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Sara Motta

Sara Motta

CONSTRUCTING 21st CENTURY SOCIALISM IN LATIN AMERICA: THE ROLE OF RADICAL EDUCATION

By Sara C Motta and Mike Cole

See: http://us.macmillan.com/constructingtwentyfirstcenturysocialisminlatinamerica/MikeCole

“This is a formidable and inspiring rendition of education as a political force and a testament to a decolonizing pedagogical spirit that dares to reignite the promise of Socialism for the twenty-first century. Motta and Cole powerfully counter hegemonic epistemologies of knowledge, moving us toward a decolonizing field of possibilities. More important is the persuasive manner in which they summon revolutionary educational projects of Latin America to challenge the blight of neoliberalism and reinvigorate our emancipatory dreams.” – Antonia Darder, Leavey Endowed Chair in Ethics and Moral Leadership, Loyola Marymount University

“At last, a powerful comparative critique of how the pedagogy of neoliberal politics and the politics of neoliberal pedagogy are being imposed on Latin America, and, most importantly, the responses of Latin American radical educators to these deadening and fatalistic politics and pedagogies. This book gives hope to radical educators everywhere for the possibilities of more grounded and transgressive ways of thinking, seeing, being, doing and feeling from the praxis of Brazilian, Colombian and Venezuelan radical educators today.” – Joyce Canaan, Professor of Sociology, Birmingham City University, UK

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-book-by-sara-c-motta-and-mike-cole-constructing-21st-century-socialism-in-latin-america-the-role-of-radical-education

Mike Cole

Mike Cole

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Social Movements

Social Movements

THE PEDAGOGICAL PRACTICES OF SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

Call for Papers Volume 6 Issue 1 (May 2014)

Interface: A journal for and about Social Movements

The pedagogical practices of social movements

Sara C Motta and Ana Margarida Esteves

In this special issue, we aim to deepen conceptualisations, analysis and practices of critical and radical pedagogies in our struggles for transformation. We seek to explore the pedagogical practices of movements by expanding our understanding of knowledge and how movements learn beyond solely a focus on the cognitive to the ethical, spiritual, embodied and affective.

Our aim is to systematize and document these practices and to provide conceptual, methodological and practical resources for activists, community educators and movement scholars alike. We are really keen to receive creative pieces including longer articles, dialogues, critical reflections on practice/particular projects etc and pieces that use visual art, photography, and video as means of critical reflection.

The May 2014 issue of the open-access, online, copyleft academic/activist journal Interface: a Journal for and about Social Movements (http://www.interfacejournal.net/) invites contributions on the theme of The Pedagogical Practices of Social Movements.

The pedagogical, understood as knowledge practices and learning processes, often takes a pivotal role in the emergence, development and sustainability of social movements and community struggles. In this issue of Interface we seek to explore the pedagogical practices of movements by expanding our understanding of knowledge and how movements learn beyond solely a focus on the cognitive to the ethical, spiritual, embodied and affective. Our aim is to systematize and document these practices and to provide conceptual, methodological and practical resources for activists, community educators and movement scholars alike.

Pedagogical practices can constitute important elements in the process of unlearning dominant subjectivities, social relationships, and ways of constituting the world and learning new ones. They can be central in the ‘how’ of movement construction and community building in spaces such as workshops, teach-ins, and through popular education. They can contribute to the building of sustainable and effective social movements through music, storytelling, ritual or through processes that surround strategy building, the sharing of experiences or simply friendship. They can help activists and organizers to learn through their participation in counter-hegemonic, grassroots initiatives such as community banks, local currencies and workers cooperatives. They can also be important aspects of movement relevant research.

In this special issue of Interface we ask the broad question, ‘What role do pedagogical practices have in the praxis of social movements and their struggle for political change and social transformation?’ The practices we would like to explore include formal methodologies such as Open Spaces for Dialogue and Enquiry (OSDE), participatory action research, as well as methodologies of popular and community education inspired by feminist, Freirean, post-colonial and Gramscian approaches, among others, but also the more informal pedagogical practices which remain under-conceptualized and theorized and which include the role of the affective, the embodied (the body and earth for example) and the spiritual.

However, we also understand the politics and dynamics of movement and community education and learning to be contested terrain. We see how mainstream institutions and actors have co-opted the language and methods of popular education and movement methodologies. These processes of co-optation often neutralize their radical and political potential. We also understand that social movements often end up reproducing, through these practices, inequalities based on factors such as class, gender, race/ethnicity, educational level, expertise and role within movement organizations. Therefore, we would be very interested in receiving contributions based on “insider” knowledge about power dynamics behind knowledge production and learning within social movements (i.e. relationship between experts and non-experts, leaders and other members, impact of gender, class, race, educational level and expertise), and how such power dynamics determine whose “voices” end up being represented in the process and outcome of knowledge leaders and other members, impact of gender, class, race, educational level and expertise), and how such power dynamics determine whose “voices” end up being represented in the process and outcome of knowledge production and learning, and whose voices end up being silenced.

Among the more specific questions we would like to address in the issue are:

 What learning processes and knowledge practices are developed by movements?

 What is the role of formal methodologies and pedagogies in movement praxis?

 What is the role of informal pedagogies of everyday practice in the building of movements, the development of their political projects and fostering their sustainability and effectiveness?

 What is the role of the affective, embodied and spiritual in learning processes?

 What is the role of ethics in movement learning?

 What is the role of counter-hegemonic economic practices, such as those classified as “Solidarity Economy”, in learning processes within social movements?

 In what way do activist researchers contribute to the learning of movements?

 What politics of knowledge underlie the politics of social movements?

 Do the processes of ‘alternative’ education within social movements and collective struggles transform, disrupt or replicate hegemonic social relations?

 What pedagogical and political insights can be gleaned from exploring education for mobilization and social change?

We are very happy to receive contributions that reflect on these questions and any others relevant to the special issue theme and that fit within the journal’s mission statement (http://www.interfacejournal.net/who-we-are/mission-statement/).

Submissions should contribute to the journal’s mission as a tool to help our movements learn from each other’s struggles, by developing analyses from specific movement processes and experiences that can be translated into a form useful for other movements.

In this context, we welcome contributions by movement participants and academics who are developing movement-relevant theory and research. Our goal is to include material that can be used in a range of ways by movements — in terms of its content, its language, its purpose and its form. We thus seek work in a range of different formats, such as conventional (refereed) articles, review essays, facilitated discussions and interviews, action notes, teaching notes, key documents and analysis, book reviews — and beyond. Both activist and academic peers review research contributions, and other material is sympathetically edited by peers. The editorial process generally is geared towards assisting authors to find ways of expressing their understanding, so that we all can be heard across geographical, social and political distances.

We can accept material in Afrikaans, Arabic, Catalan, Croatian, Danish, English, French, German, Hebrew, Hungarian, Italian, Latvian, Maltese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish and Zulu.

Please see our editorial contacts page (http://www.interfacejournal.net/submissions/editorial-contact/) for details of who to submit to.

Deadline and Contact Details

The deadline for initial submissions to this issue, to be published May 1, 2014, is November 1, 2013. For details of how to submit to Interface, please see the “Guidelines for contributors” on our website. All manuscripts, whether on the special theme or other topics, should be sent to the appropriate regional editor, listed on our contacts page. Submission templates are available online via the guidelines page and should be used to ensure correct formatting.

Details: http://www.interfacejournal.net/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Interface-5-1-CFP-vol-6-no-1.pdf

Sara Motta

Sara Motta

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Gigi Roggero

Gigi Roggero

DOING AND UNDOING ACADEMIC LABOUR

CENTRE FOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE 2012

Conference 2012

Doing and Undoing Academic Labour

June 7, 2012
9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Learning Landscapes (MB1019)
University of Lincoln

 

In recent decades, a wealth of information has been produced about academic labour: the financialisation of knowledge, diminution of professional autonomy and collegiality through managerialism and audit cultures; the subsumption of higher education into circulations of capital, proletarianisation of intellectual work, shift from dreams of enlightenment and emancipation to imperatives of ‘employability’, and experiences of alienation and anger amongst educators across the world.

This has also been a period of intensifying awareness about the significance of these processes, not only for teachers and students in universities, but for all labour and intellectual, social and political life as well. And now we watch the growth of a transnational movements that is inventing new ways of knowing and producing knowledge, new forms of education, and new possibilities for pedagogy to play a progressive role in struggles for alterantives within the academy and beyond.

Yet within the academy, the proliferation of critical work on these issues is not always accompanied by qualitative changes in everyday practice. The conditions of academic labour for many in the UK are indeed becoming more precarious and repressive – and in unequal measure across institutions and disciplines, and in patterns that retrench existing inequalities of gender, physical ability, class, race and sexuality. The critical analysis of academic labour promises much, but often remains disconnected from the ways we work in practice with others.

This conference brings together scholars and activists from a range of disciplines to discuss these problems, and to consider how critical knowledge about new forms of academic labour can be linked to struggles to humanise labour and knowledge production within and beyond the university.

 

Contributions from:

Mette Louise Berg

Rob Coley

Anna Curcio

Richard Hall

Maria Do Mar Pereira

Dean Lockwood

Andrew McGettigan

Justine Mercer

Sara Motta

Adam O’Meara

Gigi Roggero 

Howard Stevenson

 

Public / Free / Open

This conference is public, free and open to everyone. Please register so we know how many people will be attending. If you have any questions about the event, please contact Dr. Sarah Amsler at samsler@lincoln.ac.uk.

Getting here

Doing and Undoing Academic Labour will be held in Learning Landscapes,  MB1019, the University of Lincoln. Click here for a map of the site.

 

Link to Conference: http://cerd.blogs.lincoln.ac.uk/conference/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Progress

INTERFACE VOLUME 3 ISSUE 2: FEMINISM, WOMEN’S MOVEMENTS AND WOMEN IN MOVEMENT

Interface 3(2) now out: feminism, women’s movements and women in movement

Volume three, issue two (November 2011): Feminism, women’s movements and women in movement
Issue editors: Sara Motta, Cristina Flesher Fominaya, Catherine Eschle, Laurence Cox
http://www.interfacejournal.net/current/

Volume three, issue two of Interface, a peer-reviewed e-journal produced and refereed by social movement practitioners and engaged movement researchers, is now out, on the special theme “Feminism, women’s movements and women in movement”. Interface is open-access (free), global and multilingual. Our overall aim is to “learn from each other’s struggles”: to develop a dialogue between practitioners and researchers, but also between different social movements, intellectual traditions and national or regional contexts.
 
This issue of Interface includes xx pages and 27 pieces in English and Spanish, by authors writing from / about Australia, Canada, Denmark, Guatemala, India, Ireland, Mexico, Nicaragua, the Netherlands, Poland, South Africa, Spain, the UK and the US.

Articles include:

 

Sara Motta, Cristina Flesher Fominaya, Catherine Eschle and Laurence Cox, Feminism, women’s movements and women in movement

 Theme-related articles:

 Janet Conway, Feminist knowledges on the anti-globalization terrain: transnational feminisms at the World Social Forum

Lyndi Hewitt, Framing across differences, building solidarities: lessons from women’s rights activism in transnational spaces

Eurig Scandrett, Suroopa Mukherjee and the Bhopal Research Team, “We are flames not flowers”: a gendered reading of the social movement for justice in Bhopal

Akwugo Emejulu, Can “the people” be feminists? Analysing the fate of feminist justice claims in populist grassroots movements in the United States

Finn Mackay, A movement of their own: voices of young feminist activists in the London Feminist Network

Melody L Hoffmann, Bike Babes in Boyland: women cyclists’ pedagogical strategies in urban bicycle culture

Nina Nissen, Challenging perspectives: women, complementary and alternative medicine, and social change

 

Special section: feminist strategies for change:

Sisters of Resistance, Why we need a feminist movement now

Nina Nijsten, Some things we need for a feminist revolution

Rosario González Arias, Viejas tensiones, nuevos desafíos y futuros territorios feministas

Tiny aka Lisa Gray-Garcia, Independence vs interdependence

Roberta Villalón, Feminist activist research and strategies from within the battered immigrants’ movement

Elena Jeffreys, Audry Autonomy, Jane Green, Christian Vega (Scarlet Alliance Australian Sex Workers Association), Listen to sex workers: support decriminalisation and anti-discrimination protections

Jean Bridgeman, Wise women in community: building on everyday radical feminism for social change

Jennifer Verson, Performing unseen identities: a feminist strategy for radical communication

Jed Picksley, Jamie Heckert and Sara Motta, Feminist love, feminist rage; or, Learning to listen

Anarchist Feminists Nottingham, Statement on intimate partner violence within activist communities

 

Other articles:

Kenneth Good, The capacities of the people versus a predominant, militarist, ethno-nationalist elite: democratisation in South Africa c. 1973 – 97

Michael Neocosmos, Transition, human rights and violence: rethinking a liberal political relationship in the African neo-colony

Roy Krøvel, Alternative journalism and the relationship between guerrillas and indigenous peoples in Latin America

Tomás Mac Sheoin, Greenpeace: a (partly) annotated bibliography of English-language publications

Anna Feigenbaum with Kheya Bag, Ken Barlow, Jakob Horstmann, David Shulman and Kika Sroka-Miller, “Everything we do is niche”: a roundtable on contemporary progressive publishing

 

This issue’s reviews include the following titles:

Jennifer Earl and Katrina Kimport, Digitally enabled social change: activism in the Internet age

SV Ojas, Madhuresh Kumar, MJ Vijayan and Joe Athialy, Plural narratives from Narmada Valley

Eurig Scandrett et al, Bhopal survivors speak: emergent voices from a people’s movement

Hilary Wainwright, Reclaim the state: experiments in popular democracy

 

A Call for Papers for volume 4 issue 2 of Interface is now open, on the theme of “The global emancipation of labour: new movements and struggles around work, workers and precarity” (submissions deadline May 1 2012). We can review and publish articles in Afrikaans, Arabic, Catalan, Croatian, Danish, Dutch, English, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, Maltese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish and Zulu. The website has the full CFP and details on how to submit articles for this issue at http://interfacejournal.nuim.ie/2011/06/call-for-papers-volume-4-issue-2-for-the-global-emancipation-of-labour-new-movements-and-struggles-around-work-workers-and-precarity/
 
The next issue of Interface (May 2012) will be on “The season of revolutions: the Arab Spring”, with a special section on the new wave of European mobilizations.

Interface is always open to new collaborators.

More details can be found on our website: http://interfacejournal.net
 
Please forward this to anyone you think may be interested

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Sara Motta

FELLOWSHIPS AT THE CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF SOCIAL AND GLOBAL JUSTICE

Announcement:

Dear colleagues and friends,

The Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (CSSGJ), University of Nottingham, is excited to announce two one month visiting fellowships between February-March 2011 and May-June 2011.

This opportunity is available to academics, activists, community educators and others who believe that they could benefit from a stay with us at the Centre and believe they could fruitfully help us to continue to develop our work.

See the link below for further information: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/cssgj/centre-members/research-fellows.aspx

Our best wishes
Sara Motta and Tony Burns
CSSGJ Co-Directors

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

Samir Amin

SAMIR AMIN AT NOTTINGHAM UNIVERSITY

Samir Amin at the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (CSSGJ), Nottingham University.

On 1 December 2011, Samir Amin, the internationally renowned political economist, will be involved in two events at the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (CSSGJ) at Nottingham University.

1. Author meets Audience session: discussion of three of Samir Amin’s books by CSSGJ members with a reply by the author.

Sara Motta on ‘Eurocentrism’

Jon Mansell on ‘The Liberal Virus’

Andreas Bieler on ‘Global History’

Thursday, 1 December at 12 noon in B62, Law and Social Science Building

 

 

2. CSSGJ Annual Lecture 2011: Samir Amin – ‘The Trajectory of Historical Capitalism’.

Thursday, 1 December, 5.30 to 7 p.m. in B62, Law and Social Science Building.

 

These meetings are open to the wider public and everybody is welcome to attend. For more information, please contact Andrew Gibson at Andrew.Gibson@nottingham.ac.uk

 

Prof. Andreas Bieler,

Professor of Political Economy,

School of Politics and International Relations,

University of Nottingham,

UK-Nottingham  NG7 2RD,

Personal website: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/~ldzab/

Tel.: 0115-951 4492,

FAX: 0115-951 4859,

Trade union and global restructuring blog: http://andreasbieler.blogspot.com/

New book: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415580830/

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Peter McLaren

NOTTINGHAM CRITICAL PEDAGOGY

The Nottingham Critical Pedagogies Group is a fluid network of academics, education workers and students interested in discussing the potentials for (and problems with) taking a critical pedagogical  approach to higher education in the UK.

To that end we organise reading groups and workshops; discuss critical pedagogy with current students; invite visiting speakers and run this blog.

Membership is informal and members may commit as much or as little time to the project as they wish.

We have close ties with the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice and have received funding for the Centre for Integrative Learning.

If you would like to be kept informed of our activities, please email Heather Watkins on ldxhw@nottingham.ac.uk and ask to join our mailing list.

Nottingham Critical Pedagogy: http://nottinghamcriticalpedagogy.wordpress.com/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Paulo Freire

NOTTINGHAM CRITICAL PEDAGOGY

Critical Pedagogy

EDUCATIONAL SPACES OF ALTERITY

CALL FOR PAPERS

Educational Spaces of Alterity
University of Nottingham, Tuesday 26th April 2010

Nottingham Critical Pedagogy invites contributions for a day of workshops considering spaces (both inside and outside the academy) that may help challenge the dominance of neoliberal logics, alienated practices and Eurocentric hegemony in contemporary educational practice, and in so doing contribute to radical social change. We are pleased to announce that John Holloway will be hosting a keynote workshop at the event.

We hope to welcome contributions from a variety of disciplines and from inside and outside the academy. These can be in any format, but we especially encourage those that break from traditional conference paper models: workshops, artistic engagements, poster presentations and performances would all be welcomed. We welcome suggestions for entire workshop sessions (90 minutes), or single contributions, which we will group into workshops.

Our event partners Spaces of Alterity: a conference hosted by the University of Nottingham’s Department of Culture, Film and Media on Wed 27th-Thurs 28th April, with keynote addresses by China Miéville and Alberto Toscano. Both events are designed to work on their own, but participants are more than welcome to attend both should they wish, and we will be co-curating an Annexinema film night with Spaces of Alterity (details tbc) to show short films which touch upon the themes of the two events.

A non-exhaustive list of themes you may wish to consider is offered over the page. Please do not feel these are mutually exclusive:

Critical Education and ‘The Crisis’

  • How can critical education respond to the crisis in higher education and wider societal crises?
  • Do these crises close down or create spaces of hope for critical education?
  • Defending the university? Transforming the university? Abandoning the university?

 

Education and the Affective

  • Emotional epistemologies and pedagogies.
  • The role of hope in critical education.
  • ‘Radical love’.

 

Community Education

  • Skillshare workshops.
  • Social movements/community politics.
  • Challenging the borders between HE and community.
  • The role of non-traditional educational spaces (art galleries, social centres, etc).

 

Border Thinking and Hybridity

  • The importance of identity and difference for critical education.
  • Challenging hegemonic and Eurocentric perspectives.
  • How can we introduce the subaltern into the classroom?

 

Reflections on Practice

  • Experiences of critical education.
  • What can we learn from past experiences, experiments and struggle?

 

Art, Music and Critical Education

  • The role of art and music in critical education.
  • Resonances between critical education and contemporary theory and practice in art and music.
  • Problems of assessment in critical and artistic education: or is assessment the problem?

 

Please send abstracts and information on the format you wish your presentation to take to nottinghamcriticalpedagogy@gmail.com no later than Tuesday 8th February. These should be no more than 300 words, but may contain links to further reading regarding your chosen method of presentation.

Registration is free for Educational Spaces of Alterity but there are fees for Spaces of Alterity: attendance for one day is £25/£35; for both days it’s £45/55 (cheaper price for students and unwaged).

We have a limited amount of money to help cover the travel and accommodation costs of participants who would not otherwise be able to attend, or to help with fees for those who wish to stay for Spaces of Alterity. Details will be announced once abstracts have been received. Food and drink will be provided for all.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Education Crisis

CRITICAL EDUCATION FOR CRITICAL TIMES

14 May 2010

University of Nottingham

The development of a critical educational movement has been long in the making, and is now urgently overdue. These are without doubt critical times. The futures of public and common life hang in the balance. Intellectual and political openness and academic space are being increasingly curtailed and foreclosed. How should we as educators be orienting our work, our relationships with each other, and with publics, communities of struggle and social movements? What constitutes critical education in these critical times?

‘Critical Education for Critical Times’ explores different responses to these questions through a series of participatory workshops and dialogues. Each workshop, facilitated by educators with experience in critical pedagogy and/or popular education, will draw on this experience to introduce new work in empowering, prefigurative, transformative and critical pedagogies that are linked to social and political movements. We will open these examples up for criticism and discussion, and hope to consolidate the knowledge produced during the day into a common resource for further developments of educational theory and practice.

CECT ORGANISED BY THE CRITICAL PEDAGOGY AND POPULAR EDUCATION MIDLANDS WORKING GROUP

And sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/cssgj/), with support from the Nottingham Freeschool (http://nottinghamfreeschool.wordpress.com/) and Critical Pedagogies Group (CSSGJ)

Workshops/Discussions

1 | Learning alternatives to neoliberalism – resistance and renewal in critical education – Stephen Cowden, Social and Community Studies, Coventry University

2 | Prefigurative epistemologies and nomadic subjectivities: in, against, beyond the university – Sara Motta, Politics, University of Nottingham

3 | Learning from each other’s struggles – knowledge from and for social movements – Laurence Cox, Sociology, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, co-founder Grassroots Gathering

4 | ‘Climate Justice’ and popular education in social movement organisation – and Alice Cutler, TRAPESE Popular Education Collective, http://hbfc.clearerchannel.org/abouttrapese.php

5 | Revalorizing critique in academic and activist education – Sarah Amsler, Sociology and Public Policy, Aston University

Location and time | Registration begins at 9:00 a.m. in the foyer of the Law and Social Sciences Building, University of Nottingham (University Park Campus), and the final session will end at 4:30 p.m.

Sessions will be held in A105 and A106 of the Hallward Library. For maps and directions, see the University website at: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/about/datesandcampusinformation/mapsanddirections/mapsanddirections.aspx
To participate | The day is free and open to all.

To pre-register| contact Sara Motta at: sara.motta@nottingham.ac.uk Please include your name, postal address and email. All those who register early will receive a packet of relevant readings for each workshop.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Critical Pedagogy

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Social Movements

INTERFACE – A JOURNAL FOR AND ABOUT SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

Interface – A Journal For and About Social Movements

Call for papers – Issue 3: CRISES, SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND REVOLUTIONARY TRANSFORMATIONS

Interface is a new journal produced twice yearly by activists and academics around the world in response to the development and increased visibility of social movements in the last few years – and the immense amount of knowledge generated in this process. This knowledge is created across the globe, and in many contexts and a variety of ways, and it constitutes an incredibly valuable resource for the further development of social movements. Interface responds to this need, as a tool to help our movements learn from each other’s struggles, by developing analyses and knowledge that allow lessons to be learned from specific movement processes and experiences and translated into a form useful for other movements.

We welcome contributions by movement participants and academics who are developing movement-relevant theory and research. Our goal is to include material that can be used in a range of ways by movements – in terms of its content, its language, its purpose and its form. We are seeking work in a range of different formats, such as conventional articles, review essays, facilitated discussions and interviews, action notes, teaching notes, key documents and analysis, book reviews – and beyond. Both activist and academic peers review research contributions, and other material is sympathetically edited by peers. The editorial process generally will be geared towards assisting authors to find ways of expressing their understanding, so that we all can be heard across geographical, social and political distances.

Our third issue, to be published in May 2010, will have space for general articles on all aspects of understanding social movements, as well as a special themed section on crises, social movements and revolutionary transformations.

CRISES, SOCIAL MOVEMENTS AND REVOLUTIONARY TRANSFORMATIONS

“In every country the process is different, although the content is the same. And the content is the crisis of the ruling class’s hegemony, which occurs either because the ruling class has failed in some major political undertaking, for which it has requested, or forcibly extracted, the consent of broad masses … or because huge masses … have passed suddenly from a state of political passivity to a certain activity, and put forward demands which taken together, albeit not organically formulated, add up to a revolution. A “crisis of authority” is spoken of: this is precisely the crisis of hegemony, or general crisis of the state”

So wrote the Italian revolutionary Antonio Gramsci from behind the walls of Mussolini’s prison, in his famous notes on “State and Civil Society”. His words aptly describe the trajectory of crises in modern history – these are periods when the wheels of economic growth and expansion grind to a halt, when traditional political loyalties melt away, and, crucially, when ruling classes find themselves confronted with popular movements that no longer accept the terms of their rule, and that seek to create alternative social orders.

The clashes between elite projects and popular movements that are at the heart of any “crisis of hegemony” generate thoroughgoing processes of economic, social and political change – these may be reforms that bear the imprint of popular demands, and they may also be changes that reflect the implementation of elite designs. Most importantly, however, crises are typically also those moments when social movements and subaltern groups are able to push the limits of what they previously thought it was possible to achieve in terms of effecting progressive change – it is this dynamic which lies at the heart of revolutionary transformations.

Gramsci himself witnessed, organised within and wrote during the breakdown of liberal capitalism and bourgeois democracy in the 1910s through to the 1930s. This was a conjuncture when tendencies towards stagnation in capitalist accumulation generated the horrors of the First World War and the Great Depression. Movements of workers and colonized peoples threatened the rule of capital and empires, old and new, and elites turned to repressive strategies like fascism in an attempt to secure the continuation of their dominance.

Today social movements are once again having to do their organizing and mobilizing work in the context of economic crisis, one that is arguably of similar proportions to that witnessed by Gramsci, and a political crisis that runs just as deep. The current crisis emerged from the collapse of the US housing market, revealing an intricate web of unsustainable debt and “toxic assets” whose tentacles reached every corner of the global economy. More than just a destruction of “fictitious capital”, the crisis has propelled a breakdown of world industrial production and trade, driving millions of working families to the brink and beyond. And, far from being a one-off, this crisis is the latest and worst in a series of collapses starting with the stock market crash of 1987, the chronic stagnation of the once all-powerful Japanese economy, the Asian financial meltdown of 1997 and the bursting of the dot.com bubble.

The current conjuncture throws into question the fundamentals of the neoliberal project that has been pursued by global elites and transnational institutions over the past three decades. Taking aim at reversing the victories won by popular movements in the aftermath of the Second World War, neoliberalism transferred wealth from popular classes to global elites on a grand scale. The neoliberal project of privatizing the public sector and commodifying public goods, rolling back the welfare states, promoting tax cuts for the rich, manipulating economic crises in the global South and deregulating the world’s financial markets continued unabated through the 1980s and 1990s.

As presaged by Gramsci, neoliberal policies have whittled away the material concessions that underpinned social consensus. Ours is a conjuncture in which global political elites have failed in an undertaking for which they sought popular consent, and as a consequence, popular masses have passed from political passivity to a certain activity.

Since the middle of the 1990s, we have seen the development of large-scale popular movements in several parts of the globe, along with a series of revolutionary situations or transformations in various countries, as well as unprecedented levels of international coordination and alliance-building between movements and direct challenges not only to national but to global power structures. The first stirrings of this activity were in the rise of the Zapatistas in Mexico, the water wars in Bolivia, and the protests on the streets of Seattle. On a global scale we saw dissent explode in the form of opposition to the wars waged by the US on Afghanistan and Iraq. In terms of sheer numbers, the mobilisation of against the latter invasion was the largest political protest ever undertaken, leading the New York Times to call the anti-war movement the world’s “second superpower”.

Each country has had its own movements, and a particular character to how they have moved against the neoliberal project. And for some time many have observed that these campaigns, initiatives and movements are not isolated occurrences, but part of a wider global movement for justice in the face of the neoliberal project. An explosion of analysis looking at these events and movements has occurred in the academic world, matched only by extensive argument and debate within the movements themselves.

In this issue of Interface, we encourage submissions that explore the relationship between crises, social movements and revolutionary transformations in general and the character of the current crisis and how social movements across different regions have related and responded to it in particular. Some of the questions we want to explore are as follows:

– What are the characteristics of the current economic and political crisis, what roles do social movements – from above and below – play in its dynamics, and how does it compare to the political economy of previous cycles of crises and struggle?

– What has been the role played by social movements in moments of crisis in modern history, and what lessons can contemporary popular movements learn from these experiences?

– What kinds of qualitative/quantitative shift in popular mobilisation we might expect to see in a “revolutionary wave”?

– Are crises – and in particular our current crisis – characterized by substantial competitions between different kinds of movements from below? How does such a dynamic affect the capacity to effect radical change?

– What goals do social movements set themselves in context of crisis and what kinds of movement are theoretically or historically capable of bringing about a transformed society?

– What are the criteria of success that activists operate with in terms of the forms of change social movements can achieve in the current conjuncture?

– Is revolutionary transformation a feasible option at present? Is revolution a goal among contemporary social movements?

– What are the characteristic features of elite deployment of coercive strategies when their hegemony is unravelling?

– How have global elites responded to the current crisis in terms of resort to coercion and consent? Have neoliberal elites been successful in trying to reestablish their legitimacy and delegitimizing opponents?

– Are we witnessing any bids for hegemony from elite groups outside the domain of Atlantic neoliberalism?

– How is coercion in its various forms impacting on contemporary social movements and the politics of global justice?

The deadline for contributions for the third issue is January 1, 2010.

Please contact the appropriate editor if you are thinking of submitting an article. You can access the journal and get further details at: http://www.interfacejournal.net/.

Interface is programmatically multilingual: at present we can accept and review submissions in Afrikaans, Catalan, Croatian, Danish, English, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, Maltese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish and Zulu. We are also willing to try and find suitable referees for submissions in other languages, but cannot guarantee that at this point.

We are also very much looking for activists or academics interested in becoming part of Interface, particularly with the African, South Asian, Spanish-speaking Latin American, East and Central European, Mediterranean, Oceanian and North American groups.

Editorial contacts

Interface is not a traditional, centralised journal with a single key editor! Because we are a global journal, and movements (and their relationships to academia) are organised so differently in different parts of the world, the basic structure of the journal is as a network of regional or linguistically-defined groups, each of which organises its own editorial processes and tries to find an appropriate way of working with its own local realities. Articles and queries should go to the contact person listed below for the relevant region:

Movements in Africa: Please submit papers in Zulu, Afrikaans or English to Richard Pithouse indianocean77@gmail.com; in English to Mammo Muchie mammo@ihis.aau.dk; and in Portuguese to Ana Margarida Esteves anamargarida.esteves@gmail.com.

Movements in the Arab world: Please submit papers in Arabic or English to Rana Barakat barakat.rana@gmail.com or Abdul-Rahim al-Shaikh aalshaikh@birzeit.edu; or in Arabic, English, German or Hebrew to Magid Shihade mshihade@gmail.com.

Movements in Central and South America: Please submit papers in Spanish to Sara Motta saracatherinem@googlemail.com or Adriana Causa acausa@gmail.com and in Portuguese to Ana Margarida Esteves anamargarida.esteves@gmail.com.

Movements in Eastern Europe: Please submit papers in Croatian, English, German, Hungarian, Latvian, Romanian, Russian, Serbian or Turkish to Steffen Böhm steffen@essex.ac.uk or Andrejs Berdnikovs aberdnikovs@gmail.com.

Movements in North America: Please submit papers in English to Ray Sin raysin@ku.edu or Lesley Wood ljwood@yorku.ca.

Movements in South Asia: Please submit papers in English to Alf Nilsen alfgunvald@gmail.com . We are currently looking for another regional editor to work with Alf.

Movements in Southeast Asia and Oceania: Please submit papers in English to Elizabeth Humphrys lizhumphrys@gmail.com, in Spanish to Cristina Flesher Fominaya flesherfomi@gmail.com and in Portuguese to Ana Margarida Esteves anamargarida.esteves@gmail.com.

Movements in Western Europe:
Please submit papers:
* in English to Cristina Flesher Fominaya flesherfomi@gmail.com or Laurence Cox laurence.cox@nuim.ie or
* in French or Italian to Laurence Cox laurence.cox@nuim.ie or
* in German to Steffen Böhm steffen@essex.ac.uk or Laurence Cox laurence.cox@nuim.ie
* in Portuguese to Ana Margarida Esteves anamargarida.esteves@gmail.com
* in Spanish to Cristina Flesher Fominaya flesherfomi@gmail.com
* We can also accept papers in Catalan, Maltese and Norwegian: please contact Laurence Cox laurence.cox@nuim.ie in relation to these.

Transnational Movements:
Please submit papers in English, Dutch, French and Spanish or with special reference to labour or social forums, to Peter Waterman pwaterma@gmail.com; in English, with special reference to dialogue-based movements, to Richard Moore rkm@quaylargo.com; in Arabic, English, German or Hebrew to Magid Shihade mshihade@gmail.com; or in English, French, Italian or German to Laurence Cox laurence.cox@nuim.ie.

Book reviews: In English: please contact Aileen O’Carroll Aileen.OCarroll@nuim.ie.

Movements in Central Asia and East Asia: We are hoping to expand our intellectual and linguistic capacity to include these areas, but at present do not have sufficient editorial expertise to review papers on movements in these regions. Expressions of interest from potential regional editors, willing to help assemble a regional subgroup of academics and activists to review papers on movements in any of these regions, are very welcome.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk