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Tag Archives: Revolutionary Pedagogy

End the Damage

AN INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATION OF TEACHER EDUCATION: EXPOSING AND RESISTING THE NEOLIBERAL AGENDA – JCEPS SPECIAL ISSUE + CALL FOR PAPERS

The Journal of Critical Education Policy Studies
Special Issue: Spring 2012
An International Examination of Teacher Education: Exposing and Resisting the Neoliberal Agenda
Chief Editor: Professor Dave Hill, Chief/Managing Editor and Founding Editor, Professor Dave Hill, Professor Peter L. McLaren Editor, North America, Professor Pablo Gentili Editor, Latin America

Guest Editors: Dr. Brad Porfilio, Lewis University & Dr. Julie Gorlewski, SUNY at New Paltz

In recent decades, the transnational capitalist class has wielded power and influence to gain control over elements of social life that were once considered vital domains to fostering the social welfare of global citizens. Affected public domains include natural resources, health care, prisons, transportation, post-catastrophe restoration, and education. The chief linchpin in the elite’s corporatization over social affairs is its effective propaganda campaign to inculcate the global community to believe that neoliberal capitalism ameliorates rather than devastates humanity. According to political pundits, free-market academics, and corporate leaders, economic prosperity and improvements in the social world emanate from “unregulated or free markets, the withering away of the state as government’s role in regulating businesses and funding social services are either eliminated or privatized, and encouraging individuals to become self-interested entrepreneurs” (Hursh, 2011).

Since neoliberalism is a term rarely uttered is most dominant (mainstream) media outlets, most citizens are not cognizant of how it is linked to many deleterious economic and social developments at today’s historical juncture, such as massive unemployment, the swelling of home foreclosures, homelessness, militarism, school closings, maldistribution of wealth, and environmental degradation (Hill, 2008; Hursh, 2011; McLaren, 2007; Ross & Gibson, 2007; Scipes, 2009). Equally important, many global citizens fail to recognize how the transnational elite have spawned a McCarthy-like witch hunt to eliminate academics, policies, and programs that have the potential to engage citizens in a critical examination of what is responsible for today’s increasingly stark social world – as well as what steps are necessary to radically transform it.

In this special issue of The Journal of Critical Education Policy Studies, we call on progressive scholars from across the globe to provide empirical research, conceptual analysis, and theoretical insights in relation to how corporate policies, practices, and imperatives are structuring life in schools of education.

Since the impact of neoliberal capitalism on programs, policies, relationships, and pedagogies in schools of education is not uniform, as local histories and politics structure how macro-forces come to impact people in local contexts (Gruenwell 2003), the issue will be integral in understanding and confronting the social actors and constitute forces gutting the humanizing nature of education. Additionally, we call on critical scholars and pedagogues who have found emancipatory fissures amid corporatized schools of education to share policies, pedagogies, and cultural work that have the potency promote critical forms of education, democratic relationships, and peace, equity and social justice across the globe.

Manuscripts are due by December 1, 2011 and should be submitted as email attachments to porfilio16@aol.com and gorlewsj@newpaltz.edu.

Papers submitted for publication should be between 5,000 and 8000 words long. While we would hope that papers would be submitted in accordance with the Harvard Referencing Style, we do accept those written in any commonly accepted academic style, as long as the style is consistent throughout the paper.

Please direct all inquires about this special issue to the guest editors at Porfilio16@aol.com and gorlewsj@newpaltz.edu

 

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Critical Pedagogy

CRITICAL PEDAGOGIES IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY: A CONFERENCE ON TRANSFORMATIVE PEDAGOGIES

Call for Papers

Critical Theories in the Twenty First Century: A Conference of Transformative Pedagogies

West Chester University of Pennsylvania

Conference Founders: Curry Malott, John Elmore, and Brad Porfilio

November 18th and 19th 2011

Proposals for papers, panels, performances, workshops, and other multimedia presentations should include title(s) and names and contact information for presenter(s). The deadline for sending prooposals is August 31, 2011. The Steering Committee will email acceptance or rejection notices by September 8, 2011. The proposal formats available to the presenters are as follows:

The general purpose of the West Chester Critical Theory Conference is to promote and support critical scholarship within students, and to advance critical theory and pedagogy more generally. By “advance” we mean to expose more people to critical practices and understandings as part of the process of the development of theory.

Through this focus we hope to work toward unifying and strengthening the sub-genres of critical pedagogy from Marxism, critical race theory, to critical neo-colonial studies. This goal is approached through the conferences internal pedagogy and therefore through a horizontal rather than a vertical organizing structure; by including students and classroom teachers in the critical pedagogical work dominated by professors; and by attempting to create a space where criticalists who do not usually work together can create meaningful unity, respect, and common goals. Since the dominant form of power in the twenty first century—neoliberal capitalist power—is both multicultural and global, critical pedagogy must too become more multicultural and global if it is to pose a significant challenge to it for a more democratic life after capitalism.

Because critical theory is concerned with not only understanding the world, but with transforming it, the conference is focused on not only understanding the consequences of an unjust social and economic system (i.e. corporate take-over of schools, high stakes testing and behaviorist pedagogy, micro classroom aggressions and bullying, poverty, racism, sexism, white supremacy, homophobia, perpetual war, ableism, etc.), but with transforming or dissolving their root causes (i.e. neoliberal capitalism and settler-state, Euro-centric oppression and their patriarchal, homophobic, racist, etc. hegemonies). As part of this goal the conference will hopefully provide introductory discussions and presentations on critical pedagogy and critical theory.

SUBMISSIONS
Proposal Formats

Individual Proposal: (45 minutes)
The conference committee welcomes individual paper proposals, with the understanding that those accepted will be grouped together around common or overlapping themes, Presenters will have approximately 45 minutes to present or summarize their individual papers. Individual paper submissions will be considered for panels with the same topic/theme. If you would prefer to present your paper/research individually you should consider the alternative format proposal. A 300-500 word abstract of the paper will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Symposium Proposal: (90 minutes)
Presenters are also welcomed to submit proposals for a symposium. A symposium is typically composed of a chair and discussant and three to five participants who present or summarize their papers. Each symposium is organized around a common theme. Each participant will have between 15 and 45 minutes to present their papers, depending upon the number of participants involved in the symposium. A 300-500 word abstract of the symposium will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Panel Proposal: (90 minutes)
A panel discussion is another venue available presenters. A panel discussion is typically composed of three to six participants who discuss their scholarly work within the context of a dialogue or conversation on a topic or theme related to the conference theme. Typically, each panelist is given 10-15 minutes to discuss the topic, present theoretical ideas, and/or point to relevant research. A chair should be identified who introduces the panel and frames the issues and questions being addressed. In addition to the chair, we encourage (but do not require) organizers of panels to include a discussant who responds to the comments of the panelists. Individual proposal submissions will be combined into panels with the same theme/topic. A 300-500 word abstract of the panel discussion will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Alternative Format and Special Interest Groups (90 minutes)
Alternative proposals that do not fit into the above categories, such as workshops, performances, video and multimedia presentations, and round-table dialogues, are encouraged. We also welcome proposals for the organization of special interest groups. A 150-250 word abstract of the panel discussion will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Email proposals to conference coordinators Brad Porfilio (porfilio16@aol.com) and Curry Malott (currymalott@hotmail.com) by August 31, 2011.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Marx and Education

ANOTHER REVIEW OF ‘MARX AND EDUCATION’ BY JEAN ANYON

If nothing else, Jean Anyon’s new book, Marx and Education has put the question and significance of Karl Marx’s views on education on the landscape of Marxist thought and writings. It follows Robin Small’s Marx and Education (2005) in establishing this relatively new field of enquiry, with the pioneers in the field, Colin Waugh and Gary Taylor having made a glorious start in the 1990s with their articles in General Educator.

In my view, Curry Stephenson Malott’s review of Anyon’s book is the best we have so far. You can see his review, entitled ‘Pseudo-Marxism and the Reformist Retreat from Revolution: A Critical Essay Review of Marx and Education’ in the latest issue of the Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies, at: http://www.jceps.com/?pageID=article&articleID=206

 

Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies: http://www.jceps.com

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory

MARX AND EDUCATION: MISLEADING TITLE AND CONFUSING NARRATIVE

April 13th 2011

By m310See all my reviews (on Amazon.com)

Review at Amazon.com: Marx and Education (Routledge Key Ideas in Education) (Paperback)

This had the potential to be a book that shed important light on the Marxist educational tradition; however, I was confused by the narrative. The title misled me into believing that I was in for a discussion of Marxist educators. Originally, I was interested in the book because I hoped it would augment the writings of U.S. Marxists, such as Ramin Farahmandpur, Rich Gibson, E. Wayne Ross, and a few others. Yet the book is dedicated to neo-Marxists, and while she gives attention to McLaren as a progressive educator (mid-1980s), she provides scant attention to his Marxist writings. Those who have read any of McLaren’s writings since 1995 know that he is a Marxist-Humanist; he is clearly not a neo-Marxist. Anyone following Marxism in education in the USwould be hard pressed to find a more prominent and influential exponent than McLaren.

Furthermore, the significant contributions made upon U.S. Marxists by British Marxists such as Glenn Rikowski, Paula Allman, Dave Hill, and Mike Cole, are not highlighted. Why were there no significant discussions of Valerie Scatamburlo D’Annibale and Deb Kelsh? The narrative in this book is not so much about Marxist educators but rather progressive and neo-Marxist educators. Where were discussions of contributions of John Holst and Himani Bannerji? The book, Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory – a milestone in the debates over Marxism and education – was not even mentioned. This truly was a narrow reading of a very small field and as a result has shortchanged its readers. Mike Cole’s work in England is far superior.

Anyon has done good work on urban education, but needs to be more aware of what is happening in the Marxist arena as far as education is concerned. I like her basic summary of Marxist analysis but wanted to find out more about U.S.-based Marxist educators, especially since there are so few of them.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

 

World Crisis

INSURGENT NOTES ISSUE 3

Just to let you know that our on-line journal Insurgent Notes has just posted issue No. 3. (contents below): http://insurgentnotes.com

Loren Goldner

March 2011

Introduction

From Cairo to Madison, The Old Mole Comes Up For An Early Spring, PDF Version, Loren Goldner

Bleeding Wisconsin, PDF Version, S. Artesian

Rethinking Educational Failure and Reimagining an Educational Future, PDF Version, John Garvey

How the French pension system works, PDF Version, Henri Simon

Of Forests and Trees, PDF Version, S. Artesian

Anti-Capitalism or Anti-Imperialism? Interwar Authoritarian and Fascist Sources of A Reactionary Ideology: The Case of the Bolivian MNR, PDF Version, Loren Goldner

 

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The Incident

ROUGE FORUM CONFERENCE 2010: CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Education in the Public Interest: Teaching and Learning for a Democratic Society 

RF 2010 will be hosted at George Williams College on the scenic banks of Geneva Lake.  Located officially in Williams Bay, Wisconsin, the college is nestled between the major metropolitan areas of Milwaukee, Wisconsin and Chicago, Illinois.  The conference will be held August 2-5. 

Bringing together academic presentations and performances (from some of the most prominent voices for democratic, critical, and/or revolutionary pedagogy), panel discussions, community-building, and cultural events, this action-oriented conference will center on questions such as:

* Transforming the notion of “saving public education” to one of creating education in the public interest, what does teaching and learning for a democratic society look like?

* What does education for liberation look like compared to the more socially reproductive/dominating education we see in many of our nation’s schools?

* Are the current crises in the economy as well as educationally in such states as California or cities like Detroit indicative of a turning point in history? Has the rightward shift ebbed or will the economic crisis push the ruling class towards fascism? 

* What is a public good?  Is education a public good? Why is it treated as a private good?

* Is climate change a matter to be debated by governments and industry leaders?  Has the public participated in the debate on climate change?  What roles do educators have in making students aware of the implications of that debate?

* Are multi-trillion dollar deficits public ‘bads’?

* What debts will future generations, including the students we may teach, carry because our financial, governmental, and military endeavors have not been concerned with public goods?

* What are the educational implications of the recent Supreme Court decision to endow corporations with the right of free speech?

* How do we learn and teach to get from where we are to where we need to be?

* How do we stand up for the correctness of our ideas?

* How does change happen (individually, within a school, within a district)?

* Can the current system be reformed in order to better serve children, families, and citizens?

* If not, what would a new system look like? How would it be implemented? What past models exist on which to work and build?

To learn more about the conference, please contact any of our conference organizers:

Faith Wilson (fwilson@aurora.edu)

Adam Renner (arenner@bellarmine.edu)

Wayne Ross (wayne.ross@ubc.ca)

Rich Gibson (rgibson@pipeline.com)

Gina Stiens (stiensg@yahoo.com)

Doug Selwyn (dselw001@plattsburgh.edu)

Joe Cronin (jcronin@antioch.edu)

Or visit the conference website at: http://www.rougeforumconference.org     

Submissions

Proposals for papers, panels, or performances should include title(s), no more than a 500 word description, and names and contact information for presenter(s). Presenters should plan on 45 minute time slots to deliver papers. Panels and performances will be awarded 90 minutes.

Review of Paper and Panel Proposals treating any of the above questions will begin April 15, 2010. Please send your proposals to Faith Wilson (fwilson@aurora.edu). As we expect a number of proposals for a limited number of slots please forward your proposal as soon as possible.

Performance Proposals should also be forwarded to Faith Wilson (fwilson@aurora.edu) by April 15, 2010. Please describe your art/performance and how it may relate to the conference topic/questions.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

 
 
 

REVOLUTIONIZING PEDAGOGY

Revolutionizing Pedagogy: Education for Social Justice Within and Beyond Global Neo-Liberalism

Edited by Sheila Macrine, Peter McLaren and Dave Hill

Palgrave Macmillan, Marxism and Education Series, 2010, ISBN: 978-0-239-60799-6

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Preface: Martha Montero-Sieburth

Introduction: Sheila Macrine, Peter McLaren, and Dave Hill

PART I: FRAMEWORKDS FOR ORGANIZING PEDAGOGY

A Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing, or a Sheep in Wolf’s Clothing: Resistance to Educational Reform in Chile: Jill Pinkney Pastrana

Education Rights, Education Policies and Inequality in South Africa: Salim Vally, Enver Motala, and Brian Ramadiro

Taking on the Corporatization of Public Education: What Teacher Education Can Do: Pepi Leistyna

Revolutionizing Critical Pedagogy: The Struggle against the Oppression of Neoliberalism – A Conversation with Peter McLaren: Sebastjan Leban and Peter McLaren

PART II: STRATEGIES FOR PRACTICING CRITICAL PEDAGOGY

Class, Capital and Education in this Neoliberal and Neoconservative Period: Dave Hill

Hijacking Public Schooling: The Epicentre of Neo Radical Centrism: João Paraskeva

Defending Dialectics: Rethinking the Neo-Marxist Turn in Critical Education Theory: Wayne Au

Critical Teaching as the Counter-Hegemony to Neo-liberalism: John Smyth

Empowering Education: Freire, Cynicism and a Pedagogy of Action: Richard Van Heertum

Teachers Matter…Don’t They? Placing Teachers and Their Work in the Global Knowledge Economy: Susan L. Robertson

Afterword: After neoliberalism: Which way capitalism? David Hursh

List of Contributors

Index

Reviews:

“An extraordinary emancipatory work: bravely negotiating the globalized toxic ruins of neo-liberalism. This is a liberatory project that embraces building a more just and democratic social world, transforming the ashes of oppressive pedagogical practices into a universe of critical and creative revolutionary possibility.”–Karen Anijar, Professor Emeritus, Arizona State University

“This volume provides both a much-needed political and economic critique of the dominant neoliberal reforms in the economy and education, and a theoretical and pedagogical path towards a democratic society and schools. I commend the contributors for their intellectual and political courage.”–David Hursh, University of Rochester, and author of High-Stakes Testing and the Decline of Teaching and Learning

Ordering Revolutionizing Pedagogy:

Palgrave Macmillan, USA & Canada : http://us.macmillan.com/revolutionizingpedagogy

Palgrave Macmillan, UK & Europe: http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?PID=313310

Palgrave Macmillan, Australia : http://www.palgravemacmillan.com.au/palgrave21/newsite/libraries/Search+Results?open&query=Revolutionizing%20Pedagogy+AND+FIELD+Division%3DPalgrave&start=1&count=20&SearchOrder=3&div=Palgrave

Palgrave Macmillan, Asia & Latin America: http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?PID=313310

Palgrave Macmillan, Africa & Middle East: http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?PID=313310

Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Revolutionizing-Pedagogy-Education-Justice-Neo-Liberalism/dp/0230607993/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1265370742&sr=1-1

Amazon.co.uk: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Revolutionizing-Pedagogy-Marxism-Education-Macrine/dp/0230607993/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1265370613&sr=1-1

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk