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Tag Archives: Social Enterprise

Education is Not for Sale

Education is Not for Sale

EMPLOYER ENGAGEMENT: WHAT RESEARCH DO WE NEED?

Launch of the Network for Employability, Enterprise and Work-based Learning

Employer Engagement: what research do we need?

9th May 2013 11.30 – 15.45

SRHE 73 Collier Street, LondonN1 9BE

Dear Colleague

You are invited to join us at the launch of this new network which will focus on this important topic, and explore current and future research needs.

Keynote Address: David Doherty, Council for Industry and Higher Education (CIHE)

The Wilson Review (2012) indicated that both the sector and employers needed to focus on fostering mutual relationships.  But what does this mean?

In response to the Wilson Review, and at the request of the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS), CIHE are creating a National Centre for Universities and Business (NUCB).  What research needs will this new body have?

 

Programme

11.30              Introductions

12.00              Keynote address and questions

13.15               Lunch and networking

14.00              Roundtable discussions:

How can HEIs be encouraged into trusting partnerships that enable them to differentiate their offer and share territory and contacts? Come with success stories

What works well and what doesn’t?

15.15               Final remarks and conclusions

15.45               Close

 

If you are currently working on research into university/employee relations and would like to share your work at this event, please let us know on h.e.higson@aston.ac.uk.

Future events run by the network will focus on short internships and work experience (led by Southampton Solent University) and the effect of Placements on Employability and Academic Performance (led by Aston University), on Enterprise Education and work with SMEs.  We hope in doing this to link with other organisations such as the Higher Education Academy  (HEA), Association of Graduate Recruiters (AGR) and the Association of Sandwich Education and Training (ASET).

 

Convenors:

Professor Helen E Higson OBE, Professor of Higher Education Learning and Management, Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Aston University

Dr Richard Blackwell, Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Southampton Solent University

 

Event booking details

To reserve a place at any of these seminars please register at: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/ or telephone +44 (0) 207 427 2350.   SRHE events are open to all and free to SRHE members as part of their membership package. The delegate fee for non-members is £45 from. Non-members wishing to join the Society may do so at the time of registration and the delegate fee will be waived. Please note that places must be booked in advance and that a £45 fee for non-attendance will be charged if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non-attendance has been given in advance.

 

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit

SRHE Event Manager

Society for Research into Higher Education

73 Collier Street

London N1 9BE

Telephone 0207 427 2350

Fax number 0207 278 1135

srheoffice@srhe.ac.uk

http://www.srhe.ac.uk

 

**END**

 

Relevant to this conference see: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2012/08/28/life-in-the-higher-sausage-factory-the-paper/

Rikowski, G. (2012) Life in the Higher Sausage Factory, Guest Lecture to the Teacher Education Research Group, The Cass School of Education and Communities, University of East London, 22nd March, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Life%20in%20the%20Higher%20Sausage%20Factory.

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

No Future

No Future

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 11th FEBRUARY 2013

EVENTS

NEW MEDIA BOOTCAMP FOR UNION ACTIVISTS

Beginning February 18

Are you interested in learning how to master new media tools for union activism?

The New Media Bootcamp for Union Activists is a free online course that teaches union activists how to better use online tools to put forward the message of the labor movement.

You can learn more about the course at http://www.NewMediaForUnions.com

You will learn things such as:
– How to make your union’s content go viral online
– How to grow your Facebook Pages
– How to create effective petition pages
– How to best use Facebook, Twitter and YouTube
– How to get your issue to the top of Google

The first module comes out on February 18th and you can complete the course at your own pace.

Register at http://www.NewMediaForUnions.com

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“RIGHT-TO-WORK” IS WRONG: DEFEAT THE HARPER/HUDAK ATTACK ON WORKERS’ RIGHTS CAMPAIGN LAUNCH AND TRAINING

Saturday March 2, 2013
9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Allstream Centre, Exhibition Place
Registration – $50.00

Passage of so-called “right-to-work” legislation in Michigan, the birthplace of industrial unionism, has sent shockwaves across both sides of our border. Conservative MPs are planning the same here, and Ontario Tory leader Tim Hudak has made it part of his election platform. Canadians are about to experience an unprecedented level of aggression against the very foundations of collective bargaining. The entire labour movement is poised to take on this immediate threat.

The Toronto and York District Labour Council will be launching a massive internal union organizing campaign on Saturday March 2nd – registration form is at http://www.labourcouncil.ca

To see a copy of the campaign flyer: http://www.labourcouncil.ca/uploads/8/8/6/1/8861416/right_to_work_flyer.pdf

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SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE: SOCIAL ENTERPRISES AND THE NEW WAVE OF FOOD AND FARMING CO-OPERATIVES

Wednesday, Feb 13th, 2013
Noon – 1:30 pm.
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (U of T)
252 Bloor St. West, (St. George Subway Station)
Room 3-104
*No registration required

Presenters: Hannah Renglich, Local Organic Food Co-ops Network; Glenn Valliere, Ontario Co-op Association Board of Directors; and Randy Whitteker, Ontario Natural Food Co-op

Join us to explore:
-The story of the Ontario Natural Food Co-op, a 37-year-old social enterprise that proactively brings to market natural, organic and local foods within a co-operative network
– The new wave of food and farming co-operatives sprouting up across Ontario, and the corresponding emergence and development of the Local Organic Food Co-ops Network
– The sustainability and resilience of the co-operative model in the current economy, as it contributes to strong local economies, environmental stewardship, and community-sufficiency

Bring your lunch and a mug. Water, coffee, tea, and fresh-baked snacks from Lemon & Allspice will be provided.

For more information, please contact us at secspeakerseries@gmail.com

Webcast: This event will be webcast live. To view the webcast, click here: http://socialeconomycentre.ca/webcast-instructions

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FILM: TSAR TO LENIN

Saturday February 16
6 pm Dinner
7 pm Film screening
Oak Street Co-op Community Room, Toronto

(Directions: take River Street north from Dundas or south from Gerrard St. E., walk east on Oak St. and look for stairs and a ramp on the right side, just past the convenience store. Community Room at bottom of stairs.)

Film screening and fundraising dinner. The definitive film record of the 1917 Russian Revolution. This film premiered on March 6, 1937, at the Filmarte Theatre in New York City, after nine years in the making. At that time, the New York Times praised Tsar to Lenin as “an important work – a complete, impartial and intelligent film history of the Russian revolution.” The critic of the New York Post described the film as the “most important moving picture I ever saw in my life…the most vital and absorbing film, to my mind, in the history of the movies.” With the onset of the Cold War this film was denied the audience it should have received.  But as the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution approaches, it is being rediscovered.
Come to this special film screening and fundraising dinner for http://www.socialist.ca

Suggested donation $7-15 (sliding scale)
Organized by Coxwell International Socialists. Info: 647.393.3096

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NEWS & VIEWS

ATTACK ON FREE COLLECTIVE BARGAINING POLITICAL, NOT FISCAL

from Leftwords

In December, it was predicted that outgoing finance minister Dwight Duncan would   reduce his deficit forecast just before his departure (for Bay Street).  Duncan had somehow estimated in his fall economic statement that the 2012-3 deficit would be $14.4 billion, i.e. higher than the 2011-12 deficit — and even higher than the 2010-11 deficit!

Sure enough, Duncan lopped another $2.5 billion off the deficit in January.

Read more: http://ochuleftwords.blogspot.ca/2013/02/attack-on-free-collective-bargaining.html

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OUR TIMES WOMEN’S ISSUE SNEAK PREVIEW

Our Times’ ever-popular annual women’s issue is heading to press soon, cutting through the noise and spin of the powers that be with the sharp, wise and sincere voices of women standing strong and making change.

We’ll be launching our three-part series, Leadership, Feminism and Equality in Canadian Unions, in which we’ll share the collective wisdom of 50 women from across Canada.

You’ll also hear from Halifax Idle No More organizer Marina Young, a Mi’kmaq activist speaking out about Indigenous and Canadian issues and efforts to shape the future of First Nations communities and the country as a whole.

We’ll also hear a parent’s point of view on the teachers’ fight against Bill 115, and though it may have been repealed, its impacts in Ontario and the fight for collective bargaining continue.

We’ll also check in with K-12 education support staff in Edmonton. And because children “shouldn’t just be for rich families,” Sharon Gregson, a spokesperson for the Coalition of Child Care Advocates of B.C., as well as unionists in B.C. and across Canada fills us in on their steadfast campaign for universal child care.

This is just a sampling of the stories in this issue. It’s going to be a great one. Please join us in celebrating and supporting women workers!

If you would like to order extra copies of this issue (more than 20) as an education resource for your workshops, conferences or schools, please place your order with our business manager by February 19.

Telephone: 416-703-7661 Toll free: 1-800-648-6131 Email: office@ourtimes.ca Special bulk order prices are available.

I hope you enjoy the issue and find it of use.

In Solidarity,
Lorraine Endicott
Editor, Our Times (http://www.ourtimes.ca)

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TELL YOUR STORY – “OUR LIFE AT WORK”

by Iles Minoff, creator and editor of OurLifeAtWork.com

I’ve posted a new website, http://www.OurLifeAtWork.com, where working people can tell their story. On the site now are fifteen stories written by electricians, roofers, rail workers, a flight attendant, a nursing home organizer, and workers at factory bakeries and a meatpacking plant among others. They were written in the 1990s by mostly labor leaders for a class in the Anthropology of Work I taught for five years in the college degree program of the George Meany Center for Labor Studies in Silver Spring, Maryland. Take a look.

What makes these stories so compelling is that the descriptions of occupations and workplaces are from their own point of view, having sometimes spent some twenty years or more on the job. They write about starting out on the job, a day at work, how the work really gets done, gaining respect on the job, the informal rules, the job pecking order, friendships, teamwork, conflicts, accidents, the emerging role of women, race, and organizing as they and their fellow workers experienced it all.

I hope you will make use of the site and encourage people to write their own stories. If you are involved in this area, or know of others who are, please let me know.  OurLifeAtWork.com is a work-in-progress. How can I make it better? Thanks.

Iles Minoff,  Email: ilesminoff@gmail.com

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AMNESTY FOR THE UNDOCUMENTED, THEY’VE EARNED IT

by Richard Mellor, Facts for Working People

Immigrants are hard workers; they have to be. They are usually economic refugees, victims of wars, both physical wars and trade wars. The Irish came to England and to the US in droves to escape poverty in their homeland, a poverty that was a product of occupation and the theft of their land. As a person of English origin living in California, I have often compared the Irish immigrants to Britain to our Mexican and other Latino immigrants who are also economic migrants, forced to leave their homes and families to stave off starvation. NAFTA drove more than a million Mexican farmers from their subsistence farms; many came up here. It’s hard to compete with Con Agra or Monsanto when it comes to agricultural production, the US small farmer can testify to that.

Read more: http://weknowwhatsup.blogspot.ca/2013/02/amnesty-for-undocumented-theve-earned-it.html

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FACTORY IN GREECE STARTS PRODUCTION UNDER WORKERS’ CONTROL

from libcomm.org

Striking workers at the Vio.Me factory in Thessaloniki, Greece who have not been paid since May 2011 have decided to restart production under workers’ control on 12 February 2013.

With unemployment climbing to 30%, workers’ income reaching zero, sick and tired of big words, promises and more taxes, unpaid since May 2011 and currently withholding their labour, with the factory abandoned by the employers, the workers of Vio.Me, by decision of their general assembly declare their determination not to fall prey to a condition of perpetual unemployment, but instead to struggle to take the factory in their own hands and operate it themselves.

Read more: http://libcom.org/news/factory-greece-starts-production-under-workers-control-11022013

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WHY I DON’T FEEL SAFE OR RIGHT FLYING PORTER AND YOU SHOULDN’T EITHER

by Trish Qualtrough – COPE Organizer

Several months ago I was approached by a group of young workers at Porter Fixed Based Operations (FBO) looking for a union to represent them as they had serious concerns around health and safety. The stories they recounted of flagrant health and safety violations and unsafe working conditions were appalling.

Read more: http://copeontario.ca/why-i-dont-feel-safe-or-right-flying-porter-and-you-shouldnt-either/

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JOBS

PROFESSIONAL TELEPHONE FUNDRAISERS FOR PROGRESSIVE CAUSES (ENGLISH AND BI-LINGUAL FRENCH-ENGLISH) – TORONTO

Progressive Metrics is a fundraising, communications and political consulting agency. We specialize in assisting trade unions, worker organizations, grassroots campaigns, political advocacy organizations and progressive candidates to work for social change.

Progressive Metrics is currently seeking telephone representatives for its Toronto-based call centre.

Primary responsibilities are fundraising for various political advocacy organizations, NGO’s, and progressive political parties and candidates.

Application deadline: 12 PM (Noon) Tuesday, February 19, 2013.

For more information and to apply: http://progressivemetrics.ca/careers/

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UNION REPRESENTATIVE- COPE LOCAL 397 (SASKATCHEWAN)

Canadian Office & Professional Employees Union (COPE), Local 397 requires an experienced person to be responsible for all aspects of Labour Relations with various employers throughout the Local’s jurisdiction.

Qualifications:
– Ability to promote and support the principles of Trade Unionism.
– Relevant post secondary education and/or extensive labour relations work-related experience (graduate of a Labour Studies program would be an asset).
– Demonstrated extensive experience in the administration, negotiation, and interpretation of Collective Bargaining Agreements.
– Working knowledge of relevant Labour Legislation.
– Strong oral and written communication skills.
– Demonstrated ability to work independently, to set priorities and to balance a demanding workload.
– Demonstrated ability to establish and maintain effective working relationships.
– Demonstrated ability to use the Microsoft Office Suite.
– Possession of valid driver’s licence and a reliable vehicle.

For more info and to apply: http://www.cope397.ca/sk/employment_opportunity

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UNION ORGANIZER – COPE LOCAL 397 (SASKATCHEWAN/MANITOBA/ALBERTA)

The Canadian Office and Professional Employees Union (COPE), Local 397 is a progressive and professional Union with Members who work at Saskatchewan Government Insurance (SGI), Service Employees International Union (SEIU-West) in Saskatoon, Moose Jaw and Swift Current, Saskatchewan NDP Provincial and Caucus Offices, Saskatchewan NDP Constituency Assistants, the RM of Alexander, the U of R Faculty Association and our Calgary Unit. We have over 1,600 members in Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Alberta.

We are currently seeking a talented and motivated individual for the term position of Union Organizer. This position will be extended as funding is available. This person will be based in Regina.

For more info and to apply: http://www.cope397.ca/sk/employment_opportunity

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Incident

The Incident

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 18th OCTOBER 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE – UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2009-2010 LUNCHBOX SPEAKERS’ SERIES

October Speakers’ Panel – Student Co-operatives

When:  Wednesday, October 21, 2009, noon – 1:30 pm
Where:  Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto,
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto, Room 12-199

Speakers:

* Marisa Charland will give an overview of Ontario Student Co-operative Association, the federation that unites all Ontario student co-operatives.
* Debbie McKay will present the development of, and services provided by the Guelph Campus Co-operative enterprise at University of Guelph.
* Andrew Haydon will discuss the challenges in developing the newest student housing co-operative in Ontario, located in Cambridge.

* Sonja Carrière, Education Manager of On Co-op, will moderate this panel.

Bring your lunch and a mug – coffee, tea and water will be provided.

For more information, contact Lisa White at secspeaker@oise.utoronto.ca, or visit our website at http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca

This event will also be webcast live on the Internet. Please see our website for detailed instructions: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca/english/webcast.php

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PEOPLE FOR EDUCATION ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Register now to attend on Saturday November 7, 2009!

Amazing speakers and workshop leaders are looking forward to sharing their expertise with you.

* Meet other parents, principals, school and school board staff from around the province.
* Come and share ideas, raise concerns, find solutions and learn a lot!
* Connect with others who care passionately about our schools.

When: Nov. 7th, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m

Where: York University, Toronto, ON

Cost: $50 and you can save $10 by becoming a member of People for Education (costs $25 but gets you lots of other privileges too!)

To view the registration form, click here: http://www.peopleforeducation.com/registration09 (Fill it out, save to your computer, then email back to jan@peopleforeducation.com)

To view the conference flyer, click here (share this by email – bring a friend or someone from your school): http://www.peopleforeducation.com/conferenceflyer09

To view the agenda and session descriptions, click here: http://www.peopleforeducation.com/conference09/sessionsupdate

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URGENT ACTION: STOP THE U OF T ATTACKS ON ACCESS & EQUITY

October 19 & 21

Students who face barriers to access education are about to be hit even harder. The Transitional Year Program (TYP), a 40 year old access program, is about to face drastic changes that will inevitably destroy it. These changes include taking away TYP’s autonomy by putting it under Woodsworth College, taking away TYP’s independent space, reducing teaching and support staff, and slashing the TYP budget.

We need your support on Monday October 19 and Wednesday October 21. On these dates university bodies will be voting to decide the fate of the program. We need a mass turnout of people to stop these committees from rubber-stamping these heinous changes:

Monday October 19, 3-5pm
Faculty of Arts and Science Council
Munk Centre, Campbell Conference Centre,
1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire and Hoskin)

Wednesday October 2,1 4:30-6pm
Woodsworth College Council
Woodsworth Residence, Waters Lounge
321 Bloor Street (Bloor and St. George)

The University has told students that they are not closing TYP. However, TYP will be unable to serve its mandate and support its students under the proposed move to Woodsworth. Reducing staff, faculty and funding limits the ability of the program to meet the needs of its students. Taking away our space by moving us into a few rooms at Woodsworth further marginalizes us by removing the supportive environment that our home at 49 St. George provides.

The University and TYP administration have been repeatedly asked to consult students through this process. After a battle, the TYP administration began meeting with the Transitional Year Program Preservation Alliance, sharing limited information and calling it consultation. Never have students or the communities TYP serves been allowed input into the process.

The future of these marginalized students is in your hands. Please join us in asking the University of Toronto to reconsider shutting the doors on this essential program.

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THIRD CANADIAN CONFERENCE ON SOCIAL ENTERPRISE

“Living Our Values: Social Enterprise in Action”
November 18-20, 2009

Join hundreds of existing and prospective social enterprise operators from every region in Canada at the Third Canadian Conference on Social Enterprise taking place in Toronto, November 18-20, 2009. The conference will consist of three days of training and work sessions toward a national policy agenda and action plan.

Day 1: Intensive training sessions geared to your stage of planning, development or growth.

Days 2 and 3: Working sessions with fellow practitioners, funders, government officials, network organizations, and supporters designed to create a national policy agenda and action plan for social enterprise in Canada.

The Third Canadian Conference on Social Enterprise is an initiative of the Social Enterprise Council of Canada. For more information on the conference, please email: info@torontoenterprisefund.ca or visit http://www.enterprisingnonprofits.ca/resources/secouncil#CCSE

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WHAT’S WRONG WITH CANADA’S IMMIGRATION SYSTEM?

A Migrant Justice Assembly with Salimah Valiani, Amina Sherazee, Himani Bannerji and David McNally

Friday, October 23
6:00pm
245 Church Street
Room ENG-LG11

* Did you know that in 2008 more temporary workers entered the workforce than permanent residents in to Canada?
* Did you know that Canada has cut its refugee acceptance rate in half over the last 20 years?
* Did you know that there are over half a million people in the country without status, over half in the GTA?

Come and hear about how the broken immigration system is being shattered. Share your own stories. Build relationships. Develop ideas for the way ahead. Come prepared to talk back!

Registration and Refreshments at 6:00; Event starts at 6:30pm sharp.

Read more: http://toronto.nooneisillegal.org/node/336

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NOTES ON NO: ABSTINENCE AND THE PROBLEM OF THINKING IN SEX EDUCATION

CUHI (Centre for Urban Health Initiatives) Youth Sexual Health RIG Seminar Series

With Jen Gilbert, Ph.D., Faculty of Education, York University

Wednesday October 28th, 2009, 1:30-3:00 pm
York University, Room 280N, York Lanes
For Directions: http://www.yorku.ca/yorkweb/maps/keele.htm
Free, all are welcome, please RSVP to adrian.guta@utoronto.ca

This paper explores the problem of prohibition in sex education. Drawing on a two-year study of the language of abstinence in the United States, Dr. Gilbert considers many of the different ways that adults and youth use “no” in sex education. Feminists and other have critiqued the use of “no” as a restrictive and punitive gesture, containing sexuality’s potential in the lives of youth, particularly girls, youth of color, and LGBT youth. While she recognizes the importance of these critiques, she takes a detour through psychoanalytic theories of negation and considers the ways “no” can, often unwittingly, make room for thinking and thoughtfulness.

Please see our website for upcoming seminar summaries and other events: http://www.cuhi.utoronto.ca

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CREATIVE PLACES + SPACES CONFERENCE    
        
Oct. 28-30, 2009

Creative Places + Spaces is a multi-media, interactive, art-infused experience designed to inspire, empower, and connect thinkers, policymakers and practitioners working to build vibrant, dynamic, sustainable and creative places. The conference runs from October 28 – 30, 2009 and is hosted by Artscape.

During Creative Places + Spaces:  The Collaborative City, delegates and speakers together will have the opportunity to hear, see, exchange and practice global perspectives on collaboration and connect them to local opportunities for change. If you are interested in building bridges across boundaries in order to solve problems, generate new ideas, and foster transformation, check out the conference schedule and register today for a crash-course in the global groundswell around collaboration.

To find out more: http://www.creativeplacesandspaces.ca/conference

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THE MAYTREE FOUNDATION: REGISTER FOR THE FIVE GOOD IDEAS FALL 2009 PROGRAM

* Creating an Automatic Marketing Culture

with Donnie Claudino

Thursday, October 22, 2009
12:00 to 2:00 pm

Are you one of those people who rarely forward emails? Yet on that rare occasion, something strikes you as special–and you are inspired to ‘pass-it-on.’ Something about it clicked with you. Perhaps you can’t even explain it; a certain … je ne sais quoi. That ‘something’ is often described by marketers as “stickiness.” Stickiness is typically associated with “Viral Marketing.” But who wants to spread a virus? When we connect with a message, a video, a website–we automatically engage with it, and want to share it. We don’t have to be asked, because it’s automatic. Attend this Lunch & Learn to discover 5 things your organization can do to grow an automatic marketing culture–and have your messages exponentially spread by your constituents.

*Managing Volunteers

with Gail Nyberg, Executive Director, Daily Bread Food Bank

Wednesday, November 18, 2009
12:00 to 2:00 pm

Most non-profit organizations rely on volunteers to not only enhance their programming, but run day-to-day operations. At Daily Bread Food Bank the job of distributing over 15 million pounds or food to over 200 food programs would not get done without the hard work of volunteers. Volunteers help to sort food, participate in events, provide information to the public and run community food banks. Last year, 15,521 volunteers helped Daily Bread with over 107,259 hours of work. Our volunteers do great work, and we are constantly looking at ways to improve our programs and our volunteer opportunities. Come and find out more about what we’ve learned over the years (and are still learning) about how to run a successful volunteer program.

Location for both sessions:

St. Michael’s College – Elmsley Hall, Charbonnel Lounge
81 St. Mary Street
At St. Mary and Bay Streets, two blocks south of Bloor, closest subway access from Bay and Wellesley stations.

Please note that though the sessions are free, registration is required. Brown bag lunches are provided on a first come, first served basis.

Please RSVP to: kvukobratovic@maytree.com

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ECHO AND OWHN WANT TO HEAR YOUR VOICE ON OCTOBER 21, TORONTO

Please join Echo and the Ontario Women’s Health Network and share your views on: The Minister of Health’s 10-Year Mental Health and Addictions Strategy

Date: Wednesday October 21, 2009
Time: 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Place: Chestnut Conference Centre
89 Chestnut Street, Toronto
(east of University/south of Dundas )

Together we will:

1)   discuss the Minister’s report called Every Door is the Right Door;
2)   prepare comments that will be shared in a report to the Minister of Health;
3)   enjoy a women-friendly day of sharing and conversation to ensure your voices are heard
4)   share a healthy breakfast, lunch and snacks.  

This is an event for community women, service providers & community planners.

Please register by contacting OWHN at 416-408-4840 or by email at: owhn@owhn.on.ca

Please ask about support for childcare and local transportation.

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REPORT LAUNCH: WHY DON’T WE WANT THE POOR TO OWN ANYTHING?

The Metcalf Foundation invites you to the launch of a new report by Metcalf Innovation Fellow John Stapleton:

Why don’t we want the poor to own anything? Our relentless social policy journey toward destitution for the 900,000 poorest people in Ontario

When: Wednesday, October 21, 2009 from 1:00 to 3:00 pm
Where: St. Christopher House – Community Hall
248 Ossington Avenue (Dundas at Ossington), Toronto

This new report explores the issue of the very low levels of savings and assets allowed for people on welfare and some other social security programs. It makes recommendations for reform to rules that are impoverishing people and almost guaranteeing they will grow old in poverty.

Low-income community members may qualify for assistance to attend this event. Please call Rick Eagan at St. Christopher House at (416) 532-4828 ext. 238 for details.

Please RSVP to Heather Dunford at hdunford@metcalffoundation.com or (416) 926- 0366 ext. 33

To view launch details: http://fpyn.ca/system/files/Launch%20invite.pdf

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ORDER NOW! OUR TIMES MAGAZINE SPECIAL FALL ISSUE ON CLIMATE CHANGE

“The division between labour movements and social justice movements is an artificial one that serves to impede our ability to make progressive and sustained change.”
Angela Robertson, Social Justice Activist
“What Binds Us Together”

Here we go again! Our Times’ special fall issue on climate change (Vol. 28 No.5) will be heading to the printer shortly. If you’d like extra copies (more than 20), please let us know as soon as possible.

In this issue we’re featuring the efforts of workers and unions to go green and create long-term sustainable jobs. We’re bringing you a fantastic photostory by B.C. photographer Joshua Berson about the firefighters who fought the massive fires this year in Kelowna. And you’ll hear about the joint efforts of the Highlander Center in Tennessee and Toronto’s Labour Education Centre to build a cross-border, cross-movement dialogue. Of course, we’ll also have great new instalments of our regular columns, including WebWork and the Our Times Tally.

If you think you may want to order extra copies of this issue as an education resource for your workshops, schools, or to include in your conference or convention kits, please contact our business manager by Monday, October 19 at the latest. Telephone: 416-703-7661. Toll-free: 1-800-648-6131. E-mail: office@ourtimes.ca. Discounted prices are available for bulk orders.

Either way, I hope you enjoy the issue and find it of use. Thank you for your support for Our Times.

In Solidarity,
Lorraine Endicott
Editor, Our Times
http://www.ourtimes.ca

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CANADIAN JOURNALISM FOUNDATION FORUM – DIVERSITY IN THE MEDIA: A CASE STUDY

In an effort to bring lessons learned about diversity and programming to a wider audience, CJF Forums presents Joan Melanson, executive producer at CBC Radio, Toronto; and Nick Davis, producer of Metro Morning, in a discussion on reaching out to diverse audiences. Suanne Kelman, a professor at Ryerson’s School of Journalism, will interview the panel.

Date:
Tuesday, October 20, 2009
6:30 PM – 9:00 PM (ET)

Location:
Innis Town Hall
2 Sussex Ave.
Toronto, Ontario M5S 1J5

After the discussion there will be a Q&A with the audience, followed by a cocktail reception.

The event is free, but guests are encouraged to make a $15 contribution to help support CJF programs upon registration.

To register:  http://www.eventbrite.com/contact-organizer?eid=451282799

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BOOK LAUNCH (TORONTO) – HARVEST PILGRIMS: MEXICAN AND CARIBBEAN MIGRANT FARM WORKERS IN CANADA

Between the Lines and the Stephen Bulger Gallery invite you to celebrate the launch of Vincenzo Pietropaolo’s new book of photography. Harvest Pilgrims tells the little-known story of Canada’s migrant workers. The photographs in the “Harvest Pilgrims” collection have been highly acclaimed internationally through many publications and exhibitions, including a travelling show curated by the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography that opened in Mexico City. Pietropaolo will present a slideshow of his work on the subject, and talk about the project, which has been 20 years in the making.

Tuesday, November 10th, 2009
7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Stephen Bulger Gallery
1026 Queen Street West
Toronto, ON

For more information, contact Between the Lines, 1.800.718.7201or email: info@btlbooks.com

About the Book:
Harvest Pilgrims: Mexican and Caribbean Migrant Farm Workers in Canada
Vincenzo Pietropaolo
144 pp | paper | 80 + duotone photos
ISBN 978-1-897071-54-0 | $49.95 | October 2009

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OISE/UT DISABILITY STUDIES SPEAKERS SERIES – “DISABILITY IN DANGEROUS TIMES”

With Dr. Catherine Frazee

Thursday, November 5
3:30 pm
OISE Library, 252 Bloor Street West
Toronto, ON (above St. George Subway stop)

All Welcome, ASL provided

Catherine Frazee, D.Litt., LLD.
Professor of Distinction
Co-director, Ryerson-RBC Institute for Disability Studies Research & Education

Catherine Frazee has been involved in the equality rights movement for many years, most notably during her term as Chief Commissioner of the Ontario Human Rights Commission from 1989 to 1992. Her current work as a writer, educator and researcher focuses upon the rights, identity, experience and well-being of persons with disabilities. Catherine is a committed activist who has lectured and published extensively in Canada and abroad on issues related to disability rights, disability culture and the disability experience. She is currently a member of DAWN Canada’s Equality Rights Committee and serves on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Association for Community Living, where she chairs the Association’s Task Force on Values and Ethics. Catherine was awarded an honorary Doctor of Letters from the University of New Brunswick in October 2002.

For more info, contact Tanya Titchkosky, 416-978-0451 or email: tanyatitchkosky@oise.utoronto.ca

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SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE – UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2009-2010 WORKSHOP SERIES

October 30: Board-Management Relations
with Vic Murray (Schulich School of Business, York University; School of Public Administration, University of Victoria)

For years, books, articles, websites and consultants have been offering all kinds of advice on how boards ought to operate and relate to the organizations they govern. Yet many boards have a very difficult time living up to these ideals or choose not to even try. Why is this? Is it the fault of the boards and managers? Or is it possible that the advice itself is not always what is needed?

Join us in this workshop to:

* Explore the gaps between the ideal and reality in board governance
* Learn how to develop ways of bringing the ideal and reality closer together
* Learn how to use contingency-based analysis and tailored board development approaches

Date:  Friday, October 30, 2009 – 9:00 am – 4:00 pm.

Cost: $140 + GST; Each additional participant from the same organization will receive a $15 discount, as will those who register for more than one workshop. Student rate available. Refreshments, coffee & tea served, but lunch not provided.

To Register: http://sec.oise.utoronto.ca/english/workshops.php or contact Lisa White at secworkshops@oise.utoronto.ca, 416-978-0022

Location:  Social Economy Centre of the University of Toronto, 252 Bloor St. W. (5th floor), Toronto, ON M5S 1V6, (St. George Subway Station)

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TELELEARNING SESSION 15: POVERTY REDUCTION IN CANADA

1. What are some public policy trends and instruments supporting poverty reduction in Canada?
2. What are some community-based approaches to poverty reduction in Canada?

If you want to know the answers to these questions and more, please join:

Jean Marc Fontan, Professor at UQÀM/Co-director of the Social Economy Community-University Research Alliance in Quebec; and Shauna McKinnon, Director of the Canadian Centre for Policy in an engaging telelearning session hosted by Jessica Notwell, Manager of the Women’s Economic Council.

Call Logistics:

* Session Date: Wednesday October 21st, 2009
* Call begins at 12:00 pm Eastern time, 9:00 am Pacific time
* Call in information will be given upon registration
* Register before October 20 to obtain dial in information and background papers
* This session is in English.

Session Format: 1 Hour
Welcome: 5 min
Presentations: 10 min by each speaker
Discussion: 35 minutes

Registration:
Register by phoning 250-472-4976, or e-mailing sekm@uvic.ca with your name, location, and work or volunteer position.

Limited number of spaces available – Register soon!
(This session is only available to Canadian Residents)

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AUDITOR’S REPORT REINFORCES NEED FOR GREATER PUBLIC CONTROL; LESS PRIVATIZATION: OPSEU

The findings by the Auditor General that greater public oversight would have prevented the spending scandal at eHealth was strongly embraced by the Ontario Public Service Employees Union.

“Let’s hope the Premier and his government learned a valuable lesson today: the more you hand over control of a vital public service like health care to the private sector, the more costs are going to skyrocket at the expense of the tax-paying public,” said OPSEU president Warren (Smokey) Thomas.

“We couldn’t agree more with Auditor General McCarter. The private consultants behind the eHealth spending scandal weren’t able to contain themselves from pinching the public purse for every last dime. That simply wouldn’t happen under a genuine public system with built-in checks, oversight and accountability.”

In his report, the Auditor General specifically pointed to the fact that “there was a heavy, and in some cases almost total, reliance on (private) consultants. By 2008, the Ministry’s eHealth Program Branch had fewer than 30 full-time employees, but was engaging more than 300 consultants …”

Thomas said watching the eHealth scandal unfold was like reading a familiar old story.

He cited the Auditor’s report from 2008 which revealed the privatization of the William Osler Hospital in Brampton cost almost $500 million more than had Ontario used traditional public procurement and financing.

For further information: Greg Hamara, OPSEU Communications, (647) 238-9933 cell

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GROCERY UNIONS JOIN WITH COMMUNITY TO BUILD BETTER SUPERMARKETS

by Tiffany Ten Eyck, Labor Notes

In New York City 11,600 retailers sell food, but fewer than 5 percent of them are grocery stores. In Detroit, more than half the city’s residents live in a “food desert,” where they’re closer to a fast food joint or a convenience store than to a supermarket.

UFCW locals in both cities are building community coalitions to create more and better grocery stores – which they hope, one day, will be union.

To read more: http://labornotes.org/node/2461

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LABOUR BOOK OF THE WEEK – THE KILLING OF KAREN SILKWOOD

It has now been 35 years since the murder of American trade unionist Karen Silkwood.

Silkwood was working at a plutonium processing plant and was killed in a mysterious car crash on her way to deliver important documents to a newspaper reporter.

She had been working on health and safety issues at the plant. She was 28 years old when she died.

To learn more about Karen and to celebrate her life please buy a copy of The Killing of Karen Silkwood — this week’s Labour Book of the Week.

The issues this book explores — whistle-blowers, worker safety, the environment, and nuclear vulnerability — are as relevant today as they were 35 years ago.

To read more: https://ssl30.pair.com/unionist/ccp51/cgi-bin/cp-app.cgi?rrc=N&pg=prod&ref=silkwood&affl=labourstart

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Learning at Work

Learning at Work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 26th AUGUST 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

To change your subscriptions settings, visit: http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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RESOURCE AVAILABLE FROM CSEW – THE EDUCATION-JOBS GAP: UNDEREMPLOYMENT OR ECONOMIC DEMOCRACY

by D.W. Livingstone

“In a scorching and informative critique of the growing discrepancy between knowledge and human capacity and the available opportunities for decent work, D.W. Livingstone has written one of the most important books of the decade. This is a book that breathes new life into the much over-looked relationship between education and economic reform.”
(Henry A. Giroux)

Garamond Press or-Percheron Press, 2004 (2nd edition with New Introduction)

Available online from publisher, UTP http://www.utppublishing.com/pubstore, or by phone 416.978.2239 or from http://www.amazon.ca

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VOLUNTEER WITH CLIFF – CANADA ’S ONLY NATIONAL FILM FEST!

The Canadian Labour International Film Festival (CLiFF) is now accepting volunteer applicants to help out with our inaugural festival. Our not-for-profit festival celebrates films about workers, for workers and by workers.

Volunteers can be involved in many aspects of the festival from suggesting recent films for inclusion to helping throw media-related events like the one we are planning for Labour Day! As our festival launch draws closer we will also need people to help distribute leaflets, assemble media kits, as well as helping manage other volunteers. During the festival itself we’ll also need help taking tickets and individuals to act us ushers. There’s a place for everyone.

Upon request, volunteers will receive a letter reflecting their commitment and involvement in the festival.  Don’t pass up this unique opportunity to see the inner workings of a festival in its first year!

All volunteers should be:

* 18 years of age or older
* willing to attend a mandatory volunteer orientation session
* committed, friendly, team players

The festival launches November 22nd in Toronto and runs until November 29th.  It launches country-wide November 28th. We will be holding volunteer orientations sessions in August through the start of November.

Please e-mail us at festival@labourfilms.ca and with the word “Volunteer” in the subject line.

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THIRD CANADIAN CONFERENCE ON SOCIAL ENTERPRISE – REGISTRATION OPEN!
November 18-20, 2009

Living Our Values: Social Enterprise in Action 

Join hundreds of existing and prospective social enterprise operators from every region in Canada at the Third Canadian Conference on Social Enterprise taking place in Toronto, November 18-20, 2009.

The conference will consist of three days of training and work sessions toward a national policy agenda and action plan.

Register now at http://www.secouncil.ca

Hosting the Third Canadian Conference on Social Enterprise is the Social Enterprise Council of Canada (http://www.enterprisingnonprofits.ca/resources/secouncil).

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“UNION STRATEGIES FOR HARD TIMES” PUBLISHED

A new book outlining how unions can help their laid off members, protect those still working, and prevent the gutting of their hard-won contracts – and their very unions themselves – has been published by Union Communication Services, Inc. (UCS).

Union Strategies for Hard Times: Helping Your Members and Building Your Union in the Great Recession, offers how-to counsel for unions as the continuing economic crisis ravages workers and threatens to destroy decades of collective bargaining gains. Urging leaders to avoid falling into a strictly defensive posture, it outlines how unions can seize the time and turn crisis into opportunity.

The author is Bill Barry, director of labor studies at the Community College of Baltimore County and a 40-year veteran of the movement. Barry calls on his long history of activism and years of “what works, what doesn’t” discussions with other leaders to come up with strategies to survive these terrible times and even use the crisis to build a better future.

Union Strategies for Hard Times outlines a frank and systematic program for union leaders, stewards and activists who want to respond aggressively to those employers and financial interests that would have working people and their institutions just shut up, be nice and accept what’s given them.

Topics in the book include:

* Hanging Tough at the Table
* New Tactics on Grievances
* Aiding and Mobilizing Members on Layoff
* Confronting Financial Strains
* Effective Communications for a New Day
* Where We are and How We Got Here

The book describes today’s challenges to unions representing workers in every sector of the economy and offers concrete, Organizing Model tactics to deal with them. No union activists who want to help their members — working or laid off — while defending and even growing their unions should be without this important book.

Barry is the author of I Just Got Elected – Now What: A New Union Officer’s Handbook. Both books are offered by Union Communication Services, Inc., publishers of The Union Steward’s Complete Guide, Steward Update newsletter and other tools for union activists. Union Strategies for Hard Times is available for $15 plus $3 shipping and handling from http://www.unionist.com, 800-321-2545, or UCS Inc., 165 Conduit St., Annapolis MD 21401.

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IFWEA INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE – WORKERS’ EDUCATION AS A GLOBAL CHALLENGE

Thursday 8 –Friday 9 October 2009

* What are the values and traditions of workers’ education and how did they evolve?
* Why is internationalism so important for workers’ education?
* What are the similarities and differences between various models of workers’ education as practised by IFWEA affiliates in different countries?
* Are any of these workers’ education models appropriate for dealing with rising social exclusion and extremism that characterises 21st century societies?
* How do these models address political education and the building of social organisation and mobilisation?
* Should workers’ education focus on individual or systemic change? Can it do both, and if so, how?

These are some of the questions that will be discussed at the Workers’ Education as a Global Challenge international conference, which will be run in partnership with the School of Management and Labour Relations at Rutgers State University of New Jersey, and the Workers’ Education Association (ABF) of Sweden.

For further details, click here: http://www.ifwea.org/conference/register.html

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CALL FOR PAPERS ON “LABOR AND THE ENVIRONMENT”

For The Labor Studies Journal Conference Issue and Presentation at the United Association for Labor Education Conference
San Diego, CA
March 24-27, 2010

The Labor Studies Journal invites submission of papers on the theme of labor and environment. Best papers will be selected for presentation at the 2010 UALE Conference and afterwards will undergo the peer-review process for possible publication in the Labor Studies Journal Special Issue.

We welcome papers address issues including but not limited to the following:

* Coalition building between labor, environmental group, and other organizations in reversing climate change
* Organized labor’s effort in protecting workers or/and community from environmental harms
* Unions and workforce development for green jobs
* Unions’ role in creating a sustainable economy
* Unions’ political action in protecting the environment
* Labor and the environment in other countries
* International comparison on labor and the environment

Please send electronic copies of manuscript draft of 5 to 8 pages by December 10, 2009 to one of the guest editors, listed below. Full-length manuscripts are expected at the time of presentation at the conference in March.

Julie Martinez Ortega   
American Rights at Work
JMartinez@americanrightsatwork.org   

Tracy Chang
University of Alabama at Birmingham
tracyc@uab.edu

The Labor Studies Journal is the official journal of the United Association for Labor Education (http://www.uale.org) and is a peer-reviewed journal. It publishes multidisciplinary research on work, workers, labor organizations, and labor studies and worker education in the United States and internationally.

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PUBLIC SERVICE ALLIANCE OF CANADA (PSAC) – REGIONAL NEGOTIATOR

Position Number 5610-0015
Closing Date: August 28, 2009 at 3:30 p.m

Job Description: Under the direction of the Coordinator of Negotiations, the Negotiator acts as chief spokesperson and chair of PSAC negotiating teams for bargaining units in the federal public and private sectors, and in provincial and territorial jurisdictions and represents the PSAC in third party dispute resolution processes such as conciliation, arbitration and mediation, in the context of federal and provincial labour legislation and the PSAC Constitution, regulations and policies. The Negotiator also provides advice and guidance to PSAC collective bargaining committees, elected officers and members on issues related to collective bargaining, including strike strategy and collective agreement interpretation.

A detailed job description is available on our website: http://www.psac.com/careers/selectjob-e.cfm or upon request. Closing Date: August 28, 2009 at 3:30 p.m. Please submit your résumé stating how your knowledge, skills and abilities relate to the qualifications of the position by mail to: Human Resources Section, PSAC, 233 Gilmour Street, Ottawa, Ontario, K2P 0P1. By fax: (613) 248-4885, by e-mail: HRACTION@psac.com  If you apply by e-mail, do not send a duplicate by fax or regular mail.

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CONFERENCE – INFORMING PUBLIC POLICY:  SOCIO-ECONOMIC AND HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES ON LABOUR IN NEW BRUNSWICK

1-2 September 2009

Understanding New Brunswick’s present by knowing about its past is the theme of a two-day bilingual conference on public policy and labour history to be held 1-2 September 2009 at the Wu Centre on UNB’s Fredericton campus.
The conference, Informing Public Policy:  Socio-economic and Historical Perspectives on Labour in New Brunswick, brings together researchers and community leaders from all parts of the province and also features keynote speakers from Laval, Harvard and Concordia universities.

Sessions include “ The Crisis in the Forest Industry”, “The Making of Labour Law and Public Policy”, “The Ongoing Crisis in Nursing”, “What Workers Need to Know: A Labour Education” and “L’Acadie at Work: The Survival and Development of Acadian Communities”.

Other highlights of the conference include the official launch of the New Brunswick Museum Nursing History Exhibition, a labour and business documents display by the Provincial Archives of New Brunswick, and multimedia and research poster displays by graduate students. 

The conference is a major event associated with “Re-Connecting with the History of Labour in New Brunswick:  Historical Perspectives on Contemporary Issues,” a Community-University Research Alliance (CURA) project supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and led by researchers at the University of New Brunswick and the Université de Moncton. To learn more about the CURA visit http://www.lhtnb.ca

Speakers will present in both English and French, and simultaneous translation is provided.
Register at http://www.informingpublicpolicy.ca

For more information contact 453-4599 or email lkealey@unb.ca or dave.steele@unb.ca

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“TELLING STORIES; CREATING CHANGE”: REGISTER NOW FOR 2009 MAYTREE LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

Thursday, October 1, 2009

Registration is now open for the 2009 Maytree Leadership Conference on Thursday, October 1, 2009, 12 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at 89 Chestnut Street, Toronto.

Join Toronto’s leaders and explore the universal power of storytelling, the art of creating compelling stories and how to use individual and organizational narratives as powerful tools for change. This year’s theme is Telling Stories; Creating Change. Keynote speaker is John Cruickshank, publisher of the Toronto Star. He’s followed by former Chief of Staff to the Prime Minister, Tim Murphy, in conversation with Deena Ladd of the Workers’ Action Centre, moderated by CBC Radio’s Mary Wiens.

Workshops will include Online Communities and Offline Action, Building Your Public Narrative, Pitching Your Story to the Media and The New Front Page: Telling Your Organization’s Stories Online.

The day will end with a tenth-year celebration of Maytree’s scholarship program along with the release of an anniversary publication telling the students’ stories. The publication will also include policy insights on Canada’s refugee policies and programs.

Click here for full conference program and registration: http://www.maytree.com/training/2009-maytree-leadership-conference

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***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski