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Knowledge

Knowledge

STRUCTURING KNOWLEDGE: NEW VISIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION

Structuring knowledge: New visions of higher education

Monday 25th and Tuesday 26th June 2012

Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford.

 

We have managed to secure some additional places for this event. Please register as soon as possible if you wish to attend.

This year the Higher Education Theory Group Symposium focuses on the topic of knowledge, specifically on the structuring of knowledge within contemporary higher education. It will also explore the ways in which different disciplines construct knowledge nowadays and the shift of traditional disciplinary boundaries, particularly within the context of open knowledge and interdisciplinary environments.

 

Keynote Speakers:

Ron Barnett: Emeritus Professor of Higher Education, Institute of Education, University of London

Tina Besley: Professor, Policy, Cultural and Social Studies in Education, University ofWaikato

Gert Biesta: Professor of Education, University ofStirling

Michael Peters: Professor Emeritus ,University of Illinoisand Professor, Policy, Cultural and Social Studies in Education, University of Waikato

Michael Young: Professor of Education, Institute of Education, University of London

 

The symposium will examine a number of discussion points which are set out on our webpage.There will be contributions from keynote speakers and opportunity for extensive plenary discussions on the issues raised. The overall aim of the symposium is to explore different perspectives and open up theoretical, methodological and pedagogical questions for debate. The main speakers will each produce a short synopsis of their contribution for participants to consider in advance of the seminar. It is intended to prepare a book for publication based on the seminar proceedings. The symposium will be of interest to a wide range of practitioners drawn from all disciplines and institutions: academics, research students, undergraduates and administrative personnel.

Cost: £168 members, £198 non-members (until 22 May); £200 members, £237 non-members (after 22 May)  

The cost covers 1 night’s accommodation at LMH and dinner on 25th June, tea coffee lunch on both days.

To register please visit http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

If you have any queries please contact me at fsmit@srhe.ac.uk     

 

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit, SRHE Event Manager, Society for Research into Higher Education, 73 Collier Street, London N1 9BE, Telephone 0207 427 2350, Fax number 0207 278 1135, srheoffice@srhe.ac.uk, http://www.srhe.ac.uk

 

**END**

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Michael Neary

MARKETISATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND THE STUDENT AS CONSUMER

Marketisation of Higher Education and the Student as Consumer, jointly edited by Mike Molesworth, Lizzie Nixon and Richard Scullion and was published by Routledge in October 2010.

The Marketisation of Higher Education and the Student as Consumer was launched at the House of Commons on 28th October. The launch was hosted by Baroness Estelle Morris in the Thatcher Room in Portcullis House.

About the Book:

Until recently government policy in the UK has encouraged an expansion of Higher Education to increase participation and with an express aim of creating a more educated workforce. This expansion has led to competition between Higher Education institutions, with students increasingly positioned as consumers and institutions working to improve the extent to which they meet ‘consumer demands’.

Especially given the latest government funding cuts, the most prevalent outlook in Higher Education today is one of business, forcing institutions to reassess the way they are managed and promoted to ensure maximum efficiency, sales and ‘profits’. Students view the opportunity to gain a degree as a right, and a service which they have paid for, demanding a greater choice and a return on their investment. Changes in higher education have been rapid, and there has been little critical research into the implications. This volume brings together internationally comparative academic perspectives, critical accounts and empirical research to explore fully the issues and experiences of education as a commodity, examining:

The international and financial context of marketisation

The new purposes of universities

The implications of university branding and promotion

League tables and student surveys vs. quality of education

The higher education market and distance learning

Students as ‘active consumers’ in the co-creation of value

Changing student experiences, demands and focus

With contributions from many of the leading names involved in Higher Education including Ron Barnett, Frank Furedi, Lewis Elton, Roger Brown and also Laurie Taylor in his journalistic guise as an academic at the University of Poppleton, this book will be essential reading for many.

About the Authors

Mike Molesworth is Senior Lecturer in Online Marketing and Consumer Behaviour at the Media School, Bournemouth University, UK.

Richard Scullion is Senior Lecturer in Marketing Communications and Political Communications at the Media School, Bournemouth University, UK.

Elizabeth Nixon is Lecturer in Marketing Communications at the Media School, Bournemouth University, UK.

The book can be bought from:

Routledge: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415584470/

Amazon UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Marketisation-Higher-Education-Student-Consumer/dp/0415584477/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1289775427&sr=1-1

Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Marketisation-Higher-Education-Student-Consumer/dp/0415584477/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1289775597&sr=1-1

A pre-print version of a chapter in the book by Michael Neary and Andy Hagyard, Pedagogy of Excess: An alternative political economy of student life can be viewed here: http://studentasproducer.lincoln.ac.uk/files/2010/10/Pedagogy-of-Excess-preprint.pdf  

Michael Neary and Joss Winn’s chapter 10 in the book, Student as Producer: reinventing the student experience in higher education can be found at: http://eprints.lincoln.ac.uk/1675/1/Future_of_HE_-_Chapter_10.pdf

See also:

Neary, M. (2010) Student as Producer: A Pedagogy for the Avant-Garde; or, how do revolutionary teachers teach? Learning Exchange, Vol.1 No.1, online at: http://learningexchange.westminster.ac.uk/index.php/lej/article/viewFile/15/13

Student as Producer blog, is at: http://studentasproducer.lincoln.ac.uk/blog/

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Marketisation of Higher Education

The University of Utopia
Radicalising Higher Education

 

2nd Annual Research Conference

The Centre for Educational Research and Development of the University of Lincoln

 

Thursday, 4th June, 2009

EMMTEC Conference Centre, Brayford Pool, University of Lincoln, LN6 7TS

 

 

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:         

Professor Ron Barnett, Institute of Education:         The Utopian University: Challenges and Prospects

Professor Antonia Darder, University of Illinois: “Breaking Silence: A Study into the Pervasiveness of Oppression”

 

 

THEMATIC WORKSHOPS

Patrick Ainley, Joyce Canaan: “The Student Experience”

Stefano Harney, Fred Moten: “Academic Labour”

Cath Lambert, Mike Neary, Elisabeth Simbuerger: “Teaching in Public”

Dennis Hayes, Terence Karran: “Academic Freedom”

 

 

What is the Conference About?

 

Thomas More’s Utopia (1516) sets out, for the first time, the paradox of the modern (new) world: the possibility of abundance (freedom) in a society of scarcity (non-freedom); and the dangers that are inherent in this paradoxical situation for the development of the emergent capitalist society.

 

More suggests the universality of education as a way of resolving this paradox.  For the humanist More, the highest pleasures are those of the mind, and true happiness depends on their realization.  On More’s fantasy island, Utopia is a universal school for all its citizens, where all civic life is education.  Citizens attend public lectures in the morning, participate in lively discussions during meal-times, and, in the evening, receive formal supervision from scholars. (Meiksins Wood, 1997).

 

In 1953, with the publication of The University of Utopia, the educational philosopher Robert Hutchins extended More’s allegory to a liberal humanist reappraisal of higher education.  Anticipating the vocationalist critique of contemporary higher education, Hutchins wrote ‘The object of the educational system, taken as a whole, is not to produce hands for industry or to teach the young how to make a living. It is to produce responsible citizens’ (p.3). Hutchins’s views have been repeated and endorsed in the increasing volume of critical literature on the commercialisation of higher education.

 

However this critical literature has struggled to provide any convincing alternatives to ‘academic capitalism’ (Slaughter and Leslie, 1997).  This absence of any radical alternative, occurs not because of a lack of imagination, but by virtue of the nature of liberal-humanism itself.  For Zizek (2002) liberal humanism ‘precludes any serious questioning of the way in which this liberal democratic order is complicit in the phenomena it officially condemns, and, of course, any serious attempt to imagine a different socio-political order’ (167). What this amounts to, for Zizek, is ‘a prohibition on thinking… the moment we question the liberal consensus we are accused of abandoning scientific objectivity and recourse to outdate ideological positions’ (168).

 

The aim of this conference is to recover the freshness of More’s critique, while going beyond Hutchins’s liberal fundamentalism, in order to imagine some real radical futures for higher education.  The conference addresses the problem of inventing a form of radicality that confronts the same paradox that emerged in Tudor England, and continues to undermine the progressive development of the postmodern world.

 

 

Why Come to the Conference?

 

The conference will be of interest to all staff in further and higher education who are concerned about the future direction and role of the changing university within the emerging global knowledge economy.

 

We look forward to welcoming you

Register online now at: http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/conferences/  

 

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