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Norwich Cathedral

Norwich Cathedral

POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES IN POLITICS, PUBLIC POLICY, CULTURE AND SOCIETY, AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF EAST ANGLIA

The School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies

University of East Anglia, Norwich, Norfolk, UK

We welcome applications from excellent candidates for our MPhil/PhD programmes and our Masters by Research.

Areas of study

We supervise topics ranging across political science and international relations.  We particularly encourage students whose research interests will complement or extend our expertise in three general areas:

Critical Global Politics:

Including foreign policy, global media, regional governance, borders, politics and religion, international security, international law, human rights and migration, theorizing global cities and global political economy

Politics and Public Policy:

Including the politics of the EU, theories of the policy process, normative and critical political theory, British political issues and ideologies, environmental policy, competition policy and regulation

Cultural Politics, Communications and Media:

Including cultural politics, media culture and identity, media events and rituals, media and globalisation, communications and media, public service broadcasting, competition policy and regulation, copyright and new business models in the creative industries, new media and society, political communication, international communication, language and politics, interculturalism, and contemporary cultural and political theory.

More details, including on how to apply, can be found at:

http://www.uea.ac.uk/political-social-international-studies/research-degrees

Funding

We invite applications for Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)-funded doctoral studentships as partners in the Consortium for the Humanities and the Arts Southeast England (CHASE) http://www.chase.ac.uk.  CHASE will be awarding up to 75 studentships in 2015.

The Faculty will also offer up to 15 University-funded PhD studentships available to students from within or outside the EU.

More information on studentships can be found at:

http://www.uea.ac.uk/arts-humanities/graduate-school/studentships

To be considered for a studentship for October 2015 entry, the application deadline is 14 January 2015.  We advise early initial contact with potential supervisors to maximise the chance of success.

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Socrates

Socrates

LECTURESHIP IN POLITICAL THEORY, UNIVERSITY OF ESSEX, UK

Closing date

26 May 2014
The Department of Government is seeking to appoint a Lecturer to conduct research and teaching in the field of political theory at undergraduate and postgraduate level. The successful candidate will also supervise undergraduate projects, M.A. and PhD dissertations, and contribute to the successful administration and management of the Department. We welcome applications from candidates working in any field of political theory, but we are particularly interested in candidates who can contribute to teaching on our new degree in Political Theory and Public Policy.

The successful candidate will have completed a PhD in Political Science or an allied field, or be close to completion. You should have demonstrable potential of excellence in both research and teaching in political theory and/or public policy. The generation of external research funding is essential to this post.

We particularly welcome female applicants and those from an ethnic minority group, as they are under-represented at this level.

For further details see: http://gs12.globalsuccessor.com/fe/tpl_essex01.asp?newms=jj&id=77249

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Punk

INTERFACE – VOLUME 3 ISSUE 1 (MAY 2011)

Interface: a journal for and about social movements

Interface: http://interfacejournal.net

Volume three, issue one (May 2011): Repression and social movements Issue editors: Cristina Flesher Fominaya, Lesley Wood http://www.interfacejournal.net/current/

Volume three, issue one of Interface, a peer-reviewed e-journal produced and refereed by social movement practitioners and engaged movement researchers, is now out, on the special theme “Repression and social movements”. Interface is open-access (free), global and multilingual. Our overall aim is to “learn from each other’s struggles”: to develop a dialogue between practitioners and researchers, but also between different social movements, intellectual traditions and national or regional contexts.

This issue of Interface includes 296 pages with 20 pieces in English and Portuguese, by authors writing from / about Angola, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Germany, Guatemala, India, Ireland, Italy, Mexico, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Palestine, South Africa, the UK and the US.

Articles include:

Cristina Flesher Fominaya and Lesley Wood, Editorial: repression  and social movements
Theme-related articles:

Peter Ullrich and Gina Rosa Wollinger, A surveillance studies perspective on protest policing: the case of video surveillance of demonstrations inGermany

Liz Thompson and Ben Rosenzweig, Public policy is class war pursued by other means: struggle and restructuring in international education economy

Kristian Williams, Counter-insurgency and community policing

Fernanda Maria Vieira and J. Flávio Ferreira, “Não somos chilenos, somos mapuches!”: as vozes do passado no presente da luta mapuche por seu território

Roy Krøvel, From indios to indígenas: guerrilla perspectives on indigenous peoples and repression in Mexico, Guatemala and Nicaragua Action / practice notes and event analysis from:
    • Musab Younis, British tuition fee protest, November 9, 2010
    • Dino Jimbi, Campanha “Não partam a minha casa”
    • Mac Scott, G20 mobilizing in Toronto and community organizing: opportunities created and lessons learned
    • Aileen O’Carroll, Alessio Lunghi, Laurence Cox, “I’m in the news today, oh boy”: smear tactics and media bullying

Other articles:

Eurig Scandrett and Suroopa Mukherjee, Globalisation and abstraction in theBhopalsurvivors’ movement

George Sranko, Collaborative governance and a strategic approach to facilitating change: the South East Queensland Forest Agreement and the Great Bear Rainforest Agreement

John Agbonifo, Territorialising Niger Delta conflicts: place and contentious mobilisation
 

This issue’s reviews include the following titles:
    • Laurence Davis and Ruth Kinna, Anarchism and utopianism
    • Fiona Dukelow and Orla O’Donovan, Mobilising classics: reading radical writing in Ireland
    • David Graeber, Direct action: an ethnography
    • Nathalie Hyde-Clarke, The citizen in communication: re-visiting traditional, new and community media practices in South Africa
    • Gabriel Kuhn, Sober living for the revolution: hardcore punk, Straight Edge, and radical politics
    • Alf Gunvald Nilsen, Dispossession and resistance in India: the river and the rage

A Call for Papers for volume 4 issue 1 of Interface is now open, on the theme of “The season of revolution: the Arab spring” (submissions deadline November 1 2011).

We can review and publish articles in Afrikaans, Arabic, Catalan, Croatian, Danish, Dutch, English, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, Maltese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish and Zulu.

The website has the full CFP and details on how to submit articles for this issue at http://www.interfacejournal.net/2011/05/call-for-papers-volume-4-issue-1-the-season-of-revolution-the-arab-spring/

Volume 3, issue 2 on “Feminism, women’s movements and women in movement” is due to be published in November 2011. A Call for Papers for volume 4 issue 2, on “The global emancipation of labour: new movements and struggles around work and workers” will shortly be published (deadline May 1 2012 for publication in November 2012).

Interface is always open to new collaborators. We need activists and academics who can referee articles in Chinese, Indonesian and Russian in particular, and translators to help with our multilingual project more generally. We are also looking for people willing to help set up regional groups in East Asia and Central Asia. We are also looking for collaborators for our existing groups, particularly but not only the African, South Asian, Spanish-speaking Latin American, East and Central European, and Oceania / SE Asian groups. More details can be found on our website: http://interfacejournal.net

Please forward this to anyone you think may be interested.

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Education Crisis

HIGHER EDUCATION AS A PUBLIC GOOD: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES

SRHE Higher Education Theory Group Seminar

Higher Education as a Public Good: Critical Perspectives

Monday 4 July –Tuesday 5 July 2011

New College, Oxford

The Society for Research into Higher Education Theory Group invites you to participate in a 2-day symposium examining issues underlying the concept of higher education as a public good. This is a topic much discussed in the light of recent policy developments in the UK and in many other countries. The seminar will explore its theoretical underpinnings from several disciplinary perspectives. There will be inputs from keynote speakers and participative discussions on the issues raised. The main speakers will each produce a short synopsis of their contribution for participants to consider in advance of the seminar. It is intended to prepare a book for publication based on the seminar proceedings.

Keynote Speakers:

Nick Barr: Professor of Public Economics. LSE London

Bob Cowen: Emeritus Professor of Education. IOE London

David Dill: Emeritus Professor of Public Policy. University of North Carolina

Jon Nixon: Honorary Professor.University of Sheffield

Paul Standish: Professor of Philosophy of Education. IOE London

Registration

This symposium will take place at New College Oxford and the fee of £125 (£155 for non members of SRHE) covers the cost of accommodation for one night in ensuite rooms and all meals, including dinner in the College on Monday evening. Rooms at the College are limited so delegates are advised to make an early registration to attend this symposium.

The closing date for bookings is 4 June 2011.

To attend this event please e-mail: Nicola Manches (nmanches@srhe.ac.uk) to reserve your place and arrange payment. Please address all enquiries about this or other SRHE events to Nicola Manches at the SRHE Offices.

Society for Research into Higher Education, 44 Bedford Row, London WC1R  4LL, Tel +44 (0) 20 7447 2525, Fax +44 (0) 20 7447 2526, http://www.srhe.ac.uk

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Books

THIRD WORLD PROTEST – BOOK LAUNCH WITH RAHUL RAO

Book Launch – Third World Protest: Between Home and the World, by Rahul Rao

Date of event: 1st November 2010

Venue: Khalili Lecture Theatre, School of Oriental & African Studies, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London WC1H 0XG

Speaker: Dr Rahul Rao

Chair: Dr Stephen Hopgood

Rahul Rao, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, discusses his new book /Third World Protest: Between Home and the World/.

If boundaries protect us from threats, how should we think about the boundaries of states in a world where threats to human rights emanate from both outside the state and the state itself? Arguing that attitudes towards boundaries are premised on assumptions about the locus of threats to vital interests, Rahul Rao probes beneath two major normative orientations towards boundaries – cosmopolitanism and nationalism – which structure thinking on questions of public policy and identity. Insofar as the Third World is concerned, hegemonic versions of both orientations are underpinned by simplistic imageries of threat. In the cosmopolitan gaze, political and economic crises in the Third World are attributed mainly to factors internal to the Third World state with the international playing the role of heroic saviour. In Third World nationalist imagery, the international is portrayed as a realm of neo-imperialist predation from which the domestic has to be secured. Both images capture widely held intuitions about the sources of threats to human rights, but each by itself provides a resolutely partial inventory of these threats. By juxtaposing critical accounts of both discourses, Rao argues that protest sensibilities in the current conjuncture must be critical of hegemonic variants of both cosmopolitanism and nationalism. The second half of the book illustrates what such a critique might look like. Journeying through the writings of James Joyce, Rabindranath Tagore, Edward Said, and Frantz Fanon, the activism of ‘anti-globalization’ protesters, and the dilemmas of queer activists, Rao demonstrates that important currents of Third World protest have long battled against both the international and the domestic, in a manner that combines nationalist and cosmopolitan sensibilities.

*Please note that the book will be available at the event at a 20% discount

— 
Lecturer in International Relations
Centre for Inter national Studies & Diplomacy
School of Oriental & African Studies
Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square
London WC1H 0XG
Tel: +44(0)20 7898 4534
http://goog_1113873052

Third World Protest:  Between Home and The World: http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780199560370.do

Available now through all good bookshops, or direct from Oxford University Press

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com
Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Daniel Faraday

RETHINKING EUROPE AFTER THE FINANCIAL CRISIS

JMCE Postgraduate Workshop: Call for Papers!

Date: Friday, 8th October 2010

Place: London, King’s College London

Theme

As we approach the end of the first decade of the 21st Century, the European Project continues to show its age-old problems – and a new powerful vector of instability. While the tormented path of the European Constitution, as amended by the Lisbon Treaty, has made palpable the gravity of the democratic deficit and has compounded the obstacles in agreeing to common foreign and economic policies and in coordinating the response to external events, the shock-waves of the global economic crisis have for the first time threatened the stability of the Euro and prompted speculation on defaults, exit strategies and a two-speed Europe.

How can we assess the impact of the financial/economic crisis on the future trajectories of the European Union and of the individual member states? And how does it force us to reconsider the tools and methodologies of the different disciplines and to develop new analyses and approaches? 

Suggested topics

Suggested topics include but are not limited to:

– the relationship between the European core and the Southern and Eastern European peripheries: uneven development, structural imbalances and political dimensions;
– national or comparative assessments of the impact of the coming austerity measures on class, gender, racial, generational and other divides;
– new developments in the law and governance of the EU and member states;
– theorising the role of the national state after the rescue of the banking system; 
– the debate over Euro and over a common European economic government;
– social and political mobilisation between apathy, mass anti-cuts struggles and the rise of far right movements; 
– rethinking the European disciplines: critical evaluations, interdisciplinary dialogue and new approaches;
– rethinking the EU as a multilayered/interdisciplinary scientific object; 

Further details

The day-long interdisciplinary workshop is organised by the Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence of King’s College London, with the aim of providing an opportunity to showcase the work of leading postgraduate research students on the future of Europe in the light of the most recent developments.

Postgraduates from across the European Union and from all European disciplines (e.g. European Studies, Public Policy, Law and Economics) will be invited to present their original contributions and to discuss the key issues in a closing round-table debate.

The proceedings of the workshop will be published on the JMCE website. Limited travel bursaries may be available to help speakers with travel expenses, please e-mail the organisers for application details.

Further details will be published in due course on the JMCE website (www.kcl.ac.uk/projects/jmce/workshop.html).

Deadline for abstracts 

If you would like to submit an abstract for the workshop to be selected by the organising committee please e-mail us your proposal, including the title, author, university and an abstract of 250 words, by Monday 19th of July 2010.

Contact: Please send your application and any enquiries to Paolo Chiocchetti at paolo.chiocchetti@kcl.ac.uk 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Education Crisis

CRITICAL EDUCATION FOR CRITICAL TIMES

14 May 2010

University of Nottingham

The development of a critical educational movement has been long in the making, and is now urgently overdue. These are without doubt critical times. The futures of public and common life hang in the balance. Intellectual and political openness and academic space are being increasingly curtailed and foreclosed. How should we as educators be orienting our work, our relationships with each other, and with publics, communities of struggle and social movements? What constitutes critical education in these critical times?

‘Critical Education for Critical Times’ explores different responses to these questions through a series of participatory workshops and dialogues. Each workshop, facilitated by educators with experience in critical pedagogy and/or popular education, will draw on this experience to introduce new work in empowering, prefigurative, transformative and critical pedagogies that are linked to social and political movements. We will open these examples up for criticism and discussion, and hope to consolidate the knowledge produced during the day into a common resource for further developments of educational theory and practice.

CECT ORGANISED BY THE CRITICAL PEDAGOGY AND POPULAR EDUCATION MIDLANDS WORKING GROUP

And sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/cssgj/), with support from the Nottingham Freeschool (http://nottinghamfreeschool.wordpress.com/) and Critical Pedagogies Group (CSSGJ)

Workshops/Discussions

1 | Learning alternatives to neoliberalism – resistance and renewal in critical education – Stephen Cowden, Social and Community Studies, Coventry University

2 | Prefigurative epistemologies and nomadic subjectivities: in, against, beyond the university – Sara Motta, Politics, University of Nottingham

3 | Learning from each other’s struggles – knowledge from and for social movements – Laurence Cox, Sociology, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, co-founder Grassroots Gathering

4 | ‘Climate Justice’ and popular education in social movement organisation – and Alice Cutler, TRAPESE Popular Education Collective, http://hbfc.clearerchannel.org/abouttrapese.php

5 | Revalorizing critique in academic and activist education – Sarah Amsler, Sociology and Public Policy, Aston University

Location and time | Registration begins at 9:00 a.m. in the foyer of the Law and Social Sciences Building, University of Nottingham (University Park Campus), and the final session will end at 4:30 p.m.

Sessions will be held in A105 and A106 of the Hallward Library. For maps and directions, see the University website at: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/about/datesandcampusinformation/mapsanddirections/mapsanddirections.aspx
To participate | The day is free and open to all.

To pre-register| contact Sara Motta at: sara.motta@nottingham.ac.uk Please include your name, postal address and email. All those who register early will receive a packet of relevant readings for each workshop.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Critical Pedagogy

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski