Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Simon Marginson

Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

INTERNATIONALISATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND GLOBAL MOBILITY

Internationalisation of Higher Education and Global Mobility

Edited by BERNHARD STREITWIESER

2014 paperback 320 pages US$56.00
ISBN 978-1-873927-42-7

IN STOCK NOW, FREE delivery on all orders
All books are sent AIRMAIL worldwide

Click here to view further information and to order this book

Continuous and rapid developments in global higher education today more than ever before present new questions, greater challenges, and vast new opportunities for institutions, policy makers, scholars and students alike. This book is a collection of studies and essays by many of the leading experts in international higher education who share their analysis of current trends and the implications they see for present and future policy and practice.

The volume is organized into three sections that address, first, global, supranational concerns in internationalization and mobility; second, focus on specific cases in Europe, the Middle East, the United States, Africa, Asia, and Latin America; and third share profiles of individual institutions, practitioners and participants involved in uniquely shaping international education in their everyday practice. The intention of this book is to expand the scope of research in the field of Comparative and International Education, to facilitate theory development, to influence policy formation, and most of all to inform anyone fascinated by the evolving and dynamic processes related to educational internationalization and global mobility.

This book will be a valuable information source for scholars, policy makers and students intent on understanding the wide scope of factors that today are shaping the fluid and changing global higher education landscape.

 

Contents

Simon Marginson. Foreword

Bernhard Streitwieser. Introduction

GLOBAL ISSUES IN INTERNATIONALISATION AND MOBILITY

Rahul Choudaha & Hans De Wit. Challenges and Opportunities for Global Student Mobility in the Future: a comparative and critical analysis

Darla K. Deardorff. Why Engage in Mobility? Key Issues within Global Mobility: the big picture

Jane Knight. Three Generations of Crossborder Higher Education: new developments, issues and challenges

Angeline M. Barrett, Michael Crossley & Titanji Peter Fon. North-South Research Partnerships in Higher Education: perspectives from South and North

Joan Dassin, Jürgen Enders & Andrea Kottmann. Social Inclusiveness, Development and Student Mobility in International Higher Education: the case of the Ford Foundation International Fellowships Program

REGIONAL STUDIES: EUROPE, THE MIDDLE EAST, THE UNITED STATES, AFRICA, ASIA, AND LATIN AMERICA

Bernd Wächter. Recent Trends in Student Mobility in Europe

Thomas Nørgaard. Liberal Education in the Erasmus Programme

Justin J.W. Powell. International National Universities: migration and mobility in Luxembourg and Qatar

Anthony Welch. Seek Knowledge Throughout the World? Mobility in Islamic Higher Education

Jonathan Z. Friedman & Cynthia Miller-Idriss. Gateways and Guesthomes: how US area studies centers serve as arbiters of scholar mobility

Rose C. Amazan. When the Diaspora Returns: analysis of Ethiopian returnees and the need for highly skilled labour in Ethiopia

Jürgen Henze. Global Climate, Local Weather: perspectives of internationalisation in Chinese higher education

Anne Hickling-Hudson & Robert F. Arnove. Higher Education and International Student Mobility: the extraordinary case of Cuba

EDUCATION ABROAD: STUDENTS AND PRACTITIONERS

Anthony C. Ogden, Bernhard Streitwieser & Emily R. Crawford. Empty Meeting Grounds: situating intercultural learning in US education abroad

Bernhard Streitwieser & Zachary Van Winkle. The Erasmus Citizen: students’ conceptions of citizenship identity in the Erasmus Mobility Programme in Germany

Jos Beelen. The Other Side of Mobility: the impact of incoming students on home students

Lisa Loberg & Val D. Rust. Key Factors of Participation in Study Abroad: perspectives of study abroad professionals

 

Related and Recent titles

Globalisation and Higher Education in the Arab Gulf StatesGARI DONN & YAHYA AL MANTHRI

Higher Education and the State: changing relationships in Europe and East AsiaROGER GOODMAN, TAKEHIKO KARIYA & JOHN TAYLOR

The Rise of Data in Education Systems: collection, visualization and use MARTIN LAWN

PISA, Power, and Policy: the emergence of global educational governance HEINZ-DIETER MEYER & AARON BENAVOT

Education’s Abiding Moral Dilemma: merit and worth in the cross-Atlantic democracies, 1800-2006 SHELDON ROTHBLATT

Higher Education and InternationalCapacityBuilding: twenty-five years of higher education links DAVID STEPHENS

 

SYMPOSIUM BOOKS
PO Box 204, Didcot, Oxford OX11 9ZQ, United Kingdom
info@symposium-books.co.uk
Specialist publishers of Comparative and International Education.
Please see our online catalogue at www.symposium-books.co.uk
for bibliographical details, contents pages, and a secure order form.

 

**END**

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Education System

Education System

CAPITALIST MARKETS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE)

Capitalist Markets in Higher Education: Utopias or Possibilities

Date – Wednesday, 16 April 2014: 14.00-16.00

Venue – University of Bath, Bath, UK

Network – South West Regional Network

 

Speaker: Professor Simon Marginson, Institute of Education

For more than two decades, governments around the world, led by the English-speaking polities, have moved higher education systems closer to the forms of textbook economic markets. Reforms include corporatisation, competitive funding, student charges, output formats and performance reporting. But, no country has established a bona fide economic market in the first-degree education of domestic students. No research university is driven by shareholders, profit, market share, allocative efficiency or the commodity form. There is commercial tuition only in parts of vocational training and international education. At the most, there are regulated quasi-markets, as in post-Browne UK. This differs from the experience of privatisation and commercialisation of transport, communications broadcasting and health insurance in many nations. The article argues that bona fide market reform in higher education is constrained by intrinsic limits specific to the sector (public goods, status competition), and political factors associated with those limits. This suggests that market reform is utopian, and the abstract ideal is sustained for exogenous policy reasons (e.g. fiscal reduction, state control, ordering of contents). But, if capitalist markets are clearly unachievable, a more authentic modernisation agenda is needed.

BIOGRAPHY

Simon worked as a Professor of Higher Education at the University of Melbourne in Australia prior to starting at the Institute of Education in October 2013. His research and scholarship draw broadly on the social sciences and political philosophy, and are focused primarily on higher education policy, systems and institutions. Most of his projects are in comparative and international higher education. In the last decade he has conducted extended inquiries into higher education and globalization, and higher education and research in East Asia. His current research includes a comparative project on the role of higher education in constructing public good, which examines the intersection between on one hand state traditions and political cultures, on the other hand educational practices. In 2014 Simon will deliver the biannual Clark Kerr lectures on higher education in the University of California system. He is Joint Editor-in-Chief of the journal Higher Education.

Too book a place please email Rajani Naidoo at R.Naidoo@bath.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

Education Crisis

ANALYSES FROM THE ANTIPODES

Friday 7th September, 2012

SRHE, 73 Collier Street, London N1 9BE

11.30-4.30 (lunch served after the first presentation)

 

There is a perception among the continental European academic community that a single Anglo-Saxon intellectual world exists, united by a common language and culture. This seminar contributes towards putting that assumption to the test. Is Australasian research into higher education in fact distinct from that carried out in other Anglophone contexts? Do Australasian researchers bring to their work culturally- and geographically-influenced perspectives that elude or challenge their UK-based colleagues? To address these – and other – questions about ‘Antipodean’ analyses, the SRHE’s International Research and Researchers Network is pleased to host a seminar in which three Australasian-based academics talk about their current work, and UK-based Australian, Professor Susan Robertson from the University of Bristol, responds as discussant.

 

The rise and rise of higher education and research in East Asia, and some implications for comparative analysis

Professor Simon Marginson, University of Melbourne, Australia

Investment in research and development in East Asia and Singapore now exceeds that of the UK and Europe. The rate of growth in science is astonishing, and many ‘World class universities’ have emerged. East Asian developments (and potential developments in other geo-spatial regions) suggest that the universal templates for comparative education need to be rethought. Global modernisation is associated with convergent political economies that are nonetheless articulated through distinctive political-cultural configurations. This presentation will address these, and other, related, issues.

 

Research into doctoral pedagogy, practice and process-towards-product

Dr Susan Carter, Centre for Academic Development, University of Auckland, New Zealand

Research on doctoral pedagogy focuses on a range of intriguing aspects: personal experience; institutional policy and rhetoric; pedagogy; and product. In this presentation, Dr Carter critiques the changing nature of the social negotiations that the doctorate makes. Her perspective on the social and personal representation of the thesis is generic: she shows the tensions between the generic requirements for a thesis, the discipline/epistemological demands, and the authorial desire for an authentic voice.

 

Do we want to overcome the failure of feedback? New analyses for new times

Professor David Boud, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia

Criticism by students about feedback has long dominated student surveys. Poor perceptions of feedback have generated many simplistic exhortations and prescriptions. Less visibly, research literature now offers increasingly well-founded advice about what might be done to improve feedback in courses. The problem, though, is that this research points not to incremental change but to challenges to cherished assumptions about what HE teachers do. This presentation will address what are these new ways of thinking about feedback, and what implications they have for how HE teaching and learning is organised.

 

Event booking details

To reserve a place at this seminar please register at: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/, or telephone +44 (0) 207 427 2350.  

SRHE events are open to all and free to SRHE members as part of their membership package. The delegate fee for non-members is £25 up until 31 July and £45 from 1 August. Non-members wishing to join the Society may do so at the time of registration and the delegate fee will be waived. Please note that places must be booked in advance and that a £45 fee for non-attendance will be charged if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non-attendance has been given in advance.

 

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit

SRHE Event Manager

Society for Research into Higher Education

73 Collier Street

London N1 9BE

Telephone 0207 427 2350

Fax number 0207 278 1135

srheoffice@srhe.ac.uk

http://www.srhe.ac.uk

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Cognitive Capitalism

COGNITIVE CAPITALISM, EDUCATION AND DIGITAL LABOR – MICHAEL PETERS & ERGIN BULUT

Michael A. Peters & Ergin Bulut (eds.)
Cognitive Capitalism, Education and Digital Labor 
Year of Publication: 2011 
Peter Lang Publishing Group
New York, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, Oxford, Wien,
2011. XLII, 341 pp.
ISBN 978-1-4331-0981-2 pb. 

http://www.peterlang.com/index.cfm?event=cmp.ccc.seitenstruktur.detailseiten&seitentyp=produkt&pk=54297&concordeid=310981

Contents

Antonio Negri: Foreword 

Michael A. Peters & Ergin Bulut: Introduction 

Timothy Brennan: Intellectual Labor 

George Caffentzis: A Critique of Cognitive Capitalism

Silvia Federici: On Affective Labor 

Christian Fuchs: Cognitive Capitalism or Informational Capitalism? The Role of Class in the Information Economy 

Jonathan Beller: Cognitive Capitalist Pedagogy and Its Discontents 

Ergin Bulut: Creative Economy: Seeds of Social Collaboration or Capital’s Hunt for General Intellect and Imagination? 

Mark Coté / Jennifer Pybus: Learning to Immaterial Labour 2.0: Facebook and Social Networks 

Emma Dowling: Pedagogies of Cognitive Capitalism – Challenging the Critical Subject 

Alex Means: Creativity as an Educational Problematic within the Biopolitical Economy

Toby Miller: For Fun, For Profit, For Empire: The University and Electronic Games 

Michael A. Peters: Algorithmic Capitalism and Educational Futures 

Alberto Toscano: The Limits of Autonomy: Cognitive Capitalism and University Struggles 

Nick Dyer-Witheford: In the Ruined Laboratory of Futuristic Accumulation: Immaterial Labour and the University Crisis 

Tahir Wood: The Confinement of Academic Freedom and Critical Thinking in a Changing Corporate World: South African Universities 

Cameron McCarthy: Afterword. The Unmaking of Education in the Age of Globalization, Neoliberalism and Information

About the author(s)/editor(s)

Michael A. Peters is Professor of Education at the University of Waikato (New Zealand) and Emeritus Professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the executive editor of Educational Philosophy and Theory and editor of two international e-journals, Policy Futures in Education and E-Learning. His interests are in education, philosophy and social policy and he has written over fifty books, including Creativity and the Global Knowledge Economy (Lang, 2009) (with Simon Marginson and Peter Murphy).

Ergin Bulut is a PhD candidate at the Institute of Communications Research at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is interested in political economy of labor and its intersection with education, communication and culture. 

Reviews

“Cognitive Capitalism, Education and Digital Labor’ provides us with a series of very thoughtful and provocative analyses of the relationship among political economy, education and new forms of knowledge and labor. It is definitely worth reading and then discussing its implications at length.” (Michael W. Apple, John Bascom Professor of Curriculum and Instruction and Educational Policy Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison)

“This volume is a ‘tour de force’. Through its chapters, a new space is opened for understanding education in the contemporary world. With an magisterial introduction by its indefatigable editor, Michael A. Peters, and his colleague Ergin Bulut, ‘Cognitive Capitalism, Education and Digital Labor’ implicitly shows the limitations of postmodernism and offers a large conceptual framework that will surely be mined and critically examined for some years to come.” (Ronald Barnett, Emeritus Professor of Higher Education, Institute of Education, London)

“‘Cognitive Capitalism, Education and Digital Labor’ is extraordinarily instructive in studying the living bestiary of capitalism, a provocative text that enervates capitalism through helping us cultivate our critical faculties creatively and exultantly in the service of its demise. An important advance in our understanding the production of subjectivity in capitalist societies.” (Peter McLaren, School of Critical Studies in Education, Faculty of Education, University of Auckland)

“This valuable, lithe volume explores the ever-evolving, mutating forms of capitalism. It is a work of craft, intelligence and provocation. It reflects on some of the most important subterranean trends in contemporary societies. These unite the material and the immaterial, biology and power, economics and education. The contributors parse the intersections of intellectual and physical labour, paid and unpaid work, labour and pedagogy, research and gaming, free information and multi-national corporations, autonomy and liberalism, accumulation and enclosure, class and creativity. They do so with verve, steel and tenacious insight.” (Peter Murphy, Professor of Creative Arts and Social Aesthetics, James Cook University)

“If you read just a single book in the field of educational theory this year, make sure it’s this one. Drawing on the rich tradition of Marxist autonomism, the contributors pinpoint what the transmutation of labor and opening of new domains of class struggle under cognitive capitalism mean for education. The editors have assembled an impressive team, all accomplished scholars adept at envisioning changes in the sites and forms of knowledge-making, acquisition and contestation. For anyone interested in the educational implications of technologically-driven shifts in capitalism’s socio-economic structures, this is the volume to buy. Brimming with insight, balanced and lively – it will attract attention from scholars and students well beyond the confines of education faculties.” (James Reveley, Associate Professor, Faculty of Commerce, University of Wollongong)

“We have now for some time been undergoing intense technological and social revolutions that transformed the nature of labor, education and the capitalist economy. Peters and Bulut and their collaborators in ‘Cognitive Capitalism, Education and Digital Labor’ chart out the changes in the new economy and social life and explore its consequences for education. All educators and those concerned with transformations of contemporary culture and society should be concerned with these issues and learn from this book.” (Douglas Kellner, UCLA; Author of ‘Guys and Guns Amok’ and ‘Media Spectacle and the Crisis of Democracy’)

“The mainstream discourse of the knowledge economy is empty. The digital-Taylorist routinisation of much of the work that was once the preserve of knowledge workers and the offshoring of knowledge jobs to countries where skilled labour is much cheaper have given the game away. But it would be wrong to assume that the electronic/IT revolution has not changed our lives and our labour when it clearly has. This outstanding collection raises fundamental questions about knowledge, the role of education and labour in the digital world. It brings current debates to a new level and should be read by students, academics and policy makers across the globe.” (Hugh Lauder, Professor of Education and Political Economy, University of Bath)

“’Cognitive Capitalism, Education and Digital Labor’ presents a new theory of capitalism and digital labor. It is a very valuable resource and will spark an industry of debate and elaboration. This book presents such a wealth of diverse material that any reader will find something new and challenging, and each chapter in this collection makes a welcome contribution to the growing literature in the field.” (George Lazaroiu, Principal Research Fellow, Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, New York)

“Cognitive capitalism is a crucial category for conceptualizing the workings of contemporary globalization. Using the theories of the Italian Autonomist Marxist tradition, or ‘operaismo’, Peters and Bulut along with the other authors in this collection present important, fascinating insights into capitalism, education and labor today. It should be read immediately by anyone concerned about how the daily practices of education prepare the multitude for the travails of their immaterial and material labor.” (Timothy W. Luke, Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University)

“Peters and Bulut have provided us with a brilliant set of papers that take us to the heart of the political economy. Under ‘cognitive capitalism’ subjectivity is both the realm of freedom and the source of value, raising the stakes in control (governmentality). Hence the continuing fecundity of interpretations at the intersection of Marx/Foucault/Deleuze. We experience both larger productive community and heightened public surveillance, together with unsolvable tensions in education and research. But this book also reminds us that the circuits of cognitive capitalism continue to rest on a mountain of physical commodities, generated largely in the emerging economies and subject to more traditional (and more traditionally Marxist) forms of manufacture, energy consumption and hyper-exploitation of labour.” (Simon Marginson, Centre for the Study of Higher Education, University of Melbourne, Australia)

“Education cannot be understood outside of the diverse national and global forces in which it is situated, including the increasing separation of power from local politics. This book brings together a number of first-rate theorists in making clear the relationship among knowledge, power and digital labor. The book is a tour de force for anyone interested in the new registers of power that are now shaping education on a global level. This is an important book and should be put on the class list of every educator who views education central to politics.” (Henry A. Giroux, Global Television Network Chair Professor, English and Cultural Studies Department, McMaster University)

“The exceptional contributions assembled for this timely volume carefully anatomize – and critically question – the category of cognitive capitalism and its composition. This book is a major resource for a generation of academic workers with a very real stake in developments, conflicts and debates surrounding the edu-factory.” (Greig de Peuter, Co-author of  ‘Games of Empire’).

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski