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A World To Win

SOUNDINGS 45

Soundings 45 is now out

Although the cuts are coming, there has been an eerie political calm and sense of inevitability about all that is in store for us (carefully nurtured by the Coalition and their allies in the media). But the storm will break – people are going to start seriously suffering and we need to ensure that there is a political battle against the assault planned by the government. Can Labour lead this battle?

CONTENTS

The political struggle ahead
Doreen Massey

Labour in a time of coalition
Sally Davison, Stuart Hall, Michael Rustin, Jonathan Rutherford

What comes after New Labour?
Gerry Hassan

The SNP and the ‘new politics’
Richard Thompson

Rebuilding social democracy
George Irvin

Greek myths
Duncan Weldon

Money manager capitalism and the global financial crisis
L. Randall Wray

Carbon trading: how it works and why it fails
Oscar Reyes and Tamra Gilbertson

Why I am a socialist
Ruth Levitas

Smile till it hurts
Laurie Penny

Lives on the line
Vron Ware

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Scotland

NEOLIBERAL SCOTLAND

CAMBRIDGE SCHOLARS PUBLISHING
Academic Publishers
NEOLIBERAL SCOTLAND: Class and Society in a Stateless Nation
ISBN 97814
Edited by Neil Davidson, Patricia McCafferty and David Miller

http://www.c-s-p.org

Email orders to orders@c-s-p.org or by fax to 44 191 2652056

ISBN 9781443816755 470pp £24.99/US$34.99

Neoliberal Scotland argues that far from passing Scotland by, as is so often claimed, neoliberalism has in fact become institutionalised there. As the mainstream political parties converge on market-friendly policies and business interests are equated with the public good, the Scottish population has become more and more distanced from the democratic process, to the extent that an increasing number now fail to vote in elections. This book details for the first time these negative effects of neoliberal policies on Scottish society and takes to task those academics and others who either defend the neoliberal order or refuse to recognise that it exists. Neoliberal Scotland represents both an intervention in contemporary debates about the condition of Scotland and a case study, of more general interest, of how neoliberalism has affected one of the “stateless nations” of the advanced West.

Chapter One takes an overview of the origin and rise of neoliberalism in the developed world, arguing that it repudiates rather than continues the thought of Adam Smith and the Scottish Enlightenment.

Part One addresses the fundamental issue of social class in Scotland over three chapters. Chapter Two attempts to locate the ruling class both internally and externally. Chapter Three explores the changing nature of working class membership and its collective experience. Chapter Four follows the working class into the workplace where heightened tensions in the state sector have provoked an increasingly militant response from trade unionists.

Part Two engages with the broader impact of neoliberalism on Scottish society through a diverse series of studies. Chapter Five assesses claims by successive Scottish governments that they have been pursuing environmental justice. Chapter Six examines how Glasgow has been reconfigured as a classic example of the “neoliberal city”. Chapter Seven looks at another aspect of Glasgow, in this case as the main destination of Eastern European migrants who have arrived in Scotland through the international impact of neoliberal globalisation. Chapter Eight investigates the economic intrusion of private capital into the custodial network and the ideological emphasis on punishment as the main objective in sentencing. Chapter Nine is concerned with the Scottish manifestations of “the happiness industry”, showing how market-fundamentalist notions of individual responsibility now structure even the most seemingly innocuous attempts to resolve supposed attitudinal problems. Finally, Chapter Ten demonstrates that the limited extent to which devolved Scottish governments, particularly the present SNP administration, have been able to go beyond the boundaries of neoliberal orthodoxy has been a function of the peculiarities of party competition in Holyrood, rather than representing a fundamental disavowal of the existing order.

Neil Davidson is a Senior Research Fellow with the Department of Geography and Sociology at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland.
Patricia McCafferty is a Lecturer in the Department of Geography and Sociology at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland, and Associate Lecturer with the Open University.
David Miller is a Professor of Sociology with the Department of Geography and Sociology at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland.

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