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Tag Archives: Revolutionary Critical Pedagogy

Teaching Marx

TEACHING MARX: THE SOCIALIST CHALLENGE

Announcing a forthcoming book: Teaching Marx: The Socialist Challenge

Edited by Curry Stephenson Malott, Mike Cole and John Elmore

To be published by Information Age Publishing

Critical Construction: Studies in Education and Society, see: http://www.infoagepub.com/series/critical-constructions

Series Editor: Curry Stephenson Malott, West Chester University

“There is growing disillusionment with a social system where increasing productivity leads only to increased gaps between rich and poor, where reductions in social programs (retirement, health care, education) are the chief response an uninspired political sector can muster, and where non-sustainable exploitation of the Earth continues undiminished — in short, as the looming, world-wide economic crisis draws nearer, the essays in Teaching Marx: The Socialist Challengeare critical reading. It is time for our teachers to prepare students not to take their place in an increasingly corrupt economy, but to bring about the fundamental changes we need to build an equitable, prosperous, sustainable future” — Dr. Dennis Vickers, Humanities Department, College of Menominee Nation, Keshena, Wisconsin.

Curry Malott

Teaching Marx: The Socialist Challenge is an extraordinarily important text at this juncture of world history. Functioning as more than just another pedagogical weapon to be used against the ideological structures of death and social hallucinogenics manufactured by the transnational capitalist class, it is a book that can provide fecund opportunities for teachers to re-learn how to put social and economic justice front and center in the agenda for educational reform by putting Marx front and center, where he belongs” — Peter McLaren, Professor, UCLA and author of Che Guevara, Paulo Freire and the Pedagogy of Revolution

Teaching Marx: The Socialist Challenge provides a useful starting point for understanding the origins of today’s global crisis of capitalism. Our work in public schools to encourage respectful dialogues between Indian and non-Indian students about local conflicts over land ownership, through the TERRA Institute, should encourage cooperative action to find common interests. This book reminds us to move those specific discussions to explorations of the causes of conflicts over land, including the imperatives of global capitalism” — David Stanfield, TERRA Institute, www.terrainstitute.org

“As this book so clearly and illustratively points out, the work of Marx has always served as a critical tool for identifying and scraping away the residue of commodity relations as a means to an end of revolutionary purpose, and teaching Marx is therefore keynote to education becoming able to serve as a tool of liberation and revolution. The reasons for why this is so are very clear in the book. As its authors successively and in detail clearly point out, we are ‘educated’ to believe that we live in a meritocracy where god-given abilities and hard work afford position and reward, and the work of social institutions like the school play a key part in this. These institutions, as ideological apparatuses of the State, barrage us with propaganda and bombard us with ideas inside practices that are designed to convince us all that at the head of the equation of the constitution of the social and economic order is the work, skills, ideas, knowledge and commitment of individual people themselves and that the effort and competences of these individuals determine social position and the possibilities for economic reward and even social justice for all.

Mike Cole

Put directly and simply, the book shows us how the public has been hoodwinked by the school and other social institutions to believe in the ethics of capitalism and its central ideological tenet that the present social order is natural and in the end inevitable and beneficial for us all. However, as well as critiquing the work of the school as an instrument of reproduction, the book also shows how and why the education system could and should challenge the anti-democratic perspectives that disguise and defend the current social relations of production and the ideological and material needs of the capitalist class. It offers that is an educational challenge to the inevitability and “correctness” of capitalism by showing how its laws can be made visible to ordinary people so the oppressive power of the capitalist class can be more correctly identified, challenged and defeated.  In this way the book both poses the question and provides answers concerning what role education can play in a possible future revolutionary moment: both as a “true” education as an act of liberation and as a dialectic lens for critiquing the world in which we live. Used appropriately the book can become a clear and fundamental ingredient for helping to create the possibilities for a more egalitarian and socially just world” — Dennis Beach, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

“This collection by Malott, Cole and Elmore’s is a very timely contribution to the current revival of Marxism in education. The authors engage seriously with the ideas of Marx – from his theory of capitalist crises to the increasing impoverishment of the working class – and debunk many of the commonly held myths about Marxism. The compilation of writings provide a devastating rejoinder to those who believe that we can only make changes within the present system and show how this crisis has made discussion of socialist alternatives, in education and society, an urgent necessity. They argue that, in Marx’s words, the educators need to get educated and find ways – through their students, through what they teach, and through their political activism – to feed into wider movements of social change” — Marnie Holborow, author on Marxism and Language, Dublin City University, Ireland.

John Elmore

 

UPDATE 2nd MARCH 2013

Teaching Marx: The Socialist Challenge – is now out!

At Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Teaching-Marx-Curry-Stephenson-Malott/dp/1623961203/ref=sr_1_1_title_0_main?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1362256280&sr=1-1

At Amazon.co.uk: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Teaching-Marx-Curry-Stephenson-Malott/dp/1623961203/ref=sr_1_7?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1362256511&sr=1-7

At the Publishers (Information Age Publishing): http://www.infoagepub.com/products/Teaching-Marx

 

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Marxism and Education

MARXIAN ANALYSIS OF SOCIETY, SCHOOL AND EDUCATION SIG #157(MASSES) – AERA 2013 

American Educational Research Association

Annual Meeting

San Francisco, California

April 27 – May 1, 2013

 

Marxian Analysis of Society, School and Education SIG #157

CALL FOR PAPERS

AERA 2013

The global financial crisis detonated in the West in 2007 has highlighted long-standing structural faults within capitalism, especially in its financialization of the economy – something that Marx and his predecessors already predicted. The current economic genocidal policies in nations such as Ireland, Greece, Portugal, Spain, Italy, and Cyprus, along with the bailouts to specific US corporations, and the slow down of China’s ‘new economy’, present a credibility check in the recognition of the predatory policies and practices of capitalism’s third hegemonic momentum. In fact such financialization of the economy, with its the recurrent and increasingly devastating financial debacles assailing the world’s capitalist economies, has been incapable of producing sustainable growth in any sector while creating economic genocide, and has resulted in driving societies towards social foreclosures strong-armed through painful strangulation of austerity policies that are asphyxiating public institutions and transforming the very notion of public good and democracy itself!

The 2013 Marxian Analysis of Society, School and Education SIG program asks scholars, educators and graduate students around the globe who are profoundly committed to the struggle for social and cognitive justice to help us examine the transformative role of education and schools in addressing the contemporary crises, as well as, addressing the role of educators in helping to resolve the contradictions of the present and to contribute to a better future for schools, education and society.

Therefore, we ask scholars, educators and graduate students to contribute papers, posters or symposium that utilize a Marxist/Class analysis that will critically address the impact of the late capitalism’s financialization of the economy on questions of schools, education and society and how to move from pre-history to history proper to create a more and just democratic society and education.

Note: All submissions will be reviewed without author identification.

Please submit them without author names on the abstracts or summaries.

Proposals that bear the names of the authors and/or participants will not be considered for review and, consequently, will not be considered for the SIG #157 program for the 2013 AERA Annual Meeting.

Thank You, Dr. Sheila Macrine, 2013 Program Chair

Sheila L. Macrine Ph.D, is Chair of the Teaching & Learning Department University of Massachusetts Dartmouth 285 Old Westport Road North Dartmouth, MA 02747 – Phone: 508-999-8262, Fax: 508-910-6916, Email: nmacrine@aol.com

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Critical Pedagogy

CRITICAL PEDAGOGIES IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY: A CONFERENCE ON TRANSFORMATIVE PEDAGOGIES

Call for Papers

Critical Theories in the Twenty First Century: A Conference of Transformative Pedagogies

West Chester University of Pennsylvania

Conference Founders: Curry Malott, John Elmore, and Brad Porfilio

November 18th and 19th 2011

Proposals for papers, panels, performances, workshops, and other multimedia presentations should include title(s) and names and contact information for presenter(s). The deadline for sending prooposals is August 31, 2011. The Steering Committee will email acceptance or rejection notices by September 8, 2011. The proposal formats available to the presenters are as follows:

The general purpose of the West Chester Critical Theory Conference is to promote and support critical scholarship within students, and to advance critical theory and pedagogy more generally. By “advance” we mean to expose more people to critical practices and understandings as part of the process of the development of theory.

Through this focus we hope to work toward unifying and strengthening the sub-genres of critical pedagogy from Marxism, critical race theory, to critical neo-colonial studies. This goal is approached through the conferences internal pedagogy and therefore through a horizontal rather than a vertical organizing structure; by including students and classroom teachers in the critical pedagogical work dominated by professors; and by attempting to create a space where criticalists who do not usually work together can create meaningful unity, respect, and common goals. Since the dominant form of power in the twenty first century—neoliberal capitalist power—is both multicultural and global, critical pedagogy must too become more multicultural and global if it is to pose a significant challenge to it for a more democratic life after capitalism.

Because critical theory is concerned with not only understanding the world, but with transforming it, the conference is focused on not only understanding the consequences of an unjust social and economic system (i.e. corporate take-over of schools, high stakes testing and behaviorist pedagogy, micro classroom aggressions and bullying, poverty, racism, sexism, white supremacy, homophobia, perpetual war, ableism, etc.), but with transforming or dissolving their root causes (i.e. neoliberal capitalism and settler-state, Euro-centric oppression and their patriarchal, homophobic, racist, etc. hegemonies). As part of this goal the conference will hopefully provide introductory discussions and presentations on critical pedagogy and critical theory.

SUBMISSIONS
Proposal Formats

Individual Proposal: (45 minutes)
The conference committee welcomes individual paper proposals, with the understanding that those accepted will be grouped together around common or overlapping themes, Presenters will have approximately 45 minutes to present or summarize their individual papers. Individual paper submissions will be considered for panels with the same topic/theme. If you would prefer to present your paper/research individually you should consider the alternative format proposal. A 300-500 word abstract of the paper will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Symposium Proposal: (90 minutes)
Presenters are also welcomed to submit proposals for a symposium. A symposium is typically composed of a chair and discussant and three to five participants who present or summarize their papers. Each symposium is organized around a common theme. Each participant will have between 15 and 45 minutes to present their papers, depending upon the number of participants involved in the symposium. A 300-500 word abstract of the symposium will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Panel Proposal: (90 minutes)
A panel discussion is another venue available presenters. A panel discussion is typically composed of three to six participants who discuss their scholarly work within the context of a dialogue or conversation on a topic or theme related to the conference theme. Typically, each panelist is given 10-15 minutes to discuss the topic, present theoretical ideas, and/or point to relevant research. A chair should be identified who introduces the panel and frames the issues and questions being addressed. In addition to the chair, we encourage (but do not require) organizers of panels to include a discussant who responds to the comments of the panelists. Individual proposal submissions will be combined into panels with the same theme/topic. A 300-500 word abstract of the panel discussion will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Alternative Format and Special Interest Groups (90 minutes)
Alternative proposals that do not fit into the above categories, such as workshops, performances, video and multimedia presentations, and round-table dialogues, are encouraged. We also welcome proposals for the organization of special interest groups. A 150-250 word abstract of the panel discussion will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Email proposals to conference coordinators Brad Porfilio (porfilio16@aol.com) and Curry Malott (currymalott@hotmail.com) by August 31, 2011.

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Education and Capitalism

EDUCATION AND CAPITALISM: STRUGGLES FOR LEARNING AND LIBERATION

EDITED BY JEFF BALE AND SARAH KNOPP

Forthcoming Fall 2011

“This book is a breath of fresh air! The chapters take on central issues in education with a clear vision of what could be. Class, race, language and culture become not just educational ‘problems,’ but tools with which to rethink the future. A stellar addition to books in our field” —Jean Anyon, author of Marx and Education

“At a time when the capitalist class and their corporate allies in the media have waged an all-out assault on teachers, students, and public education, Education and Capitalism responds by speaking truth to power.…Drawing from the lived experiences of the editors and their students, and informed by cutting edge socio-political critique, Education and Capitalism clears the path for a new understanding of the current assault on public schooling and points towards important directions if we are to save it.” —Peter McLaren, author of Che Guevara, Paulo Freire, and the Pedagogy of  Revolution 

In the first decade of the twenty-first century, a conservative, bipartisan consensus dominates about what’s wrong with our schools and how to fix them. In each case, those solutions scapegoat teachers, vilify our unions, and promise more private control and market mentality as the answer. In each case, students lose—especially students of color and the children of the working class and the poor.

This book, written by teacher activists, speaks back to that elite consensus. It draws on the ideas and experiences of social justice educators concerned with fighting against racism and for equality, and those of activists oriented on recapturing the radical roots of the labor movement. Informed by a revolutionary vision of pedagogy, schools, and education, it paints a radical critique of education in Corporate America, past and present, and contributes to a vision of alternatives for education andliberation. Inside are essays that trace Marxist theories of education under capitalism; outline the historical educational experiences of emergent bilingual and African American students; recap the history of teachers’ unions; analyze the neoliberal attack on public schools under Obama; critically appraise Paolo Freire’s legacy; and make the historical link between social revolution and struggles for literacy.

With contributions from:
Rose Aguilar
Megan Behrent
Bill Bigelow
Michele Bollinger
John T. Green
Jesse Hagopian
Adrienne Johnstone
Brian Jones
Jessie Muldoon
Gillian Russom
Adam Sanchez
Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor
Elizabeth Terzakis
Dan Trocolli

Sarah Knopp is a public high school teacher inLos Angeles and an activist with United Teachers Los Angeles.

Jeff Bale is assistant professor of second language education at Michigan State University. Their work has appeared in Rethinking Schools, International Socialist Review, and CounterPunch

Available Fall 2011 |Trade paper | $17.00 | 220 pages | ISBN: 9781608461646 | Published by Haymarket Books | http://www.haymarketbooks.org | info@haymarketbooks.org | 773-583-7884

For review or desk copies, contact Sarah Macaraeg, sarah@haymarketbooks.org

Book details at: http://www.scribd.com/doc/52611703/EDUCATION-AND-CAPITALISM-STRUGGLES-FOR-LEARNING-AND-LIBERATION

For more information, visit:
http://www.haymarketbooks.org/pb/Education-and-Capitalism

or link to the book’s Facebook page:
http://www.facebook.com/educationandcapitalism

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William Godwin

ANARCHIST PEDAGOGIES

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSAL SUBMISSIONS

For a book entitled

Anarchist Pedagogies

Editor: Robert Haworth PhD

University of Wisconsin-La Crosse

Overview:

Anarchist movements have a long history of resisting traditional schooling and authoritative pedagogical practices, while at the same time, attempting to construct transformative educative processes. Examples include Francisco Ferrer’s (1913) work entitled, Origins of the Modern School and the creation of the Escuela Moderna schools in Spain, the Modernist Schools in the United States (Emma Goldman, Voltaraine de Cleyre, Alex Berkman and others) during the early 20th century as well as contemporary anarchists who are experimenting in participatory informal learning spaces. These examples are important to acknowledge within radical notions of teaching and learning being that they are experiences that enable activists and scholars to critically re-imagine education and build theories on “how” and “where” individuals experiment in constructing knowledge through differing learning spaces (Coté, Day & Peuter, 2007; de Leon, 2008, Malott, forthcoming).

Moreover, as totalizing efforts of the nation-state continue to develop standardized curriculum, efficiency models and data driven outcomes, anarchist pedagogies attempt to construct ongoing collective learning environments that can be described as ‘disciplined improvisation’ or ‘spontaneous’ in nature (Goldman, 1969; Haworth, forthcoming; Sawyer, 2003; Ward, 1972). Furthermore, these informal learning spaces create new ways of exposing illegitimate corporate and state power, as well as participating in the ‘coming communities’ (Day, 2007).

This edited book calls on international scholars (15 single authored or collectively authored chapters) in anarchist studies to critically reflect on historical and contemporary experimentations in anarchist pedagogies. Scholarly efforts will focus on what we have learned from past anarchist experiences and current transformative learning environments — where individuals are engaged in collective, participatory, voluntary and mutual efforts that contest global capitalist structures.

The edited collection responds to the need to reflect on anarchist pedagogies and will highlight three major themes. Authors in the first section will be encouraged to focus on historical discussions surrounding anarchism and education. The authors will give introspective critiques of historical practices, including theories of teaching and learning and alternatives to compulsory public schools. Authors in the second section will construct philosophical and theoretical frameworks evolving from contemporary anarchists, particularly through individuals participating in cooperatives, independent media collectives, infoshops, political zines, open source projects, DIY, direct action networks and other autonomous and cultural spaces.

Continued efforts to construct theoretical and philosophical discussions surrounding anarchism have also provided opportunities to build affinities and tensions with frameworks outside of anarchist writings (Cohn, 2007). The third section will encompass anarchist theories of teaching and learning. Authors will be asked to construct linkages and apprehensions to theories surrounding critical pedagogies and critical theory, autonomous Marxism, postmodernity and poststruturalism.

Proposed sections:

Forward:

Zack de la Rocha

1) Introduction

2) Section 1: Anarchism & Education: Historical experimentations

a. Anarchist perspectives on education

b. Modern Schools; Spain and the United States

c. Pedagogical practices: teacher/student relationship

d. Issues of the state and compulsory education

e. Connection and/or tensions between progressive education and social reconstruction

f. What have we learned?

3) Section 2: Anarchist Pedagogies in the “here and now”

a. Contesting power through multiple fronts: Movements against neoliberalism and learning through collective processes: Infoshops, cooperatives, autonomous spaces, zines, DIY

b. Teaching and learning in non-hierarchical, mutual and voluntary spaces — issues surrounding race, class, gender, LGBT

c. Technology: Issues surrounding the use of technology: open source, listservs, blogs & discussion boards

4) Section 3: Anarchism: Theoretical Frameworks on Teaching & Learning

a. Affinities: Anarchism & Critical pedagogies. Relationship to Postmodernism and Poststructuralism-Postanarchism

b. Informal learning spaces

c. De-schooling

d. Anarchism & the role of the university

e. Pedagogical practices

Audience:

Anarchist Pedagogies will draw upon and make connection to contemporary anarchist studies literature, particularly in education. The book will be important for scholars in anarchist studies, critical pedagogy, as well as undergraduate students and activists who are interested in building philosophical, theoretical, historical and contemporary discussions and imaginations beyond traditional forms of education.

Timeframe:

1) Proposals due by July 20th, 2010

2) Proposal confirmations: August 20th, 2010

3) Chapter drafts due by October 1st, 2010

4) Editor

5) Review of drafts: November, 2010

Editor will produce a comprehensive introductory and single authored chapter in one of the three sections. The forward will be written by an activist/scholar. Final editing and approval of the formatted version will be submitted December 30th, 2010. Publishing date will be set for early fall, 2011.

Contributors:

Process for submitting proposals:

Interested scholars, researchers, educators, activists and others should send to the editor, by July 20th, 2010, the following:

1) Names, positions, mailing addresses, fax and phone numbers, and email addresses of authors;

2) Title of proposed chapter;

3) Description, of no more than 300 words, of chapter, including type of research, approach, context, connection to the book, and other pertinent information;

4) Biographies of authors of no more than 200 words;

Biography of editor:

Robert Haworth is an Associate Professor in Multicultural Education at University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. He currently serves as the director for the Research Center for Cultural Diversity and Community Renewal. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses surrounding diversity and education, globalization and neoliberalism. He has published multiple peer reviewed book chapters and presented internationally on anarchism and informal learning spaces, as well as critical social studies education. He co-founded Regeneration TV, along with other research collectives that are directly involved in contesting neoliberal policies at the university level. This is Robert Haworth’s first edited book.

Robert Haworth PhD—Associate Professor University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, haworth.robe@uwlax.edu, 608.385.0891

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Education Crisis

CRITICAL EDUCATION FOR CRITICAL TIMES

14 May 2010

University of Nottingham

The development of a critical educational movement has been long in the making, and is now urgently overdue. These are without doubt critical times. The futures of public and common life hang in the balance. Intellectual and political openness and academic space are being increasingly curtailed and foreclosed. How should we as educators be orienting our work, our relationships with each other, and with publics, communities of struggle and social movements? What constitutes critical education in these critical times?

‘Critical Education for Critical Times’ explores different responses to these questions through a series of participatory workshops and dialogues. Each workshop, facilitated by educators with experience in critical pedagogy and/or popular education, will draw on this experience to introduce new work in empowering, prefigurative, transformative and critical pedagogies that are linked to social and political movements. We will open these examples up for criticism and discussion, and hope to consolidate the knowledge produced during the day into a common resource for further developments of educational theory and practice.

CECT ORGANISED BY THE CRITICAL PEDAGOGY AND POPULAR EDUCATION MIDLANDS WORKING GROUP

And sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/cssgj/), with support from the Nottingham Freeschool (http://nottinghamfreeschool.wordpress.com/) and Critical Pedagogies Group (CSSGJ)

Workshops/Discussions

1 | Learning alternatives to neoliberalism – resistance and renewal in critical education – Stephen Cowden, Social and Community Studies, Coventry University

2 | Prefigurative epistemologies and nomadic subjectivities: in, against, beyond the university – Sara Motta, Politics, University of Nottingham

3 | Learning from each other’s struggles – knowledge from and for social movements – Laurence Cox, Sociology, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, co-founder Grassroots Gathering

4 | ‘Climate Justice’ and popular education in social movement organisation – and Alice Cutler, TRAPESE Popular Education Collective, http://hbfc.clearerchannel.org/abouttrapese.php

5 | Revalorizing critique in academic and activist education – Sarah Amsler, Sociology and Public Policy, Aston University

Location and time | Registration begins at 9:00 a.m. in the foyer of the Law and Social Sciences Building, University of Nottingham (University Park Campus), and the final session will end at 4:30 p.m.

Sessions will be held in A105 and A106 of the Hallward Library. For maps and directions, see the University website at: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/about/datesandcampusinformation/mapsanddirections/mapsanddirections.aspx
To participate | The day is free and open to all.

To pre-register| contact Sara Motta at: sara.motta@nottingham.ac.uk Please include your name, postal address and email. All those who register early will receive a packet of relevant readings for each workshop.

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Critical Pedagogy

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