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Werner Bonefeld

STUDIES IN SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THOUGHT ANNUAL CONFERENCE – POWER AND RESISTANCE

June 15-16, 2012
University of Sussex, Brighton

Keynote Speakers:
Werner Bonefeld (York)
Alberto Toscano (Goldsmiths)

While governments around the world have initiated austerity measures on a grand scale and have even been ousted in favour of technocratic administrations, pockets of sustained resistance continue to manifest themselves. Whether it is the populist Occupy movement, ultra-left theorists of Communisation, anti-cuts protesters, or even the rioters who took to the streets of London and beyond, the struggle against the apparent status quo continues. When taken in the light of the Arab Spring, questions must be asked in regards to the relationship between resistance and revolution. These movements managed to turn a tide of resistance into a force for revolution. Is this a paradigm-shift in the way this relationship must be thought?

Alongside these movements and despite the optimism generated by them, the power of the governments to crush, de-legitimise, and ignore opposition appears to remain. Some critics blame a lack of coherent message and agenda; others say that the forces of opposition are not dealing with the reality of the situation. This critique, however, does not have the last word. These forms of resistance, in their many guises, challenge the state’s belief that it has a monopoly on reality. They challenge the very legitimacy of the state to disseminate the status quo and, therefore, represent a radical alternative even if they do not, or cannot, dictate what the alternative may be. What role do the concepts of power and resistance play in our analysis of the current situation? Do they require a reassessment or does the contemporary conjuncture simply represent a reassertion of the same old forces in a different guise?

Power is one of the core concepts of social and political thought. Yet there is plenty of disagreement about what is, how it functions and how it should be contested. Our present conjuncture is witnessing many different manifestations of power and resistance. However, there is a lack of serious theoretical engagement with the current situation. We are seeking papers that engage theoretically with the current situation, and which emphasise the central roles of the concepts of power and resistance. Possible theoretical frameworks include, but are not limited to, theories of biopolitics, instrumental reason, critical theory, post-colonialism, discourse and democratic theory, structuralism and post-structuralism, recognition, soft-power, hegemony, world-systems, sovereignty, legality, and legitimacy.

Programme:

Day 1: June 15, 2012 (All talks unless otherwise noted will be held in Fulton 107)

9-10 – Registration

10-1045 – Gianandrea Manfredi (Sussex), Understanding the structural form of resistance and the processes by which resistant social spaces are negated

1045-1130 – Jeffery Nicholas (Providence College/CASEP London Metropolitan University), Reason, Resistance and Revolution: Occupy’s Nascent Democratic Practice

1130-1215 – Svenja Bromberg (Goldsmiths), A critique of Badiou’s and Ranciere’s notion of emancipation

1215-1315 – Lunch

1315-1400 – Khafiz Tapdygovich Kerimov (American University in Bulgaria), From Epistemic Violence to Respecting the Differend: The Fate of Eurocentrism in the Discourse of Human Sciences

1400-1445 – Marta Resmini (KU Leuven), Participation as Surveillance? Counter-democracy versus Governmentality

1445-1515 – Coffee Break

1515-1600 – Alastair Gray (Sussex), Activity Without Purpose: Parrhesia, The Unsayable and The Riots

1600-1645 – Zoe Sutherland (Sussex) & Rob Lucas (Independent Researcher) – A Theory of Current Struggles

1645-1700 – Coffee Break

1700-1900 – Keynote: Werner Bonefeld (York) (Fulton Lecture Theatre A)

Day 2: June 16, 2012 (All talks unless otherwise noted will be held in Fulton 102)

1045-1145 – Registration

1145-1230 – Sarit Larry (Boston College), The Status of Vagueness: Mythical Events and the Israeli Social Justice Movement

1230-1315 – Mehmet Erol (York), Bringing Class Back In: The case of Tekel Resistance in Turkey

1315-1430 – Lunch

1430-1515 – Torsten Menge (Georgetown Univesity), A deflationary conception of social power

1515-1600 – Sarah Burton (University of Cambridge), Reimagining Resistance: misrule and the place of the fantastic in John Holloway’s anti-power

1600-1645 – Jorge Ollero Perán & Fernando Garcia-Quero (University of Granada), Can ethics be conceived as an economic institution? An interdisciplinary approach to the critique of neoliberal ethics

1645-1700 – Coffee Break

1700-1900 – Keynote: Alberto Toscano (Goldsmiths) (Arts A1)

Please email ssptconference2012@gmail.com to register and check http://ssptjournal.wordpress.com for more information. There will be a £15 conference fee (£7.50 for one-day) payable in cash on the day to help cover expenses.

 

*****END*****

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Edward Said

Edward Said

2012 EDWARD W. SAID MEMORIAL LECTURE

The lecture, entitled ‘What’s Left in Postcolonial Studies?’ will be delivered by Professor Benita Parry.

6pm, Tuesday, 29th May

Mathematics Institute (Room MS 0.3), University of Warwick 

Sponsored by the Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies at Warwick, the Memorial Lecture series has been set up to honour the life and work of Edward W. Said, who died in 2003. Said, who was Professor of Comparative Literature at Columbia University in New York, was an internationally renowned literary and cultural critic and one of the foremost public intellectuals of our time. Besides his work as a cultural critic, Edward Said was very well known as an impassioned spokesperson for the Palestinian people in their struggle for justice, freedom and autonomy, and as a commentator on Middle Eastern politics more generally. His commitment to secular humanism and his engaged style of intellectual practice has served as a model and inspiration for many of his readers, both within and outside the academy.

Benita Parry is Professor Emerita of English and Comparative Literary Studies at the University of Warwick. She has published widely in postcolonial studies and the literatures of colonialism and imperialism. Her many publications include the monographs, Delusions and Discoveries:India in the British Imagination, 1880-1930(1972, rev. 1998) and Conrad and Imperialism: Ideological Boundaries and Visionary Frontiers (1984); the collection, Postcolonial Studies: A Materialist Critique (2004); and the edited volumes, Cultural Representations of Imperialism: Edward Said and the Gravity of History (1998) and Postcolonial Criticism and Theory (1999).

Useful links:

Getting to Warwick: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/visiting/directions

The Mathematics Institute is located in the Zeeman Building: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/visiting/maps/interactive/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Books

Books

THE POLITICS OF POSTCOLONIALISM

The Politics of Postcolonialism: Empire, Nation and Resistance
Rumina Sethi

Paperback | 9780745323633 | £17.99 / $28
Hardback | 9780745323640 | £60 / $90

To buy the book visit: http://www.plutobooks.com/display.asp?K=9780745323633

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ADOPTED ON 20 UNIVERSITY COURSES

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‘This book develops an argument that is both even-handed and radical. Rumina Sethi explores the history and the difficulties of post-colonial theory and without jettisoning its value she urges quite fresh thinking about its political and social implications.’ — Dame Gillian Beer, King Edward VII Professor Emeritus, University of Cambridge

‘Rumina Sethi challenges postcolonial critics to put their feet back on the ground and to link the postcolonial once again to the political activism by which it has always been inspired.’ — Robert J.C. Young, Julius Silver Professor of English & Comparative Literature at New York University

‘”If postcolonial studies is to be relevant today,” Rumina Sethi argues, “it must become the voice of the people and theorize about movements against globalization, not become part of its grand design.” Her critical analysis of the “politics of postcolonialism” and the lack of constructive dialogue with the Marxist perspective, interweaving with analysis of globalization and the state of “postcoloniality,” seeks to overcome the academic ossification of concepts that should be integrated with social change and activism.’ — Noam Chomsky

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In a period of global restructuring, unrestricted capital has eroded the traditional distinctions between nations and nationhood. In ‘The Politics of Postcolonialism’, Rumina Sethi devises a new form of postcolonial studies that makes sense of these dramatic changes.

Returning to the origins of the discipline, Sethi identifies it as a tool for political protest and activism among people of the third world. Using a sophisticated mix of spatial theory and local politics, she examines the uneven terrain of contemporary anti-capitalism and political upsurges in Africa, Asia and Latin America, emphasising postcolonial politics, dissent and resistance. Her analysis shows that as the traditional means of direct political control have largely lost their hold, postcolonial cultures, now dominated by neoliberalism, need to seek fresh ways to express their discontent.

This original and persuasive work frees the discipline from its current preoccupation with hybridity and multiculturalism, giving students of politics, cultural studies and international relations a new perspective on postcolonialism.

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RUMINA SETHI is a Professor in the department of English and Cultural Studies at Panjab University, Chandigarh, India. She is the author of ‘Myths of the Nation: National Identity and Literary Representation’ (1999). She wrote her doctoral thesis atTrinityCollege,Cambridge, and was a British Academy Fellow at Wolfson College, Oxford. She was awarded the Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship in 2006.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Acknowledgements

1. Postcolonialism and its Discontents: An introduction
2. The End of the Nation?
3. Globalization and Protest
4. The United States and Postcolonialism
5. Conclusion: New Directions

Notes
Bibliography
Index

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We need all these details to be able to be able to process a request. Inspection copies are provided with an invoice that is cancelled if the book is adopted for a course, or returned in a resalable condition.

You can also request inspection copies using our online form at www.plutobooks.com/lecturers.asp.

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REVIEW COPIES

If you would like to request a copy of a book to review for a journal or other publication, please email our publicity manger Jon Wheatley atjonw@plutobooks.com, providing your contact details and the name of the publication you intend to review the book for.

ORDERS

To place an order, visit our website at www.plutobooks.com.

Best regards,
Jonathan Maunder
Academic Marketing
Pluto Press
Email: jonm@plutobooks.com
Tel: 020 8348 2724
www.plutobooks.com

 

**END**

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

THE POST-COLONIAL STATE – TARIQ AMIN-KHAN

Global Capitalism

 

http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415891592/

New book on the Post-Colonial State:

Tariq Amin-Khan, The Post-Colonial State in the Era of Capitalist Globalization: Historical, Political and Theoretical Approaches to State Formation. New York: Routledge, 2012.

ISBN 978-0-415-89159-2.

 State formation in post-colonial societies differed greatly from the formation of the Western capitalist state. The latter has been extensively studied, while a coherent grasp of the post-colonial state – despite the recent ethnographical explorations – has remained elusive. Amin-Khan provides a critical, historical and contemporary understanding of post-colonial state formations in Asia andAfrica, and articulates how this process differed for Latin American states.

 A common signifier of the post-colonial state is the retention of the unitary colonial state structure by its ruling classes. This legacy has reinscribed the colonial-era social relations in post-colonial societies, and consolidated the power of the ‘overdeveloped’ civil and military bureaucracy. At the same time, the US was able to remove ‘nationalist’ leadership in Africa and Asia to create client post-colonial states that have remained beholden to Western states, transnational corporations and international financial institutions.

The analysis of these developments shows that the vast majority of post-colonial states have remained proto-capitalist – with feudal landholders and bureaucratic elite having a stranglehold on state power. In contrast, those few countries (India, South Africa and others) that have emerged as capitalist post-colonial states have been able to partly shake off the colonial legacy and loosen the noose of imperialist domination. The final two chapters ground theory by concretely analyzing the nature and development trajectories of the states of India and Pakistan as two distinct examples respectively of capitalist and proto-capitalist states – which can be generalized as the two state forms prevalent in post-colonial societies.

Original source: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/now-out-tariq-amin-khan-the-post-colonial-state-in-the-era-of-capitalist-globalization

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Frantz Fanon

IS FANON FINISHED?

Call for Participants: Is Fanon Finished?

30-31 March 2012

The American University of Paris invites proposals for a two-day interdisciplinary conference that aims to gather critical and experimental ‘translations’ of Fanon’s ideas into the present.

This is a conference organized by the Master of Arts in Cultural Translation Program at AUP with the support of Academic Affairs, the Master of Arts in Middle East and Islamic Studies Program, the Master of Arts in Global Communications Program and the Master of Arts in International Affairs Program.

This year, the 50th anniversary of his death and of the publication of The Wretched of the Earth, Frantz Fanon’s life, work and contemporary relevance have been widely discussed. The proliferation of celebrations, conferences, exhibitions and publications in itself expresses an apparent necessity: we must understand where we stand on Fanon if we are to grasp our present. To some he constitutes the archetypal ‘Black Atlantic’ subject, one of the first to articulate the effects of colonialism and racism on occupied peoples; to others, he is an advocate of violence as the only means for those subjugated to gain psychical and territorial independence. To all, it appears he is a figure with whom we must reckon. Yet the modes of commemoration and tribute run the risk of monumentalizing Fanon’s contribution, packaging and parking it in a suspended moment in time.

What is it exactly that we want to hear Fanon say? How does his work resonate through contemporary events, objects or circumstances? Starting from the understanding that extensive work has been done recently to articulate and place his writing and practice as psychiatrist, black revolutionary and anti-colonial theorist, we would like to focus here on ‘testing’ his ideas against the present. What is translatable and what must be discarded? As a writer thoroughly ensconced in his own context, is there anything to actualize from his praxis? His multiple geographies (Martinique, France, Algeria, Tunisia, Ghana), his anticipation of the problems faced by postcolonial states, and his configuration of a universal free subject, tend to speak more easily across the half century that divides him from us than do his normative views of sexuality or his conception of a future that could only come from a violent breaking with the past. But have we really finished following through his lines of thought?

In the spirit of his praxis as keen observer of and actor in the present, we would like to invite speakers to focus on a specific aspect of Fanon’s work that traverses their own work and context, be it academic, artistic, activist, or a mix of the three. How do Fanonian themes help clarify, or instead obscure, a sense of our own situatedness in the present?

We aim to organize this conference as a series of panels that open out onto discussion and debate amongst speakers, and with active participation from our graduate students here at AUP.

We invite speakers to address issues related, but not limited, to the following themes:

–       The Arab Revolutions and non-violence
–       Fanon as writer and witness: speaking for the other(s)
–       Imagining a non-Eurocentric universality
–       Rethinking African nation-states or a default panafricanism
–       Urban cities of the Global South: locating agency
–       France and Algeria: 50th anniversary of independence
–       Applying a Fanonian method to contemporary forms of cultural resistance
–       “Fortress France” or the metropolis occupied by the ex-colonies
–       Palestine as last colonized territory
–       The Occupy movements as inspired by a South to North circulation of ideas
–       The effectiveness of violence as an engine of political change
–       Why teach Fanon today?

Please send an abstract (350 words) and a short biography to fanon.at.aup@gmail.com no later than 1 February 2012. Registration is free.

Organizing Committee: Sousan Hammad, and Lisa Damon

For enquiries, contact: Fanon.at.AUP@gmail.com

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub,Bangor, northWales)  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

CLR James

GRASSROOTS POLITICS IN THE POSTCOLONY

Call for Papers
Race/Ethnicity: Multidisciplinary Global Contexts (Indiana University Press)
Volume 6, Number 3 (Spring 2013)
Grassroots Politics in the Postcolony

Franco Barchiesi (Ohio State University), Guest Editor

Submissions are invited to explore the politics of contention and social movements in the postcolonial world (Africa, Asia, and Latin America), with particular regard to the ways in which race and ethnicity relate to identities and claims revolving around class, gender, nationality, and religion. Comparative discussions of social contestation in different societies are welcome.

Guest Editor Franco Barchiesi, Associate Professor in the Department of African American and African Studies at the Ohio State University, and the editorial staff of Race/Ethnicity invite submissions for Volume 6, Number 3, entitled “Grassroots Politics in the Postcolony”. We welcome submissions from activists, advocates and practitioners working on relevant issues, as well as from scholars in the social sciences and the humanities. In this issue, we look to engage the  following questions:

* How are racial and ethnic identities implicated in collective mobilization (including rural, labor, women, youth, indigenous, and religious movements) in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the “global South”?
* Is the concept of “social movement” useful to understand contemporary forms of social contention and grassroots politics?
* How do racial inequalities shape local contentious politics and everyday forms of social contestation?
* How do claims for racial and ethnic justice relate to grassroots politics in realities of economic liberalization and privatization?
* In which ways do intersections of race and ethnicity with current social conflicts interrogate the legacies of nationalism and decolonization?
* Do processes of migration and diaspora internationalize postcolonial political identities?
* How do grassroots identities, and their elaborations of race and ethnicity, interrogate political institutions and ideas of citizenship and civil society?
* How have postcolonial social movements responded to the global economic crisis and its impact on racial and ethnic dynamics?

Contributions can include, but are not limited to, case studies, theoretical discussions, and experience-based reflections.

Papers must be received by September 15, 2012 to be considered for publication in this issue.
Submission of artwork for the cover that relates to the theme of the issue is welcome. See website at http://www.raceethnicity.org/coverart.html for submission guidelines.

Please send manuscript publications to the managing editor: Leslie Shortlidge shortlidge.2@osu.edu

See Style Guidelines at http://www.raceethnicity.org  

Submission of artwork for the cover that relates to the theme of the issue is welcome. See website for submission guidelines.

Race/Ethnicity: Multidisciplinary Global Contexts encourages and welcomes contributions by scholars, researchers, grassroots activists, policy advocates, and organizations.

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

The Incident

LAW AND THE POSTCOLONIAL

Law and the Postcolonial: Ethics, Politics, & Economy

Series edited by Prof Denise Ferreira da Silva, Queen Mary University of London; Dr Mark A. Harris, La Trobe University and Dr Brenna Bhandar, University of Kent

Law and the Postcolonial: Ethics, Politics, & Economy seeks to expand the critical scope of racial, postcolonial, and global theory and analysis, focusing on how the global juridico-economic apparatus has been, and continues to be, shaped by the Colonial and the Racial structurings of power. It includes works that seek to move beyond the previous privileging of culture in considerations of racial and postcolonial subjectivity to offer a more comprehensive engagement with the legal, economic and moral issues of the global present.

The following categories of works have been identified which would fit with the aims and objectives of the series:

1. Architectures, Apparatuses, and Procedures: with a focus on the legal-economic institutions, frameworks, agreements, and processes, including multilateral agreements, the state, international financial institutions, International NGOs, etc.

2. Dispossession, Displacement and Obliteration: with a focus on the various strategies of appropriation of land and resources, exploitation of labour, processes that create forced and voluntary displacement of populations, or threaten or cause the eradication of local population

3. Occupation, Intervention, and Detention: with a focus on policing strategies and the related moral statements that sustain them, including humanitarian interventions, military occupations, the criminalization and detention of migrant works; the criminalization of economically dispossessed urban populations and racial and ethnic collectives

4. Grammars, Discourses, and Practices: with the focus on structures and mechanism of symbolic representation, and related moral (including religious), and legal frameworks, such as the Human Rights framework, with particular attention to how they enable the articulation of political subjects

This interdisciplinary series welcomes exclusively theoretical essays that engage with the conceptual and analytical questions detailed above and discussions of how particular conceptual approaches can illuminate existing processes and help in the study of the global landscape. In addition monographs and edited volumes, using qualitative and quantitative methods with a strong theoretical grounding, which deal with these questions and processes are also welcomed.

To discuss or propose an idea for a book, please contact the series editors:

Prof Denise Ferreira da Silva, d.ferreiradasilva@qmul.ac.uk, School of Business & Management,
Queen Mary College, University of London, London E1 4NS, United Kingdom, Tel. +44 (0) 20 7882 8414

Dr Brenna Bhandar, B.Bhandar@kent.ac.uk, Kent Law School, University of Kent, Kent CT2 7NS, United Kingdom, Tel. +44 (1227) 824774

Dr Mark A. Harris, Mark.Harris@latrobe.edu.au, School of Law, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3086, Australia, Tel. +61 (3) 94791276

Guidelines for preparing a book proposal can be found at: http://www.routledge.com/info/authors

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

SEVENTH ANNUAL EDWARD SAID MEMORIAL LECTURE

The University of Warwick
The Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies, invites you to

The Seventh Annual Edward Said Memorial Lecture

By Mourid Barghouti, poet, essayist, author of the acclaimed “I Saw Ramallah” (1997)

On Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011
at 6 pm
Warwick Arts Centre Conference Room
Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry

The lecture is free and open to the public.
Complimentary tickets must be obtained by calling the Warwick Arts Centre Box office at 02476 524 524. For directions consult: www.warwickartscentre.co.uk

RSVP and  Enquiries: Department of English 02476 524 928, http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/events/edwardsaid/

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor,  north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

World Crisis

INSURGENT NOTES ISSUE 3

Just to let you know that our on-line journal Insurgent Notes has just posted issue No. 3. (contents below): http://insurgentnotes.com

Loren Goldner

March 2011

Introduction

From Cairo to Madison, The Old Mole Comes Up For An Early Spring, PDF Version, Loren Goldner

Bleeding Wisconsin, PDF Version, S. Artesian

Rethinking Educational Failure and Reimagining an Educational Future, PDF Version, John Garvey

How the French pension system works, PDF Version, Henri Simon

Of Forests and Trees, PDF Version, S. Artesian

Anti-Capitalism or Anti-Imperialism? Interwar Authoritarian and Fascist Sources of A Reactionary Ideology: The Case of the Bolivian MNR, PDF Version, Loren Goldner

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

MUSIC, POLITICS AND AGENCY

A one-day conference presented by:
Centre for Cultural Studies Research, University of East London
Faculty of Social Sciences, Open University
Media Industries Research Centre, University of Leeds

May 20th 2011
11:00 – 18:00
University of East London
Docklands Campus
Room EB.2.43
Permalink: http://culturalstudiesresearch.org/?p=694

Can music change anything, or does its potency lie merely in its exemplary status as an organised human activity? What are the effects of power relations on music and to what extent is music itself a site at which power relations can be reinforced, challenged or subverted? What are the economic, affective, corporeal or ideological mechanisms through which these processes occur? Has the age of  recorded music as a potent social force now passed, a relic of the twentieth century; or with the music industry in crisis, is music culture in fact the first post-capitalist sector of the cultural economy, only now emerging from the long shadow of the culture industry? What historical or contemporary examples can we draw on to address some or all of these questions?

This conference is programmed by Jeremy Gilbert (Centre for Cultural Studies Research, University of East London), David Hesmondhalgh (Media Industries Research Centre, Institute of Communications Studies) and Jason Toynbee (Centre for Research on Socio-Cultural Change, Open University).

The conference is free to attend, but pre-registration is recommended.
To register email j.gilbert@uel.ac.uk with the subject “Music, Politics and Agency Registration”
For any further information, email j.gilbert@uel.ac.uk

UEL Docklands Campus is best reached via Cyprus DLR (Docklands Light Railway) station, which is literally located at the campus.
For information about the campus, see http://www.uel.ac.uk/campuses/docklands.htm

Room EB.2.43 is on the second floor of the main building (‘East Building’) which is to the left of the main square upon entering from the square from Cyprus DLR .
See http://journeyplanner.tfl.gov.uk/user/XSLT_TRIP_REQUEST2?language=en to plan your journey.

Speakers and Papers

Anne Danielsen
Power, mediation, and aesthetics in the music of Public Enemy

Anne Danielsen is Professor and Head of Research in the Department of Musicology at the University of Oslo. Her publications include Pleasure and Presence: the Funk Grooves of James Brown and Parliament (2006) and Musical Rhythm in the Age of Digital Reproduction (2010).

Barry Shank
The political agency of music

Barry Shank teaches popular music, American studies and cultural theory in the department of Comparative Studies at Ohio State University.  He is the author ofDissonant Identities: The Rock’n’Roll Scene in Austin, Texas and A Token of My Affection: Greeting Cards and American Business Culture.  He is currently completing a book for Duke University Press entitled Silence, Noise, Beauty: The Political Agency of Music.

David Hesmondhalgh
Music and human flourishing

David Hesmondhalgh teaches and researches at the University of Leeds. His books include Creative Labour: Media Work in Three Cultural Industries (2011), co-written with Sarah Baker, and Western Music and its Others: Difference, Appropriation and Representation in Music (with Georgina Born, 2000).

Helen Reddington
The sound of women musicians in the punk era

Helen Reddington lectures in songwriting and production on the University of East London’s Music Cultures BA. Her research interests include the punk subculture and women’s engagement with music technology. Her book The Lost Women of Rock Music will appear revised in paperback in January 2012 and a double CD of archive material by her punk-pop band is due to be released by the label Damaged Goods later this year.

Jeremy Gilbert
Music after capitalism? Culture, creativity and markets

Jeremy Gilbert is Reader in Cultural Studies at the University of East London. His publications include (with Ewan Pearson) Discographies: Dance Music Culture and the Politics of Sound (Routledge 1999) and Anticapitalism and Culture: Radical Theory and Popular Politics  (Berg 2008). He is co-director of the Centre for Cultural Studies Research, editor of new formations and a founder member of Lucky Cloud Sound System.

John Street
Music as political thought and action: the arguments and the evidence

John Street is a professor of politics at the University of East Anglia. His latest book is Music and Politics, which is due to be published by Polity later this year. He is a member of the editorial group of the journal Popular Music.

Martin Stokes
Scale, agency and music in religious movements

Martin Stokes is University Lecturer in Ethnomusicology and Tutorial Fellow at St. John’s College, University of Oxford. Martin is an ethnomusicologist with a particular interest in social and cultural theory. His most recent book The Republic of Love: Cultural Intimacy in Turkish Popular Music, has just been published by the University of Chicago Press (2010).

Tim Lawrence
Rhizomatic musicianship: Arthur Russell and after

Tim Lawrence is a Reader in Cultural Studies at the University of East London and the programme leader of the Music Culture: Theory and Production degree. He is the author of Love Saves the Day: A History of American Dance Music Culture, 1970-79 (Duke University Press, 2003) and Hold On to Your Dreams: Arthur Russell and the Downtown Music Scene, 1973-92 (Duke University Press, 2009). He is a founding member of the Centre for Cultural Studies Research and Lucky Cloud Sound System.

Tuulikki Pietilä
Body politic: youth musics in the “New South Africa”

Tuulikki Pietilä is a social anthropologist and a research fellow in the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies. She has published a monograph and a number of articles on trade and gender in Kilimanjaro and the post-colonial Africa more broadly. Currently she is studying South African music and music industry.

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

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Miles Straum

LABOR CRISIS IN CHINA

The Center for Place, Culture and Politics and the Committee on Globalization and Social Change
Present:
LABOR CRISIS IN CHINA
A lecture by Ching Kwan Lee
Professor of Sociology, UCLA

TUESDAY MARCH 22, 2011 at 4 pm
Skylight Room

C.K. Lee’s research focuses on the politics of rights and the changing citizenship regime in China, examining how ordinary Chinese mobilize legal and extra-legal resources to battle for their rights as citizens, forging new notions of property, labor and land, and engaging the local and central governments. She is most recently the author of Against the Law: Labor Protests in China’s Rustbelt and Sunbelt (UC Press, 2007), which received the Sociology of Labor Book Award in 2008.

Roundtable discussion to follow with:

REBECCA KARL: Associate Professor of History at New York University. She is the author most recently of Mao Zedong and China in the Twentieth Century World: A Concise History (Duke UP 2010).

PETER KWONG: Professor of Asian American Studies and Urban Affairs and Planning at Hunter College, as well as Professor of Sociology at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, and author of numerous books including Forbidden Workers: Chinese Illegal Immigrants and American Labor.

DAVID HARVEY, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography

PETER HITCHCOCK, Associate Director of the Center for Place, Culture  and Politics and author of The Long Space: Transnationalism and Postcolonial Form (Stanford UP 2010)

CUNY Graduate Center *365 Fifth Avenue @ 34th Street* Free and open to the public

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

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Imperialism

IMPERIALISM, EMPIRE AND GENOCIDE

Please attend this excellent event and spread the word!

Institute of Commonwealth Studies, University of London

Workshop Series: ‘Imperialism, Empire and Genocide’ 14th March 2pm-4pm

Venue: Chancellor’s Hall, Senate House, Malet Street, London

The British Empire seems to be making a come back. Historians, politicians and journalists now speak about the positive aspects of colonialism and empire. During a state visit to East Africa in 2005 the then Chancellor Gordon Brown, commented that Britain must stop apologising for its colonial past and, instead, celebrate its achievements. He said, ‘I’ve talked to many people on my visit to Africa and the days of Britain having to apologise for its colonial history are over. We should celebrate much of our past rather than apologise for it.’ Some scholarly work has followed the fashion suggesting that empire is more necessary in the 21st century than ever before. The new approach to the British Empire insists that we must undertake a balance view of the positive contributions made to instilling democratic values, development and political institutions. 

This series of workshops will take a different approach. Speakers will shed light, empirically and conceptually, on the tortured relationship between empire and modernity, colonialism and progress, disclosing the story and contemporary legacy of colonial genocide, imperial conquest and environmental destruction.

Speakers: Professor John Newsinger, Richard Gott and Dr Tom Lawson.

Professor John Newsinger (Professor of Modern History at Bath Spa University), Author of The Blood Never Dried: A People’s History of the British Empire, Orwell’s Politics, United Irishman, Rebel City, Dangerous Men: The SAS and Popular Culture, British Counterinsurgency (new edition 2012). John Newsinger will examine histories of the British Empire, the uses to which they have been put and the crimes they neglect and leave out.

Richard Gott (former Latin America correspondent and features editor for The Guardian, currently an honorary research fellow at the Institute for the Study of the Americas, University of London). Author of Hugo Chávez and the Bolivarian Revolution (2005),Cuba: A New History (2004). Richard Gott will be talking about his most recent book, to be published in the autumn, entitled “Britain’s Empire: Resistance, Repression and Revolt”. The book is conceived as a revisionist history of Empire, written from the perspective of the subject peoples.

Dr Tom Lawson (Reader in History, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Winchester). Author of The Church of England and the Holocaust: Christianity, Memory and Nazism (2006) and Debates on the Holocaust (2010). Tom Lawson will be talking about his latest research into the colonisation of Tasmania where the British government is often portrayed as the benign protector of the Aborigines, unable to curb the destructive urges of the settler population. However Tom will argue this paper argues that what amounted to a genocidal policy was both formally approved in Downing Street, and emerged from an imperial culture that began at home.

This is a free event, however, to confirm attendance please email Ms Olga Jimenez, Events Manager
olga.jimenez@sas.ac.uk

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com