement

125 years ago the Matchwomen’s gallant struggle and victory against all the odds led to the new union movement. For far too long they have been unsung heroes in the pages of history. Celebrate the 125th anniversary of the Matchwomen’s victory and the beginning of the modern labour movement!

The festival will be the kind of ‘knees- up’ the Matchwomen themselves would have enjoyed – there will be bands, comedians and actors, choirs, stalls, and great food and drink.

In July 1888, several hundred women walked out of an East London match factory – and changed the world. The strike was a reaction to management bullying and terrible conditions, and it should have failed. Bryant & May were powerful and prosperous, with friends in government. The women were mere ‘factory girls’, and even worse, mostly Irish. But their courage, solidarity and refusal to back down impressed all who saw it. What they revealed about conditions inside the factory, including the horrors of the industrial disease ‘phossy jaw’, shamed Bryant & May, and their shareholders, many of whom were MP’s and clergymen. In just two weeks, the women won better rates of pay and conditions, and the right to form the largest union of women in the country.

Their victory was remarkable, but until now, rarely acknowledged as the beginning of the modern trade union movement. Following the Matchwomen’s victory a wave of strikes, including the 1889 Great London Dock Strike, swept the nation. Multitudes of the most exploited workers formed new unions, sowing the seeds of the modern labour movement, and Labour Party. The Dock Strikers never denied the Matchwomen’s influence. In the throes of the Dock Strike, leader John Burns urged a mass meeting of tens of thousands to ‘stand shoulder to shoulder.

Remember the Matchwomen, who won their fight and formed a union.

Speakers & Performers include: Tony Benn, Owen Jones, Lindsey German, Robb Johnson, Anna Davin, Professor Jane Martin, Michael Rosen, The Socialist Choir and many more, with lots of events for children and young people.

Website and Registration for Tickets: http://www.matchwomensfestival.com/

Bryant & May

Bryant & May

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Match Women's Strike

The Match Women’s Strike

Educating from Marx

Educating from Marx

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 18th FEBRUARY 2013

EVENTS

COLLABORACTION: BUILDING BLOCKS LEARNING EXCHANGE

Wednesday, March 20, 2013
12:00 PM to 5:00 PM
Toronto Reference Library
789 Yonge St.

Promote civic engagement and participation of diverse, low income communities in the Greater Toronto Area.

Participatory workshops will focus on:

– Imperative of engagement in diverse low income communities
– Building civic movements and leaders
– Web-based methodologies for community organizing
– Models for mobilizing diverse low income communities
     
This will be a lively learning exchange. We’ll showcase local leadership success stories and give you plenty of opportunities to connect with and learn from others. You’ll leave with ideas and practical information to build civic literacy and promote engagement and participation in your community.

Register online: http://colaboractionmarch202013.eventbrite.com/#

Sponsored by The Maytree Foundation.

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SOCIAL DEMOCRACY AND BRITISH COLUMBIA’S WORKING CLASS

A Community Workshop organized by the Canadian Committee on Labour History

Sunday, June 2, 1-5pm
Legacy Art Gallery
630 Yates Street, Victoria, BC
Coffee house/social to follow @ 5pm

Fresh on the heels of the BC provincial election, this workshop brings together activists and academics to consider the past, present and future of social democracy and BC’s working class. It seeks to provide context to current debates and strategies over labour laws, social programs and the balance of power in the workplace and communities.

Featuring:
– Jim Sinclair, British Columbia Federation of Labour
– Tara Ehrcke, Greater Victoria Teachers’ Association
– Ingo Schmidt, author of Social Democracy after the Cold War

Sponsored by the Canadian Committee on Labour History, University of Victoria Social Justice Studies Program and the Society for Socialist Studies.

To register, contact CCLH secretary Ben Isitt: isitt@uvic.ca  Registration fee $20, waived for students and the unwaged.

+++++

LEADERSHIP, HIGHER AND ADULT EDUCATION (OISE-UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO) RESEARCH SMORGASBORD + SOCIAL

February 27
12-2pm
OISE, Room 12-199
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto

Come hear faculty from Adult Ed/Community Development, Ed Admin and Higher Ed programs present the findings from research in which they are engaged and have published, or are in the process of publishing. Social to follow. Light refreshments will be served.

– Peter Dietsche: “A perfect storm: public policy, access and student success in ontario colleges”
– Glen Jones: “Academic careers and national systems of higher education”
– Linda Muzzin: “Mapping curriculum and equity in Canada’s community colleges”
– Shahrzad Mojab: “Re-organization of educational services and social services in response to policy mandates emphasizing the security and securitization of youth”
– Jean-Paul Restoule: “Deepening knowledge and enhancing instruction through incorporation of indigenous worldviews in initial teacher education program at OISE”
– Kiran Mirchandani: “Phone clones: Identity, learning and work in the international call centre system with special attention to India”
– Jim Ryan: “The micropolitics of social justice leadership in organizations”
– Joe Flessa: “Streaming in Ontario schools”
– Carol Campbell: “Leading with evidence for educational improvement through education system change, professional capacity and student learning”

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FORUM: CLASS STRUGGLES IN CRISIS: FROM WALMART TO THE STATE

Friday February 22, 7 pm
Oakham House
Ryerson University Student Centre
63 Gould St, Toronto, at Church St.
Dundas St Subway.

A Socialist Register event

Please join for a panel discussion introduced and moderated by SR editors, Greg Albo, Vivek Chibber and Leo Panitch

“Class Struggles in Crisis: from Walmart to the State”
with Kevin Doogan, Arun Gupta, Jane Hardy, and Charles Post.

– Kevin Doogan is professor in the School for Policy Studies at the University of Bristol.
– Arun Gupta is a co-founder of The Indypendent and The Occupied Wall Street Journal.
– Jane Hardy is a professor in the Business School at the University of Hertfordshire
– Charles Post is a professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York (CUNY).

+++++

BOOK LAUNCH: BOOM, BUST AND CRISIS
Labour, Corporate Power and Politics in Canada

Edited by John Peters

Wednesday, February 27, 2013
7:30 pm
Centre for Social Innovation, Main Floor Café, 720 Bathurst Street (South of Bloor), Toronto

This is a free event. Everyone is welcome.

Published by Fernwood Publishing. Co-sponsored by the Centre for Social Justice.

For more information: http://www.socialjustice.org/community/#e836 or call Nancy Malek 902-857-1388

+++++

GREATER TORONTO WORKERS’ ASSEMBLY (GTWA) GENERAL MEMBERS MEETING

Sunday, February 24
2 – 4 PM
Steelworkers’ Hall, 25 Cecil St.
Toronto

We will be having a discussion with Gautam Mody, General Secretary of the New Trade Union Initiative (http://ntui.org.in/), an exciting union in India which in two decades has built a democratic organization that now represents around 1.5 million workers with a special emphasis on informal workers.

You can read a delegates’ report on their founding convention here: http://labornotes.org/print/214

An interview with Mody can be read at: http://www.amrc.org.hk/alu_article/interview_with_gautam_mody_secretary_new_trade_union_initiative

Join the Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly and please bring friends.

We will also be discussing the GTWA’s Public Sector Committee and its project to develop workplace and community power right here in Toronto.

Visit the GTWA website: http://www.workersassembly.ca

+++++

NEWS & VIEWS

CAMPUS FIGHTBACKS IN THE AGE OF AUSTERITY: LEARNING FROM QUEBEC STUDENTS

by Xavier Lafrance and Alan Sears, The Bullet

The 2012 Quebec student strikes delivered one of the few victories we have seen in anti-austerity struggles in the Canadian state. The mobilization, which at its high point saw over 300,000 students on limited or unlimited strike, and demonstrations of hundreds of thousands, was a crucial highpoint
that has a great deal to teach radicals. The attempted clampdown by the Jean Charest government through Bill 78 that attempted to outlaw the movement, unleashed a new and innovative round of resistance including the casseroles night marches.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/771.php

+++++

“WHOSE STREETS? OUR STREETS!”: REFLECTIONS ON THE WORLD’S LARGEST DEMONSTRATION, TEN YEARS LATER

by Sarah Grey and Leo Zeilig, MRzine

February 15, 2003, Sarah, New York:

The wind that whips down the avenues is bitterly cold, but that doesn’t stop us from protesting the drive to war in Iraq.  People from all over the city and the Northeast — young and old, hardened activists and first-time protestors — have converged on Manhattan, where the wounds of 9/11 are
still gaping, to tell our unelected president NO to war on Iraq. 

Read more: http://mrzine.monthlyreview.org/2013/gz150213.html

+++++

VIDEO – BOOK LAUNCH: TOWARD THE UNITED FRONT
Proceedings of the Fourth Congress of the Communist International, 1922

Toronto — 3 February 2013.

Moderated by Abbie Bakan. Panel discussion with:

– John Riddell is the translator and editor of this book. He maintains a blog at http://www.johnriddell.wordpress.com
– David McNally teaches Political Science at York University, Toronto, and is the author of “Monsters of the Market: Zombies, Vampires and Global Capitalism”
– Greg Albo teaches Political Economy at the Department of Political Science, York University. He is the co-editor of “Empire’s Ally: Canada and the War in Afghanistan”
– Suzanne Weiss is a Toronto writer, active in Palestinian, Latin American solidarity and work for climate justice
– Paul Kellogg teaches Political Economy at Athabasca University

The book is published by Haymarket Books and can be ordered here: http://www.haymarketbooks.org/pb/Toward-the-United-Front

Watch the video: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/ls161.php

+++++

SUBMIT TO UPPING THE ANTI (UTA) ISSUE 15!

Upping The Anti: A Journal of Theory and Action is a radical journal published twice a year by a pan-Canadian collective of activists and organizers. We are dedicated to publishing radical theory and analysis about struggles against capitalism, imperialism, and all forms of oppression.

Upping The Anti believes that praxis – the dialectical combination of theory and practice – is integral to the building of strong revolutionary movements. We work with activists and thinkers in these movements to distil the lessons learned from struggle. We prioritize reflection which leads to political clarification, summation, and synthesis.

We are currently looking for story ideas for ISSUE FIFTEEN, which will be released in June 2013. If you have an idea for a story you would like to see published in our journal, please send us a one-page pitch by Thursday, February 28, 2013. In addition to the pitch, please submit a short writing sample (max 1,000 words).

In your pitch, please provide a brief description of the topic of your proposed investigation, your main questions, an account of how you will address these questions, as well as a brief biographical note.

Before submitting a pitch, we encourage you to read back issues in order to familiarize yourself with the kind of writing that we publish. We also encourage you to have a look at the Upping The Anti submission guide, which can be downloaded at http://uppingtheanti.org.

+++++

ONTARIO WORKERS NEED URGENT PROTECTION FROM THE MINISTRY OF LABOUR

from the Workers’ Action Centre

New Minister of Labour, Yasir Naqvi, has an opportunity to make a difference in the lives of thousands of Ontario workers by taking immediate action to address wage theft.

In December 2012, people from across Ontario responded to our call for action for better conditions for workers.  Over 12 days, more than 500 messages were sent to the Minister of Labour calling for stronger protections for workers in Ontario.

We’ve already outlined 5 priorities for action:

1. Increase the minimum wage
2. Target employers that violate employment standards
3. Ensure adequate resources for proactive enforcement of employment standards
4. Update the ESA to create good jobs
5. Equal protections for temporary foreign workers

Read more: http://www.workersactioncentre.org/updates/ontario-workers-need-urgent-protection-from-the-ministry-of-labour/

+++++

WORKING WITHOUT A CONTRACT: A STRATEGY WHOSE TIME HAS COME?

by Robert M. Schwartz, Labor Notes
   
Some unions have changed their policy from “no contract, no work” to “no contract, no peace,” and are using the advantages of working without a contract in order to get a contract.

Read more: http://www.labornotes.org/2013/02/working-without-contract-strategy-whose-time-has-come

+++++

JOBS/INTERNSHIPS

CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK (CUNY) NEW YORK UNION SEMESTER

NY Union Semester offers a mentored internship for graduates and undergraduates at a labor union or worker organization, in addition to 4 outstanding classes.

Interns receive:

– A weekly stipend and unlimited Metro Card
– In-state tuition rates and a scholarship for 4 labor studies courses
– 12 graduate or 16 undergraduate credits

Interested students in the New York area can attend Open Houses March 18, April 17.

Others can contact laurie.kellogg@mail.cuny.edu, call 212-642-2055, or visit The Murphy Institute website:  http://www.sps.cuny.edu/institutes/jsmi

+++++
+++++

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Work

Work

WORKING LIVES – SPECIAL ISSUE OF ‘ORAL HISTORY’

A New Special Issue of Oral History

Forum d’histoire orale, the peer-reviewed journal of the Canadian Oral History Association.

“Working Lives: Special Issue on Oral History and Working-Class History” is guest edited by Joan Sangster (TrentUniversity) and Janis Thiessen (University of Winnipeg).

You are invited to explore the articles and reviews contained in this new issue, now available online at: http://www.oralhistoryforum.ca/index.php/ohf/issue/view/43.

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/working-lives-special-issue-of-oral-history-forum-dhistoire-orale

**END**

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Howard Zinn

Howard Zinn

HOWARD ZINN SPEAKS
Collected Speeches 1963 to 2009
By Howard Zinn
Edited by Anthony Arnove
Published by Haymarket Books

cloth
http://goo.gl/DYlYC

paperback
http://goo.gl/B3E6Y

Howard Zinn has illuminated our history like no other U.S. historian. This collection of his speeches on protest movements, racism, war, and topics vital to our democracy will be an invaluable resource for the new generation of students who continue to discover his work, as well as the millions of people who Howard moved and informed in his lifetime.

“Few people changed more lives than Howard Zinn. He changed them as an author, as a play write and as a filmmaker. But he also changed them face-to-face, as a speaker. With ferocious moral clarity and mischievous humor, Howard turned routine anti-war rallies into profound explorations of state violence and he turned staid academic conferences into revival meetings for social change. Collected here for the first time, Howard’s speeches — spanning an extraordinary life of passion and principle — come to us at the moment when we need them most: just as a global network of popular uprisings searches for what comes next. We could ask for no wiser a guide than Howard Zinn.”
—Naomi Klein, author The Shock Doctrine

“Howard Zinn — there was no one like him. And to hear him speak was like listening to music that you loved — lyrical, uplifting, honest. If you never got to hear him speak, this book will move you in profound ways. Although Howard’s ‘voice’ is no longer with us, his true voice will live on forever. And I know he would love it for each of you to find your voice, too, and to be heard. Perhaps this book will provide you with some inspiration.”
—Michael Moore

“Reading Howard’s spoken words I feel that I am almost hearing his voice again. Even in writing its unique appeal comes through — his stunning pitch-perfect ability to capture the moment and the concerns and needs of the audience whoever they may be, always enlightening, often stirring, an amalgam of insight, critical history, wit, blended with charm and appeal. I’ve heard Howard speak to tens of thousands at demonstrations, to small groups of homeless people, to activists enduring brutal treatment, and at many other times and places. Always just the right tone and message, always inspiring, a gift to all of us to be treasured.”
—Noam Chomsky

“Howard Zinn was one of us, the best part of us. Enjoy these speeches. Hear his voice. Then hear your own, hear it closely.”
—Josh Brolin

“One of my favorite expressions from Nicaragua is: ‘Struggle is the highest form of song.’ In that case Howard Zinn is one of our great singers and these speeches are righteous songs filled with the boldness, vision, humor, depth and urgings of his profoundly human voice. Howard sang a different America, an invisible America, an America of the 99 percent. He sang of the lies and deceit of the government and the impossibility and horror of wars made in America’s name. He sang of a dream, a deeper dream that is now rising in the streets. I cannot think of a more important set of songs to be singing at this time.”
—Eve Ensler

“Howard Zinn’s speeches, beautifully gathered together here by Anthony Arnove, are a joy and an inspiration.”
—Marisa Tomei

“Howard Zinn’s towering legacy will forever be as a historian who made history. He made history because his books, his actions, and especially his speeches inspired ordinary people to do extraordinary things. We fight onward today in a remarkable tradition of struggle. For many of us, we first became aware of this tradition by sitting in a packed, musty meeting hall and listening to stories of heart, humor, and heroism, as communicated by Howard Zinn.”
—Dave Zirin

“The first time I heard Howard Zinn speak I was a student in the deep South, and amazed that anyone could stay alive long enough to say such things. He was completely fearless, totally relaxed, making joking asides as he went straight to the bloody heart of Empire. How much time it has saved me, having him as a teacher my second year in college. Reading this book brings back memories of those times when Howie spoke to sometimes shocked crowds of people who, before hearing him, had thought historians should be silent about current affairs or, at most, write quiet books. Howard Zinn was a free man. Delightful because of this. Howard Zinn Speaks is a book to savor. It is wise, humorous, serious, without one moment of hesitation in tackling the basic notions about who we are as a people, a country, and a world. Elder brother, great teacher. Presenté.”
–Alice Walker

“I hesitate to comment on Howard Zinn Speaks because of my unshakable and overt bias for anything Zinn. I don’t think it’d be fair honestly to gloat about his work in such a way. But then again having a Zinn bias just means you favor truth and justice over lies and oppression.”
–Lupe Fiasco

“These speeches make great reading for students and teachers—especially when read aloud.”
–Rethinking Schools

#ZinnSpeaks
@haymarketbooks

Howard Zinn Speaks paperback
http://goo.gl/B3E6Y

Howard Zinn Speaks cloth
http://goo.gl/DYlYC

Twitter:
https://twitter.com/haymarketbooks

Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/haymarketbooks

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

 

The Individuality Pr♥test: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/transcontinental/the-individuality-prtest

I Love Transcontinental: http://ihearttranscontinental.blogspot.co.uk/