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Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

THE FUTURE OF NGOs – CALL FOR PAPERS

Call for Papers: The Future of NGOs: incorporation, reinvention, critique?

Special issue of Critical Sociology

 

Special Issue Editors:

Sangeeta Kamat, Associate Professor, International Education, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Feyzi Ismail, Teaching Fellow, Development Studies, School of Oriental and African Studies, UK

The last three decades have seen a range of critical studies on NGOs, and in particular a growing body of theoretical work on the links between NGOs, the neoliberal state and social movements (Kamat 2004; Hearn 2007; Fernando 2011; Choudry and Kapoor 2013; Dauvergne and LeBaron 2014). These studies have contributed to our understanding of ‘NGOisation’ as a vital aspect of global capitalism and its crucial function in stabilising the neoliberal order. In this special issue we seek to build upon these critiques towards a theorisation that illuminates the present conjuncture of the new aid architecture – now unfolding in the context of the global financial crisis – that has further subordinated NGOs to global capital but which is also confronted by a deepening crisis of the neoliberal state (Harvey 2010; Duménil and Lévy 2011; Saad Filho 2011).

Critical Sociology (http://crs.sagepub.com/ ) invites contributions analysing the role of NGOs at this conjuncture, how they are responding to critiques and struggles against neoliberalism and whether they seek to articulate a new politics.

Since the late 1990s visible and widespread challenges to neoliberalism have taken the form of the anti-globalisation and anti-war movements, including the popular movements in Latin America and the World Social Forums, the vast mobilisations against the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Occupy movement, the Arab uprisings and demonstrations against austerity. In some cases the movements have led to mass strikes in workplaces and the mobilisation of trade unions. NGOs have often had an ambivalent relation to these oppositional movements, either participating on the fringes of these movements or seeking new kinds of alliances with Left or progressive politics. At the same time, the aid regime of the new millennium has undergone significant changes, with corporate entities playing a leading role in the development sector and partnering with states to enforce new rules of compliance for NGOs. In other words, NGOs today straddle both the imperialist and neoliberal ambitions of the aid regime and the popular mobilisations, which at times dominate the political landscape.

In this special issue we seek to analyse how NGOs mediate these struggles toward particular ends. How are NGOs being repositioned within contemporary capitalism, and how is the relationship between NGOs, the state and the private sector evolving? In what ways are NGOs being further co-opted by corporate power? As the neoliberal state becomes increasingly privatised on the one hand – and challenged on the other – how have NGOs analysed these times of crisis and flux? Is the general critique of neoliberalism that many NGOs also espouse leading to a new kind of politics and new political understandings within the sector? What are the factors that determine the political direction that NGOs take? Are there examples of NGOs reinventing themselves to maintain or pursue radical politics, and are they adopting new ideas and new ideologies? What kinds of new organisational alliances or strategic partnerships are being made, for example, with the political Left?

Our contention is that the existence of an organised Left makes a difference, shaping both political history and the political space that is occupied by NGOs. Where left-wing political parties have had a strong legacy, we wish to investigate the historical relationship between NGOs and the Left in order to understand the politics of NGOs in that particular context. Where NGOs have taken on traditional roles, and have been funded and professionalised, we seek to understand not only the political compulsions that influence NGOs but what kind of political alternatives are possible. The focus here is on the factors that influence one tendency or the other, with the aim of drawing general conclusions on how the work of NGOs is being reshaped both at national and global levels.

We are seeking manuscripts (8,000 words maximum) on the following themes (though not limited to these), and encourage interdisciplinary approaches:

Neoliberalism and the co-option of NGOs;

The relationship between NGOs and left-wing political parties in power;

Conflict and collaboration between NGOs and social movements;

Class, class struggle and the role of NGOs;

Questions of strategy and democracy amongst NGOs and within the sector;

Ways that NGOs are reinventing themselves and envisioning new forms of political engagement;

The role of NGOs and the global financial crisis;

Labour NGOs and trade union organising;

Development NGOs in the present aid architecture and the implications for Left politics.

 

Within this broad thematic we are interested in case studies from Latin America (e.g. Venezuela and Bolivia), where left-wing governments have been in power; South Asia (e.g. India, Nepal and Bangladesh), where Left parties and social movements have a strong presence inside and outside of government; Eastern Europe (e.g. Bosnia, Serbia and Kosovo), where previous democratic transitions meant compromise between communist parties and NGOs; South East Asia (e.g. Cambodia, Thailand and the Philippines), where there have been significant and sustained popular movements and workers’ strikes; and the Middle East (e.g. Egypt, Syria and Palestine), which has experienced colossal political upheaval and polarisation during and since the uprisings in 2011. In addition, we are interested in case studies documenting the work of labour NGOs and their relationship with trade union activity (e.g. China, Qatar and Saudi Arabia), and the role of NGOs in the Arab uprisings.

To submit your proposal, email the title, abstract (300 words maximum), and contact information for the primary author to Sangeeta Kamat <skamat@educ.umass.edu> and Feyzi Ismail <fi2@soas.ac.uk>, with the subject line “ATTN: SPECIAL ISSUE PROPOSAL”. All papers are subject to the standard review process at Critical Sociology.

 

Submission of abstracts: 31 May

Solicitation of full papers: 15 June

Draft paper submissions due to editors: 31 August

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-the-future-of-ngos-incorporation-reinvention-critique-special-issue-of-critical-sociology

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Tariq Ali

TARIQ ALI IN BROOKLYN

Please post, announce, and forward widely
Talk and book signing

TARIQ ALI

From Cairo to Madison — The Arab Revolution and a World in Motion

TUESDAY, MAY 17, 2011
Door: 7 PM | Talk: 8 PM
FREE

Renowned author Tariq Ali discusses the global implications of the revolts shaking North Africa and the Middle East and assesses their implications for movements around the world for those seeking to challenge neoliberalism and empire. Sponsored by Haymarket Books and Verso Books.

For more information visit: http://www.TariqAli.org

To register, visit: http://fromcairotom adison.eventbrite.com/

Galapagos Art Space | 16 Main Street, DUMBO | Brooklyn, NY 11201 | 718 222 8500 | F to York Street  | C or A to High Street Brooklyn Bridge

See:

http://www.versobooks.com/events/130-tariq-ali-from-cairo-to-madison http://fromcairotomadison.eventbrite.com/
http://www.galapagosartspace.com/
http://www.haymarketbooks.org/

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Smoke Monster

THE PERSISTEMCE OF THE NEGATIVE

The Persistence of the Negative: A Critique of Contemporary Continental Theory
Benjamin Noys

Benjamin Noys’ brilliant and wide-ranging new book is a timely  reminder that no revolutionary and egalitarian approach to politics and philosophy can afford to overlook the disruptive labour of the negative, or to neglect the active contribution that contradiction and antagonism make to a critique of actually-existing forms of domination on the one hand and a renewal of emancipatory agency on the other.– Peter Hallward, Professor of Modern European Philosophy, Middlesex University

In this bold and highly original book, Benjamin Noys rethinks the role of the negative in both ontology and political practice. His critical revaluations of familiar figures in recent European thought move in surprising new directions; they have forced me to reconsider much that I thought I knew.– Steven Shaviro, DeRoy Professor of English, Wayne State University

In this original critique of contemporary continental theory, Noys uses a series of incisive readings of leading theoretical figures of affirmationism – Jacques Derrida, Gilles Deleuze, Bruno Latour, Antonio Negri, and Alain Badiou – to reveal a profound current of negativity that allows theory to return to its political calling. It is essential reading for anyone concerned with continental theory and its relation to left politics.

http://www.euppublishing.com/book/9780748638635

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Persistence-Negative-Critique-Contemporary-Continental/dp/0748638636

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Lost

LABOUR’S FUTURE

Labour’s Future
Edited by Jonathan Rutherford and Alan Lockey
© Soundings 2010

CONTRIBUTORS: Philip Collins, Sally Davison, Jeremy Gilbert, Stuart Hall, David Lammy, Neal Lawson, Doreen Massey, Anthony Painter, James Purnell, Michael Rustin, Jonathan Rutherford, Marc Stears, Allegra Stratton, Heather Wakefield, Stuart White

http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/ebooks/laboursfuture.html

In May, Soundings and the Open Left project at Demos organised a seminar with Jon Cruddas and David Miliband. The aim was to explore both differences and common ground, and the prospects for cross-party political renewal.

This e-book offers a series of short essays from participants that we hope broadly reflects the debate, and offers some of the groundwork for developing a wider discussion about Labour’s future.

Published jointly by Soundings and Open Left at Demos

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

 

David Cameron

‘THE MEANING OF DAVID CAMERON’ – WITH RICHARD SEYMOUR

Wednesday, 26 May 2010
Time: 19:00 – 21:00
Location: Housmans Bookshop
Street: 5 Caledonian Road, Kings Cross
Town/City: London, United Kingdom

Description:
Richard Seymour, blogger of ‘Lenin’s Tomb’ fame, and author of ‘The Liberal Defence of Murder’ will be in store discussing his latest publication, ‘The Meaning of David Cameron’.

The Tories are posing as a ‘progressive’ and ‘radical’ alternative to New Labour. Drawing from George W Bush’s ‘compassionate conservatism’, they maintain that the ‘Big Society’ can do what ‘Big Government’ cannot – produce a cohesive, mutually supportive, happy society. Cameron’s court intellectual, Philip Blond, maintains that this if David Cameron’, which is a viable alternative to the failures of the egalitarian left and the excessively pro-market right. But is this more than campaign mood music? And are the conservative traditions that they draw on – from the bucolic, pseudo-medievalism of G K Chesterton to the anti-statism of Friedrich Hayek – really a bulwark of progress and radicalism?

Richard Seymour argues that such ideas can only seem ‘progressive’ in light of New Labour’s acquiescence to Thatcherism. To understand the Cameronites, it is necessary to understand how the social landscape and corresponding political language was transformed by the collapse of post-war social democracy and its more radical competitors. To resist the Cameronites, he argues, it is necessary to attack the neoliberal consensus on which all major parties found their programme.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Labor and the Logic of Abstraction: An Interview with Moishe Postone

 

In this interview with Timothy Brennan, Moishe Postone, author of Time, Labor, and Social Domination, discusses the Marxian critical theory of capitalism against the background of the author’s intellectual biography and central historical developments of recent decades. The interview focuses on his reinterpretation of Karl Marx’s critical theory, especially on the notion of the historical specificity of the categories that purportedly grasp capitalism and its historical dynamic. It also engages the author’s understandings of Georg Lukács, the Frankfurt School, and poststructuralism, while addressing issues of capitalism’s historical transformations, its possible abolition, and the reconstitution of progressive politics. 

From South Atlantic Quarterly, Vol.108 No.2, pp.305-330 (2009), at:

http://platypus1917.home.comcast.net/~platypus1917/postone_brennan_saq2009.pdf

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com