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Paulo Freire

Paulo Freire

CRITICAL KNOWLEDGE AND PRAXIS – REMINDER

ANGLIA RUSKIN SEMINAR

May 13th 2015, 3.30-6.30pm.

Marconi Building, Room 104, Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford Campus.

Professor Dave Hill and Cassie Earl and the Department of Education are delighted to invite you to a special session of the CEJ (Critical Education and Justice) Research Group at Anglia Ruskin University:

 

Critical Knowledge and Praxis

With Professor Mike Neary, Dr. Sarah Amsler & Dr. Joss Winn from the University of Lincoln

 

The seminar will explore the fate of critical knowledge and praxis and how it might have a role in progressive politics and revolutionary struggles against current injustices created and exacerbated by the violence of capitalist abstractions: Money, the State and its other institutional forms, e.g. the neoliberal university.

A key issue for the seminar will be the extent to which it is possible to operate as a critical scholar within a neo-liberal university, and to what extent it is necessary to develop other social institutions to carry through with the implications that form the substance of our work.

 

Reading

Amsler, S. (2014) For feminist consciousness in the academy, Special Issue on Materialist Feminisms against Neoliberalism, Politics and Culture. Sarah’s new book ‘The Education of Radical Democracy‘ will be published in April.

Neary, M. (2014) ‘Making with the University of the Future: pleasure and pedagogy in higher and higher education’.  In: J. Lea (Ed.) (2015) Enhancing Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: engaging with the dimensions of practice. Maidenhead: Open University Press.

Winn, J. (2015) The co-operative university: Labour, property and pedagogyPower and Education, 7 (1).

 

See: http://josswinn.org/2015/03/anglia-ruskin-seminar-critical-knowledge-and-praxis/

If you are coming from outside the University and need directions, please contact either Dave Hill (dave.hill@anglia.ac.uk) or Cassie Earl (cassie.earl@anglia.ac.uk)

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Paulo Freire

Paulo Freire

CRITICAL KNOWLEDGE AND PRAXIS

ANGLIA RUSKIN SEMINAR

May 13th 2015, 3.30-6.30pm.

Marconi Building room 104, Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford Campus.

Critical Knowledge and Praxis

The seminar will explore the fate of critical knowledge and praxis and how it might have a role in progressive politics and revolutionary struggles against current injustices created and exacerbated by the violence of capitalist abstractions: Money, the State and its other institutional forms, e.g. the neoliberal university.

A key issue for the seminar will be the extent to which it is possible to operate as a critical scholar within a neo-liberal university, and to what extent it is necessary to develop other social institutions to carry through with the implications that form the substance of our work.

Reading

Amsler, S. (2014) For feminist consciousness in the academy, Special Issue on Materialist Feminisms against Neoliberalism, Politics and Culture. Sarah’s new book ‘The Education of Radical Democracy‘ will be published in April.

Neary, M. (2014) ‘Making with the University of the Future: pleasure and pedagogy in higher and higher education’.  In: J. Lea (Ed.) (2015) Enhancing Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: engaging with the dimensions of practice. Maidenhead: Open University Press.

Winn, J. (2015) The co-operative university: Labour, property and pedagogyPower and Education, 7 (1).

See: http://josswinn.org/2015/03/anglia-ruskin-seminar-critical-knowledge-and-praxis/

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

STUDENTS AND POLITICS

Society for Research into Higher Education

Date – 23 January 2015, 12.15 – 16.00

Venue – SRHE, 73 Collier St, London N1 9BE

Network – Student Experience

This seminar explores student activism and students influencing institutional, national and societal politics. Current movements, events and research will be explored, including new ways, methods and organisations that students are involved in. Issues such as how institutions are reacting to, working with and engaging with students and/or disempowering students will be discussed. A particular focus will be on how students’ activity in politics influences institutional decision-making, policies and the curriculum.

Speakers will include students, student organisations, researchers and policy makers.

Speakers:

Alastair D. Robertson, Abertay University, Director of Teaching & Learning Enhancement, ESD Student Attitudes longitudinal survey from HEA and institutional initiatives

Andre Pusey, Lecturer, Built Environment and Engineering, Leeds Beckett University

Ben Glover, Post-Crash Economics Society, University of Manchester

Sarah Amsler, Reader, School of Education, University of Lincoln

 

To reserve a place: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Alternative & Sustainable Universities

SUSTAINING ALTERNATIVE UNIVERSITIES

UK Free University Network (FUN)

Sustaining Alternative Universities

Collaborative Research Conference

1–2 December 2012

Oxford, UK

 

They will admit that little is to be expected from present-day governments, since these live and act according to a murderous code. Hope remains only in the most difficult task of all: to reconsider everything from the ground up, so as to shape a living society inside a dying society. [People] must therefore, as individuals, draw up among themselves, within frontiers and across them, a new social contract which will unite them according to more reasonable principles.’ (Albert Camus, ‘Neither victim nor executioner’, 1946)

Following on from the inaugural meeting of the UK Free University Network held in early 2012, we are calling out to representatives of all free universities and to all those who wish to participate in a conference with a more focused objective.

In recent years, we have witnessed the accelerated neoliberal capitalist colonisation of the university. In the UK (and far beyond) many students are now priced out of higher education and the academic finds him/herself subservient to the logic and interests of capital. In response to this intolerable reality, many groups of scholars, students, and others have come together independently to create alternative, ‘free’ universities.

The ‘Sustaining Alternative Universities’ conference, as a space for coordinating research and sharing knowledge and experience, seeks to support these projects in taking further decisive steps towards the creation of a national movement of individuals and organisations dedicated to the construction and development of alternative democratic, critical, and ultimately sustainable higher education communities.

 

Sustainability: history, dialogue, and practice

The successes of this movement hinge on its sustainability. ‘How can we build, develop, and maintain truly sustainable educational communities outside the existing institutional frameworks?’ is the question upon which our collective investigations and discussions should be founded. Therefore, our collective task is to conceptualise, research, imagine, and, ultimately, cultivate a sustainable movement based on a network of locally-based, sustainable, free universities. We believe that this conference can help us to successfully undertake this task through a three-step process.

Step one: history. An intrinsic element of building sustainability today must surely be to learn from the history of previous projects of popular, democratic and radical education here in the UK, and beyond. Therefore, we invite representatives of each free university to conduct and present research into the history of these traditions in their specific locality, drawing on their own particular influences. Researchers should keep in mind the practical purpose driving this research and consider issues such as: Who participated in these efforts? How were they structured, organised, and sustained? What was the significance of their historical and spatial context? What lessons can be derived from these efforts for our own endeavours today?

We hope that this shared research effort will allow us to both map out a history of popular / democratic / radical higher education in the UK, and to identify ways these can inform our own current projects. Ultimately, this collaborative research endeavour could also help us trace the roots of our network.

Step two: dialogue. The next step is to engage in dialogue with one another, and with our histories. We need to both imagine our ideals and talk freely and openly about the challenges and obstacles that impede our ambitions and objectives today. We need to name the material, social and subjective conditions that constrain the actualisation of our imagination and hopes. At the conference, we aim to draw on our collective experiences in democratic education to create a supportive, democratic space in which participants feel able to share their thoughts, feelings, and ideas in these areas.

Step three: practice. Finally, we need to take the lessons and ideas derived from our historical research and dialogue and put them into practice. The conference will culminate in a session in which we all make plans for practical action to take things forward on a local and national level.

 

Affinities and collaborations

We invite collaboration and co-operation with all. Beyond the Free University Network itself, we particularly welcome collaboration from members of the following groups:

Academic members of the ‘For a Public University’ working group and Campaign for the Public University. We at FUN have not forsaken the mainstream university, and many of our members are not only academics or students, but also active in defending the public university. We recognise the rich traditions of critical pedagogy within the university and the enduring possibilities of its democratic promise. We welcome contributions from all academics.

Members of the Co-operative Movement. Clearly, the co-operative model of organisation offers much for free universities today to draw on, and at least one in the UK is explicitly organised upon co-operative principles. We welcome members of the Co-operative Movement who might contribute to our historical and contemporary understanding of co-operative education, and/or who would like to build bridges between these two movements.

University workers who are not academics. All too often, non-academic staff working in universities are marginalised within or excluded from these discussions. Their contributions, knowledges, experiences and possibilities are overlooked. We seek to redress this situation and invite all those making invaluable contributions to higher education in ways that are not specifically ‘academic’ to participate in this conference.

Students and all those desiring to learn. Critical pedagogy aspires to break down hierarchical boundaries between students and teachers, and to expand the right of learning to everyone whether they occupy the role of ‘student’ or not. In the democratic universities we envisage, students shape their own learning experiences. We welcome contributions from students, past, present, and future.

All others who share our principles, and who are active in creating alternative institutions in other areas of social life, particularly in education. There is much we can learn from each other.

 

An open, democratic, egalitarian, anti-elitist intellectuality

This is a critical pedagogical and political project. This conference is not intended to be a typical academic conference based exclusively on theoretically dense papers and presentations. There is validity, truth, importance, and profound insight in many other methods and ways of expressing knowledge, and we open our conference and minds to these. We believe that narrative – telling stories – is a particularly important means for reaching the personal and social heart of the obstacles and challenges that confront us in our ambitions to create democratic and sustainable learning communities.

 

Where and when

In the spirit of the Occupy movement, we have decided to host this conference on higher education in Oxford for obvious historical reasons.

We propose that the conference will be held on the weekend of 1–2 December 2012.

We recognise the high cost of transport and accommodation and ask those in a position to do so to offer contributions to help unwaged participants to attend. A system will be created to make this transparent and possible.

 

Impact and output

Only joking!

We want this conference to be the turning point at which we really begin to cultivate a sustainable and flourishing free university movement. We hope you can join us for this conference.

If you are interested in participating in the conference and/or in its planning of and preparation, please contact either Sarah Amsler (samsler@lincoln.ac.uk) or Joel Lazarus (joel_lazarus@hotmail.com). 

We aim to have a coordinating committee established by 13 August.

 

Venue

The location of the conference venue will depend on final numbers. However, what is certain is that this conference’s organisation will be guided by fully inclusive principles. This means a family friendly venue with park/playground nearby and a safe indoor space for children of all ages to play. Childcare duties will not preclude participation at this conference. Equally, we will ensure that the venue is fully accessible and that all dietary requirements are catered for. Please contact us if you have any concerns, ideas, or requests.

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Gigi Roggero

Gigi Roggero

DOING AND UNDOING ACADEMIC LABOUR

CENTRE FOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE 2012

Conference 2012

Doing and Undoing Academic Labour

June 7, 2012
9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Learning Landscapes (MB1019)
University of Lincoln

 

In recent decades, a wealth of information has been produced about academic labour: the financialisation of knowledge, diminution of professional autonomy and collegiality through managerialism and audit cultures; the subsumption of higher education into circulations of capital, proletarianisation of intellectual work, shift from dreams of enlightenment and emancipation to imperatives of ‘employability’, and experiences of alienation and anger amongst educators across the world.

This has also been a period of intensifying awareness about the significance of these processes, not only for teachers and students in universities, but for all labour and intellectual, social and political life as well. And now we watch the growth of a transnational movements that is inventing new ways of knowing and producing knowledge, new forms of education, and new possibilities for pedagogy to play a progressive role in struggles for alterantives within the academy and beyond.

Yet within the academy, the proliferation of critical work on these issues is not always accompanied by qualitative changes in everyday practice. The conditions of academic labour for many in the UK are indeed becoming more precarious and repressive – and in unequal measure across institutions and disciplines, and in patterns that retrench existing inequalities of gender, physical ability, class, race and sexuality. The critical analysis of academic labour promises much, but often remains disconnected from the ways we work in practice with others.

This conference brings together scholars and activists from a range of disciplines to discuss these problems, and to consider how critical knowledge about new forms of academic labour can be linked to struggles to humanise labour and knowledge production within and beyond the university.

 

Contributions from:

Mette Louise Berg

Rob Coley

Anna Curcio

Richard Hall

Maria Do Mar Pereira

Dean Lockwood

Andrew McGettigan

Justine Mercer

Sara Motta

Adam O’Meara

Gigi Roggero 

Howard Stevenson

 

Public / Free / Open

This conference is public, free and open to everyone. Please register so we know how many people will be attending. If you have any questions about the event, please contact Dr. Sarah Amsler at samsler@lincoln.ac.uk.

Getting here

Doing and Undoing Academic Labour will be held in Learning Landscapes,  MB1019, the University of Lincoln. Click here for a map of the site.

 

Link to Conference: http://cerd.blogs.lincoln.ac.uk/conference/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

 

Education Crisis

GLOBAL DISRUPTIONS AND HIGHER EDUCATION

Occupy: A New Pedagogy of Space and Time?

Professor Mike Neary, Dean of Teaching and Learning, Director of Centre for Educational Research and Development,University ofLincoln

Dr Sarah Amsler, Senior Lecturer, Centre for Educational Research and Development,University ofLincoln

Friday 9th March 2012, 15.00 – 16.30, Room 120, Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol, 35 Berkeley Square

Dear All

Welcome to the first SRHE Southwest Higher Education Network Seminar of 2012!  

Full details of the event are attached to this email.

Booking: To book a place or for further information, please contact:  Richard.Budd@bristol.ac.uk

Look forward to seeing you there.

Dr Lisa Lucas

Co-Director Teaching, Learning and Assessment DirectorMPhil/PhD Programme Graduate School of Education University of Bristol, 35 Berkeley Square, Bristol, BS8 1JA, Tel: +44 (0)117 331 4351 (internal number 14351)

Email: Lisa.Lucas@bristol.ac.uk

Webpage: http://www.bris.ac.uk/education/people/person/lisa-lucas/overview.html

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Higher Education Crisis - but now there is Hope

THE SOCIAL SCIENCE CENTRE – LINCOLN

The Social Science Centre (SSC) provides an opportunity for students and academics to have a very special co-operative experience of higher education. All courses at SSC are taught and assessed at the same level as similar courses in mainstream universities in the UK. The courses are taught by experienced academics, including professors and lecturers with national and international reputations based on the quality of their scholarship in the social sciences.

One of the unique features of the Centre is that it is run as a ‘not-for-profit’ co-operative. The Centre is managed on democratic, non-hierarchical principles with all students and staff having an equal involvement in how the Centre operates.

The co-operative principles on which the management of the Centre is based extend to the ways in which courses are taught. All classes will be participative and collaborative, so as to include the experience and knowledge of the student as an intrinsic part of the course. Students will have the chance to design courses with the professors and lecturers, as well as deliver some of the teaching themselves with support from other students and the teaching staff. Students will be able to work with academics on research projects as well as publish their own writings. A core principle of the Centre is that teachers and students have much to learn from each other.

The subjects taught at the Centre are the core subjects in social science: Sociology, Politics and Philosophy. The Centre will provide teaching at all levels including undergraduate, Masters and Doctorates in Philosophy.

The urgent need for such a centre is the decision by the Coalition Government to remove all funding for teaching the social sciences in English universities. While staff involved with the Centre are protesting this decision and fighting for funding to be restored, they are, at the same time, establishing an alternative model for Higher Education, which will not depend on the funding decisions of politicians.

The SSC believes that university degrees are being devalued by a system of Higher Education increasingly focused on the perceived needs of the business sector. SSC provides a learning experience based on academic values, including critical thinking, experimentation, sharing, peer review, co-operation, collaboration, openness, debate and constructive disagreement. SSC believes that these academic values, rather than the short-termist, highly competitive, profit driven motives of the private sector, are more likely to provide a better future for us all.

The Centre is entirely self-funded. All members of the Centre will pay an annual subscription, based on the level of their salary. For those students and academics who are unemployed or are on a low income there will be no subscription charge. The Centre accepts monies, and other forms of ‘payment in kind’, from donors who share their ethics and values. The Centre staff will donate their time and expertise freely and will not receive any payment.

Students will not leave the Centre with a university degree, but they will have a learning experience that is equivalent to the level of a degree. Each student will receive a certificate in higher education, with an extensive written transcript detailing their academic and intellectual achievements. The Centre believes that given the current constraints of university teaching, the Centre will provide academics and students with a learning and teaching experience that compares favourably with what is provided by English universities.

By joining the Centre, students will be part of a unique experiment in higher education. We think this experiment in co-operative learning has the potential to transform the way in which higher education is designed and delivered.

The Centre will make use of the most up to date educational technologies, but this is not an online or web-based provision. It is important that the Centre is in a real space at the heart of its local community.

The Centre is designed for students who do not wish to take on the burden of debt currently imposed by the government, but do wish to receive a higher level of education.

It is envisaged that the Centre will have about twenty students at any one time, and a pool of about twenty lecturers. All students will be part-time, with most teaching taking place in the evenings and at weekends. While a full-time degree normally takes three years, it is envisaged that students at the Centre will take up to six years to obtain their undergraduate certificate in higher education, up to four years for the equivalent of a Masters and up to eight years for the equivalent to a PhD.

While this Centre is located in Lincoln and based around the Social Sciences it is hoped and expected this model of small scale, self-funded higher education provision will be adapted for different subject areas and in different locations nationally and internationally. These multi-various Centres will provide a supportive and co-operative network to further advance this sustainable and resilient model for higher education.

For more information see: http://socialsciencecentre.org.uk/

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski

14th MARXISM AND EDUCATION: RENEWING DIALOGUES (MERD) SEMINAR

Understanding the Current Crisis in Higher Education
MARXISM AND EDUCATION: RENEWING DIALOGUES XIV

A Day Seminar

10.30 – 4.30
Saturday April 9th 2011
Institute of Education, University of London
20 Bedford Way, WC1
Room 828

Speakers to include:
Patrick Ainley, Martin Allen, Sarah Amsler, Joyce Canaan, Clyde Chitty, Chris Knight

The seminar is free but places are limited.

To reserve a place and receive a numbered ticket, please contact Alpesh Maisuria at: amaisuria@ioe.ac.uk
A waiting list will come into operation when all the places have been allocated.

Please forward this invite to those who may be interested.

Convenors: Tony Green and Alpesh Maisuria

The MERD Seminars were co-founded by Tony Green and Glenn Rikowski in 2001. The First MERD Seminar took place at the University of London, Institute of Education on 22nd October 2002. For details of the first ten MERD Seminars, see: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=events&sub=MERD

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Higher Education Crisis

NEW ACTIVISM OR OLD POLITICS? SOUNDING STUDENT REACTION TO HIGHER EDUCATION’S CRISIS

Society for Research into Higher Education

Free Day Event

The Student Experience Network

New Activism or Old Politics? Sounding Student Reaction to HE’s Crisis

30th September 2010, 11am – 4:00pm

University of Aston, Birmingham

Room 404D, Main Building

This day event will discuss likely student reactions to the impending cuts and rising fees in higher education. It is free to staff and students in UK Higher Education/ anyone else interested, but please register below.

Timetable

10.30 Registration

11.00 Welcome by Patrick Ainley, Network co-coordinator and co-author of Lost Generation? Continuum 2010

11.15 Ben Little, University of Middlesex, talking on and around his free edited e-book: Radical Future – Politics for the Next Generation. Please read at http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/ebooks/radicalfuture.html

12.15 Jonathan Ward, Studentforce for Sustainable Development – Brown Dystopia or Green Hope?

1.15 Lunch

1.45 Jim Dickinson, Director of Campaigns and Strategy, NUS

2.45 Queen Mary College London University Countermappers and/or members of the Really Open University

3.45 Plenary discussion as and when.. tea and depart

Chairs am Joyce Canaan, Birmingham City University; pm Sarah Amsler, Aston University

A full guide to travelling to Aston, including campus maps, is available at http://www1.aston.ac.uk/about/directions/. The campus is a short walk from all Birmingham train stations. The university does not have visitor parking, but visitors with special needs can request a pass by emailing Dr Sarah Amsler (s.s.amsler@aston.ac.uk) and there is paid parking nearby.

Next meeting: 2 – 4 on November 24th November at University College London: Dr. R.T.Allen The Value of the Inexact, Michael Polanyi’s philosophy of tacit integration in relation to teaching and assessment (further details to follow).

New Activism or Old Politics is free, but please confirm attendance with Patrick at Patrickjdainley@aol.com

Nicola Manches, Administrative Assistant, Society for Research into Higher Education, 44 Bedford Row, London WC1R 4LL

Tel:  +44 (0) 20 7447 2525

Fax: +44 (0) 20 7447 2526

www.srhe.ac.uk

SRHE Annual Research Conference 2010

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com/

Education Crisis

CRITICAL EDUCATION FOR CRITICAL TIMES

14 May 2010

University of Nottingham

The development of a critical educational movement has been long in the making, and is now urgently overdue. These are without doubt critical times. The futures of public and common life hang in the balance. Intellectual and political openness and academic space are being increasingly curtailed and foreclosed. How should we as educators be orienting our work, our relationships with each other, and with publics, communities of struggle and social movements? What constitutes critical education in these critical times?

‘Critical Education for Critical Times’ explores different responses to these questions through a series of participatory workshops and dialogues. Each workshop, facilitated by educators with experience in critical pedagogy and/or popular education, will draw on this experience to introduce new work in empowering, prefigurative, transformative and critical pedagogies that are linked to social and political movements. We will open these examples up for criticism and discussion, and hope to consolidate the knowledge produced during the day into a common resource for further developments of educational theory and practice.

CECT ORGANISED BY THE CRITICAL PEDAGOGY AND POPULAR EDUCATION MIDLANDS WORKING GROUP

And sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/cssgj/), with support from the Nottingham Freeschool (http://nottinghamfreeschool.wordpress.com/) and Critical Pedagogies Group (CSSGJ)

Workshops/Discussions

1 | Learning alternatives to neoliberalism – resistance and renewal in critical education – Stephen Cowden, Social and Community Studies, Coventry University

2 | Prefigurative epistemologies and nomadic subjectivities: in, against, beyond the university – Sara Motta, Politics, University of Nottingham

3 | Learning from each other’s struggles – knowledge from and for social movements – Laurence Cox, Sociology, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, co-founder Grassroots Gathering

4 | ‘Climate Justice’ and popular education in social movement organisation – and Alice Cutler, TRAPESE Popular Education Collective, http://hbfc.clearerchannel.org/abouttrapese.php

5 | Revalorizing critique in academic and activist education – Sarah Amsler, Sociology and Public Policy, Aston University

Location and time | Registration begins at 9:00 a.m. in the foyer of the Law and Social Sciences Building, University of Nottingham (University Park Campus), and the final session will end at 4:30 p.m.

Sessions will be held in A105 and A106 of the Hallward Library. For maps and directions, see the University website at: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/about/datesandcampusinformation/mapsanddirections/mapsanddirections.aspx
To participate | The day is free and open to all.

To pre-register| contact Sara Motta at: sara.motta@nottingham.ac.uk Please include your name, postal address and email. All those who register early will receive a packet of relevant readings for each workshop.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Critical Pedagogy

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Critical Pedagogy

Critical Pedagogy

CRITICAL PEDAGOGY AND POPULAR EDUCATION – PODCASTS

 

The Critical Pedagogy Podcasting Project was launched at a day seminar on 3rd July 2009 at Aston University, Birmingham, UK. The event was called ‘Podcasting Critical Pedagogy and Popular Education’.

See: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2009/06/17/critical-pedagogy-and-popular-education/ for details on the development and history of this project. It is recommended that you check this out first, to see the organisational roots of the podcasts referred to below.

Gurnam Singh and colleagues at Coventry University developed a series of podcasts for the day seminar on 3rd July. These are:

‘Critical Pedagogy, Critical Theory and Critical Hope – Interview with Sarah Amsler’

‘Popular Education and Higher Education – Interview with Jim Crowther’

‘Indigenous Pedagogy – Interview with Michael Williams’

‘Critical Reflection and Critical Pedagogy – Interview with Philip Chambers’

‘Autonomist Marxism, Social Movements and Popular Education – Steve Wright’

‘The Neoliberal University, Critical Pedagogy and Popular Education – Part 1: Joyce Canaan’

‘The Neoliberal University, Critical Pedagogy and Popular Education – Part 2: Joyce Canaan’

‘The Workers Education Association and Popular or Informal Learning – Mogs Russell’

Gurnam Singh (Coventry University) is the Interviewer  

The podcasts are now available at: http://coventryuniversity.podbean.com/category/education/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

CRITICAL PEDAGOGY AND POPULAR EDUCATION

C-SAP Critical Pedagogy and Popular Education Special Interest Group

LAUNCH OF CRITICAL PEDAGOGY PODCASTING PROJECT

“Podcasting Critical Pedagogy and Popular Education”

Date: 3rd July 2009, 10:00 – 3:30.

Venue: Aston University, Main Building, Room 404C,

Aston Triangle, Birmingham, B4 2ET

http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?hl=en&q=Aston%20university&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wl

The C-SAP – Critical Pedagogy/Popular Education Special Interest Group (SIG) seeks to hold a day seminar to expand upon ideas discussed at its 20 February 2009 event 

Whilst the prior event explored the relevance and importance of the bodies of ideas known as Critical Pedagogy and Popular Education for HE teachers and educators, the 3 July event seeks to take forward the discussion from that day with a slightly different focus.  In 2008 Dr Gurnam Singh, one of the members of the SIG, obtained funding from C-SAP to develop a series of podcasts on themes associated with Critical Pedagogy and Popular Education. Gurnam, with, support from other colleagues, has now completed a series of 8 podcasts that will provide the basis for the day’s activities. The day will be divided into two sessions, with the morning session bringing together as many as possible of those who participated in making the dialogical podcasts with Gurnam will discuss the significance of this process for themselves and the wider audience. The afternoon will focus on the work of the Critical Pedagogy and Popular Education SIG to both publicise the availability of the material on the C-SAP website and consider the wider issues raised by the podcasts.

 

 The programme of the day will be as follows:

10:00 Coffee and welcome

10:30 – 11:15 Overview of Podcasting Project: Gurnam Singh will offer a general overview of the project, what he sought to achieve and what came out of it.

11:15   – 12:30 Responses from Interviewees in which the issues raised within the interviews will be discussed.

12:30 – 1:30 Lunch

1:30 – 3:30 Developing and Extending the work of the Special Interest Group.

This discussion aims to respond to the prior event and is entitled, “We have the analysis, now what do we do with it?”

Much of what happens in academia concerns discussion and analysis of the current situation in which we find ourselves.  Whilst this is essential work, as Critical Pedagogy is not just a method but a practice, we also want to think about how we build a bridge between theory and practice, in other words how can Critical Pedagogy and Popular Education be used as means to facilitate real change in HE today. 

Cost and who can attend: The workshop is free for participants and places will be allocated on a first come first served basis. The event is primarily aimed at HE teachers and students.

If you would like to attend please contact Sarah Amsler: S.S.Amsler@aston.ac.uk  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk