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Aesthetics

PERFORMANCE AND LABOUR SYMPOSIUM

Performance and Labour Symposium

9.30 – 18.00, Saturday 3rd November 2012

Sir Ambrose Fleming Lecture Theatre, Roberts Building, University College London, Torrington Place, London, WC1E 7JE

This symposium is an interdisciplinary event that will address performance in an expanded sense as a form of labour. Performance will be considered as an activity and a practice that takes place both within and outside the realm of art. The symposium will interrogate the physical and intellectual experiences of viewing and producing performances. These questions will be raised across the fields of art history, philosophy, performance studies, political economy, theatre and dance. Addressed in this expanded way, the aim of the symposium is to investigate the histories of mass performances and social choreographies in political contexts, to situate performance as a form of praxis and to interrogate the language of performance as a managerial strategy within late capitalism.

This symposium is organised by Larne Abse Gogarty and Josefine Wikström with support from the

Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy, Kingston University London, and the Centre for the Study of Contemporary Art, History of Art Department, University College London.

For full details of the programme please visit http://www.ucl.ac.uk/art-history/events/performance-and-labour

The symposium is free, but registration is required.

To register: email performanceandlabour@gmail.com by October 27th

Keynote Lecture

Professor Randy Martin (TischSchool of the Arts, New YorkUniversity)

From the Derivative to Dance and Back: Economies of Performance

Panels

Performance, the Commodity Form and Management Cultures

Marina Vishmidt, A Dysmorphia of Assets: Performative Logics in Labour and in Art

David Hodge and Dick Higgins, Performance and Art in the Age of its Real Subsumption

Gavin Grindon Trip Without a Ticket: The Digger Free Store and the re-composition of collective performance in contemporary art

Performance and Labour-Power

Olive McKeon: Performance, Labour-Power and the Value-Form: The Performer as Worker

Rose Anne Gush: Contemporary Service/ Work in Tino Sehgal’s ‘These Associations’

Theron Schmidt: Troublesome Professionals

Rhythm and Collectivity

Bojana Cvejic: When Social Choreography Begins to Falter

Jenny Nachtigall: Rhythm and Labour: The Performance Principle from Dada Zurich to Berlin

Marina Gerber: The Production of Collective Actions

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/performance-and-labour-symposium-ucl-3-november

**END**

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Aesthetics

PERFORMANCE AND LABOUR SYMPOSIUM

Call for Papers – Performance and Labour Symposium
3rd November – University College London
Supported by CRMEP, Kingston and the Centre for the Study of Contemporary Art, UCL

Keynote Speaker: Randy Martin (Tisch School of the Arts at NYU)

 

This symposium is an interdisciplinary event that will address performance in an expanded sense and as a form of labour. This means considering performance as an activity and a practice that takes place both within and outside the realm of art. The symposium will interrogate the physical and intellectual experiences of viewing and producing performances; these questions will be raised across the fields of art history, philosophy, performance studies, political economy, theatre and dance. Addressed in this expanded way, the aim of the symposium is to investigate the histories of mass performances and social choreographies in political contexts, to situate performance as a form of praxis and to interrogate the language of performance as a managerial strategy within late capitalism.

We invite papers on collective performance; reproductive labour and performance; aesthetics; the political economy of performance; histories of performance; divisions of labour and cultures of management within performance.

 

Collectivity and Mass Performance

Whilst theatre by its very nature generally tends to be thought of as a collective performance, the histories of performance art are overwhelmingly oriented towards a singular performer rather than a mass, or collective, and are therefore theorised through the body, rather than bodies. What are the political implications of this occlusion of histories of collective performance? How might this be negotiated by socially engaged or mass performance art? What is the pedagogy of performance?

 

Performance, Experience and Emancipation

This session aims to raise questions about the aesthetics of performance. Can we think about the aesthetic of performance as anemancipatory, transformative process for performers, rather than an experience directed towards an audience? What forms of aesthetic analyses are capable of theorising performance as a transformative experience? In thinking about our current moment, how have restrictions upon protest, gatherings, and occupations through the use of injunctions and dispersal orders implicated the possibilities of an emancipatory politics of collective movement?

 

Performance and the Commodity Form

Whilst the commodity form and the labour internal to it within art forms such as painting, sculpture and photography have been well examined – mainly through concepts such as reproducibility, technique and craft – performance art has frequently been neglected within this discussion. Many artists during the 1960s used performance as way to escape the increasing commodification of the visual arts and the rapid expansion of the art market.  But how can we relate the past aspirations of performance as an anti-commodity to the status of performance art today? How does performance circulate and re-produce itself on the art market and how can we conceptualise the labour internal to its production?

 

We ask for abstracts no longer than 500 words, papers are to be 20 minutes in length.

Please send your abstract proposals to performanceandlabour@gmail.com by 23rd of July. 

The conference will take place on Saturday 3rd November 2012 at University College London.

This symposium is organised by Larne Abse Gogarty and Josefine Wikström with support from the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy, Kingston University London, and the Centre for the Study of Contemporary Art, History of Art Department, University College London.

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

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Lateral

LATERAL

Issue 1 of Lateral now online:

http://culturalstudiesassociation.org/lateral/issue1.html

 Lateral is the publishing platform for the Cultural Studies Association (CSA). Its aims are to support, leverage, and organize the capacities of those affiliated with CSA to develop critical forms of publishing that are commensurate with innovative approaches to knowledge making, political intervention, and material forms of cultural expression. Lateral focuses on providing a place of experimentation in the range of material forms so that the knowing, feeling, sensibility ascribed to the cultural can find an elastic and sustainable outlet for expression. In short, Lateral is interested in recasting both the form and content of what cultural studies can be. Lateral is an online and open access journal published under the Creative Commons license. Lateral is organized in research threads; Issue 1 consists of four threads: Theory and Method, Mobilisations, Interventions and Cultural Policy, Universities in Question and Culture Industries. Patricia Ticineto Clough, Randy Martin and Bruce Burgett compose its curatorial board; design editor is Jamie “Skye” Bianco.

 

Contents of Issue 1:

Introduction (mashup by Erin R. Anderson)

 

Theory and Method (edited by Patricia Ticineto Clough)

The Humanities and the University in Ruins (by John Mowitt)

Ante Anti-Blackness: Afterthoughts (by Jared Sexton)

With responses by Morgan Adamson, Adam Sitze and Christina Sharpe

 

Mobilisations, Interventions, Cultural Policy (edited by Emma Dowling)

Urban Interventions/Interventi Urbani (by Alexander Dellantonio)

Postcool: the question of collective organization in postcolonial capitalism as challenged by a small militant group in the Raval, Barcelona (by Francesco Salvini)

nanopolitics: a first outline of our experiments in movement (by the nanopolitics group)

With responses by Gavin Grindon, Begüm Özden Firat and Sandro Mezzadra

 

Universities in Question (edited by Randy Martin and Bruce Burgett)

Countermapping the University (by the Countermapping Queen Mary Collective – Manuela Zechner, Tim Stallmann, Maria Catalina Bejarano Soto, Liz Mason-Deese,  Rakhee Kewada, Bue Rübner, Mara Ferreri, and Camille Barbagallo)

Interview Countermapping Queen Mary Collective

The Map | The Game ( Countermapping Queen Mary Collective/Interaction design by Erin R. Anderson)

Lateral Moves – Across Disciplines (by Miriam Bartha, Bruce Burgett, Randy Martin, Diane Douglas, and Kanta Kochhar-Lindgren)

 

Culture Industries edited by Jaafar Aksikas, Stefano Harney and Toby Miller

Towards a Cultural Study of the Culture Industries: A Research Resources Guide/ Chart

“Nothing gold can stay”: Labor, Political Economy, and the Birmingham Legacy of the Culture Industries Debate (by Sean Andrews)

Distributed Centralization: Web 2.0 as a Portal into Users. Lives (by Robert W. Gehl) 

 

Design: Erin R. Anderson

Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/issue-1-of-lateral-now-online

 ***End***

 

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Money

ON THE POLITICS OF INDEBTEDNESS

A discussion with Richard Dienst, Randy Martin and Bruce Robbins to launch The Bonds of Debt

Join Richard Dienst at New York’s Brecht Forum for a discussion to launch his new book, The Bonds of Debt: Borrowing Against the Common Good. The discussion will be moderated by Jeremy Glick.

Wednesday May 25th, 7.30pm

Brecht Forum
451 West Street (btw Bank and Bethune)
New York, NY 10014

Sliding scale: $6/$10/$15
Free for Brecht Forum Subscribers

Register online here: https://brechtforum.org/civicrm/event/info?id=11939&reset=1

And for more information, visit the Verso website: http://www.versobooks.com/books/959-the-bonds-of-debt

The credit crisis has pushed the whole world so far into the red that the gigantic sums involved defy understanding. On a human level, what does such an enormous degree of debt and insolvency mean? In The Bonds of Debt, cultural critic Richard Dienst considers the financial crisis, global poverty, media politics and radical theory to parse the various implications of a world where man is born free but everywhere is in debt. 

Written with humor and verve, The Bonds of Debt ranges across subjects—such as Obama’s national security strategy, the architecture of Prada stores, press photos of Bono, and a fairy tale told by Karl Marx—to capture a modern condition founded on fiscal imprudence. Moving beyond the dominant pieties and widespread anxieties surrounding the topic, Dienst re-conceives the world’s massive financial obligations as a social, economic, and political bond, where the crushing weight of objectified wealth comes face to face with new demands for equality and solidarity. For this inspired analysis, we are indebted to him.

www.versobooks.com

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Utopia

 

WHAT IS THE RADICAL IMAGINATION?

 

“What is the Radical Imagination?” a special issue (4.2) of Affinities: Journal of Radical Theory, Culture and Action

Edited by Max Haiven and Alex Khasnabish

Read and download for free at: www.affinitiesjournal.org

 

Launch party: joint launch with Upping the Anti #11,  January 15, 2011, 8:30pm, Toronto Free Gallery, 1277 Bloor St. W (at Landsdown).  $5 cover, $10 includes a copy of UTA11.  Details here.  In conjunction with the North American Anarchist Studies Network Conference.

 
 
Table of contents:
Editorials/Introductions

Max Haiven, Alex Khasnabish: “What is the radical imagination? A Special Issue”

 

Interventions: Struggles
 
Franco BIFO Berardi: “Precariousness, Catastrophe and Challenging the Blackmail of the Imagination”

 

Taiaiake Alfred: “What is Radical Imagination? Indigenous Struggles in Canada”



Julie E. Dowsett: “Commodity Feminism and the Unilever Corporation: Or, How the Corporate Imagination Appropriates Feminism”



Phanuel Antwi and Amber Dean: “Unfixing Imaginings of the City: Art, Gentrification, and Cultures of Surveillance”



 

Interventions: Provocations
  
 
Larissa Lai: “Other Presents: Imagining the Human and Beyond”

Justin Paulson

“The Uneven Development of Radical Imagination”

Chris Churchill

“A Radical and Elitist Imagination? Political Paternities and Alternatives in the History of Ideas”

Petra Rethmann

“A few notes on the question, what is radical imagination?”

Randy Martin

“Dancing Through the Crisis”

 

Interventions: Openings

Allan Antliff: “Anarchist Imaginaries”

Judy Rebick: “Re-Imagining Revolution”



Patrick Reinsborough: “Giant Whispers: Narrative Power, Radical Imagination and a Future Worth Fighting For…”



Glen Coulthard: “Place against Empire: Understanding Indigenous Anti-Colonialism”

 

Peer Reviewed Articles
Rachel Elaine Strasinger

“Beyond Protest: Radical Imagination and the Global Justice Movement”

Terry Maley

“Participatory Budgeting and the Radical Imagination: In Europe but not in Canada?”

Michael Truscello

“The Disruptive Time of the Gift: (Radical) Imagination at Work in Free and Open Source Software”

 

Read and download for free at:  www.affinitiesjournal.org

 

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Capitalist Crisis

THE UNIVERSITY OF FINANCE

Business and management theorists have so far responded to the financial crisis by centring on the notion of finance as an object of study. The inference here has been that the responsibility for the crisis lies with the flaws of individual managers, and, consequentially, that a sprinkling of Business Ethics (Wayne, 2009) and/or Critique (Currie et al, 2010) to the MBA curriculum is a suitable panacea for the recent excesses. From this we get the characterisation of the crisis as a product of individual misbehaviours in the financial sector: a regression onto the already decisively discredited “bad apple” thesis (e.g. Bakan, 2005). A different but related set of responses has sought to de-emphasize this traditional role of the business school as handmaiden to capitalism and thereby widen the curriculum to include politics, philosophy and cultural studies (e.g. HBR, 2009; Schmidt, 2008).

The questions raised in this special issue attempt to push the debate within the university in general, and the business school in particular, on from this concern with finance as an object of study and on towards a concern with finance as a condition of study. This focus upon the notion of finance as condition of study considers the various ways in which students and teachers alike have long been induced to view study through a purely financial logic: as surplus value without underlying production, as “knowledge transfer” without work. Within this special issue, our contributors therefore consider not so much how the curriculum might be changed in light of the crisis. Instead, they consider how the very study of finance as a condition of study might itself form the basis for a collective resistance to the ongoing financial conditioning of study.

http://www.ephemeraweb.org

Ephemera

Volume 9, Number 4 (November 2009)

Editorial

Armin Beverungen, Stephen Dunne and Casper Hoedemaekers: The University of Finance

Articles:

Morgan Adamson: The Human Capital Strategy

Dick Forslund and Thomas Bay: The Eve of Critical Finance Studies

Ishani Chandrasekara: Why is Finance Critical? A dialogue with a women’s community in Sri Lanka

Talk:
Stefano Harney: Extreme Neo-liberalism: An introduction

Roundtable:

Dick Bryan and Michael Rafferty: Sydney Forum on the financial crisis: an introduction

John Roberts: Faith in the numbers

Randy Martin: Whose crisis is that? Thinking finance otherwise

Martijn Konings: The ups and downs of a liberal conciousness, or, why Paul Krugman should learn to tarry with the negative

Dick Bryan and Michael Rafferty: Homemade Financial Crisis

Melinda Cooper and Angela Mitropoulos: The Household Frontier

Fiona Allon: The Futility of Extrapolation: Reflections on crisis, continuity and culture in the ‘Great Recession’

Reviews:

Elizabeth Johnson and Eli Meyerhoff: Toward a global autonomous university

Francesca Bria: A crisis of finance

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High Finance

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Capitalist Crisis

CRISIS OF CAPITALISM

Rethinking Marxism: A journal of economics, culture & society

Vol. 22 No. 2
APRIL 2010

http://www.rethinkingmarxism.org

IN THIS ISSUE:

Editors’ Introduction (Full Text)

SYMPOSIUM: CRISIS OF CAPITALISM

The Economic Crisis: A Marxian Interpretation – Stephen Resnick & Richard Wolff
Like most capitalist crises, today’s challenges economists, journalists, and politicians to explain and to overcome it. The post-1930s struggles between neoclassical and Keynesian economics are rejoined. We show that both proved inadequate to preventing crises and served rather to enable and justify (as “solutions” for crises) what were merely oscillations between two forms of capitalism differentiated according to greater or lesser state economic interventions. Our Marxian economic analysis here proceeds differently. We demonstrate how concrete aspects of U.S. economic history (especially real wage, productivity, and personal indebtedness trends) culminated in this deep and enduring crisis. We offer both a class-based critique of and an alternative to neoclassical and Keynesian analyses, including an alternative solution to capitalist crises.

What’s in It for Us? Rethinking the Financial Crisis – Randy Martin
In the aftermath of the financial meltdown, much attention has been given to capital’s crisis. For labor, the crisis augurs more than loss of home, job, or further deterioration of social infrastructure. The evident failure of financial knowledge has wider implications for the purported sovereignty of the professional managerial class in what has been called a knowledge society. Knowledge production has been subordinated to capital yet yielded no mastery of its conditions. Rather, the mutual indebtedness that is a feature of the crisis references an underlying socialization of risk and the work that goes into making it that should properly be the basis for a re-enchantment of socialism.

The Bull-of-Last-Resort: How the U.S. Economy Capitalizes on Nationalism – David Brennan
The dramatic purchase of corporate equities by the U.S. government in 2008 marks a distinct change in the way crises are handled. While many fear that this represents a move toward socialism, others look forward to the progressive possibilities. This paper argues that the policy of massively purchasing stocks is an attempt to provide support for equity values when no other bull could be found. This policy was used because high share values provide important class conditions of existence for capitalist exploitation today. As a consequence, the move to “nationalize” is viewed here as an attempt to protect the capitalist status quo. In this regard, the goals of current government policy are no different from past interventions.

The Green Economy: Grounds for a New Revolutionary Imaginary? – Boone Shear
In this essay I report on and briefly consider the composition, goals, and practices of some social actors in the green economy movement in Massachusetts, where I live. While cognizant of elite interests and state power that are working to shore up capitalist relations of production, I choose to amplify some of the openings and possibilities for intervention and transformation in the green economy rather than focusing on critique or (the very real) possibilities of cooptation and complicity. In doing so I hope to underscore the importance of the following questions: What new discursive formations are emerging from green economic imaginings? How are discourses constructed and contested and what new subjects are being produced in relation to a green social imaginary? Under what conditions are non-capitalist desires being created? What are the possibilities for a new left historical bloc?

2008: A New Chapter for U.S. Imperialism – Antonio Callari
This essay argues that the current economic crisis normalizes a transformation of the U.S. imperialist structure of surplus “accumulation.” Whereas the prior form of imperialism worked to create the conditions for surplus value production within the United States, the new imperialism works to channel globally produced surplus back to it. And whereas the prior form of imperialism was characterized by relatively high labor-power values in the United States, the new imperialism is characterized by a lowering of the value of labor power. The current economic crisis works to normalize this lowering of the value of labor power in the United States. It is this lowering of the value of labor power that sets the conditions for class struggle over the foreseeable future and thus the terms for Marxian theoretical and political work.

Mortgage Stakeholders, 2008 – Damon Rich & Larissa Harris
Red Lines Housing Crisis Learning Center is an exhibition developed between 2006 and 2008 at MIT’s Center for Advanced Visual Studies by artist and designer Damon Rich. An idiosyncratic history of American home finance realized in outsized objects, models, photographs, found artifacts, text, and video documents, the exhibition opened at MIT in September 2008 in the midst of the global crisis spurred by some of its subject matter, and travelled to the Queens Museum of Art in Spring 2009. As in his work with the education non-profit Center for Urban Pedagogy (CUP), which he founded in 1997, Rich,who was trained as an architect and works as an urban designer, asked a question about the built environment–in this case, how is it paid for?–in order to tell a story about race, class, private capital, and public power in the United States.

Betting the House – Anette Baldauf
Since spring 2008, an unprecedented housing crisis has left the front yards of U.S. single-family homes littered with “For Sale” signs, foreclosure notices, and dead flowers. The crisis has emptied out entire neighborhoods in Florida, California, Arizona, and Nevada, destroying years of sustained community building. What is happening in the United States of America? How is it that mostly ethnic minorities and women are stripped of their minimal savings, and why is such a vast rip-off possible? If so many Americans are now dispossessed, relocated to shantytowns, or worse, dumped onto the street, why aren’t they marching on Wall Street? And, finally, are Marxist theorists able to make sense of this tragedy?

As the World Turns: Globalization, Consumption, and the Feminization of Work – Drucilla K. Barker and Susan F. Feiner
It is widely argued that global imbalances are the cause of the financial crisis. Political imbalance (the United States as dominant world force) mirrors economic imbalance (the debt-financed consumption sprees of the past three decades). There is, however, a missing (third) term—gender, which is constitutive of the economy both discursively and materially. Gender, in this sense, is a governing code that feminizes women as well as economically, racially, and culturally marginalized men. The feminization of labor made the consumption patterns of the elite possible and naturalized the type of hegemonic masculinity that characterized the international finance system.

Collaborators in Crisis – Harriet Fraad
This article explores the roots of U.S. passivity as the recent economic crisis loots American lives. It looks at four collaborators in this crisis. One is the recent capitalist economic breakdown. A second is the end of traditional gender roles and marriage. A third is the fall in participation in collectives of almost all kinds. The fourth is the anesthetizing of Americans with psychotropic drugs. I also explore ways to reactivate Americans.

Tragedy and Farce in the Second Great Depression: A Marxian Look at the Panic of 2008 and its Aftermath – Asatar Bair

Capitalism in Crisis

In this essay I recount some of the farcical things that were said about the economic prospects of the United States at the end of the great housing boom and the peak of the stock market in 2007; then I turn to a discussion of the causes of the Panic of 2008, examining the relation between productive and unproductive labor in the economy. I discuss the explanations according to which the Panic and subsequent Second Great Depression are blamed on neoliberal ideology. I critically examine the call for a Keynesian solution of government regulation and stimulus, counterposing it to a Marxian strategy of class transformation.

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE:

Beyond Equality
David M. Bholat
My paper explores the character of Marx’s critique of equality as an ideal and the salience this critique has for progressives today. I suggest a reading of Marx different from the standard Marxist critique of liberalism as an emancipatory but unrealized set of ideals whose primary function in capitalist society is to conceal its conditions of inequality and unfreedom. Rather, I argue that Marx gestures at the limitations of liberal ideals, and shows why they are logically compatible with capital. This means that progressives are tasked with transcending, rather than merely appropriating, ideals such as freedom and equality.

REMARX

Task of the Dreamer
Marc Kaminsky
The incidents in this short story are refracted through the shattered sensorium of a traumatized but ethically intact survivor of the Holocaust. His narrative kaleidoscopically reconfigures horror and everyday life, nightmare and history, the gates of a Jewish ghetto in Nazi-occupied Poland and a checkpoint at the border between Israel and Palestine during the First Intifada. His act of witness defends the specificity of the human being, the other, in the face of the reasons of state and the abstractions of ideology.

REVIEW

Marx is Back: The Marx-Engels-Gesamtausgabe (MEGA) Project
Marcello Musto
After years of neglect, a definitive edition of Marx’s collected works is once more under way. Included are not only the published works of Marx and Engels, but all known correspondence and numerous notebooks of excerpts that are foundational for understanding the development of Marx’s thought. As a result of this project, a different and less dogmatic Marx emerges.

http://www.rethinkingmarxism.org

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Review of Radical Political Economics

REVIEW OF RADICAL POLITICAL ECONOMICS – VOL.41 NO.4

Review of Radical Political Economics — Table of Contents Alert

A new issue of Review of Radical Political Economics has been made available:

1 December 2009; Vol. 41, No. 4 

URL: http://rrp.sagepub.com/content/vol41/issue4/?etoc

Articles

Introduction: The Political Economy of Financialization
Jonathan P. Goldstein
Review of Radical Political Economics 2009; 41 453-457
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/41/4/453?etoc

Financialization and Marx: Giving Labor and Capital a Financial Makeover, by Dick Bryan, Randy Martin, and Mike Rafferty
Review of Radical Political Economics 2009; 41 458-472
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/41/4/458?etoc

From the Gold Standard to the Floating Dollar Standard: An Appraisal in the Light of Marx’s Theory of Money
Ramaa Vasudevan
Review of Radical Political Economics 2009; 41 473-491
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/41/4/473?etoc

Post-Keynesian Theories of the Firm under Financialization
Thomas Dallery
Review of Radical Political Economics 2009; 41 492-515
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/41/4/492?etoc

Islamic Alternatives to Purely Capitalist Modes of Finance: A Study of Malaysian Banks from 1999 to 2006
Tamer ElGindi, Mona Said, and John William Salevurakis
Review of Radical Political Economics 2009; 41 516-538
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/41/4/516?etoc

Financialization and Changes in the Social Relations along Commodity Chains: The Case of Coffee
Susan A. Newman
Review of Radical Political Economics 2009; 41 539-559
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/41/4/539?etoc

Book Review Essay: Heterodox Crisis Theory and the Current Global Financial Crisis: The Trillion Dollar Meltdown: Easy Money, High Rollers, and the Great Credit Crash Charles, R. Morris; New York: Public Affairs, 2008, 194 pp.,$22.95 (hardback). The Credit Crunch: Housing Bubbles, Globalisation, and the Worldwide Economic Crisis, Graham Turner; London and Ann Arbor, MI: Pluto Press, 2008, 232pp., $27.95 (paperback). The New Paradigm for Financial Markets: The Credit Crisis of 2008 and What it Means, George Soros; New York: Public Affairs, 2008, 162 pp.,$22.95 (hardback). Bad Money: Reckless Finance, Failed Politics, and the Global Crisis of American Capitalism, Kevin Phillips; New York: Penguin Group, 2008, 239 pp., $25.95 (hardback)
Jonathan P. Goldstein
Review of Radical Political Economics 2009; 41 560-569
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/41/4/560?etoc

Book Review: Poverty & Inequality: An End to Poverty? A Historical Debate, Gareth Stedman Jones, New York: Columbia University Press, 2005, 288 pp., $29.50 (hardcover). Inequality Matters: The Growing Economic Divide in America and its Poisonous Consequences, James Lardner and David A. Smith, eds., New York: The New Press, 2006, 328 pp., $16.95 (paperback). The Politics of Inequality: A Political History of the Idea of Economic Inequality in America, Michael J. Thompson, New York: Columbia University Press, 2007, 264 pp., $32.50 (hardcover)
Stephen Pimpare
Review of Radical Political Economics 2009; 41 570-576
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/41/4/570?etoc

Book Review: Poverty, Work, and Freedom: Political Economy and the Moral Order, David P. Levine and S. Abu Turab Rizvi. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005. 159 pp + bibliography and index. ISBN-13 978-0-521-84826-8 (hardback), ISBN-10 0-521-84826-1; $65 (US) or {pound}40, hardback. (hardback)
Matt Davies
Review of Radical Political Economics 2009; 41 577-581
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/41/4/577?etoc

Book Review: New Departures in Marxian Theory, Stephen A. Resnick & Richard D. Wolff; Routledge, 2006, 418 pp
Ian J. Seda-Irizarry
Review of Radical Political Economics 2009; 41 581-585
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/41/4/581?etoc

Book Review: Multinationals on Trial: Foreign Investment Matters, James Petras and Henry Veltmeyer (2007), Aldershot Hampshire, UK: Ashgate, pp159; Price $89.95
Dennis C. Canterbury
Review of Radical Political Economics 2009; 41 585-589
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/41/4/585?etoc

Book Review: International Migration: Prospects and Policies in a Global Market, Douglas S. Massey and J. Edward Taylor, editors (Oxford University Press, 2004) Worlds in Motion: Understanding International Migration at the End of the Millennium Douglas S, Massey, Joaquin Arango, Graeme Hugo, Ali Kouaou chi, Adela Pellegrino and J. Edward Taylor (Oxford University Press, 1998)
Marcos T. Aguila
Review of Radical Political Economics 2009; 41 589-593
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/41/4/589?etoc

Book Review: Ex Mex: From Migrants to Immigrants, By Jorge G. Castaneda. New York: The New Press, 2007. 222 pp. $25.95 hardback
Mary C. King
Review of Radical Political Economics 2009; 41 593-596
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/41/4/593?etoc

Book Review: Communities Without Borders: Images and Voices from the World of Migration, David Bacon (Forwards by Carlos Munoz Jr. and Douglas Harper), Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press 2006 235pp $29.95. ISBN13 978 0 8014 
7307 4
Richard Leitch
Review of Radical Political Economics 2009; 41 596-599
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/41/4/596?etoc

Book Review: Rethinking Municipal Privatization, By Oliver D. Cooke New York: Routledge, 2008. Hardcover ISBN 10: 0-415-96209-9
Tom Angotti
Review of Radical Political Economics 2009; 41 599-601
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/41/4/599?etoc

Book Review: Solidarity Economy: Building Alternatives for People and 
Planet, Jenna Allard, Carl Davidson, and Julie Matthaei (eds) Chicago, 
ChangeMaker Publications, 2008; 427 pages, 978-0-6151-9489-91 by Len 
Krimerman, GEO Newsletter and Director, Creative Community Building 
Program, University, of Connecticut
Len Krimerman
Review of Radical Political Economics 2009;41 601-603
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/41/4/601?etoc

Book Review: Doubt is Their Product: How Industry’s Assault on Science 
Threatens Your Health, David Michaels, New York, Oxford University Press, 
2008, pp372, ISBN 978-0-19-530067-3
Joan Greenbaum
Review of Radical Political Economics 2009;41 604-605
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/41/4/604?etoc

Book Reviews: Labor-Environmental Coalitions: Lessons from a Louisiana 
Petrochemical Region By Thomas Estabrook. Amityville, NY: Baywood 
Publishing. 2007
J. Timmons Roberts
Review of Radical Political Economics 2009;41 606-607
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/41/4/606?etoc

Book Review: Fair Trade: The Challenges of Transforming Globalization, Edited by Laura T. Raynolds, Douglas L. Murray, and John Wilkinson. London and New York: Routledge, 2007. 240 pp. ISBN: 978-0-415-77203-7. $29.95 
Brewing Justice: Fair Trade Coffee, Sustainability, and Survival, By Daniel Jaffee. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2007. 331 pp. ISBN: 978-0-520-24959-2. $22.95
Noah H. Enelow
Review of Radical Political Economics 2009;41 608-611
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/41/4/608?etoc

Books Received
David Barkin
Review of Radical Political Economics 2009;41 612-618
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/41/4/612?etoc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Historical Materialism 6

Historical Materialism 6

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM SIXTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE – REGISTRATION

 

Sixth Historical Materialism Annual Conference
Another World is Necessary: Crisis, Struggle and Political Alternatives
27–29 November 2008
School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) and Birkbeck College, London, WC1
In association with Socialist Register and the Isaac and Tamara Deutscher Memorial Prize Committee

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN!
http://mercury.soas.ac.uk/hm/conference2009.htm

The annual Historical Materialism conference is organised by the editorial board of Historical Materialism in association with the Deutscher Memorial Prize committee and the Socialist Register. The conference has become an important event on the Left, providing an annual forum to discuss recent developments on the agenda of historical-materialist research and has attracted an increasingly high attendance over the past four years. The Editorial Board of Historical Materialism welcomes attendance and active engagement in discussion with panellists from new as well as prior participants with an interest in critical-Marxist thought.

One of the principal objectives of the conference has been to build bridges among the various Marxist communities, including the breaking down some of the linguistic and intellectual barriers which continue to hamper the circulation and expansion of critical-Marxist thought. The sixth annual Historical Materialism Conference, under the banner of ‘Crisis, Struggle and Political Alternatives’, promises to continue and take forward this objective.

The conference is organised around three plenary sessions (the Deutscher lecture, the launch of the Socialist Register 2010, and Historical Materialism’s plenary) and a host of workshops dedicated to specific themes.

THE FULL TIMETABLE WILL BE AVAILABLE SOON

For more details, please contact: historicalmaterialism@soas.ac.uk

Attendance is free, but participants must register in advance online (if this is not possible, please contact historicalmaterialism@soas.ac.uk). However, the conference is largely self-funded and we will depend on voluntary donations by attendants and participants to support the organisation and running of the event. The suggested advanced online donation is £40 for waged and £15 for unwaged: http://mercury.soas.ac.uk/hm/conference2009.htm, , and the suggested donation on the door is £50 for waged and £20 for unwaged.

For logistical and other support, Historical Materialism would like to thank the School of Oriental and African Studies and the Centre for International Security and Diplomacy. For sponsorship, thanks to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS, SOAS Student Union, Brill Academic Publishers, the Deutscher Memorial Prize committee, Socialist Register, Journal of Agrarian Change, the International Initiative for the Promotion of Political Economy and Bookmarks.

The Editorial Board of Historical Materialism

THEMES FOR THIS YEAR’S CONFERENCE INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING: A LEFT PROJECT: TRANSFORMING THE STATE? * AGENCY * AGRARIAN CHANGE IN CONTEMPORARY CAPITALISM: TECHNICAL DYNAMICS AND ENVIRONMENTAL * TRAJECTORIES * ALTHUSSER AND PHILOSOPHY * APOCALYPSE MARXISM * ART AGAINST CAPITALISM * ART AND CRITIQUE IN GERMANY BETWEEN THE WARS * BOOK LAUNCH: ALEX CALLINICOS’S IMPERIALISM AND GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY * BOOK LAUNCH: KARL MARX AND CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY * CAPITALISM, CITIZENSHIP AND CRISIS * CLASS AND CONFLICT IN ANCIENT GREECE * CLASS AND POLITICS IN THE ‘GLOBAL SOUTH’ * CLASS, CRISIS, DISTRIBUTION * COGNITIVE MAPPING, TOTALITY AND THE REALIST TURN * COMMODIFYING HEALTH CARE IN THE UK * CUBAN REVOLUTION AND CUBAN SOCIETY * DERIVATIVES * DEVELOPMENTALISM, THE STATE AND CLASS FORMATION * DIMENSIONS OF THE FOOD CRISIS * EASTERN CENTRAL EUROPE FROM TRANSITION TO EU ENLARGEMENT: CHANGE AND CONTINUITY IN THE GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY * ECOLOGICAL CRISIS * EMPIRE AND IMPERIALISM * ENERGY AND GEOPOLITICS * ENERGY, WASTE AND CAPITALISM * EPISTEMOLOGY, DIALECTICS AND HISTORICAL MATERIALISM * EXTENDING THE MINERALS-ENERGY-COMPLEX * FEMINISM AND SOCIALIST STRATEGY * FINANCE, THE HOUSING QUESTION AND URBAN POLITICS * GLOBAL LAW AND HUMAN RIGHTS: MARXIST REFLECTIONS * GRAMSCI RELOADED * GREEN CAPITALISM AND ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS * HISTORICAL MATERIALISM AND LATE CAPITALIST DEVELOPMENT * HISTORICAL MATERIALISM AND SOCIAL RESEARCH * HISTORICISING HISTORICAL MATERIALISM * HM BOOK SERIES LAUNCH:  MIKKO LAHTINEN ON ALTHUSSER AND MACHIAVELLI * HM BOOK SERIES LAUNCH: PETER THOMAS’S THE GRAMSCIAN MOMENT * IN MEMORY OF PETER GOWAN * INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON THE CRISIS * INTERPRETATIONS OF THE CRISIS * ISAAC AND TAMARA DEUTSCHER MEMORIAL PRIZE LECTURE: KEES VAN DER PIJL, NOMADS, EMPIRES, STATES * KNOWLEDGE, NATURE, PROPERTY * LABOUR * LABOUR AND THE ECONOMIC SUBJECT IN CONTEMPORARY ART * LABOUR BEYOND THE FACTORY * LATIN AMERICAN WORKING CLASSES * LEARNING FROM PAST CRISES * LINEAGES OF NEOLIBERALISM * LISTEN TO VENEZUELA SCREENING AND DISCUSSION * MARXISM AND LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY * MARXISM AND NATIONALISM TODAY * MARXISM AND POLITICAL VIOLENCE * MARXISM AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS * MARXISM AND TIME * MARXISM BETWEEN ETHICS AND UTOPIA * MARXISM, DEMOCRACY AND CLASSICAL POLITICAL THEORY * MIGRATION * MONEY * MORBID SYMPTOMS: HEALTH UNDER CAPITALISM * NEOLIBERALISM, AESTHETICS AND THE RECUPERATION OF DISSENT * ON THE OBJECTS OF COMMUNISM: A HACKING PANEL * PHILOSOPHY AND COMMUNISM IN THE EARLY MARX * PLANNING, LOCALISM AND THE LEFT * POSTNEOLIBERALISM * PRESENTATION OF THE JOURNAL CHTO DELAT/WHAT IS TO BE DONE? * RACE, NATION AND ORIENTALISM * RED PLANETS: MARXISM AND SCIENCE FICTION * RE-EMBEDDING MARXISM: COERCION AND POLITICAL ECONOMY * REGISTERING THE CRISIS: A SOCIALIST REGISTER ROUNDTABLE * RESEARCH ON MARX * RESTRUCTURING, OUTSOURCING, DISTRIBUTION: DIMENSIONS OF THE GLOBAL CRISIS * REVOLUTIONARY THEORY, AUTONOMIST MARXISM AND THE CRITIQUE OF POLITICAL ECONOMY * SLAVERY AND CAPITALISM IN THE US SOUTH * SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN LATIN AMERICA: THE CURRENT CONJUNCTURE * STUDENT MOVEMENTS AND YOUTH REVOLTS * THE ARTS AND CAPITALIST CRISIS: THE NEW DEAL EXPERIENCE * THE CRITIQUE OF RELIGION AND THE CRITIQUE OF CAPITALISM * THE POLITICAL AESTHETICS OF REALISM * THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF WORK * THE POLITICS OF FINANCE * THE POLITICS OF THE WILL * THE POLITICS OF VALUE * THE RIGHT: RACE, NATION, IDENTITY * THE TURN TO ETHICS AND THE CRITIQUE OF CAPITALISM * ‘TURBULENCE: IDEAS FOR MOVEMENT’, NEW ISSUE LAUNCH * UNION STRUGGLES * UNOISM, ECOLOGY AND CRISIS * UTOPIAS, DYSTOPIAS AND SOCIALIST BIOPOLITICS * WEBLOGS AND THE OPPOSITIONAL PUBLIC SPHERE: A DISCUSSION * WHAT IS ABSTRACTION? * WORKERS AND STRUGGLE TODAY * ZIONISM, 
ANTISEMITISM AND THE LEFT – A DEBATE

SPEAKERS INCLUDE: Gilbert Achcar * Gregory Albo * Robert Albritton * Peter Alexander * Noaman Ali * Kevin B. Anderson * Ricardo Antunes * Caroline Arscott * Sam Ashman * John Ashworth * Ilker Atac * Jairus Banaji * Fletcher Baragar * Banu Bargu * Colin Barker * Tom Barnes * Luca Basso * Matthew Beaumont * Pinar Bedirhanoglu * John Bell * Aaron Benanav * Halil Berktay * Armin Beverungen * Robin Blackburn * Paul Blackledge * Max Blechman * Derek Boothman * Mark Bould * Bill Bowring * Ulrich Brand * Craig Brandist * Michael Brie * Wendy Brown * Dick Bryan * Adrian Budd * Verity Burgmann * Alex Callinicos * Mauro Farnesi Camellone * Bob Cannon * Thomas Carmichael * Warren Carter * Giorgio Cesarale * Maria Elisa Cevasco * Dae-op Chang * Vivek Chibber * Andrew 
Chitty * Christopher Chitty * Joseph Choonara * Sheila Cohen * Alex Colas * Tim Cooper * Stipe Curkovic * Steve Cushion * Gareth Dale * Neil Davidson * Gail Day * Tim Dayton * Kathryn Dean * Angela Dimitrakaki * Demet Dinler * Kevin Doogan * Elizabeth Dore * Nick Dyer-Witheford * Juliane Edler * Aram Eisenschitz * Hester Eisenstein * Fuat Ercan * Adam Fabry * Daniel Fairfax * Mariano Feliz * Ben Fine * Robert Fine * Mark Fisher * Peter Fleming * Gregory C. Flemming * Keith Flett * John Foran * Vassillis Fouskas * Carl Freedman * James Furner * Alexander Gallas * Andreia Galvao * Ferruccio Gambino * Earl Gammon * Mike Geddes * Lindsey German * Frantz Gheller * Lesley Gill * John Glenn * Jesse Goldstein * Maya Gonzalez * Jeff Goodwin * Jamie Gough * Nick Gray * Juan Grigera * Peter Hallward * Ayeesha Hameed * Carrie Hamilton * Bue Hansen * Jane Hardy * Chris Harman * Stefano Harney * Barnaby Harran * David Harvie * Owen Hatherley * Mike Haynes * Lesley Henderson * Christoph Henning * Rob Heynen * Andy Higginbottom * Sarah Hines * John Holloway *  John Holst * Patricia Howard * Peter Hudis * Liz Humphries * Robert Jackson * Dhruv Jain * Fredric Jameson * Elinor Jean * Seongjin Jeong * Bob Jessop * Bonn Juego * Anush Kapadia * Brian Kelly * Sami Khatib * Jeff Kinkle * Kelvin Knight * Meri Koivusalo * Ahmet Hasim Kose * Conor Kostick * Primoz Krasovec * Maria Kyriakidou * Xavier Lafrance * Mikko Lahtinen * Alex Levant * Les Levidow * Iren Levina * William Lewis * Nicola Livingstone * Jean-Guy Loranger * Monica Clua Losada * David Mabb * Andreas Malm * Gonzo Poso Martin * Randy Martin * Jonathan Martineau * Meade McCloughan * David McNally * Angela McRobbie * Simon Mohun * Peter P. Mollinga * Kim Moody * Colin Mooers * Jason W. Moore * Adam Morton * Sara Motta * Tadzio Müller * Vlad Mykhnenko * Ozgur Narin * Jonathan Neale * Mike Newman * Susan Newman * Benjamin Noys * Blair Ogden * Ozlem Onaran * Deidre O’Neill * Ebru Deniz Ozan * Melda Ozturk * Leo Panitch * Giorgos Papafragkou * David Parker * Jaime Pastor * Jody Patterson * Knox Peden * Alexei Penzin * Simon Pirani * Iain Pirie * Amedeo Policante * Nicolas Pons-Vignon * Charles Post * Moishe Postone * Nina Power * Gonzalo Pozo-Martin * Lucia Pradella * Toni Prug * Ozren Pupovac * Thomas Purcell * Hugo Radice * Ravi Raman * Akbar Rasulov * Gene Ray * John Rees * Tobias Reichardt * Paul Reynolds * Sébastien Rioux * John Roberts * Ed Rooksby * Ellen Rosen * Christina Rousseau * Sheila Rowbotham * Sally Ruane * Frank Ruda * Alfredo Saad-Filho * Spyros Sakellaropoulos * Birgit Sauer * Johannes Dragsbaek Schmidt * Alan Sears * Thomas Sekine * Ben Selwyn * Greg Sharzer * Stuart Shields * Subir Sinha * Gary Slater * John Smith * Johan Soderberg * Clare Solomon * Panagiotis Sotiris * Dimitris Sotiropoulos * Susan Spronk * Kerstin Stakemeier * Julian Stallabrass * Engelbert Stockhammer * Adam Swain * Erik Swyngedouw * Lotta Takala-Greenish * Daniel Tanuro * Jean Baptiste Thomas * Peter Thomas * Hillel Ticktin * John Timberlake * Bruno Tinel * Massimiliano Tomba * Jonathon Tomlinson * Alberto Toscano * Ben Trott * Julian Tudor-Hart * Emily van der Meulen * Marco Vanzulli * Leandro Vergara-Camus * Zaira Rodrigues Vieira * Dmitry Vilensky * Marina Vishmidt * Andriana Vlachou * Hilary Wainwright * Mike Wayne * Xiaoping Wei * Duncan Wigan * Evan Calder Williams * Michael Wood * Phil Woodhouse * Galip Yalman * Karel Yon * Christian Zeller * Alexander Zevin * Mislav Zitko *

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk