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Postcolonial

Postcolonial

POSTCOLONIAL THEORY AND THE SPECTRE OF CAPITAL

Vivek Chibber, Professor of Sociology at New York University (NYU) and the author of Locked in Place: State-Building and Late Industrialization in India (2003), will present his new book at SOAS on: Thursday 17 October, 7pm, SOAS main building, DLT (G2).

Chair: Gilbert Achcar, Development Studies

From the book’s back cover:

Postcolonial theory has become enormously influential as a framework for understanding the Global South. It is also a school of thought popular because of its rejection of the supposedly universalizing categories of the Enlightenment. In this devastating critique, mounted on behalf of the radical Enlightenment tradition, Vivek Chibber offers the most comprehensive response yet to postcolonial theory. Focusing on the hugely popular Subaltern Studies project, Chibber shows that its foundational arguments are based on a series of analytical and historical misapprehensions. He demonstrates that it is possible to affirm a universalizing theory without succumbing to Eurocentrism or reductionism.

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/postcolonial-theory-and-the-spectre-of-capital-with-vivek-chibber-soas-17-october

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Postcolonial

Postcolonial

POSTCOLONIAL THEORY AND THE SPECTER OF CAPITAL

By Vivek Chibber

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Published April 2013

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A provocative intellectual assault on the Subalternists’ foundational work.

Postcolonial theory has become enormously influential as a framework for understanding the Global South. It is also a school of thought popular because of its rejection of the supposedly universalizing categories of the Enlightenment. In this devastating critique, mounted on behalf of the radical Enlightenment tradition, Vivek Chibber offers the most comprehensive response yet to postcolonial theory. Focusing on the hugely popular Subaltern Studies project, Chibber shows that its foundational arguments are based on a series of analytical and historical misapprehensions. He demonstrates that it is possible to affirm a universalizing theory without succumbing to Eurocentrism or reductionism.

POSTCOLONIAL THEORY AND THE SPECTER OF CAPITAL promises to be a historical milestone in contemporary social theory.

———————–

“With its focus on cultural identities and mixtures, postcolonial theory ignored the larger context of capitalist relations and thus limited its scope to Western academia where it excelled in the game of growing and profiting from the liberal guilt feeling. Chibber’s book simply sets the record straight, bringing postcolonialism down from cultural heights to where it belongs, into the very heart of global capitalist processes. The book we were all waiting for, a burst of fresh air dispelling the stale aroma of pseudo-radical academic establishment.” – Slavoj Žižek

“In this scrupulous and perceptive analysis, Vivek Chibber successfully shows that the ‘universalizing categories of Enlightenment thought’ emerge unscathed from the criticisms of postcolonial theorists. He shows further that—perhaps ironically—Subaltern Studies greatly underestimates the role of subaltern agency in bringing about the transformations that they attribute to the European bourgeoisie. Chibber’s analysis also provides a very valuable account of the actual historical sociology of modern European development, of Indian peasant mobilization and activism, and much else. It is a very significant contribution.” – Noam Chomsky

“In this outstanding work—a model of clarity in its architecture and argumentation—key theorists of the ‘Subaltern’ and of postcoloniality have met their most formidable interlocutor and critic yet. Chibber’s critique of postcolonial theory and the historical sociological studies associated with it is, at the same time, a vigorous and welcome defense of the enduring value of certain Enlightenment universals as an analytical framework to both understand and radically change the world we live in.” – Achin Vanaik

“Vivek Chibber has written a stunning critique of postcolonial theory as represented by the Subaltern Studies school. While eschewing all polemics, he shows that their project is undermined by their paradoxical acceptance of an essentially liberal-Whig interpretation of the bourgeois revolutions and capitalist development in the West, which provides the foundation for their fundamental assertion of the difference of the East. Through a series of painstaking empirical and conceptual studies Chibber proceeds to overturn the central pillars of the Subalternists’ framework, while sustaining the credibility of Enlightenment theories. It is a bravura performance that cannot help but shake up our intellectual and political landscape.” – Robert Brenner

“POSTCOLONIAL THEORY AND THE SPECTER OF CAPITAL is a must-read book for students of comparative politics and social theory. Vivek Chibber presents a forceful challenge to the Subaltern Studies school and to postcolonial theory more broadly. Arguing with great clarity, Chibber raises fundamental objections to their ideas about capitalism, power, and agency, and presents an alternative account of these ideas. Most fundamentally, he rejects the fundamental division between ‘East and West’ associated with postcolonial theory and defends the ‘universalizing categories of Enlightenment thought.’ This is a major contribution that is bound to reshape debate on these important issues.” – Joshua Cohen

“In this book, Vivek Chibber has carried out a thoroughgoing dissection of Subaltern Studies. Like a highly skilled anatomist, he lays bare the skeleton, the nervous system, the arteries and veins of this school … In the process the reader is also exposed to the nitty-gritty of a materialist historiography.” – Amiya Kumar Bagchi

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Not Even Marxist? Paul M. Heideman examines Chris Taylor’s critique of Vivek Chibber:

http://www.versobooks.com/blogs/1297-not-even-marxist-paul-m-heideman-examines-chris-taylor-s-critique-of-vivek-chibber

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-from-verso-postcolonial-theory-and-the-specter-of-capital-by-vivek-chibber

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Edward Said

Edward Said

2012 EDWARD W. SAID MEMORIAL LECTURE

The lecture, entitled ‘What’s Left in Postcolonial Studies?’ will be delivered by Professor Benita Parry.

6pm, Tuesday, 29th May

Mathematics Institute (Room MS 0.3), University of Warwick 

Sponsored by the Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies at Warwick, the Memorial Lecture series has been set up to honour the life and work of Edward W. Said, who died in 2003. Said, who was Professor of Comparative Literature at Columbia University in New York, was an internationally renowned literary and cultural critic and one of the foremost public intellectuals of our time. Besides his work as a cultural critic, Edward Said was very well known as an impassioned spokesperson for the Palestinian people in their struggle for justice, freedom and autonomy, and as a commentator on Middle Eastern politics more generally. His commitment to secular humanism and his engaged style of intellectual practice has served as a model and inspiration for many of his readers, both within and outside the academy.

Benita Parry is Professor Emerita of English and Comparative Literary Studies at the University of Warwick. She has published widely in postcolonial studies and the literatures of colonialism and imperialism. Her many publications include the monographs, Delusions and Discoveries:India in the British Imagination, 1880-1930(1972, rev. 1998) and Conrad and Imperialism: Ideological Boundaries and Visionary Frontiers (1984); the collection, Postcolonial Studies: A Materialist Critique (2004); and the edited volumes, Cultural Representations of Imperialism: Edward Said and the Gravity of History (1998) and Postcolonial Criticism and Theory (1999).

Useful links:

Getting to Warwick: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/visiting/directions

The Mathematics Institute is located in the Zeeman Building: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/visiting/maps/interactive/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Incident

LAW AND THE POSTCOLONIAL

Law and the Postcolonial: Ethics, Politics, & Economy

Series edited by Prof Denise Ferreira da Silva, Queen Mary University of London; Dr Mark A. Harris, La Trobe University and Dr Brenna Bhandar, University of Kent

Law and the Postcolonial: Ethics, Politics, & Economy seeks to expand the critical scope of racial, postcolonial, and global theory and analysis, focusing on how the global juridico-economic apparatus has been, and continues to be, shaped by the Colonial and the Racial structurings of power. It includes works that seek to move beyond the previous privileging of culture in considerations of racial and postcolonial subjectivity to offer a more comprehensive engagement with the legal, economic and moral issues of the global present.

The following categories of works have been identified which would fit with the aims and objectives of the series:

1. Architectures, Apparatuses, and Procedures: with a focus on the legal-economic institutions, frameworks, agreements, and processes, including multilateral agreements, the state, international financial institutions, International NGOs, etc.

2. Dispossession, Displacement and Obliteration: with a focus on the various strategies of appropriation of land and resources, exploitation of labour, processes that create forced and voluntary displacement of populations, or threaten or cause the eradication of local population

3. Occupation, Intervention, and Detention: with a focus on policing strategies and the related moral statements that sustain them, including humanitarian interventions, military occupations, the criminalization and detention of migrant works; the criminalization of economically dispossessed urban populations and racial and ethnic collectives

4. Grammars, Discourses, and Practices: with the focus on structures and mechanism of symbolic representation, and related moral (including religious), and legal frameworks, such as the Human Rights framework, with particular attention to how they enable the articulation of political subjects

This interdisciplinary series welcomes exclusively theoretical essays that engage with the conceptual and analytical questions detailed above and discussions of how particular conceptual approaches can illuminate existing processes and help in the study of the global landscape. In addition monographs and edited volumes, using qualitative and quantitative methods with a strong theoretical grounding, which deal with these questions and processes are also welcomed.

To discuss or propose an idea for a book, please contact the series editors:

Prof Denise Ferreira da Silva, d.ferreiradasilva@qmul.ac.uk, School of Business & Management,
Queen Mary College, University of London, London E1 4NS, United Kingdom, Tel. +44 (0) 20 7882 8414

Dr Brenna Bhandar, B.Bhandar@kent.ac.uk, Kent Law School, University of Kent, Kent CT2 7NS, United Kingdom, Tel. +44 (1227) 824774

Dr Mark A. Harris, Mark.Harris@latrobe.edu.au, School of Law, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3086, Australia, Tel. +61 (3) 94791276

Guidelines for preparing a book proposal can be found at: http://www.routledge.com/info/authors

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Edward Said

6th ANNUAL EDWARD SAID MEMORIAL LECTURE

The University of Warwick
Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies, presents:

The 6th Annual Edward Said Memorial Lecture

By:

Professor EYAL WEIZMAN (Director, Centre for Research in Architecture, Goldsmiths College, London. Author of Hollow Land: Israel’s Architecture of Occupation (2007)

“Political Plastic: Spatial Politics in Israel and Palestine”

On Tuesday, March 2nd, 2010, 6 pm, in the Ramphal Building, Room RO.21

For more info: contact Professor Neil Lazarus (n.lazarus@warwick.ac.uk), or the English Department on 02476 524928

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

 

 

 

Postcolonial

Postcolonial

WHAT POSTCOLONIAL THEORY DOESN’T SAY

 

Call for Papers and Panels

A conference at the University of York, UK, 3-5 July 2010, in partnership with the University of Leeds and Manchester Metropolitan University

 Postcolonial Studies is firmly ensconced in the Anglophone metropolitan academy: the field has its own specialised journals, academic posts, postgraduate courses, and dedicated divisions within learned bodies. But how well have these configurations travelled to other locations, institutions and disciplines? What topics, questions and approaches remain unexplored? And what’s ‘theoretical’ about postcolonial theory anyway?

This conference will examine these and related questions through a set of interdisciplinary interventions aimed at assessing not only what postcolonial theory (still) doesn’t say, but also what we would like it to say: in other words, how we might best put the field’s cultural and institutional capital to use. Our intent, therefore, is not to repeat well-rehearsed debates about the field’s various failings, but rather to advance the discussion by identifying common goals and areas of enquiry. In order to promote a sense of coherence among the papers and interventions at the conference, applicants are encouraged to submit panel proposals, though paper proposals are also welcome. Possible subjects include, but are not limited to:

1. Institutional chronologies: the Reagan/Thatcher years and the rise of postcolonial studies.
2. Postcolonial theory as travelling theory: adoptions, adaptations, and critiques beyond the Anglophone metropole.
3. Neglected regions: East Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe and the Middle East.
4. Postcolonial theory and religion.
5. Postcolonial prospects: assets, liabilities and futures.
6. What’s left in/of postcolonial theory: activism, Marxism and globalisation.
7. What’s wrong with belonging? Rethinking diaspora, transnationalism and cosmopolitanism.
8. Postcolonial theory and the wars of the twenty-first century (Iraq, Afghanistan, Zimbabwe).
9. Postcolonial theory and the aesthetic: form, narrative, ‘Third World aesthetics’, the novel versus newer forms of cultural text (film, comics, graphic novels etc.)
10. Postcolonial contraband: secrets, silence and censorship.

Please send 20-minute paper proposals or panel proposals consisting of three papers, together with a brief bio, to yorkpoco@googlemail.com by October 1, 2009.

Questions and queries can be sent to the organizing committee:
Ziad Elmarsafy (ze500@york.ac.uk); Department of English, University of York
Anna Bernard (ab609@york.ac.uk ), Department of English, University of York
David Attwell (da506@york.ac.uk ), Department of English, University of York
Stuart Murray (S.F.Murray@leeds.ac.uk , Department of English, University of Leeds
Eleanor Byrne (E.Byrne@mmu.ac.uk , Department of English, Manchester Metropolitan University.

Ziad Elmarsafy
Department of English and Related Literature
University of York
Heslington, YO10 5DD
UK

Tel: 01904 433342
Fax: 01904 433372
Email: ziad12@gmail.com

‘Postcolonial Text’: http://postcolonial.org

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com