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Marxism and Feminism

Marxism and Feminism

MARXISM AND FEMINISM

A new book edited by Shahrzad Mojab

See: http://www.zedbooks.co.uk/node/20825

Global events, from economic crisis to social unrest and militarization, disproportionately affect women. Yet around the world it is also women who are leading the struggle against oppression and exploitation. In light of renewed interest in Marxist theory among many women activists and academics, Marxism and Feminism presents a contemporary and accessible Marxist-feminist analysis on a host of issues. It reassesses previous debates and seeks to answer pressing questions of how we should understand the relationship between patriarchy and capitalism, and how we can envision a feminist project which emancipates both women and society.

With contributions from both renowned scholars and new voices, Marxism and Feminism is set to become the foundational text for modern Marxist-feminist thought.

Reviews

‘Marxism and Feminism is a serious, nuanced collection that covers a great deal of ground in a clear and concise way. The essays here represent a profoundly warm, human way of thinking through some of the toughest political problems of our age. It will be of great use to anyone thinking seriously about the relationship between Marx and feminism, not to mention gender, race, class, intersectionallity, patriarchy, work and many other key topics today.’
Nina Power, author of One Dimensional Woman

‘The relationship between Marxists and Feminists has always been problematic. But in these times of an ongoing crises of capitalism, when the whole world is looking for alternatives to the present destructive World System, Shahrzad Mojab’s Marxism and Feminism is especially necessary today. I hope that many women and men read it.
Maria Mies, author of Patriarchy and Accumulation on a World Scale

‘Marxism and feminism are back! This book marks a refreshing return to basics after years spent in the wilderness of identity politics and the ‘cultural turn’. Offering a rich synthesis of the key concepts in both schools of thought, the book provides a valuable resource for rethinking Marxism, feminism, a renewed project for human emancipation and, yes… revolution.’
Radha D’Souza, University of Westminster

‘Marxism and Feminism is an outstanding contribution to the shared project of scholar-activists across diverse disciplines and movements. The collection is both the result of, and a significant contribution to, a (re)emerging conversation – one that attends to, as Shahrzad Mojab succinctly notes, ‘two major emancipatory projects.’ The keywords approach is inspired, providing breadth and depth in a single, accessible, and highly engaged volume.’
Abigail B. Bakan, University of Toronto

‘Reading this book made me aware of how much such a book is needed to awaken a dialogue between Marxism and feminism. I didn’t agree with all that I read, but that’s exactly what a book with this framework should do to awaken us.’
Dorothy Smith, University of Victoria

The Future Present

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements

 

1 Introduction: Marxism and feminism

Shahrzad Mojab
Part One: Class and race in Marxism and feminism

2 Gender relations
Frigga Haug

3 The Marx within feminism
Frigga Haug

4 Building from Marx: reflections on ‘race’, gender and class
Himani Bannerji
Part Two: Marxist-feminist keywords

5 Democracy
Sara Carpenter

6 Financialization
Jamie Magnusson

7 Ideology
Himani Bannerji

8 Imperialism and primitive accumulation
Judith Whitehead
9 Intersectionality
Delia D. Aguilar

10 Labour-power
Helen Colley

11 Nation and nationalism
Amir Hassanpour

12 Patriarchy/patriarchies
Kumkum Sangari

13 Reproduction
Michelle Murphy

14 Revolution
Maryam Jazayeri

15 Standpoint theory
Cynthia Cockburn

16 Epilogue: gender after class
Teresa L. Ebert

Recommended reading
About the authors
Index

Critique of Political Economy

Critique of Political Economy

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Feminism

Feminism

Educating from Marx

Educating from Marx

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 27th JANUARY 2013

EVENTS

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: 2013 ALAN THOMAS FELLOWSHIP

We are pleased to announce the call for applications for the 2013 Alan Thomas Fellowship to Promote Civil Society and Voluntary Action. The Fellowship was first awarded in 2008, and there are now seven Fellowship recipients whose research and reflection has made a significant contribution towards strengthening leadership for civil society and promoting greater understanding of the importance of voluntary action. The Fellowship will again be awarded in 2013 to a leader in the NGO/not-for-profit sector who would not normally have access to a sabbatical leave. Valued at a maximum amount of $60,000 for up to one year, the award is intended to allow the recipient, at a transitional moment in his or her career, to make a contribution to the sector, through research and reflection.

In recognition of a shared desire to strengthen and support leadership capacity in the voluntary sector as an essential element in advancing development and positive social change, both locally and internationally, the Carold Institute and Cuso International are now working together to promote our respective Fellowship opportunities.

Visit our websites at http://www.carold.ca and http://cusointernational.org/content/bob-ward-memorial-fellowship for fuller detail on the Fellowships and on past recipients. The new deadline for applications is March 29, 2013, and the 2013 recipients will be announced in June 2013. Please publicize both these Fellowship as widely as possible within your membership and among your networks, and strongly encourage any potential candidates to apply.

For further information, please contact Juliet Huntly at the address below.
The Carold Institute
Alan Thomas Fellowship
Secretariat
Ph: (613) 376-3391   email: jhuntly@kos.net

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BUILDING A FUTURE FOR WOMEN IN TRADES: 2013 FORUM IN HAMILTON

The Provincial Women’s Access to Trades Network is pleased to invite you to our 2013 forum…

Building a Future for Women in Trades
Moving forward through collaboration and partnership

Thursday, February 28, 2013
8:00 am – 4:00 pm
Mohawk College STARRT Institute
481 Barton Street, Stoney Creek (click here for a map:
http://www.mohawkcollege.ca/Assets/Documents/Maps/STARRT+Stoney+Creek+PDF+Map.pdf

For more information on the event or to register please visit: http://thecentre.on.ca/pwatn

The Provincial Women’s Access to Trades Network (PWATN) is a collaboration of organizations dedicated to accelerating women’s participation in non‑traditional trades in order to increase women’s access to good jobs and decrease their risk of poverty.

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A WORKERS’ HISTORY OF THE 1970s: A FILM SERIES

6 weeks starting 7 February
7pm-midnight
Double Double Land
209 Augusta Ave., Toronto

Although the sixties are looked at as the high watermark of radicalism and rebellion in North America, it is actually the decade that followed that saw the highest frequency of labour unrest and worker militancy since the era of the depression. It was during these years that the power of organized labour was at its height, and the intra-union struggle of rank-and-file workers came the closest to realizing a true integration of the race- and gender-based social movements born of the 60s with the traditional American labour movement. Arguably, it was the failure to do so that made the crushing of labour’s power in the latter half of the decade possible, quickly ushering in the era of neo-liberalism that has prevailed to this day. Will an understanding of the past help put us back in control of our future?

The Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly in partnership with the Foundation for Social Economics is proud to present a six-week film series spotlighting some of the now nearly forgotten labour-themed cinema of the 1970s. Each film will be preceded by a short talk detailing an episode from that decade’s labour history.

Films (subject to change):  ‘JOE’ [1970]; ‘THE ROWDYMAN’ [1972]; ‘THE MOLLY MAGUIRES’ [1976]; ‘F.I.S.T.’ [1978]; ‘BLUE COLLAR’ [1978]; ‘NORMA RAE’ [1979].

Free: donations accepted
Beverages for sale
Social following each film

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CALL FOR MANUSCRIPTS: THE JOURNAL OF CONTINUING HIGHER EDUCATION

The Journal of Continuing Higher Education (JCHE) announces a Call for Manuscripts for its upcoming issues. JCHE strives to support continuing higher education by serving as a peer reviewed forum for the reporting and exchange of information based on research, observations, and professional experience relevant to the field. Issues are published in the winter, spring, and fall. JCHE is published by Routledge.

The Journal of Continuing Higher Education considers four types of articles:

Major articles—current research, theoretical models, conceptual treatments—of up to 7,000 words on:
• organization and administration of continuing higher education
• development and application of new continuing education program directions
• adult and non-traditional students
• continuing education student programs and services
• research within continuing higher education and related fields

Manuscripts should demonstrate implications for both the theory and practice of continuing higher education.

“Best Practices” articles of up to 4,000 words. These “Best Practice” articles contain descriptions of new, innovative, and successful programs or practices. The programs or practices should be replicable and of significance to continuing education.

• Book reviews of current publications in the field–prospective authors are advised to consult with the editor prior to preparing book reviews.

• Opinion pieces of up to 2,000 words addressing issues directly relevant to continuing higher education.

For best consideration for the Spring 2013 issue, manuscripts should be received by March 15, 2013. Manuscript submission guidelines are available online at http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t908610301 or through ACHE’s website: http://www.ACHEinc.org. Potential authors should feel free to consult with JCHE editor James K. Broomall, University of Delaware. He can be reached at jbroom@udel.edu or (302) 831-2795.

Please share this announcement with colleagues and graduate students who may be interested in submitting manuscripts to JCHE. The Journal has published outstanding graduate student work in the past.

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NEWS & VIEWS

CANADA’S CEOS BREAKING OUT THE BUBBLY

from Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

In our annual look at CEO compensation, we find Canada’s highest paid 100 CEOs had reason to break out the bubbly: by 1:18pm on January 2nd, the first official working day of the year, Canada’s top 100 CEOs had already pocketed $45,448. It takes the average Canadian an entire year of full-time work to earn that.

This year, we produced a short factsheet, Overcompensating: Executive Pay in Canada, which highlights some key numbers around executive pay in Canada and also includes a list of Canada’s highest paid 100 CEOs. Download the factsheet here: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/commentary/overcompensating

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THE MAN WHO COULD HAVE SAVED ORGANIZED LABOR

by Alec Macgillis, New Republic

It has been a dispiriting year for organized labor. Unions contributed greatly to the re-election of Barack Obama and the Democrats’ retention of the Senate, but were punched in the gut before they could savor the victories. Michigan’s Republican legislature and governor rushed a bill through the lame-duck session, making the birthplace of the United Auto Workers a “right-to-work” state.

Few have fought harder to keep labor from this plight than Jerry Tucker. An outspoken dissident, Tucker urged an alternate course for American unions for more than three decades, one with a broader progressive message and greater empowerment of rank and file workers. Labor could desperately use Tucker’s guidance today, but it’s too late: He died in his hometown of St. Louis on October 19 of pancreatic cancer, at age 73.

Read more: http://www.newrepublic.com/blog/alec-macgillis/111488/the-man-who-tried-save-organized-labor#

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VIDEO: BUGGER THE BANKERS

The Austerity Allstars present: Bugger the Bankers – The Official Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=WSIUf2hD6Io

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SUBSIDIES AND CONCESSIONS: THE NEVER-ENDING CORPORATE SHAKE-DOWN

by Leo Panitch and Sam Gindin, The Bullet

Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s first economic policy initiative of 2013, which took him to Oakville in early January to trumpet yet another $250-million in auto subsidies, ought to raise some very fundamental questions. The heady free market rhetoric of recent decades was often cast in terms of the economic benefits associated with multinational corporations escaping the confines of nation states by being able to go global. In fact, what economic globalization has really been about has been the ability of these corporations to rely on the support of so many more states than ever before. And they have secured such state support while using the whip of competitiveness to discipline their workers – and to discard them when convenient.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/764.php

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MARTIN LUTHER KING WAS A RADICAL, NOT A SAINT

by Peter Dreier, Common Dreams

Today Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. is viewed as something of an American saint. His birthday is a national holiday. His name adorns schools and street signs. Americans from across the political spectrum invoke King’s name to justify their beliefs and actions, as President Barack Obama will no doubt do in his second Inaugural speech and as gun fanatic Larry Ward recently did in outrageously claiming that King would have opposed proposals to restrict access to guns.

