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Heathwood Press

Heathwood Press

HEATHWOOD INSTITUTE, HEATHWOOD PRESS, HEATHWOOD NETWORK & THE GLOBAL VOICE PROJECT

Hello everyone,

We have just launched our new website and are sending out several batches of newsletters to update our readers, friends, and colleagues about what has been going on over the last three months and what to expect from the organisation moving forward.

Launch of New Beta Site

– Our ambition as a group has always been to break down the barriers separating critical theoretical discourse and ‘the everyday practise of social and individual life’. In attempting to achieve this we have engaged with readers and have been working with several leading theories of alternative media and web application, to develop new ways in which a range of media projects can assist the organisation to bridge the theory-practise divide.

– One of the new features on our website includes the organisation’s Global Voice project, which acts as centralised hub or platform for the publication of non-profit research and reports.

The non-profit sector of society is notorious for its ability to encourage ethical and critical practise across many different social spheres. Drawing close links to some of the leading non-profit organisations, locally and globally, Heathwood can directly assist and support the ongoing research and practise of NPO’s in a number of fundamental ways: 1) to pull-in non-profit media, report, commentary and critique from around the world and disseminate that information in one centralised place; 2) to normatively engage with independent non-profits so as to support their efforts on a grassroots level with a highly engaged critical theory; 3) to listen to NPO’s across the globe and the struggles and conflicts they report in order to further our own understanding about social agency and structure;  and 4) to integrate non-profit research and data, which is heavily rooted in praxis, with Heathwood’s post-Frankfurt school critical theory.

– Another exciting feature that we’ve been working on for some time consists around the democratisation of media and how to make Heathwood’s site more representative of a truly social, participatory media centre.

To achieve this we have launched a new on-site comments system that allows for real-time discussion between members of the public as well as between readers/public and members of Heathwood. The aim of this new feature is to encourage over time the development of a fertile digital ground for discussion and the sharing of ideas.

Heathwood Network

We have also recently launched a new public forum called the Heathwood Network, which will further support and encourage direct discussion and engagement on a range of subjects. The forum can be accessed via the menu on our new site.

– We’ve also been developing a series of critical theory eGuides, ranging in subject from alternative education and epistemology to alternative economics and ideology critique. No launch date has been set for this programme.

-Lastly, we have been working on publishing a range of infographics, interactive media, videos and datablogs to further support our present research activity and public engagement campaigns.

New Members

We’ve welcomed a new member in past few months, Robert King, whose work in systems will be a great addition to the organisation.

We’ve also had the opportunity to work with some great people from around Europe and North America, including Glenn Rikowski, Chris Cutrone, Richard Wolff, Peter Thompson, Daniel Little, Geert Dhondt, Jeanne Willette, and others.

Moving Forward

There’s a lot planned for the upcoming year, including several new book publications and further expansion to our digital media projects.

If anyone has any questions or would like to discuss more about Heathwood and where it is headed, please feel free to contact Robert C. Smith at robert.smith@heathwoodpress.com

Alternatively, follow the organisation on twitter for daily publication updates.

Signed,

-The members of Heathwood

P.S. Feel free to forward this information to friends, colleagues or whomever you may think appropriate.

Robert C. Smith
Director and Researcher at Heathwood Institute and Press
Website: http://www.heathwoodpress.com
Email: robert.smith@heathwoodpress.com
Phone: +44 (0) 07919252541
Holt, Norfolk, United Kingdom

******END******

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Unemployment

Unemployment

THE FUTURE AND PRACTICE OF DECENT WORK

International Center for Development and Decent Work, KasselUniversity, 14 – 15 February 2013

The Financial and Economic Crisis: A Decent Work Response report prepared by the International Institute for Labour Studies and the Employment Sector and Policy Integration and Statistics Department Geneva in 2009 indicates that the Decent Work Agenda should provide a policy framework to stem crises by placing employment and social protection at the heart of ‘extraordinary fiscal stimulus measures’ which can both protect vulnerable people, and reactivate investment and demand in economies.

The International Labour Organisation’s World of Work Report 2012 forecasts a global unemployment rate of 6.1 per cent in 2012, with total world unemployment rising from 196 million in 2011 to 202 million in 2012. In this context, and with the rise in austerity measures which cannot guarantee growth but which have already triggered social disruption and harm, this conference will explore the concept of decent work and search for a praxis of decent work in all countries, all contexts, and for all people.

Guy Ryder, an experienced trade unionist, was elected as the ILO’s new Director General on 28th May 2012, to take office in September, and he has stated his commitment to prioritise people and the world of work (Ryder, 2012).  In June 2012, India, Brazil and South African signed a long term Declaration of Intent in a number of areas including development and cooperation, and labour, which is explicitly designed to further the Decent Work Agenda, aiming toward creating jobs, guaranteeing rights at work, extending social protection and the promotion of social dialogue, with gender equality as a core objective. These types of initiatives indicate a continuation of the relevance of a concept that was coined by Juan Somavia, Director General 1999 – September 2012, but the global climate of strained governance continues to challenge the possibilities for decent work in developed and developing countries alike.
 
The ILO’s new Director General faces a Eurozone crisis, rising unemployment, a spate of emergency crisis-driven labour policy deregulation that has often not been passed with consent from relevant social partners, and the dramatic rise in precarity and nonstandard employment which impacts lives in all corners of the world. Several governments across the European Union, including Portugal, Spain, Hungary, and the United Kingdom, have recently passed emergency labour motions and reforms using the rationale of austerity to decentralise collective bargaining, disempower temporary workers, and increase working time for less remuneration, in many cases via Memoranda of Understanding passed in consultation and consent with the Troika (the European Commission, the European Central Bank and the IMF) (Clauwaert and Schomann, 2012). Nonetheless the ‘international consensus’ remains committed to securing ongoing decent work, and labour law is expected to provide the theatre for appropriate labour standards and rights despite labour law modernisation (Faioli, 2010).

The conference involves papers dealing with questions around the legitimation and the tripartite structure of the International Labour Organisation, questions about the world of work in the current context of global recession, issues surrounding social unrest as linked to rising unemployment, and the nature of international labour standards in this context. The concept of decent work is in crisis and this conference is a call for praxis around these issues.

Please email decentworkconference@gmail.com to express interest in attending this event. 

First published in: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/the-future-and-praxis-of-decent-work-international-center-for-development-and-decent-work-kassel-university-14-2013-15-february-2013

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Communisation SIC

Communisation SIC

AN EVENING ON COMMUNISATION

An Evening on Communisation: Presentations and Release of Sic Volume 1: International Journal for Communisation

Friday April 20th – 7pm

16 Beaver Street
4th Floor
New York, NY10004

We invite you to join us for an evening of presentations and discussion on the theme of communisation with the release of Sic: International Journal for Communisation (http://communisation.net). Topics include:

–         The periodization of the capital-labor relation

–         The restructuring and crisis of the 1970s

–         The loss of the worker identity

–         The characterizing tendencies of contemporary struggles

–         The relation of communist theory to practice

–         The Sic project itself

Train: 4, 5 to Bowling Green / R to Whitehall / 1, 2 to Wall Street / J to Broad Street

Wine and beer to be served

From the Editorial:

The present journal aims to be the locus for an unfolding of the problematic of communisation. It comes from the encounter of individuals involved in various projects in different countries: among these are the journals Endnotes, published in the UK and in the US, Blaumachen in Greece, Théorie Communiste inFrance, Riff-Raff inSweden, and certain more or less informal theoretical groups in the US (New York and San Francisco). Each of these projects continues its own existence. Also participating are various individuals in France, Germany, and elsewhere, who are involved in other activities and who locate themselves broadly within the theoretical approach taken here.

Communisation

In the course of the revolutionary struggle, the abolition of the division of labour, of the State, of exchange, of any kind of property; the extension of a situation in which everything is freely available as the unification of human activity, that is to say the abolition of classes, of both public and private spheres – these are all ‘measures’ for the abolition of capital, imposed by the very needs of the struggle against the capitalist class. The revolution is communisation; communism is not its project or result.

One does not abolish capital for communism but by communism, or more specifically, by its production. Indeed communist measures must be differentiated from communism; they are not embryos of communism, rather they are its production. Communisation is not a period of transition, but rather, it is revolution itself which is the communist production of communism. The struggle against capital is what differentiates communist measures and communism. The content of the revolutionary activity is always the mediation of the abolition of capital by the proletariat in its relation to capital: this activity is not one branch of an alternative in competition with the reproduction of the capitalist mode of production, but its internal contradiction and its overcoming.

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, a whole historical period entered into crisis and came to an end – i.e. the period in which the revolution was conceived in different ways, both theoretically and practically, as the affirmation of the proletariat, its elevation to the position of ruling class, the liberation of labour, and the institution of a period of transition. The concept of communisation appeared in the midst of this crisis.

During the crisis, the critique of all the mediations of the existence of the proletariat within the capitalist mode of production (mass party, union, parliamentarism), of organisational forms such as the party-form or the vanguard, of ideologies such as Leninism, of practices such as militantism along with all its variations – all this appeared irrelevant if revolution was no longer to be affirmation of the class – whether it be the workers’ autonomy or the generalisation of workers’ councils. It is the proletariat’s struggle as a class which has become the problem within itself, i.e. which is its own limit. That is the way the class struggle signals and produces the revolution as communisation in the form of its overcoming.

Since then, within the contradictory course of the capitalist mode of production, the affirmation of the proletariat and the liberation of labour have lost all meaning and content. There is no longer a worker’s identity facing capital and confirmed by it. This is the revolutionary dynamic of the present struggles which display the active denial of the proletarian condition against capital, even within ephemeral, limited bursts of self-management or self-organisation. The proletariat’s struggle against capital contains its contradiction with its own nature as class of capital.

The abolition of capital, i.e. the revolution and the production of communism, is immediately the abolition of all classes and therefore of the proletariat. This occurs through the communisation of society, which is abolished as a community separated from its elements. Proletarians abolish capital by the production of a community immediate to its elements; they transform their relations into immediate relations between individuals. These are relations between singular individuals that are no longer the embodiment of a social category, including the supposedly natural categories of the social sexes of woman and man. Revolutionary practice is the coincidence of the changing of circumstances and of human activity or self-transformation.

A Problematic

This minimal approach of communisation constitutes neither a definition, nor a platform, but exposes a problematic:

* The problematic of a theory – here the theory of revolution as communisation – does not limit itself to a list of themes or objects conceived by theory; neither is it the synthesis of all the elements which are thought. It is the content of theory, its way of thinking, with regards to all possible productions of this theory

* The analysis of the current crisis and of the class struggles intrinsic to it

* The historicity of revolution and communism

* The periodisation of the capitalist mode of production and the question of the restructuring of the mode of production after the crisis at the end of the 1960s and the beginning of the 1970s

* The analysis of the gender relation within the problematic of the present class struggle and communisation

* The definition of communism as goal but also as movement abolishing the present state of things

* A theory of the abolition of capital as a theory of the production of communism

* The reworking of the theory of value-form (to the extent that the revolution is not the affirmation of the proletariat and the liberation of labour)

* The illegitimacy of wage-demands and others in the present class struggle

By definition no list of subjects coming under a problematic can be exhaustive.

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Guy Debord

SPECTACULAR CAPITALISM

Spectacular Capitalism Release Party and Presentation 
Saturday June 25th @ 7PM @ X Marks the Bökship (http://bokship.org)
210/ Unit 3 Cambridge Heath Road London E2 9NQ

Over the past forty years the ideas and practices of Guy Debord and the Situationist International have become a constant reference point for those involved in radical politics, the arts, and cultural theory. Despite this ubiquity Debord’s work has been reduced to a palatable cliché rather than being used as a tool for crafting an ongoing practice of critique and engagement. Come on join us to celebrate the release of Richard Gilman-Opalsky’s new book, Spectacular Capitalism: Guy Debord and the Practice of Radical Philosophy, as we excavate this potential from the historical wreckage. 

Drawing on the work of Guy Debord, Gilman-Opalsky argues that the theory of practice and practice of theory are superseded by upheavals that do the work of philosophy. Spectacular Capitalism makes the case not only for a new philosophy of praxis, but for praxis itself as the delivery mechanism for philosophy – for the field of human action, of contestation and conflict, to raise directly the most irresistible questions about the truth and morality of the existing state of affairs.

Commentary and response from Gavin Grindon:

“Richard Gilman-Opalsky’s Spectacular Capitalism rescues Situationist theory and praxis from merely antiquarian and art-historical commentary and puts it in dialogue with the project of a radical philosophy for leaving the 21st century.” – McKenzie Wark, author of A Hacker Manifesto and Gamer Theory

Organized by Minor Compositions (http://www.minorcompositions.info) and the Centre for Ethics and Politics @ Queen Mary, University of London (http://cfep.org.uk)

Spectacular Capitalism: Guy Debord and the Practice of Radical Philosophy
Richard Gilman-Opalsky
http://www.minorcompositions.info/spectacularcapitalism.html
To be released June 2011
ISBN 978-1-57027-228-8

Bio: Richard Gilman-Opalsky is Assistant Professor of Political Philosophy in the Department of Political Science at the University of Illinois at Springfield. He is the author of Unbounded Publics: Transgressive Public Spheres, Zapatismo, and Political Theory (Lexington Books, 2008), as well as numerous articles.

Released by Minor Compositions, London / New York / Port Watson
Minor Compositions is a series of interventions & provocations drawing from autonomous politics, avant-garde aesthetics, and the revolutions of everyday life.
Minor Compositions is an imprint of Autonomedia
www.minorcompositions.info |info@minorcompositions.info

*****

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Antonio Gramsci

RETHINKING GRAMSCI

Rethinking Gramsci
Edited by Marcus E. Green
New York: Routledge, 2011
ISBN: 9780415779739
Details: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415779739/

Contents

Introduction Marcus E. Green, Rethinking Marxism and Rethinking Gramsci

I. Culture and Criticism

1. Stuart Hall. Race, Culture, and Communications: Looking Backward and Forward at Cultural Studies

2. Paul Bové. Dante, Gramsci and Cultural Criticism

3. Daniel O’Connell. Bloom and Babbitt: A Gramscian View

4. Marcia Landy. Socialist Education Today: Pessimism or optimism of the intellect?

II. Hegemony, Subalternity, Common Sense

5. Derek Boothman. The Sources for Gramsci’s Concept of Hegemony

6. Marcus E. Green. Gramsci Cannot Speak: Presentations and Interpretations of Gramsci’s Concept of the Subaltern

7. Cosimo Zene. Self-consciousness of the Dalits as ‘subalterns’: Reflections on Gramsci in South Asia

8. Evan Watkins. Gramscian Politics and Capitalist Common Sense

9. Frank R. Annunziato. Gramsci’s theory of trade unionism

10. Nelson Moe. Production and Its Others, Gramsci’s ‘Sexual Question’

11. Adam David Morton. Social Forces in the Struggle over Hegemony: Neo-Gramscian Perspectives in International Political Economy

12. Richard Howson. From Ethico-Political Hegemony to Post-Marxism

III. Political Philosophy

13. Richard D. Wolff. Gramsci, Marxism and Philosophy

14. Carlos Nelson Coutinho. General Will and Democracy in Rousseau, Hegel, and Gramsci

15. Wolfgang Fritz Haug. From Marx to Gramsci, from Gramsci to Marx: Historical Materialism and the Philosophy of Praxis

16. Steven R. Mansfield. Gramsci and the Dialectic

17. Esteve Morera. Gramsci’s Critical Modernity

IV. On Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks

18. David F. Ruccio. Unfinished Business: Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks

19. Joseph W. Childers. Of Prison Notebooks and the Restoration of an Archive

20. Peter Ives. The Mammoth Task of Translating Gramsci

21. William V. Spanos. Cuvier’s Little Bone: Joseph Buttigieg’s English Edition of Antonio Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks

22. Joseph A. Buttigieg. The Prison Notebooks: Antonio Gramsci’s Work in Progress

Antonio Gramsci

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Paulo Freire

PRAXIS & PEDAGOGY

The Praxis and Pedagogy research/seminar group at GradCAM aim to develop an innovative programme of practice and theory that is structured by three related elements. These are the theoretical, the practical and the pedagogical.

Theory articulates models of analysis, interpretation, and conceptualization that express the general conditions of particular objects, relationships or situations. It describes the systems and structures of knowledge, power, symbolic representation and material exchange that operate within a wide range of social, political and cultural fields. Moreover, theory establishes connections between distinct discursive and conceptual fields, allowing for interdisciplinary discussions to emerge around shared ideas and issues.

Practice is the basis from which the possibility of ‘new thinking’ can develop. The notion of ‘praxis’ implies the urgency that theory expands beyond its own history, beyond the perceived understanding of its proper practice, in order to propose new models of critical reflection and change.

To establish ‘praxis’ as the core programme of the group is to prescribe the conditions of openness, uncertainty and risk. Theoretical thinking and new innovative pedagogical models will support the experimental nature of the practice. By aligning our programme with an ethos of experimentation between theory and practice in this way, the group intends to expand not only the range of objects under investigation but also the possibilities of theory itself as practice – as a form of creativity, of creative activity, responsive to developments both internal to its traditional fields, and external in areas of investigation not commonly associated with theory.

Finally, pedagogy insists on the limits of theory: on the structural barriers that condition all acts of predication and interpretation. By linking theory to practice, and practice to pedagogy, the group questions the assumptions and generalizations elaborated by theoretical projects to interrogate what remains undisclosed or unthought in their concepts and practices.

The group is convened by Glenn Loughran, artist, activist, and PhD Scholar at the NCAD and GradCAM. Other members include John Buckley (NCAD/GradCAM), Edia Connole (NCAD/GradCAM), Susan Gill (DIT/GradCAM) and Thomas McGraw-Lewis (DIT/GradCAM).

The group convenes Wednesdays bi-weekly.

For more information on joining the Praxis seminar series, and/or related activities  see http://www.gradcam.ie, or email the group at praxis@gradcam.ie

Praxis & Pedagogy is at: http://praxispamphlet.wordpress.com/

 

 

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The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Capitalism

Capital’ Against Capitalism – New Website

Saturday June 25 -Central Sydney

It seems significant, and hardly coincidental, that the impasse that politics fell into after the 1960s and 1970s coincided with the eclipse of Marx and the research project of historical materialism. Social democracy, various left-wing melancholies and/ or the embrace of dead political forms has stood-in for these absent names. Returning to Marx, to Capital and to the various traditions tied-up with these names may present a way to cut across this three-fold deadlock.

The papers at Capital Against Capitalism will respond to contemporary politics from a range of historical materialist perspectives. We want to bring together the theoretical discussions and debates occurring in Capital reading groups, PhD study circles, and Marxist political organisations and networks. Our conjuncture – its manifold crisis – urges new analyses, new strategic orientations and the engagement of activists and academics alike on these questions.

‘Capital’ Against Capitalism: http://capitalagainstcapitalism.blogspot.com/

Provisional Timetable

SATURDAY JUNE 25 – CENTRAL SYDNEY

9.00 – 9.15
Welcome

9.15 – 10.45
Plenary 1 – AUSTRALIAN LABORISM
Speaker: Rick Kuhn, on his book, with Tom Bramble, Labor’s Conflict: Big business, workers and the politics of class (Cambridge University Press, 2010)
Respondents: Geoffrey Robinson and Tad Tietze

10.45 – 11.00
Short morning tea

11 – 12.30
Workshop 1A – MARXISM AND THEOLOGY
Roland Boer: ‘The Religion of Everyday Life’: Capital as Fetish
Tamara Prosic: Orthodox Christian Theology and Social Change
Remy Low: Religion and Revolutionary Praxis: Theologies of liberation in retrospect and prospect

Workshop 1B – READING CAPITAL IN OUR OWN TIME
Tom Barnes: From ‘surplus populations’ to informal labour: Is Capital relevant to class formation in the Global South?
Paul Rubner: Deciphering the Dialectic in Marx’s Capital
Mike Beggs: Zombie Marx and modern economics

12.30 – 1.15
Lunch

1.15 – 2.15
Workshop 2A – SOCIAL CHANGE
Jess Gerrard: Hegemony, Class and Culture
John Pardy: Patterns of schooling in Australia: Toward a historically materialist explanation.

Workshop 2B – TALKING REVOLUTION
Mark Steven: The Silliest Insurrection: On Marxism and the Marx Brothers
David Lockwood: Marxism and the Bourgeois Revolution

2.15 – 3.45
Workshop 3A – MARXISM AND LAW
Jess Whyte: Leaving the ‘Eden of the innate rights of man’: Marx’s Critique of Rights
Richard Bailey: Strategy, rupture, rights: law and resistance in Australian immigration detention
David McInerney: To read and speak the law: Althusser on Montesquieu

Workshop 3B – ACCUMULATION OF VALUE
Marcus Banks: How does workfare produce value?
Humphrey McQueen: Labour time
Ben Reid: Is there Australian Exceptionalism? Scenarios for capital accumulation and crises after the second great contraction

3.45 – 4.15
Afternoon tea

4.15 – 5.15
Plenary 2 – MARX’S CAPITAL
Speaker: Nicole Pepperell on the key ides of her PhD thesis and forthcoming book on Marx’s Capital (Brill/Historical Materialism Book Series 2011)
Respondent: Dave Eden

5.15 – 5.30
Wrap Up

More information

For more information contact:

Elizabeth Humphrys: lizhumphrys@gmail.com  

Jonathon Collerson: jonathoncollerson@gmail.com

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Cultural Marxism

MARXISM AND CULTURE: CALL FOR BOOK PROPOSALS

Marxism and Culture 
Series Preface (Pluto Press) 
Call for Book Proposals 

The Marxism and Culture series aims to revive, renew and develop Marxism as an emancipatory tool for analyzing media and cultural practices within capitalism and class society. During the 1990s Marxism got bashed; it was especially easily mocked once its ‘actually existing’ socialist version was toppled with the fall of the Berlin Wall. Postmodernism made Marxism a dirty word, and class struggle a dirty thought and even dirtier deed. But those days that consigned Marxism to history themselves now seem historical. The crash of neo-liberalism in a now global economy has trashed many so-called certainties about the superiority of capitalism. A new spirit of critical questioning is emergent in the context of a crisis that is political, economic, social, cultural and ecological. 

Marxism, however critically its inheritance is viewed, cannot be overlooked by the increasing numbers who make efforts to provide an analysis and a consequent practice. Our series is dedicated to exploring both Marxist methodologies and the role of culture in this situation, from the mass media to the avant-garde. Culture is the contested terrain on which we imagine alternative models of social being and critically decode the ways we remain tied, by habits and perspectives, values and emotions, to the horizon of capital. We welcome proposals that contribute to the understanding of our urgent situation through the prism of culture. 

Books published in the series so far: 

Marxism and Media Studies: Key Concepts and Contemporary Trends – Mike Wayne 

Philosophizing the Everyday, The Philosophy of Praxis and the Fate of Cultural Studies – John Roberts 

Marxism and the History of Art, from William Morris to the New Left – Andrew Hemingway (ed) 

Red Planets, Marxism and Science Fiction – Mark Bould & China Mieville 

Dark Matter, Art and Politics in the Age of Enterprise Culture , Gregory Scholette 

Magical Marxism, Subversive Politics and the Imagination, Andy Merrifield 

Series Editors 
Esther Leslie (e.leslie@bbk.ac.uk
Mike Wayne (michael.wayne@brunel.ac.uk

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Dave Hill

JOURNAL FOR CRITICAL EDUCATION POLICY STUDIES – VOLUME 8 NUMBER 1 (August 2010)

JCEPS 8(1), AUGUST 2010

Table of Contents

1. Re-thinking normative democracy and the political economy of education. Paul R. Carr, Lakehead University (Orillia), Ontario, Canada

2. Neoliberal Ideology and Public Higher Education in the United States. Daniel B. Saunders, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA

3. Full of sound and fury, signifying nothing? a reply to Dave Hill’s ‘Race and Class in Britain: a critique of the statistical basis for critical race theory in Britain’. David Gillborn, Institute of Education, University of London, England

4. The New Assimilationism: The Push for Patriotic Education in the United States Since September 11. Liz Jackson, Educational Policies Consultant, Republic of South Africa

5. Neo-Liberalism and the evolvement of China’s education policies on migrant children’s schooling. Jie Dong, Tilburg University, the Netherlands

6. Freire: Informal Education as Protest. Susanne Butte, Walden University, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

7. Some Social Consequences of Faith-based Schooling: A Comparative Study of Denominational Secondary Education in Thanet and Lille. Paul J. Welsh, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent, UK

8. Access for Whom, Access to What? The Role of the “Disadvantaged Student” Market in the Rise of For-profit Higher Education in the United States. Bonnie K. Fox Garrity, Mark J. Garrison, and Roger C. Fiedler, D’Youville College, Buffalo, New York, USA

9. “Why Does Wearing A Yellow Bib Make Us Different”?: A Case Study of Explaining Discrimination in a West of Scotland Secondary (High) School. Henry Maitles, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland and Erin McKelvie, Classroom teacher, Glasgow City Council, Glasgow, Scotland

10. Manufacturing (il)literacy in Alberta’s classrooms: The case of an oil-dependent state. Albert Hodgkins, University of Alberta, Canada

11.  ‘Media Mediators’: Advocating an Alternate Paradigm for Critical Adult Education ICT Policy. Karim A. Remtulla, Ontario Institute of Studies in Education of the University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

12. Schooling Ugandan Girls: a policy historiography. Mary Kabesiime, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

13. Transformation of the Turkish Vocational Training System: Capitalization, Modularization and Learning Unto Death. Ergin Bulut, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Illinois, USA

14. Alternative State Formation in Colonial Hong Kong: Patriotic Schools, 1946-1976. Lau Chui Shan, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong, China

15. American Education Discourse: Language, Values, and U.S. Federal Policy. Chad Becker, Indiana State University, Indiana, USA

16. Book Review Symposium: Peters, Michael, Lankshear, Colin, and Olssen, Mark. (2003). Critical Theory and the Human Condition: Founders and Praxis. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, Gabriela Walker, Alexander Rakochy, Margaret Fitzpatrick, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, USA; Colegio Roosevelt – The American School of Lima, Peru

17. Book Review Symposium: Kahn, Richard (2010).  Critical Literacy, Ecopedagogy, and Planetary Crisis.  New York: Peter Lang. Samuel Day Fassbinder, Greg William Misiaszek, Jorunn Thordarson, DeVry University, Illinois, USA; University of California, Los Angeles, USA; University of North

JCEPS: http://www.jceps.com

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John Locke

STUDIES IN SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THOUGHT – ISSUE 17

University of Sussex Social and Political Thought

Volume 17 Spring/Summer 2010

Contact sspt@sussex.ac.uk if you would like a paper copy for £5 or a PDF for free. Also contact us to get involved in editing or writing for the journal. 

Sussex Conference on Theodor W. Adorno: 40 Years Conference Report – (Simon Mussell)

Gaps: An Inquiry into Deformation and Determination in Adorno (Nicholas Joll)

A Forcefield between Nature, Society, and Reason: Approaching Adorno’s Philosophy of Language
Philip Hogh

Aesthetic Praxis
Josh Robinson

Theses Against Occultism Today: Towards Capitalism as Occultism?
Chris O’Kane

Articles

Meadian Reflections on the Existential Ambivalence of Human Selfhood
Simon Susen

Reconsidering the Marxist Theory of the Capitalist State: An Alternative Approach
Fatma Ülkü Selçuk

Leo Strauss, Political Philosophy, and Modern Judaism
J. Christopher Paskewich

Butler and Buddhism: Identity, Performativity and Anatta
Paddy McQueen

Reviews

‘Derrida, An Egyptian’ by Peter Sloterdijk
Arthur Willemse

‘Living on Borrowed Time’ by Zygmunt Bauman
Matt Dawson

‘Decolonizing Development: Colonial Power and the Maya’ by Joel
Stratis-Andreas Efthymiou

‘Walter Benjamin and Bertolt Brecht:The Story of a Friendship’ by Erdmut
R. Phillip Homburg

‘One Dimensional Woman’ by Nina Power
Zoe Sutherland

==================================

Studies in Social and Political Thought (SSPT)

sspt@sussex.ac.uk

http://www.sussex.ac.uk/cspt/sspt

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Peace

PEACE EDUCATION: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

Call for Papers for a special issue of the Journal of Peace Education

“Peace Education:  Past, Present, & Future”

Editor:  B. Jeannie Lum

Objectives of the Special Issue:

Peace Education is currently a burgeoning field of scholarship and research that continually experiences challenges to its legitimation and participation in more traditional and conventional approaches to education.   Today, it receives increasing recognition by educators and the public in response to growing societal interests in globalization and local forms of school violence.

“Peace” is a guiding concept and principle that motivates current educational movements to redirect cultures of war into cultures of peace and transform their school cultures into constructive learning communities.  Peace education has worked in repairing the physical, psychological, and social fabric of human lives and societies impacted by natural disasters, war, violence, and human struggle throughout highly developed and underdeveloped countries. It addresses all life stages of human development and growth that lead to sustainable peace education practices within formal institutional and informal settings.  This special edition will examine the field of peace education, its past, present, and projected future.

This call for papers invites submissions that take an overview of the field of peace education, its emergence and gradual formation from the past, the current state of the field and possible visions for the future. It encourages submissions that utilize multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary methodological approaches to study and research.  It accepts works that examines the conceptual foundations of peace education and accounts for the relationship of theory to practice/praxis within a variety of traditional, modern, and post-modern philosophical frameworks.  It seeks papers that review historical trends and/or analyze specified areas of peace education, e.g. environmental ecology, varieties of conflict resolution and mediation, non-traditional school practices, philosophical concepts, historical and current figures, educational movements, multicultural communities, local to global transitions, national/internatio nal and comparative education, educational programs in various regions around the world, impact and effectiveness of NGO activities and global institutions, indigenous education,  etc.  Importantly, it looks for overviews and discussions in peace education about context based schooling practices – curriculum, discipline, classroom management, assessment & evaluation, educational policy and accounts regarding any members involved in schooling.   Importantly, it seeks works that venture to understand how peace education might be distinguished as a field of scholarship and research from other educational traditions.

Notes for Prospective Authors:

Expressions of interest including a 1,000 word should be sent to the Editor by: November 15th, 2010

Please contact Jeannie Lum (jlum@hawaii. edu), if you have inquiries regarding your topic prior to submitting your proposal.  

If selected, submissions should be between 5,000 – 9,000 words and follow the journal’s style requirements. Details can be found at http://www.tandf. co.uk/journals/ journal.asp? issn=1740- 0201&linktype=44

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Negri

FROM EMPIRE TO COMMONWEALTH: COMMUNIST THEORY AND CONTEMPORARY PRAXIS

Call for Papers
From Empire to Commonwealth: Communist Theory and Contemporary Praxis

Conference to be held at the University of Wollongong, 
25-26 November 2010

With the publication of Commonwealth in 2009 Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri’s three part series (which started with Empire and continued with Multitude) is complete. The series constitutes an almost unparalleled attempt to revitalise emancipatory communist politics for our time. Drawing on the Italian traditions of operaismo and autonomia and combining them with post‐structuralism, Hardt and Negri attempt a radical reworking of the basis of anti‐capitalist thought. Following the disasters of the 20th Century, two directions seemed open to radical thought: one denied the specificity of late capitalism and insisted that nothing had fundamentally changed while the other asserted that everything had changed and that the revolutionary transformation of society was no longer possible.

Hardt and Negri reject both these alternatives. They maintain the Marxian critique of capitalism, and emphasise the emancipatory potential of labour by attempting a challenging rethinking of the revolutionary project. They do so in a way which refuses the dominant ideologies of global capitalism, is heretical to orthodox Marxism, is refreshingly different from the staid left liberalism and reheated social democracy typical of the Academy, and resonates with struggles across the globe.

At ‘From Empire to Commonwealth’ we would like to open up a space for critical dialogue about Hardt and Negri’s work, their understanding of the world, their politics, the traditions with which they engage and the criticisms they have faced. We would also like to generate our own ideas and critiques and contribute to the development of emancipatory and rebellious theories of the world.

While this conference takes place within the boundaries of the university we would like to position ourselves on the edge of this space, challenging both the demarcations which separate the university from the rest of society and struggling within the university to open up the horizon of what and how we can think.

We are seeking papers on, but not limited to, the follow topics. Presentations that defy the genre of academic conferences are welcome:

·  The politics of love

· Affective, precarious and immaterial labour

·  Feminism and autonomy

· Empire as a theory of international relations

· Capitalism and the control society

· The intellectual history of autonomist Marxism

· Queer struggles against capitalism

· Post-structuralism and anti-capitalism

· Multitude and class composition

· Labour and value in contemporary capitalism

· Contemporary anti-capitalist politics

· Identity and subjectivity

Please email abstracts of approximately 200 words to Alexander Brown at: alexandersragtimeband@gmail.com by 30 July 2010. Further information will be posted on the conference blog, http://fromempiretocommmonwealth.wordpress.com as it becomes available. We are considering publishing the conference papers.

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