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Samir Amin

Samir Amin

SAMIR AMIN: SIX DECADES OF DEVELOPMENT DEBATE

Seminars with the renowned Egyptian economist Samir Amin, which took place on 25 and 26 April at SOAS, University of London, are now available online.

The seminars (with links to the film) include:

The Deployment of the Bandung Project (1955 – 1970)

Neoliberalism and the Decline of the Bandung Project (1975 – 2000)

The Second Wave of the Rise of the South; the Emerging Countries (as of 2000)

Professor Samir Amin is Director of the Third World Forum (Dakar, Senegal). He is one of the most prominent theorists of the political economy of development and global accumulation as well as one of the best-known analysts of Arab and African economies.

Organiser Professor Gilbert Achcar commented: “The Department of Development Studies at SOAS was delighted to host these three lectures by Professor Samir Amin, one of the best-known names in the field, a thinker who emerged since the 1960s as a major and most prominent contributor to the study of development and to the debates on North-South relations.”

To view the seminars please click on the individual links above.

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/samir-amin-six-decades-of-development-debate

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

China

CHINA LEFT REVIEW – ISSUE 5 (2012)

http://chinaleftreview.org/

2012, Issue #5
Democracy: Critiques and Prospects

English Introduction

Part I.  Reflections and Critiques of Bourgeois Democracy

WANG Shaoguang: Reflections on Democratic Systems
Interview with WANG Hui: Contradictions, Systemic Crisis and Directions for Change
HAN Yuhai: Constitutional Rule and the Proletarian State

Part II. Experiments and Practices Beyond Bourgeois Democracy

CAO Haohan: Lenin, the Soviet and the Dictatorship of the Proletariat
Fred ENGST: An Analysis of the Relationship between the Working Class and Its Party in the Socialist Period
YAN Hairong: Reflection is not Demonization: A Conversation with Cao Zhenglu about His New Novel Lessons in Democracy (excerpted)
George LAMBIE: The Cuban Revolution in the 21st Century (abridged and excerpted)
Marta HARNECKER: Popular power in Latin America — Inventing in order to not make errors (abridged and excerpted)
Appendix: Democratic Experiments in Venezuela

Shanghai

Part III. Reflections on Democratic Transitions

CHENG, Tun-Jen: Is the dog barking?: The middle class and democratic movements in the East Asian NICs
Przemyslaw WIELGOSZ: 25 Years of Solidarity – From Workers Revolution to Capitalism
HUANG De-bei: Taiwan’s Democratization: Experiences and Reflection (abridged and excerpted)
Samir AMIN: Movement in Egypt: Wang Hui and Lau Kin Chi’s Conversation with Amin (abridged and excerpted)
James PETRAS/Henry VELTMEYER: Uprisings and Regime Change in the Arab World (Beyond Neoliberalism: A World to Win)

China

Part IV. Debate: Views and Analyses on Democracy in China

Some Notable Proposals for China’s Political Change
Barry SAUTMAN and YAN Hairong: The ‘Right Dissident’: Liu Xiaobo and the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize
Christopher McNALLY and Teresa WRIGHT: Sources of Social Support for China’s Current Political Order: The ‘Thick Embeddedness’ of China’s Private Capital Holders

Part V.  On Village Elections

ZHANG Deyuan: When it is Time Again for Our Village Election Experience. Rural Grassroots Election: Clans, Violence, and Bribery
ZHANG Chenghao: A Migrant’s Diary: Struggles for Interest in Rural Elections Turn White-Hot

China

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/china-left-review-2012-issue-5

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon

MEMEFEST FESTIVAL OF SOCIALLY RESPONSIVE COMMUNICATION AND ART 2012

Memefest, an international organization dedicated to promoting new, productive and relevant forms of cultural activism, together with the Queensland College of Art, Griffith University, this year introduces the Memefest/Griffith-QCA award for ‘Imaginative Critical Intervention’.

This award invites cultural activists, creatives and thinkers from the productive margins of professions, radical theorists, imaginative intellectuals and anyone who is uncomfortable with the status quo and dreams of alternative futures that are more satisfying, just, and sustainable, to submit projects for peer feedback, broader dissemination, and a chance to work collaboratively with other imaginative activists, artists, researchers and intellectuals.

Memefest FESTIVAL 2012 theme: DEBT (debt, la dette, χρέος, dolg, задолженность, долг, debito, дълг, ŝuldo, חוב, schuld, deuda, borç …)

You can’t evict an idea whose time has come! 

These words express the nature of the current global movement against the rule of money over life. They belong to the people, the 99%, who are bringing the fundamental urgent issues to the streets, into the media, into the realm of public consciousness, into the schools, universities, jobs, homes and intimate discussions and relationships. 

These words also express something else. They speak about a state of mind, a focus and a concise articulation of the problem. The idea whose time has come is mainly about three things. First: interventions that create a rupture in the order of things with the goal to redefine our fields of experience and the relationship between being, doing and saying. Second: dialogue. Third: creating new emancipatory social institutions. 

If communication and art are to play a relevant role in shaping a future worth having, we need to further redirect, reinvent and re-imagine our own understanding and the way we think, theorise and practice them both. Debt is not only an opportunity to do so, but also an urgent responsibility. 

The Friendly Competition

Participants are invited to submit works three categories: critical writing, visual communication practice and the participatory art/communication category Beyond…

This year’s theme for Visual communication practice and Critical writing is: DEBT. Participants will respond with their work to three carefully chosen texts:

I. First written text is taken from the book Debt, the first 5000 years by American social anthropologist David Greaber in which he explains the function of debt in human history, showing that the current situation is not as natural at all as it seems to be.

II. Second visual text is taken from the documentary Debtocracy by Katerina Kitidi and Aris Hatzistefanou, who together with economist Samir Amin, philosopher Alain Badiou, sociologist and geographer David Harvey and other guests research the reasons for the crisis in Greece, while also showing how Latino American Ecuador stood up to the IMF and refused to acknowledge legitimacy to their enforced slavery. 

III. Third is the song No Banker Left Behind by American slide guitar virtuoso, taken from his politically engaged and critically acclaimed album Pull Up Some Dust and Sit Down (2011). 

Category Beyond…:

While a lot of subversive writing, communication and art has emerged which challenges the status quo using its own conventions, very few of these initiatives have employed a mode of communication that is not rooted in commercial culture itself.

The ‘Beyond…’ category hopes to bring out new visual and conceptual forms of communication and art which catalyse social change while engaging people as something more than mere consumers.

This category draws on the traditions of independent artistic practice in that the entries will have no brief other than to identity and radically address important issues on a deeply felt personal level. However, we expect that, unlike most ‘museum’ art, it will generate genuine participatory relations with its audience and be able to work outside institutional sites and conventions. Participatory art and communication is the core principle of what we are looking for at Beyond…

More about Beyond… here: http://www.memefest.org/en/competition/beyond_intro/

Awards: 

The international editorial and curatorial board will select the most convincing works. Among strong traditional awards, which you can see on www.memefest.org, two new awards are introduced this year.

1) The first Griffith-QCA/ Memefest Award for Critical Imaginative Critical Intervention.

Best authors of all three categories (critical writing, visual communication practice and Beyond…) will be invited toBrisbaneto take part in a special extradisciplinary workshop resulting in a public intervention in the city ofBrisbane.

2) Authors of best works in the category: critical writing will be invited to publish their work in the academic peer reviewed journal Zoontechnica http://zoontechnica.com.

Deadline for your submissions is May 30th.

Participation is free of charge and there is no age limit or any other restriction. Your work can be submitted online.

See more about our Awards here: www.memefest.org/en/competition/awards_2012/

More information on the whole Friendly competition: http://www.memefest.org/en/competition/intro/

More information on the Festival of Socially responsive communication and Art: www.memefest.org

Contact Patricia Laboca: memefest@memefest.org

 

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‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub,Bangor, northWales)  

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

We Are the Crisis

We Are the Crisis

THE SUBVERSIVE FORUM: ‘THE FUTURE OF EUROPE’

ZAGREB, CROATIA, MAY 13-19, 2012

Under the umbrella of Subversive Forum a number of events will take place in May 2012 in the Croatian capital, including an international conference dedicated to the main theme The Future of Europe, numerous debates The Crisis of Europe (May 14-15), The Struggle for the Commons (May 16) and Towards the Balkan Social Forum (May 17-18), the Subversive book fair and, during the introductory week (May 5-12), the 5th Subversive Film Festival.

It is no news that the European Union is facing its biggest crisis since it was created. It is at the same time an economic, financial, social and ideological crisis of this project. Across the continent, instead of solidarity we are witnessing a resurgence of national selfishness, the rise of extreme right, intolerance, and racism. The Mediterranean countries who have been hit the hardest by the crisis show us also a possible response to it: the appearance of strong social movements demanding social justice, a different economic model, and direct democracy. Almost everywhere we see the youth on the streets, in Greece, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Romania, but also in the future EU member: Croatia.

Through a critical examination ofEurope’s current crisis, the Subversive Forum will try to outline realistic possibilities for its transformation and the creation of another political, social and economic project across the Old Continent. The keynote speakers include Stéphane Hessel, Michael Hardt, Tariq Ali, Gayatri Spivak, Slavoj Zizek, Saskia Sassen, Christian Marazzi, Samir Amin, Bernard Cassen, Ignatio Ramonet, Eric Touissant, Costas Douzinas, Renata Salecl, and more than 100 participants from 20 different European, African and Asian countries. For one week in May,Zagreb, the town placed almost exactly on the EU’s shifting border, will become both a center of the world’s critical thought and a laboratory of possible political, social and economic alternatives.

The Subversive Forum is endorsed by the World Social Forum.

For more information: www.subversiveforum.com

Contact: info@subversiveforum.com

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Samir Amin

SAMIR AMIN AT NOTTINGHAM UNIVERSITY

Samir Amin at the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (CSSGJ), Nottingham University.

On 1 December 2011, Samir Amin, the internationally renowned political economist, will be involved in two events at the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (CSSGJ) at Nottingham University.

1. Author meets Audience session: discussion of three of Samir Amin’s books by CSSGJ members with a reply by the author.

Sara Motta on ‘Eurocentrism’

Jon Mansell on ‘The Liberal Virus’

Andreas Bieler on ‘Global History’

Thursday, 1 December at 12 noon in B62, Law and Social Science Building

 

 

2. CSSGJ Annual Lecture 2011: Samir Amin – ‘The Trajectory of Historical Capitalism’.

Thursday, 1 December, 5.30 to 7 p.m. in B62, Law and Social Science Building.

 

These meetings are open to the wider public and everybody is welcome to attend. For more information, please contact Andrew Gibson at Andrew.Gibson@nottingham.ac.uk

 

Prof. Andreas Bieler,

Professor of Political Economy,

School of Politics and International Relations,

University of Nottingham,

UK-Nottingham  NG7 2RD,

Personal website: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/~ldzab/

Tel.: 0115-951 4492,

FAX: 0115-951 4859,

Trade union and global restructuring blog: http://andreasbieler.blogspot.com/

New book: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415580830/

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Battle in Seattle: Its Significance for Education

TRADE UNIONS, FREE TRADE AND THE PROBLEM OF TRANSNATIONAL SOLIDARITY

Two-day workshop at the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (CSSGJ) at Nottingham University on 2 and 3 December 2011 with Samir Amin as keynote speaker

Since the completion of the GATT Uruguay Round and the establishment of the WTO in the mid-1990s, the international free trade agenda has been drastically expanded including now also issues related to intellectual property rights, trade in services and trade-related investment measures. The WTO Doha negotiations round launched in 2001 had been intended to complete ‘unfinished business’ especially in the area of free trade in services, public procurement and agriculture. At the same time, resistance to these developments has increased with the demonstrations at the WTO ministerial conference in Seattle in 1999 as a first landmark event. The latest attempt to revive the Doha round in July 2008 ended in failure. In view of the problems at the multilateral level, both the EU and the USA have increasingly engaged in bilateral strategies of free trade agreements. These strategies include the expanded trade agenda and are a tool to achieve what has been impossible within a multilateral setting.

Free trade strategies have increasingly become a problem for the international labour movement. On the one hand, trade unions in the North especially in manufacturing have supported free trade agreements. They hope that new export markets for products in their sectors will preserve jobs. On the other, trade unions in the Global South as well as social movements more generally oppose these free trade agreements, since they often imply deindustrialisation and the related loss of jobs for them. Unsurprisingly, transnational solidarity is difficult if not impossible to achieve as a result. At the same time, however, it has to be asked what free trade actually is and whether we can call the existing system really a free trade system? How trade unions understand both these questions is fundamental for their chances to understand each other. Understandings of free trade, which draw on alternative economic theories – see, for example, Samir Amin’s theory of unequal exchange and imperialism – may open up new avenues. 

Additionally, a focus is required on countries’ different position in the global economy, core, semiperiphery, periphery, the related dynamics of uneven and combined development structuring it, as well as the related implications for labour movements in view of free trade. Equally, a sector specific view is required, as particular sectoral dynamics are likely to have an influence on trade unions’ outlook on free trade.

In this workshop, we intend to focus on the problematic around free trade, the current free trade system and the related neo-liberal ideology, as well as analyse the problems for trade unions and social movements in more detail. The objective is to understand better the dynamics underlying free trade as well as explore possibilities for transnational solidarity against the background of uneven and combined development. This will also involve a discussion of alternative conceptualisations of free trade based on different economic theories and the related implications for labour movements. The workshop intends to reach beyond academia and facilitate discussions between academics and trade union researchers as well as social movement activists.

In more detail, we invite papers by academics, trade union researchers and social movement activists in the following areas:

• Basic analyses of what a ‘proper’ free trade system is;
• Analyses of current free trade policies, the implications of neo-liberalism as well as the concrete results of free trade policies for the populations affected. Can we call the current system a free trade system?
• Analyses of free trade policies and the relationships with other policies of neo-liberal restructuring;
• Implications of countries’ structural location in the global economy as well as sectoral specificities for trade unions’ positions on free trade;
• Analyses of resistance movements to concrete free trade agreements with a specific emphasis on co-operation and/or non – co-operation between trade unions and social movements;
• Analyses of the position of specific trade unions and/or social movements on free trade;

Paper proposals of ca. 250 words should be sent to Andreas.Bieler@nottingham.ac.uk by 9 May 2011. There is no registration fee for the workshop and all participants will be provided with coffee/tea breaks, two lunches and one evening dinner free of charge.

The workshop is supported with a small research grant of £6960 by the British Academy (SG102043) as well as a grant of £1750 by the University of Nottingham priority group Integrating Global Society.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Karl Marx

KARL MARX’S ‘GRUNDRISSE’ 150 YEARS LATER – OUT IN PAPERBACK

Karl Marx’s Grundrisse
Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later

Edited by Marcello Musto

Hardback 2008. Price: € 82.00, £70.00, $ 130.00, CAD$ 135.00

Paperback 2010. Price: € 27.00, £ 22.50, $ 32.95, CAD$ 35.00

Written between1857 and 1858, the Grundrisse is the first draft of Marx’s critique of political economy and, thus, also the initial preparatory work on Capital. Despite its editorial vicissitudes and late publication, Grundrisse contains numerous reflections on matters that Marx did not develop elsewhere in his oeuvre and is therefore extremely important for an overall interpretation of his thought.

In this collection, various international experts in the field, analysing the Grundrisse on the 150th anniversary of its composition, present a Marx in many ways radically different from the one who figures in the dominant currents of twentieth-century Marxism. The book demonstrates the relevance of theGrundrisse to an understanding of Capital and of Marx’s theoretical project as a whole, which, as is well known, remained uncompleted. It also highlights the continuing explanatory power of Marxian categories for contemporary society and its present contradictions.

With contributions from such scholars as Eric Hobsbawm, Moishe Postone, Ellen Meiksins Wood, Terrell Carver, John Bellamy Foster, Enrique Dussel and Iring Fetscher, and covering subject areas such as political economy, philosophy and Marxism, this book is likely to become required reading for serious scholars of Marx across the world.

Table of Contents

1. Prologue

2. Foreword, Eric Hobsbawn

Part I. Grundrisse: Critical Interpretations

3. History, Production and Method in the 1857 ‘Introduction’ to the Grundrisse, Marcello Musto

4. The Concept of Value in Modern Economy. On the Relationship between Money and Capital in ‘Grundrisse’, Joachim Bischoff and Christoph Lieber

5. Marx Conception of Alienation in ‘Grundrisse’, Terrell Carver

6. The Discovery of the Category of Surplus value, Enrique Dussel

7. Historical Materialism in ‘Forms which precede Capitalist Production’, Ellen Meiksins Wood

8. Marx’s ‘Grundrisse’ and the Ecological Contradictions of Capitalism, John Bellamy Foster

9. Emancipated Individuals in an Emancipated Society. Marx’s Sketch of Post-Capitalist Society in the ‘Grundrisse’, Iring Fetscher

10. Rethinking ‘Capital’ in Light of the ‘Grundrisse’, Moishe Postone 

Part II. Marx at the time of Grundrisse

11. Marx’s life at the time of the ‘Grundrisse’. Biographical notes on 1857-8, Marcello Musto

12. The First World Economic Crisis: Marx as an Economic Journalist, Michael R. Kratke

13. Marx’s ‘Books of Crisis’ of 1857-8, Michael R. Kratke

Part III. Dissemination and reception of Grundrisse in the world 

14. Dissemination and Reception of the ‘Grundrisse’ in the world. Introduction, Marcello Musto

15. Germany and Austria and Switzerland, Ernst Theodor Mohl

16. Russia and Soviet Union, Lyudmila L. Vasina

17. Japan, Hiroshi Uchida

18. China, Zhongpu Zhang

19. France, Andre Tosel

20. Italy, Mario Tronti

21. Cuba and Argentina and Spain and Mexico, Pedro Ribas and Rafael Pla

22. Czechoslovakia, Stanislav Hubik

23. Hungary, Ferenc L. Lendvai

24. Romania, Gheorghe Stoica

25. USA and Britain and Australia and Canada, Christopher J. Arthur

26. Denmark, Birger Linde

27. Yugoslavia, Lino Veljak

28. Iran, Kamran Nayeri

29. Poland, Holger Politt

30. Finland, Vesa Oittinen

31. Greece, John Milios

32. Turkey, E. Ahmet Tonak

33. South Korea, Hogyun Kim

34. Brazil and Portugal, Jose Paulo Netto

Author Biography

Marcello Musto teaches at the Department of Political Science at York University, Toronto – Canada.

Reviews:

“Nothing Marx wrote has better illustrated the complexity of his thought and the enormous array of the world’s appreciation of it than the Grundrisse. This collection of essays gives one an indispensable entry into understanding better what Marx has to offer the world today and the social bases of the multiple Marxisms” — Immanuel Wallerstein, Yale University

“In this edited collection of essays by international scholars, Marcello Musto has helped to chart the recognition and influence of one of Marx’s most important, methodologically rich – and most neglected – texts: the Grundrisse. The volume is the fruit of many years of sustained and devoted scholarship, his chapter on the ‘1857 Introduction’ is one of the finest in the collection” — Stuart Hall, Open University

“Karl Marx’s Grundrisse is a magnificent volume, which also serves as a global map of world Marxist theory” — Fredric Jameson, Duke University

“Over the last two decades, Marx’s Grundrisse has increasingly been seen as the key text to the understanding his work. An up-to-date discussion of the Grundrisse is therefore much to be welcomed. And when it is of the consistently high quality that Marcello Musto has here put together, scholars of Marx can only rejoice” — David McLellan, Goldsmiths College, University of London

“Karl Marx’s Grundrisse represents a major resource for studies on Marx. It is a key text for understanding his critique of political economy; but also – and no less importantly – it makes visible the questions that Marx did not develop later in Capital, such as capitalism as a global system, ecology, and the contours of a post-capitalistic society. This volume is required reading for all serious students of Marx” — Samir Amin, Third World Forum

“At a time when Marx’s writings are once again attracting ever-wider circles of readers seeking to understand yet another global capitalist crisis, Marcello Musto has produced an edited volume devoted to Marx’s Grundrisse. The essays of interpretation as well as the studies of both the production of this great work and its reception across many different societies and social contexts make this book an especially timely and valuable contribution to Marx’s current ascendancy” — Richard D. Wolff, New School University, New York

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Jacob

THE LAW OF WORLDWIDE VALUE – SAMIR AMIN

New from Monthly Review Press

The Law of Worldwide Value

Samir Amin

Order online
Or call 800.670.9499

$15.95 pbk | 144 pages

In his new extensively revised and expanded edition of this book, Samir Amin suggests new approaches to Marxian analysis of the crisis of the late capitalist system of generalized, financialized, and globalized oligopolies following on the financial collapse of 2008.

Considering that Marx’s Capital, written before the emergence of imperialism as a decisive factor in capitalist accumulation, could provide no explanation for the persistent “underdevelopment” of the
countries of the “global South,” Amin advances several important theoretical concepts extending traditional Marxian views of capitalist evolution.

Most strikingly, he proposes adding to the model of reproduction in Volume II of Capital a Third Department of Production devoted to surplus absorption, necessitated by the capitalist tendency constantly to produce an economic surplus too large to be realized by the consumption and investment purchases generated within Marx’s original two-department model.

Equally interesting is his theoretical concept of “imperialist rent,” derived from the scaling of radically different wages paid for the same labor in countries of the North and the South, whose effect has been to provide Northern capital with sufficient profits to permit it to pacify for a long period its conflict with the Northern proletariat. To account for this new type of rent he extends the Marxian “law of value” in the form of a “law of globalized value” whose operations determine such changes in the polarized world system as the industrial growth of many Third-World nations within the global imperialist context.

Amin sees the present crisis as a moment in the second long crisis of the capitalist system, dating from the early 1970’s (the first long crisis, he maintains, lasted from 1873 until 1945). He sees no exit from repeated crises under capitalism except the descent into barbarism. The challenge is not to escape from the crisis of capitalism —a hopeless project—but to escape from capitalism in crisis. And Amin reasserts his historical optimism as to the socialist project. He expects a “second wave” of socialist attempts that will stem from the self-liberating efforts of the nations and peoples of the South which, by eliminating the imperialist rent, will lead to an awakening of the Northern popular classes to join the awakening of the global South. This book has an important place among the theoretical resources for anyone involved in the study of contemporary Marxian economic and political theory.

Samir Amin was born in Egypt in 1931 and received his Ph.D. in economics in Paris in 1957. He is director of the Third World Forum in Dakar, Senegal. His numerous works include Eurocentrism: Second Edition, The World We Wish to See, The Liberal Virus, Accumulation on a World Scale, Unequal Development, and Spectres of Capitalism.

Order online or call 800.670.9499

http://www.monthlyreview.org

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Globalization

 

DEVELOPMENT AND GLOBALIZATION: A MARXIAN ANALYSIS

A new book by David F Ruccio

 
    • Price: £29.99 £26.99
    • Binding/Format: Paperback
    • ISBN: 978-0-415-77226-6
    • Publish Date: 28th September 2010
    • Imprint: Routledge
    • Pages: 320 pages

Series: Economics as Social Theory

Details at: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415772266/

Since the mid-1980s, David F. Ruccio has been developing a new framework of Marxian class analysis and applying it to various issues in socialist planning, Third World development, and capitalist globalization. The aim of this collection is to show, through a series of concrete examples, how Marxian class analysis can be used to challenge existing modes of thought and to produce new insights about the problems of capitalist development and the possibilities of imagining and creating non-capitalist economies.

The book consists of fifteen essays, plus an introductory chapter situating the author’s work in a larger intellectual and political context. The topics covered range from planning theory to the role of the state in the Nicaraguan Revolution, from radical theories of underdevelopment to the Third World debt crisis, and from a critical engagement with regulation theory to contemporary discussions of globalization and imperialism.

Foreword Stephen Resnick and Richard Wolff

Introduction

1. Rethinking Planning, Globalization, and Development from a Marxian Perspective Planning

2. Essentialism and Socialist Economic Planning: A Methodological Critique of Optimal Planning Theory

3. Planning and Class in Transitional Societies

4. The State and Planning in Nicaragua 
5. Nicaragua: The State, Class, and Transition Development

6. Radical Theories of Development: Frank, the Modes of Production School, and Amin

7. The Costs of Austerity in Nicaragua: The Worker-Peasant Alliance, 1979-1987

8. When Failure Becomes Success: Class and the Debate over Stabilization and Adjustment

9. Power and Class: The Contribution of Radical Approaches to Debt and Development

10. Capitalism and Industrialization in the Third World: Recognizing the Costs and Imagining Alternatives

11. ‘After’ Development: Reimagining Economy and Class

12. Reading Harold: Class Analysis, Capital Accumulation, and the Role of the Intellectual in Globalization

13. Fordism on a World Scale: International Dimensions of Regulation

14. Class Beyond the Nation-State

15. Global Fragments: Subjectivity and Class Politics in Discourses of Globalization

16. Globalization and Imperialism

David F. Ruccio is Professor of Economics at the University of Notre Dame, USA and past editor of the journal Rethinking Marxism.

Observations and Comments on Development and Globalization: A Marxian Analysis

Development, and Globalization is anti-essentialist social theory at its very best. Whether re-reading socialist planning debates, economic and social development struggles in the global South, or capitalist and alter-capitalist theories of globalization, David Ruccio engages the contemporary conjuncture in fresh and exciting ways, demonstrating throughout the successes of the rethinking Marxism project and the immense potential and range of contemporary Marxian analysis. What Maurice Dobb did for twentieth-century critiques of socialist planning, capitalist development, and imperialist expansion, Ruccio redoubles for a new age of post-Communist and globalized political economy — John Pickles, Earl N. Phillips Distinguished Professor of International Studies and Chair of the Department of Geography, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and author of A History of Spaces: Cartographic Reason, Mapping, and the Geo-Coded World

David Ruccio is a central figure in the exciting and innovative “postmodern” school of Marxian thought. Through his own writing and his stewardship of the journal Rethinking Marxism he has contributed immensely to this tradition. In this collection, Ruccio draws together, sharpens, and extends central insights from that school of thought and applies them to debates over socialist planning, economic development, and globalization. The essays demonstrate the depth of Ruccio’s intellect and the range of his expertise, to be sure, while also conveying the power of the postmodern Marxian tradition in helping us to overcome the malaise that now affects much contemporary left scholarship about prospects for radical reform in the Global South. In Ruccio’s hands, Marxism emerges as a vibrant tradition that continues to generate new avenues of scholarship and practical politics in pursuit of a more just world. — George DeMartino, Josef Korbel School of International Studies, University of Denver and author of Global Economy, Global Justice: Theoretical and Policy Alternatives to Neoliberalism

Whether one agrees or not with the basic premises and analysis of this book, it will provide an intellectual challenge to everyone. Focusing on issues related to planning, development and globalization, particularly in Latin America, Ruccio questions the prevailing wisdom in circles of both the Right and the Left. His privileging of class analysis provides the unifying thread to the wide variety of themes covered in the sixteen chapters. In our post-crisis search for new economic thinking and alternatives for social transformation, Ruccio’s book comes at a perfect time to contribute to the debates. — Lourdes Beneria, Cornell University and author of Gender, Development, and Globalization: Economics as if All People Mattered

Pathbreaking in its originality and breathtaking in its coverage, the truly outstanding volume David Ruccio has delivered is indispensable in critiquing a variety of prevailing developmental paradigms. Rather than simplistically noting the ‘failures’ of capitalism, this book reveals how neoliberal development policies can be considered successful in terms of promoting the emergence and strengthening of capitalist class processes and the appropriation of surplus-value in Latin America and beyond. It is obligatory reading for scholars and students seeking to construct Marxian class analyses and to formulate alternatives to the world economy today. — Adam David Morton, University of Nottingham and author of Unravelling Gramsci: Hegemony and Passive Revolution in the Global Political Economy

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David Harvey

SPACES OF DEMOCRACY EVENTS: DAVID HARVEY, DOREEN MASSEY, ANANYA ROY

Please see below for details of FIVE forthcoming, present and related Spaces of Democracy and the Democracy of Space events:-

1] A one day workshop centred around a debate between DOREEN MASSEY and DAVID HARVEY, Friday 19th November, organised by Chantal Mouffe (node Director at the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Westminster). (further details forthcoming).

2] ANANYA ROY ON POVERTY, DEMOCRACY AND PUBLIC SCHOLARSHIP: A micro-seminar on the research and activism of ANANYA ROY (organised by Katharyne Mitchell, node Director, University of Washington) and Victoria Lawson at University of Washington).

This includes a public lecture by Ananya Roy: Monday, Oct 11, 6:00pm, Kane Hall; a preliminary seminar on Friday, Oct 8, 2:30 – 5:20pm, CMU 202 and a concluding seminar on Tuesday, Oct 12, 3:30 – 5:20pm, CMU 202 where there will be a discussion of intersections between public lecture, Roy’s publications and her public activism and scholarship.

3] A FILM is being made on NEOLIBERALISING INDIAN CITIES with Director of the South Asia Node of the Spaces of Democracy and the Democracy of Space network, Swapna Banerjee-Guha, from the School of Social Sciences, TISS, India. (further details forthcoming).

4] The book WHAT IS RADICAL POLITICS TODAY? (2009) Palgrave-MacMillan, edited by Jonathan Pugh, Newcastle University, is now available for £10 at some bookstores.

A crisis makes you re-think your life. The recent economic crisis is no exception. All of us are now thinking how the world could be run differently. Despite this, a radical alternative has hardly emerged to mobilise the masses, which begs the question: What is radical politics today? In this book, leading academics, politicians, journalists and activists attempt to pinpoint an answer, debating the issues facing radical politics in the 21st Century. Rarely united in their opinions, they collectively interogate the character and spirit of being radical in our times.

Including original contributions from Zygmunt Bauman, Will Hutton, Frank Furedi, Clare Short, Ken Worpole, Nick Cohen, Hilary Wainwright, Paul Kingsnorth, Chantal Mouffe, Terrell Carver, Edward W. Soja, David Chandler, Dora Apel, Doreen Massey, Jason Toynbee, James Martin, Michael J. Watts, Jeremy Gilbert and Jo Littler, Gregor McLennan, Tariq Modood, Amir Saeed & David Bates, Alastair Bonnett, Nigel Thrift, Sheila Jasanoff, Saul Newman, David Featherstone, James Heartfield, Alejandro Colás and Jason Edwards, David Boyle, Saskia Sassen.”

* Explores the spirit and character of radical politics, at this pivotal moment in history.

* Thirty well known and influential commentators write original 3000 word essays.

* Offers thought provoking and often conflicting opinions.

* The only current wide ranging survey of the state of radical politics, post-crisis.

* Accessibly written for the general public and student audiences.

Recent reviews include:

“Provocative, authoritative and timely …” (New Statesman)

“This stimulating and impressively diverse collection of essays helps us to begin re-thinking our predicament. Anyone who finds themselves in agreement with all the authors here must be seriously confused, since several of the pieces offer directly contradictory analyses. But the strength of the book as a whole lies precisely in bringing different political traditions into productive dialogue” (Red Pepper)

“Jonathan Pugh gathers some of the most innovative and insightful voices from Britain and beyond to stage a series of debates on the central issues facing radical politics today.  This collection is a model for the kinds of discussion we need to move forward.” Michael Hardt (Duke University).

“This is a bold, brave and timely book. As we emerge, blinking into the light after three decades of neo-liberal darkness, Jonathan Pugh has put together a collection of essays that will provoke and provide clues to the question of what comes next; what indeed is radical politics today?” Neal Lawson (Director, Compass).

“This timely and well-planned collection of essays by distinguished and concerned scholars throws much new light on where we should be looking for new ideas. It represents a major contribution to the ongoing debate on the problems of our times.” Lord Bhikhu Parekh

5] A number of participants in the network have also contributed to the following special issue of the journal GLOBALIZATIONS

Special Issue: Globalization and Crisis
Volume 7, Issue 1-2, April 2010

This special issue of Globalizations consists of a set of analyses provided by leading international scholars in the field of both the theoretical and the practical relationship between ‘globalization’ – as each contributor interprets this concept – and ‘crisis’ both historically and in the present context i.e. the most severe global systemic crisis for a century. The articles are intended to provide substantial analytical critique, and contribute to the development of new
understandings of globalization.

Contributors: Editor:

Barry K. Gills, Newcastle University, UK
Foreword: ‘Fair Globalization in Crisis’
Mrs Tarja Halonen, President of Finland
Saskia Sassen
Walden Bello
Grahame Thompson
Ankie Hoogvelt
Henry Veltmeyer
Richard Falk
Craig N. Murphy
V. Spike Peterson
Mustapha Kamal Pasha
Heikki Patomaki
James H. Mittelman
Barry K. Gills
Francois Houtart
Susan George
Wazir Jahan Karim
M. Scott Solomon
Ronaldo Munck
Andreas Bieler
Ingemar Lindberg
Werner Sauerborn
Samir Amin
Jonathan Pugh
Nick Buxton
Gemma Bone

END

For “The Spaces of Democracy and the Democracy of Space” network website: http://www.spaceofdemocracy.org/

For Radical Politics Today magazine: http://www.spaceofdemocracy.org/resources/publications/magazine/magazine.html

For more on the book What is radical politics today?, published in 2009 by Palgrave MacMillan: http://www.spaceofdemocracy.org/resources/resources_bookstoread.html

Jonathan Pugh
Senior Academic Fellow
Director “The Spaces of Democracy and the Democracy of Space” network
School of Geography, Politics and Sociology
5th Floor Daysh Building
Newcastle University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU
United Kingdom
Honorary Fellow, The Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster

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Conference on Giovanni Arrighi

http://madrid2009arrighi.blogspot.com/

Conference on the Work of Giovanni Arrighi

“Dynamics of the Global Crisis, Anti-Systemic Movements and New Models of Hegemony”

“Dinámica de la crisis global, movimientos antisistémicos y nuevos modelos de la hegemonía”

At the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid

25-29 May 2009

Participants: Giovanni Arrighi, Perry Anderson, Beverly Silver, David Harvey, Robert Brenner, Samir Amin, Emir Sader, Walden Bello, Theotonio dos Santos, Marcello de Cecco, Ravi Palat, John Saul, Ho-Fung Hung, Gillian Hart, Lu Aiguo, Ravi Sundaram, Takeshi Hamashita, Amiya Bagchi, Roberto Patricio Korzeniewicz, Luis Sandoval Ramírez, William Martin, Tom Reifer, Siba Grovogui

Organized by the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía
http://www.museoreinasofia.es
and the Universidad Nómada
http://www.universidadnomada.net

Sponsored by the Fundación por la Europa de los Ciudadanos and CLACSO

Full programme available here: http://madrid2009arrighi.blogspot.com/

“Remenbering Giovanni Arrighi” – by Steven Colatrella, from Counterpunch: http://www.counterpunch.org/colatrella06242009.html 

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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