So it is easy to forget that in his day, in his own country, King was considered a dangerous troublemaker.

Read more: http://www.commondreams.org/view/2013/01/21-2

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VIDEO AND PRESENTATION: ANTI-CAPITALISM AND FEMINISM

Moderated by Abbie Bakan.

Presentations:

• “Socialist Feminism in Canada: A Brief History.” Meg Luxton is Professor and Director of the Graduate Program of Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies at York University.
• “Marxist Feminism: Keywords and Key Concepts.” Shahrzad Mojab is Professor in the Department of Leadership, Higher and Adult Education and Women and Gender Studies, University of Toronto.

Presented by the Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly.

Watch the video: http://www.workersassembly.ca/node/212

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ON THE STREET AT UALE (UNITED ASSOCIATION OF LABOR EDUCATION) 2013

We look forward to welcoming you all to Toronto in April. Please make sure to bring some sensible shoes (along with your passports), since you will have four chances for educational walks during the conference.

Here is the current plan:
On the Street at UALE 2013

• Why are we doing this? Because we know that workers and educators both learn as much from experiences as from formal conference presentations.

• Who is doing this? A lively group of eight people is writing the programs and will guide them, using as a starting point the publication “Mapping Our Work: Toronto Labour History Walking Tours”, prepared by the School of Labour at George Brown College and the Canadian Union of Public Employees Local 79, with support from Toronto’s Labour Council. All are active in union, community, arts and equality struggles. Copies of that publication will be provided to all conference participants.

• Where will they go? All walks leave from the lobby of the Metropolitan Hotel.

(1) Toronto’s Old Town (2.5 hours, including lunch): The first one (for which we request advance registration and payment of $20) leaves at 9:30 on Wednesday morning, and tours sites of the earliest labour struggles in Toronto’s “old town.”

(2) “The Ward” (1 hour): The second walk leaves at 5:00 pm on Wednesday, and takes participants to various close by sites in the historic “St John’s Ward” neighbourhood, where successive generations of immigrants arrived. The tour ends at the Steelworkers Hall, 25 Cecil Street, for a reception, dinner and a labour arts program.

(3) Union Station (2.5 hours, including lunch): The third walking tour leaves at noon on Thursday and goes through Toronto’s historic railway station, Union Station, to highlight the history of African-Canadian workers.

(4) Spadina Avenue (2.5 hours, including dinner): The fourth tour leaves on Friday at 5:30 p.m. to explore Spadina Avenue, with its rich history of labour militancy, political struggles, and the contributions of Jewish and Chinese-Canadian workers’ organizing.

• Should we reserve? As people register for the conference on-line, they can pay $20 to confirm their participation in the first tour. Before leaving on that Wednesday morning tour, we ask that participants check in and pick up their conference kit. That way, they can avoid line-ups at the desk, and return comfortably in time for the conference opening. Part of that check in process will allow for reserving other outings, so that we can plan the number of guides and confirm reservations for meals.

• How much will tours cost? We are trying to get union sponsorships for all four events. At most, the programs will cost $20 each, with a meal included.

• Will the timing interfere with the regular program? For the second walk, people will leave after the conference plenary session, and end at the site of the evening reception and dinner. For the third, timing might be tight, and depending on the number of participants we may delay the start of the afternoon sessions by a few minutes. For the fourth, the walk starts after the end of the UALE membership meeting, which should be shorter than usual since there are no elections this year. Depending on that, the walk may start as early as 5:00.

• What if walking is hard for me? These outings are designed as walks, and will be challenging for people with limited mobility. Some may prefer to take a taxi from the hotel directly to and from the location of the meal. Some may prefer to stay in the hotel, for informal networking and evening film screenings on Thursday and Friday. For a special treat, on the second floor of the hotel is one of Canada’s best Chinese restaurants, Lai Wah Heen, expensive but fabulous.

For more info on UALE’s April 17-20, 2013 conference in Toronto: http://uale.org/conference/conference-2013

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

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Sara Carpenter and Shahrzad Mojab

Sara Carpenter and Shahrzad Mojab

FEMINISMS AND MARXISMS

Call for Papers: In the framework of the 9th Historical Materialism Conference, ‘Weighs like A Nightmare’, SOAS, Central London, 8-11 November 2012

Feminisms and Marxisms 

A new generation of anti-capitalist feminists has emerged in the last years across the world. Although not without tensions and disagreements, these new feminist currents have been in constant dialogue with different traditions of Marxism and the Marxist critique of political economy in areas ranging from social science, philosophy to art history. With the aim of providing a space for this dialogue, the 9th Historical Materialism conference inLondonwelcomes presentations exploring the synergies between the feminist and the Marxist critiques of capitalism in their various articulations. 

Paper proposals (between 200 and 300 words) should be submitted by registering at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences BEFORE 10 May 2012. Submissions will be peer reviewed. Please be aware that the conference is self-funded therefore we are unable to help with travel and accommodation costs.

Themes of particular interest for the conference include:

      Marxist and Socialist feminism in the 21st century

      The critique of the political economy of sex work

      Autonomia and Feminism: A legacy?

      Intersectionality theory and Marxism

      Feminist and Marxist critiques of liberal feminism

      Queer studies, LGBTQ and Marxism

      Feminist and Marxist critiques of gendered labour exploitation

      Feminist and Marxist critiques of racism and Islamophobia

      The political economy of gender and carceral detention

      Feminism, Marxism and art theory

      Women’s collectives and the contemporary art world

      Feminist, Marxism and the visual cultures of globalisation

      Gendered international migrations

      Commodification of care

      Social reproduction

Please note that the following donations are requested in support of conference costs:

£50 waged/15 unwaged on pre-registration
£75 waged / 25 unwaged at the door

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

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Educating from Marx

Educating from Marx

EDUCATING FROM MARX: RACE, GENDER, AND LEARNING – BY SARA CARPENTER AND SHAHRZAD MOJAB

Series: Marxism and Education

Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN-10: 0230115810

ISBN-13: 978-0230115811

270 pages; hardback

 

This text is an articulation of a renewed Marxist-feminist framework for adult education. In recent years adult educators have been working to develop an important body of literature on neo-liberalism, capitalism, and imperialism. Many of these analyses draw on various strands of Marxist theorizing. With the exception of Jane Thompson’s work as an early socialist feminist, a Marxist-Feminist framework has yet to be articulated for adult education. This text combines original empirical studies with literature review from critical adult education and feminist theory to examine the sites, theories, and practices of adult education from a Marxist-Feminist perspective.  

Contents:

PART I: MARXIST-FEMINISTS ORGANIZING KNOWLEDGE

Introduction: A Specter Haunts Adult Education: Crafting a Marxist-Feminist Framework for Adult Education & Learning; Sara Carpenter & Shahrzad Mojab

Ideology, Science, and Social Relations: A Reinterpretation of Marx’s Epistemology; Dorothy E. Smith

Building from Marx: Reflections on ‘Race’, Gender, and Class; Himani Bannerji

PART II: MARXIST-FEMINIST PRAXIS

Examining the Social Relations of Learning Citizenship: Citizenship and Ideology in Adult Education; Sara Carpenter

Learning to Mentor Young People: A Saintly Vocation or an Alienating Experience?; Helen Colley

Exploring the Social Relations of Class Struggle in the OntarioMinimum Wage Campaign; Sheila Wilmot

The Ideological Construction of ‘Canadian Work Experience’: Adult Education and the Reproduction of Labor and Difference; Bonnie Slade

PART III: MARXIST-FEMINISM, IMPERIALISM, AND CULTURE

Adult Education in/and Imperialism; Shahrzad Mojab

Materiality and Memory: A Marxist-Feminist Perspective on the ‘Cultural Turn’ in Adult Education; Tara Silver 

Epilogue: Living Revolution, Learning Revolution, Teaching Revolution; Shahrzad Mojab & Sara Carpenter

 

SHAHRZAD MOJAB Professor in the Department of Adult Education and Counselling Psychology at the University of Toronto’s Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), Canada.
SARA CARPENTER is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Adult Education & Counselling Psychology at theUniversity ofToronto’s OISE,Canada.

“Congratulations to the editors and other outstanding contributors to this exemplary text. The collaborative project that underpinned and drove the production of this work is clearly evident throughout: therefore, in one text we find the critically analytical/theoretical coherence one expects from a single-authored text with the added benefit of that coherence being brought to bear on a multiplicity of contexts that only a multiple-authored text can provide. An amazing contribution to critical revolutionary praxis inspired and informed by Marx” — Paula Allman, author of Critical Education Against Global Capitalism: Karl Marx and Revolutionary Critical Education

At Palgrave Macmillan: http://us.macmillan.com/book.aspx?isbn=9780230115811

At Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Educating-Marx-Learning-Marxism-Education/dp/0230115810/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1333664978&sr=1-1

At Amazon.co.uk: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Educating-Marx-Learning-Marxism-Education/dp/0230115810

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

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Dave Hill

JOURNAL FOR CRITICAL EDUCATION POLICY STUDIES – VOLUME 8 NUMBER 2 (DECEMBER 2010)

The latest edition of JCEPS (The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies) is now online.

JCEPS is a free, online, peer-juried/refereed international scholarly journal.

It is online at: http://www.jceps.com

Dave Hill (Chief/ Founding Editor; Middlesex University, London, UK; Visiting Professor of Education at  Athens University, Greece; Visiting Professor of Critical Education Policy and Equality Studies at the University of Limerick, Ireland)

Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies, Volume 8, Number 2: December 2010

CONTENTS:

Anna-Carin Jonsson and Dennis Beach (University of Borås, Sweden): Reproduction of social class in teacher education: The influence of scientific theories on future teachers’ implicit beliefs

Petar Jandric (Polytechnic Graduate School, Zagreb, Croatia): Wikipedia and education: anarchist perspectives and virtual practices

Periklis Pavlidis (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece): Critical Thinking as Dialectics: a Hegelian-Marxist Approach

Andrew N. McNight (University of Alabama at Birmingham, Alabama, USA): A Pragmatic and pedagogically Minded Revaluation of Historical Materialism

Diana Mulinari and Anders Neergaard (Centre for Gender Studies, Lund University, Sweden; Institute for Migration, Ethnicity and Society, Linköping University, Sweden): The ‘others’ in Sweden. Neoliberal policies and the politics of ‘race’ in education

James Avis (Huddersfield University, UK): Workplace learning, knowledge, practice and transformation

Imed Labidi (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA): Arab Education Going Medieval: Sanitizing Western Representation in Arab Schools

Margaret Kennedy and Martin J. Power (University of Limerick, Ireland): ‘The Smokescreen of meritocracy’: Elite Education in Ireland and the reproduction of class privilege

Magnus Dahlstedt and Mekonnen Tesfahuney (Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society), Linköping University, Sweden; University of Karlstad, Sweden): Speculative Pedagogy: Education, Entrepreneurialism and the Politics of Inclusion in Contemporary Sweden

Jean Leon Boucher (The University of Texas at El Paso, USA): There Will be Struggle: The Development and Operational Issues of Social Justice Programs at State Universities in the United States of America

Knud Jensen and Dirk Michel-Schertges (Aarhus University, School of Education, Denmark): Transforming of Educational Institutions after GATS – Consequences in Social Relations as Corporation, Competition and State Regulation

Donn Short (University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada): Conversations in Equity and Social Justice: Constructing Safe Schools for Queer Youth

Shahrzad Mojab (Ontario Institute in the Studies of Education, University of Toronto, Canada): Pedagogical Possibilities of Class in Culture: Review of: Ebert, Teresa, L. and Mas’ud Zavarzadeh (2008) Class in Culture. Boulder, Colorado: Paradigm Publishers.

Samuel Day Fassbinder (DeVry University. USA): Book Review: Nocella II, Anthony J., Steven Best, and Peter McLaren, eds. Academic Repression: Reflections from the Academic-Industrial Complex. Oakland CA: AK, 2010.

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies is a free e-journal published by The Institute for Education Policy Studies (IEPS)

IEPS is an independent Radical Left/ Socialist/ Marxist institute for developing policy analysis and development of education policy. It is at www.ieps.org.uk The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies (JCEPS) seeks to develop Marxist and other Left analysis of education.

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies seeks and publishes articles that critique global, national, neo-liberal, neo-conservative, New Labour, Third Way, postmodernist and other analyses of policy developments, as well as those that attempt to report on, analyse and develop Socialist/ Marxist transformative policy for schooling and education from a number of Radical Left perspectives. JCEPS also addresses issues of social class, ‘race’, gender, sexual orientation, disability and capital/ism; critical pedagogies; new public managerialism and academic / non-academic labour, and empowerment/ disempowerment. JCEPS welcomes articles from academics and activists throughout the globe. It is a refereed / peer reviewed/ peer juried international journal.

Contact: dave.hill@ieps.org.uk and DAVE6@mdx.ac.uk

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Critical Pedagogy

RADICALIZING LEARNING

New Title: Radicalizing Learning: Adult Education for a Just World

Brookfield, S. D., & Holst, J. D. (2010): Radicalizing learning: Adult education for a just world. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

$38.00 USD
Hardcover
http://www.josseybass.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0787998257.html

Radicalizing Learning calls for a total rethinking of what the field of adult education stands for and how adult educators should assess their effectiveness. Arguing that major changes in society are needed to create a more just world, Brookfield and Holst set out to show how educators can help learners envision and enact this radical transformation.

Praise for Radicalizing Learning

“This is a book that is so interesting that I had trouble putting it down. It is well written; there is new material; it articulates familiar concepts in such novel ways that your thought patterns get hijacked reading it. Adult learning and its processes are examined from a socialist perspective with a focus on social justice.” –Phyllis M. Cunningham, Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus, Northern Illinois University

“Read this book and rub shoulders with Nelson Mandela, Septima Clark, Antonio Gramsci, Paulo Freire, Jane Thompson, Myles Horton, and a whole horde of inspiring leaders, learners, teachers, trainers, and activists. Engage with remarkable writers you have heard of, and, if you are like me, encounter a number of remarkable writers for the first time. This is a splendid, extraordinary book, which will stir and trouble you. But why am I not surprised? It is a seamlessly collaborative work by two of the best minds in the field—John Holst, the challenging, unremittingly rigorous theorist; and Stephen Brookfield, the inspired and cannily perceptive analyst. This book earns my highest praise: it will make you think.” —Michael Newman, author, Teaching Defiance

“Stephen Brookfield and John Holst have written a monumental text in the field of adult education. It is a bold, ambitious book, beautifully written and uncompromising in its social justice agenda. It is sure to become a classic in the field.” —Peter McLaren, Professor, University of California, Los Angeles

“This book offers new readings of the theory, politics, policy, and practice of radical adult education and learning where people’s lives are understood as complex and interrelated matters. Brookfield and Holst’s poetics and deeply human prose sound rebellious; the authors confront some of the main radical trends in the field of adult education including critical theory, transformative learning, and popular education.” —Shahrzad Mojab, Professor, Department of Adult Education and Counseling Psychology, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto

END

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