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Eric Hobsbawm

Eric Hobsbawm

HISTORY AFTER HOBSBAWM

A conference on the current trajectories of history

Starts: April 29, 2014 05:00 PM

Finishes: May 01, 2014 06:00 PM

Location: Senate House, London

A major international conference, with plenary speakers and large parallel sessions, exploring where the study of history is currently heading. The conference draws inspiration from the capacious legacy of the late Eric Hobsbawm, but is not a memorial event. We aim, rather, to bring together discussion about what we are currently doing as socially-committed historians, where we are headed, and what it means to be an historian in the twenty-first century.

Please download a copy of the draft programme here.

To register, visit https://www2.bbk.ac.uk/history/hobsbawm.

Please note that the conference fee includes refreshments, lunches, and a drinks reception, but does NOT include accommodation which you will need to arrange separately.

 

Plenary Session Speakers

Mark Mazower (Columbia)
Gareth Stedman Jones (Queen Mary)
Catherine Hall (UCL)
Chris Wickham (Oxford)
Maxine Berg (Warwick)
Rana Mitter (Oxford)
Geoff Eley (Michigan)

Panels

Capitalism

Emma Rothschild (Harvard/Cambridge)
Prasannan Parthasarathi (Boston)
Donald Sassoon (Queen Mary)
Frank Trentmann (Birkbeck)

Frameworks of historical explanation

Peter Burke (Cambridge)
Joanna Innes (Oxford)
Renaud Morieux (Cambridge)
Filippo de Vivo (Birkbeck)

The Crisis of the 17th Century

Sanjay Subrahmanyam (UCLA)
Geoffrey Parker (Ohio State)
John Elliott (Oxford)
Mike Braddick (Sheffield)

History of political conflict

Lucy Riall (EUI/Birkbeck)
François Jarrige (Bourgogne)
Steve Smith (Exeter)
Illaria Favretto (Kingston)

Britain, Empire, Europe

Antoinette Burton (Illinois)
Maya Jasanoff (Harvard)
Jan Rüger (Birkbeck)

What happened to class?

John Tosh (Roehampton)
Sonya Rose (Michigan/Birkbeck)
Marjorie Levine-Clark (Colorado)
Sean Brady (Birkbeck)

Global environmental history

Harriet Ritvo (MIT)
Paul Warde (UEA)
Christof Mauch (Munich)
Sunil Amrith (Birkbeck)

Latin America

Alan Knight (Oxford)
Paulo Drinot (UCL)
Joan Martinez Alier (ICTA, Barcelona)

Marxist and post-Marxist social history

Andy Wood (Durham)
Jane Whittle (Exeter)
Lucy Robinson (Sussex)

Nationalisms

Stefan Berger (Bochum)
Bill Schwarz (Queen Mary)
John Breuilly (LSE)

Further details will be available closer to the conference dates.

The conference is organised by Birkbeck, University of London, where Eric Hobsbawm taught most of his life, and by Past & Present, which he co-founded. We are grateful for the support offered by the Birkbeck Institute of the Humanities and the Institute of Historical Research.

**END**

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Globalisation

GLOBAL DISCOURSE: VOLUME 2 ISSUE II

Volume 2: Issue II: Special Issue Part 2: Examining the Contemporary Relevance of Marxism

The second special issue on examining the contemporary relevance of Marxism has been released. The issue contains articles on Post-Marxism, Derrida and the Communist Manifesto, Cambodia and development, criminology and a symposium on imperialism and the neo-national bourgeoisie, including analysis of ‘Turkey’s turn to the East’ and ‘the changing formations of the power bloc in Iran’.

There are substantive replies by Mark Devenney, Simon Choat, James Tyner, Kristian Lasslett and Farhang Morady, and book review symposia on ‘Left in the Past: Radicalism and the Politics of Nostalgia by Alastair Bonnett’, ‘Marx at the Margins: On Nationalism, Ethnicity, and Non-Western Societies by Kevin B. Anderson’ and ‘The International Political Economy of Work and Employability by Phoebe V. Moore-Carter’.

Full contents are available at: http://global-discourse.com/contents/ (Includes Part 1 contents).

Global Discourse: A Development Journal of Research in Politics and International Relations: http://www.global-discourse.com

**END**

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

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Revolution

REVOLUTIONARY VOICES: MARXISM, COMMUNICATION, AND SOCIAL CHANGE

National Communication Association (NCA) Preconvention Seminar
“Revolutionary Voices: Marxism, Communication, and Social Change”
10:30 am-5:00 PM, Wednesday, November 16th.
New Orleans, LA

In the wake of the Soviet Union’s collapse, and the subsequent worldwide retreat of the communist and socialist Left, the very concept of “revolution” was deemed by many theorists to be outdated and passé. Liberal, poststructuralist and conservative intellectuals jointly proclaimed Marxist project -with its emphasis on class struggle, anti-imperialism and a totalizing critique of capitalism– no longer relevant to an understanding of our “postmodern” world. Today, with the popular uprisings associated with the “Arab Spring” roiling dictatorships in countries like Egypt, Tunisia, Syria and Yemen and with the global capitalist economy just barely emerging from the throes of its worst crisis since the Great Depression, Marxism is not so easily dismissed. The recent popularity of thinkers like Giovanni Arrighi, Alain Badiou, Antonio Negri, David Harvey and Slavoj Zizek suggests a renewal of scholarly interest in Marxist and post-Marxist theory. The fact that Karl Marx himself was featured on the cover of the February 2, 2009 TIME Magazine suggests that this revival of interest is not confined to the academy.

This pre-convention conference aims to explore the continued relevance of Marxism and Marxist theoretical concepts (i.e. ideology, hegemony, class, dialectics, reification, commodification ) to the study of communication, focusing on communication’s instrumental role in maintaining, perpetuating and contesting capitalism’s structures of domination. Unlike other theoretical orientations within the social sciences and the humanities, Marxism has long insisted that theory be informed by and inform social and political praxis. Thus, one special emphasis of our discussions will be on the way that Marxist work in field of communication can help to advance and clarify current struggles for progressive social change in the US and around the world. Moreover, at a time when even the mainstream corporate press speaks openly of the revolutionary currents spreading across North Africa and the Middle East, we will devote special attention to the concept of “revolution” and the way that it can refine and enhance our understanding of communication, political conflict and social change.

We hope that by bringing together a critical mass of scholars whose work is informed by Marxist theory, our seminar will “make a difference” both in our discipline and in the larger fight for social justice. Ultimately, we plan to publish an edited volume or a special issue of an academic journal as a way of bringing the scholarship produced by seminar participants to an even larger audience.

This mini-conference builds on a series of NCA panels, pre-conference seminars and publications about Marxism and communication that began with a well-attended panel at the 2003 NCA convention in Miami. Last year’s mini-conference “Bridging Theory and Practice” drew dozens of participants to a series of three inter-related panels at the national conference in San Francisco. The year before that, in Chicago, our panel “The 2009 Crisis of Neoliberalism: Marxist Scholars on Rhetorics of Stability and Change,” drew a standing-room-only crowd. And in 2006, three of the co-organizers of this seminar (Artz, Cloud and Macek) published an anthology — Marxism and Communication Studies: The Point is to Change It (Peter Lang)-composed almost entirely of conference papers delivered at our NCA panels and seminars. This seems to us an opportune moment for yet another pre-convention seminar and yet another publication devoted to this topic.

The organizers invite potential participants to submit complete papers or extended abstracts (350-500 words) relevant to the subject of Marxism, communication and social change for inclusion in this pre-convention seminar. Work in political economy of the media, cultural studies, rhetoric, critical theory, social movement studies and political communication is especially welcome. Send your submissions along with complete contact information (mailing address, e-mail and phone #) to both Steve Macek (at shmacek@noctrl.edu) and Dana Cloud (at dcloud@mail.utexas.edu) no later than August 8th, 2011.

Steve Macek
Associate Professor
Speech Communication
Program Coordinator, Urban and Suburban Studies
North Central College
30 N. Brainard
Naperville, IL 60540-4690
Phone: 630-637-5369
Fax: 630-637-5140
Webpage: http://shmacek.faculty.noctrl.edu/

Out now from U of MN Press:
Urban Nightmares: The Media, the Right, and the Moral Panic over the City. Winner of the 2006 Urban Communication Foundation Publication Award.
ISBN: ISBN 0-8166-4361-X
http://www.upress.umn.edu/Books/M/macek_urban.html

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Antonio Gramsci

RETHINKING GRAMSCI

Rethinking Gramsci
Edited by Marcus E. Green
New York: Routledge, 2011
ISBN: 9780415779739
Details: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415779739/

Contents

Introduction Marcus E. Green, Rethinking Marxism and Rethinking Gramsci

I. Culture and Criticism

1. Stuart Hall. Race, Culture, and Communications: Looking Backward and Forward at Cultural Studies

2. Paul Bové. Dante, Gramsci and Cultural Criticism

3. Daniel O’Connell. Bloom and Babbitt: A Gramscian View

4. Marcia Landy. Socialist Education Today: Pessimism or optimism of the intellect?

II. Hegemony, Subalternity, Common Sense

5. Derek Boothman. The Sources for Gramsci’s Concept of Hegemony

6. Marcus E. Green. Gramsci Cannot Speak: Presentations and Interpretations of Gramsci’s Concept of the Subaltern

7. Cosimo Zene. Self-consciousness of the Dalits as ‘subalterns’: Reflections on Gramsci in South Asia

8. Evan Watkins. Gramscian Politics and Capitalist Common Sense

9. Frank R. Annunziato. Gramsci’s theory of trade unionism

10. Nelson Moe. Production and Its Others, Gramsci’s ‘Sexual Question’

11. Adam David Morton. Social Forces in the Struggle over Hegemony: Neo-Gramscian Perspectives in International Political Economy

12. Richard Howson. From Ethico-Political Hegemony to Post-Marxism

III. Political Philosophy

13. Richard D. Wolff. Gramsci, Marxism and Philosophy

14. Carlos Nelson Coutinho. General Will and Democracy in Rousseau, Hegel, and Gramsci

15. Wolfgang Fritz Haug. From Marx to Gramsci, from Gramsci to Marx: Historical Materialism and the Philosophy of Praxis

16. Steven R. Mansfield. Gramsci and the Dialectic

17. Esteve Morera. Gramsci’s Critical Modernity

IV. On Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks

18. David F. Ruccio. Unfinished Business: Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks

19. Joseph W. Childers. Of Prison Notebooks and the Restoration of an Archive

20. Peter Ives. The Mammoth Task of Translating Gramsci

21. William V. Spanos. Cuvier’s Little Bone: Joseph Buttigieg’s English Edition of Antonio Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks

22. Joseph A. Buttigieg. The Prison Notebooks: Antonio Gramsci’s Work in Progress

Antonio Gramsci

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FROM POST-MARXISM TO MANY MARXISMS – PETER THOMAS

Dr. Peter Thomas (Brunel University – Historical Materialism) gives a lecture:

From Post-Marxism to Many Marxisms

In Helsinki,  31 January 2011 (at 14–16, House of Science and Letters, Kirkkokatu 6, Hall 505)

To celebrate the publication of  a new book in Finnish

Juha Koivisto & Vesa Oittinen (eds.): MEGA-Marx. Johdatus uuteen Marxiin. Vastapaino: Tampere 2011.

All Welcome!
Info: Juha.Koivisto@uta.fi

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Capitalist Crisis

CRISIS AND CHANGE TODAY

Crisis and Change Today: Basic Questions of Marxist Sociology
Second Edition

By Peter Knapp and Alan Spector

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

Crisis and Change Today provides a solid introduction to Marxist social theory. The work’s unique voice is expressed in its Socratic-dialogic approach, structured around forty questions that students have about society and social change. Topics range from theories of history, economics, unemployment, racial oppression, the state, fascism, the collapse of the Soviet bloc, and points of convergence and difference between the dialectical approach and other approaches to social science. The content and tone of the work invites students to evaluate various traditional and current explanations of social institutions and social processes and encourages them to weigh the debates and investigate further.

The first edition was very well received (recipient of the Distinguished Scholarship Award of the Section on Marxist Sociology of the ASA), and the second edition has been thoroughly revised and updated to be relevant for students today. Though the first edition was written during the wake of the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of the Soviet Union, the growing gap between the rich and the poor and the economic crisis have generated more interest in using Marxist analysis as a tool to understand both the crises of capitalism and the weaknesses of past Marxist praxis.

Peter Knapp is Professor of Sociology at Villanova University and author of books and articles on Marx and Hegel.

Alan Spector is Professor of Sociology at Purdue University Calumet. In addition to publishing, he has served as Chair of the Section on Marxist Sociology of the American Sociological Association and is currently on the editorial board of Critical Sociology.

========================================================

More information on the book is available here: http://www.rowmanlittlefield.com/Catalog/SingleBook.shtml?command=Search&db=^DB/CATALOG.db&eqSKUdata=0742520439&thepassedurl=collegepublishing&exam_copy=true

For European readers: http://www.rowmanlittlefield.com/Catalog/Eur/Singlebook.shtml?command=Search&db=^DB/CATALOG.db&eqSKUdata=0742520439

Prepublication reviews from Bertell Ollman, Rhonda Levine, David Fasenfest, and Berch Berberoglu are available here: http://www.rowmanlittlefield.com/Catalog/Reviews.shtml?command=Search&db=^DB/CATALOG.db&eqSKUdata=0742520439

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Global Capitalism

EXAMINING THE RELEVANCE OF MARX AND MARXISM TO CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL SOCIETY

 

Please Circulate around your lists:

2nd Call for Papers
Examining the Relevance of Marx and Marxism to Contemporary Global Society
Newcastle University, 29th and 30th of January 2011

Rationale, Outline and Aims
The 21st century has so far seen US-led military interventions, global financial crises, identity conflicts, terrorism on a grand scale, environmental disasters and fraught industrial/labour relations. These dramatic events have challenged the notion of an ‘end to history’ and the widespread belief that the collapse of the Soviet Union has made Marx and Marxism irrelevant. With growing instability in the social, political and economic functioning of human societies, we wish to examine the relevance of Marx to contemporary global society.

In order to do this, Global Discourse (http://global-discourse.com) is organising a two-day conference at Newcastle University on Saturday 29th and Sunday 30th of January 2011.

The aims of the event are:
* To examine the relevance and application of Marxian, Marxist, Neo-Marxist and Post-Marxist thought to contemporary issues.
* To reassess scriptural and doctrinal commitments within various ‘Marxisms’.
* To facilitate interdisciplinary, inter-paradigmatic discourse on a range of contemporary issues.

Papers from this event will form the basis of a special issue of Global Discourse to be released in February 2011.

Keynote Papers
The keynote talks will be given by Professor Norman Geras, author of Marx and Human Nature, whose paper will relate to the general theme, ‘What does it mean to be Marxist?’, and Professor Stuart Sim, author of Post-Marxism: An Intellectual History, who will be examining the achievements of Post-Marxism.

Topics, Deadlines and Publishing Process
We are currently soliciting papers addressing the two topics covered by the keynote speakers, namely: ‘What does it mean to be Marxist?’ and ‘Post-Marxism and its discontents’.

We invite the submission of abstracts on these topics by November 15th.
Authors whose abstracts are accepted will then be invited to submit full papers by December 17th. This will enable refereeing priori to publication of the special issue of Global Discourse in February 2011.

We aim, subsequently, to publish a collected edition in print based on these papers.

Please submit all abstracts, papers and panel proposals to the editors at editor@global-discourse.com.

Costs
There will be no conference fee.

A lunch buffet and refreshments will be provided free of charge.

An optional evening conference meal on Saturday 29th of January will be held at a nearby restaurant. We will seek to organise a special rate for the meal and will circulate details in due course. Participants shall bear the cost of their meal.

Places
There will be space for 40 paper-givers and 20 non-paper-giving participants.

Please address all queries and submit all papers to Matthew Johnson and Mark Edward at editor@global-discourse.com.

Global Discourse: http://global-discourse.com/

Global Economic Crisis

With best wishes
Matthew Johnson

 

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Alternative Culture

 

COMMONALITIES CONFERENCE

Please join us for “Commonalities: Theorizing the Common in Contemporary Italian Thought,” a conference sponsored by the journal diacritics. The event, to be held at Cornell University on September 24-25, 2010, will bring together a number of leading thinkers around the theme and question of the common. Participants will include Kevin Attell, Franco “Bifo” Berardi, Remo Bodei, Bruno Bosteels, Cesare Casarino, Roberto Esposito, Ida Dominijanni, Michael Hardt, Antonio Negri (by video conference), and Karen Pinkus. More information can be found at the conference website (www.commonconf.com) or by contacting Professor Timothy Campbell (tcc9@cornell.edu)

Il manifesto
For the better part of a decade the position of Italian thought in the Anglo-American academy has increasingly grown in importance. From issues as far ranging as bioethics and bioengineering, to euthanasia, to globalization, to theorizing gender, to the war on terror, works originating in Italy have played a significant, perhaps even the dominant, role in setting the terms and conditions of these debates. Indeed it might well be that no contemporary thought more than Italian enjoys greater success today in the United States. If twenty years of postmodernism and poststructuralism were in large measure the result of French exports to the United States — Derrida, Lacan, Deleuze, and Foucault — today a number of Italian philosophical exports are giving rise to a theoretical dispositif that goes under a variety of names: post-Marxist, posthuman, or most often biopolitical. Yet the fact that Italian thought enjoys such enormous success in the United States and elsewhere begs an important question, one put to me polemically recently by a prominent Italian philosopher. Is there really such a thing as contemporary Italian thought? And if there is what in the world do its proponents have in common?

By way of responding, it might be useful to recall some details about the recent reception of Italian thought in the American academy. In the aftermath of the end of the postmodern — which a number of American observers savored as spelling the end of the use and abuse of philosophy by large numbers of literary critics — two works appeared in English within a span of three years: Giorgio Agamben’s ‘Homo Sacer’ and Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri’s ‘Empire’. Stepping into the void left by the departure of what in the United States was known as “theory,” these works made a number of bold theoretical claims about the relation between political power and individual life (Agamben) and globalization and collective life (Hardt and Negri), claims that uncannily – sometimes almost prophetically – addressed some of the most pressing issues in our current state of affairs. Equally a number of important works of Italian feminism appeared over roughly the same period. Works by Adriana Cavarero and Rosi Braidotti, among others, deeply influenced a whole generation of American theorists in fields like gender studies, political philosophy, and law. Looking back it’s difficult to overestimate the influence of all these figures when accounting for the intellectual success of Italian thought today. Certainly it became possible for other voices to be heard, Paolo Virno, and more recently Franco Berardi, Roberto Esposito, and Maurizio Lazzarato among others.

But to take up again the question at hand: what do authors as seemingly different as Agamben and Negri, Berardi and Esposito, Braidotti and Bodei, or Cavarero and Virno have in common outside of the mere fact of writing in Italian? Beyond a common language, is there, for example, such a thing as a common Italian philosophical tradition of which they are all a part? Some, most notably, Mario Perniola, would say yes, one found in the elements of repetition, transmission, mixture, and body that together forged an Italian philosophical culture over the last 300 years. Deleuze and Guattari would have said no, arguing that Italy has historically “lacked a milieu” for philosophy. For them the reason for this lack could be found in Italy’s proximity to the Holy See, which continually aborted philosophy across the peninsula, reducing Italian thought to mere rhetoric, philosophy’s shadow, and allowing only for the occasional “comet” to briefly light up the philosophical sky. Yet what if Italian thought today does in fact enjoy a milieu? What “event” or “events” in the recent past might have fashioned a milieu for the emergence of Italian thought? What would the features of that milieu look like?

Undoubtedly, the decade-long Italian 1968 would have played the decisive role. The votes on abortion, the emergence of counterculture and student and feminist movements, and changes in labor and production all deeply changed the space in which politics — as well as philosophy – was practiced. Indeed one of the central features of the Italian 1968 was precisely the emphasis on politics as philosophy and philosophy as a form (among others) of politics. We can see this in the place 1968 and 1977 awarded political militancy; in the increasing prominence given to questions of subjectivization; and more broadly in the birth of new forms of social and political life separated from those that had previously dominated.

Yet Italy’s long 1968 wasn’t enough on its own. It was only with 1989 and the fall of the Berlin Wall that politics and philosophy truly begin to pass intensely into each other, to stay with the language of Deleuze and Guattari. Although it may seem less the case for those writing in Italy, when seen from the outside 1989 was experienced as trauma more in Italy than in the rest of Europe. The result forced a number of thinkers to re-examine the fundamental political and philosophical categories that had underpinned decades if not centuries of thought: what meaning would the end of a certain form of common life have for politics, for philosophy, for culture? Such a calling into question of the previous understanding of the common had the effect of reterritorializing politics and philosophy under new terms and new problematics, one of which will be “life,” broadly speaking. It is only when 1968 is considered as the motor for deterritorialization of the common in political theory and philosophy and 1989 as the turn toward its reterritorialization as newly mapped by (among other things) biopolitical theory that something like a milieu is constructed for contemporary Italian thought.

This is not to say that proponents of Italian thought share the same understanding of the common or even celebrate it. Clearly they do not. Yet the centrality of the common raises a number of questions about Italian thought and Italian public life today. What does it mean to be or have in common in 2010? What are the effects of questioning the weight of shared life and what possible futures are there for the common? How might singularities be thought together so as to create new forms of life and what kinds of co-habitations or contaminations might reinforce these new forms of life? These kinds of questions are ones Italian thought, in all its diversity, has placed at the forefront of contemporary theory, questions that in turn raise fundamental questions about the nature of relationality and of a politics that would seek to strengthen relations and to extend them in order to create yet further relationality. Such is the force of Hardt and Negri’s discussion of the capacity for love near the end of Commonwealth, though one can well imagine others, including a capacity for play, for attention, and for compassion too.

Yet the relationality implicit in these new forms of shared life doesn’t only lead to greater and more positive capacities for relationality among singularities. The deterritorialization of the common as biopolitics, the posthuman or even insurrection by no means conjures away the specter of power; thus with greater capacity on the one hand comes the possibility of more intense and invasive forms of power on the other. The question then becomes: how are new forms of the common that are being forged today — shared singularities, mirror neurons, impersonality – also being reterritorialized and recontained, and by whom? Is it possible that more intense forms of relationality might signal a return to the very terms that earlier critiques of the common had attempted to uncover? On the one hand the recent success of social networking sites like Facebook suggests that new forms of virtual relations involving vast numbers of “friends” are not only possible but involve ever greater exposure to others. On the other hand such exchanges continue to be premised on the notion that my body and my opinions belong to me, what the Invisible Committee unforgetably characterized as treating “our Self like a boring box office,” using whatever prosthesis is at hand “to hold onto an I.” In such a neo-liberal scenario, the circulation of information, of goods, of persons, of persons as goods is taken to mean a return to a common mode of being-together. It’s a film we’ve seen countless times before: the common’s reinscription in contexts less open to affect that are continually based upon a conflation of connnectivity with more open modes of relating.

These questions among others will be the foundation for a two-day conference sponsored by the journal Diacritics to be held on the campus of Cornell University on September 24-25, 2010. The conference, titled “Commonalities: Theorizing the Common in Italian Thought,” will bring together a number of Italian voices so as to think together not only the relation between Italy and the common but to consider emerging forms of the common and common life today as well as consider the efficacy of a term like the common for a progressive (bio)politics. Equally, the event, the first of its kind of recent memory in the United States, is an occasion to register the state of Italian thought today. When seen from the other side of the Atlantic, no other contemporary thought more than Italian seems better suited today to offer what Foucault called an ontology of the present. At a minimum, and pace my doubting Italian philosopher, the editorial and intellectual success of Italian thought merits a closer look.

Featured at the conference will be some of the leading philosophical figures from Italy today, including Franco Berardi, Remo Bodei, Cesare Casarino, Ida Dominjanni, Roberto Esposito, Michael Hardt, and Antonio Negri. The conference will be transmitted over the internet at http://www.commonconf.com. A number of Cornell students will be blogging the conference live over the two days.

Antonio Negri

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Alternative Culture

CULTURAL LOGIC: AN ELECTRONIC JOURNAL OF MARXIST THEORY AND PRACTICE

A NEW DOUBLE ISSUE

Dear colleagues and comrades:

I am pleased to announce that the new double-issue of ‘Cultural Logic: an electronic journal of marxist theory and practice’ is now available online at: http://clogic.eserver.org/

Below, please find the table of contents to each part of the double-issue.

Sincerely and in solidarity,

Joe Ramsey

Editor of the forthcoming 2010 Cultural Logic special issue on “Culture and Crisis” – jgramsey@gmail.com

Cultural Logic: an electronic journal of marxist theory and practice

New Double Issue 2008/2009

Issue 2008: http://clogic.eserver.org/2008/2008.html

Issue 2009: http://clogic.eserver.org/2009/2009.html

***********************

Cultural Logic, ISSUE 2008: http://clogic.eserver.org/2008/2008.html

Articles

Stephen C. Ferguson II: “Contractarianism as Method: Rawls contra Mills”

Melissa Hull Geil: “Shakespeare and the Drama of Capital”

Nigel M. Greaves: “Intellectuals and the Historical Construction of Knowledge and Identity: A Reappraisal of Gramsci’s Ideas on Leadership”

Sven-Eric Holmström: “New Evidence Concerning the ‘Hotel Bristol’ Question in the First Moscow Trial of 1936”

Nicola Masciandaro: “Consciousness, Individuality, Mortality: Basic Thoughts about Work and the Animal/Human Boundary”

John H. McClendon III: “The African American Philosopher: The Missing Chapter in McCumber on McCarthyism”

J. C. Myers: “Traces of Utopia: Socialist Values and Soviet Urban Planning”

Garry Potter: “Humanism and Terror: Merleau-Ponty’s Marxism”

J. Jesse Ramirez: “Rage Against the Dying of the Light: Herbert Marcuse and the Politics of Death”

Jacek Tittenbrun: “Between Subjectivism and Individualism: A Critical Appraisal of the Austrian Case for Private Ownership”

Reviews

Lukas MacKenzie: Mark S. Blumberg, Basic Instinct: The Genesis of Behavior, and Michael Tomasello, Constructing a Language: A Usage-Based Theory of Language Acquisition

Poetry

Bruno Gulli: “Hölderlin’s Window”

Howard Pflanzer: “The Endless War”

*********************** 

Cultural Logic, Issue 2009:
http://clogic.eserver.org/2009/2009.html

Articles

Jeffrey Cabusao: “The Social Responsibility of Filipino Intellectuals in the Age of Globalization and Empire: An Interview with E. San Juan, Jr. and Delia D. Aguilar”

Alzo David-West: “The Literary Ideas of Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il: An Introduction to North Korean Meta-Authorial Perspectives”

Barbara Foley: “Rhetoric and Silence in Barack Obama’s Dreams from My Father”

Grover Furr: “Evidence of Leon Trotsky’s Collaboration with Germany and Japan”

Bülent Gökay and Darrell Whitman: “Mapping the Faultlines: A Historical Perspective on the 2008-2009 World Economic Crisis”

Dave Hill: “Culturalist and Materialist Explanations of Class and “Race”: Critical Race Theory, Equivalence/Parallelist Theory, and Marxist Theory”

Michele Frucht Levy: “‘For We Are Neither One Thing Nor The Other’: Passing for Croat in Vedrana Rudan’s Night”

Gregory Meyerson: “Post-Marxism as Compromise Formation” (Foreword by E. San Juan, Jr.)

Michael Joseph Roberto: “Crisis, Revolution, and the Meaning of Progress: The Poverty of Philosophy and its Contemporary Relevance”

Spyros Sakellaropoulos and Panagiotis Sotiris: “Peter Gowan’s Theorization of the Forms and Contradictions of US Supremacy: A Critical Assessment”

E. San Juan, Jr.: “An African American Soldier in the Philippine Revolution: An Homage to David Fagen”

Daniel F. Vukovich: “Uncivil Society, or, Orientalism and Tiananmen, 1989”

Reviews

Paul M. Heideman: Michael E. Brown, The Historiography of Communism

David Schwartzman: Eileen Christ and H. Bruce Rinker, eds., Gaia in Turmoil: Climate Change, Biodepletion and Earth Ethics in an Age of Crisis

Poetry

Christopher Barnes: Selected Poems

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Socialism and Hope

SOCIALIST STUDIES

Socialist Studies: The Journal of the Society for Socialist Studies has just published its latest issue at: http://www.socialiststudies.com/index.php/sss.

This issue is a “re-launch” of the journal, featuring expanded content, a new design, additional reading and navigation tools, and an option to download or print the entire issue as a single file.  We hope these changes make the journal more useful, and welcome your comments.

We invite you to review the Table of Contents here and then visit our web site to review articles and items of interest.

Thanks for the continuing interest in our work,
Chad D Thompson & Elaine Coburn, Editors

Socialist Studies: The Journal of the Society for Socialist Studies
Vol 5, No 2 (2009)
Table of Contents
http://www.socialiststudies.com/index.php/sss/issue/view/14

Frontmatter
——–
Volume 5, Number Two: Frontmatter
admin admin

Editorial Note
——–
Re-Launching Socialist Studies
Elaine Coburn, Chad D Thompson

Editorial
——–
What is Socialism? What are Socialist Studies?
Elaine Coburn

Articles
——–
Philosophy at the Service of History: Marx and the need for critical
philosophy today
Jeffrey Noonan

SPECIAL SECTION ON RETHINKING LENINISM: Introduction
Alex Levant

Leninism: It’s Not What You Think
Paul Kellogg

Strategy, Meta-strategy and Anti-capitalist Activism: Rethinking Leninism
by Re-reading Lenin
Stephen D’Arcy

Lenin’s Aggressive Unoriginality, 1914-1916
Lars T Lih

Media, Arts, and Culture
——–
Ipsographing the Dubject; or, The Contradictions of Twitter
Mark A McCutcheon

Review Essays
——–
Social Science and the Afghan War: Canadian Perspectives
Jerome Klassen

The Political Economy of Food
Ian Hussey

Book Reviews
——–
Aziz Choudry et al. Fight Back:Workplace Justice for Immigrants
Sheila Wilmot

G.A. Cohen. Why Not Socialism?
Frank Cunningham

Terry Gibbs & Garry Leech. The Failure of Global Capitalism: From Cape
Breton to Columbia and Beyond
Adam Belton

Roberto J Gonzalez. American Counterinsurgency: Human Science and the Human Terrain
Ryan Toews

Sean P. Hier et al. Racism and Justice:  Critical Dialogue on the Politics
of Identity, Inequality, and Change
Amanda Glasbeek

Jasmin Hristov. Blood & Capital: The Paramilitarization of Colombia
Henry Veltmeyer

Fuyuki Kurasawa. The Work of Global Justice: Human Rights as Practices
Elaine Coburn

Judy Rebick. Transforming Power: From the Personal to the Political
Tammy Findlay

Göran Therborn. From Marxism to Post-Marxism?
William K Carroll

Mark P Thomas. Regulating Flexibility: The Political Economy of Employment Standards
Bryan Mitchell Evans

Calls for Papers and Proposals

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com