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SIXTY

Today is my 60th birthday!

Indulgence time! Nostalgia time!

2010 - Garden Scene

2010 - Garden Scene

Yes, I am a real person and not just an ‘advertising machine’, as one reader of this blog suggested a few years ago.

I have been listening to these tunes today and last night, and they have had continued significance for me since I first heard them. I won’t go into it here regarding the ‘whys’ and ‘how comes’ these pieces of music have such significance for me. Perhaps I’ll do that if and when I hit 80!

Of course, I can’t get every piece of music that has played a role in my life in here, but here are just 47 examples:

Jollity Farm (1929) – Leslie Sarony with Jack Hylton and His Orchestra: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8dxHNAo_a7s – obviously recorded before I was born, but I used to play this 78 record when I was a kid.

No Strings (1936) – Fred Astaire: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NK4C7zXBOog – I also played this 78 a lot when I was a kid.

You Don’t Need a Licence for That (1946) – George Formby: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWHHKMFY4yc – Ditto.

Lonely Pup in a Christmas Shop (1960) – Adam Faith: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0_NKL2nr6I

Poetry in Motion (1960) – Johnny Tillotson: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDCQEbJPPgI

Blue Velvet (1963) – Bobby Vinton: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=icfq_foa5Mo

She Loves You (1963) – The Beatles: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0YifXhm-Zc

Bits and Pieces (1964) – The Dave Clarke Five: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XoRLIJJSG4o

Good Vibrations (1966) – The Beach Boys: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TCeD_6Y3GQc

Bike (1967) – Pink Floyd: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iR234BH9Cr4 [But I hear this until 1969]

Also Sprach Zarathustra (Richard Strauss, 1896): I first heard this 1968, when I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey at the Odeon, Leicester Square with my cousin, Gerhard. It was stunning; I bought the sound track as soon as I could. This got me into classical music:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o09L-hkrzhw and also the ‘Dawn of Man’ scene from the same film: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2iiPpcwfCA – the film and music had such a big impact on my intellectual development. It would take ages to explain, so I won’t bore you with it!

Manco Capac (1969) – Quintessence: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyYqOIqKRIU – If it hadn’t have been for this track I wouldn’t have applied to study at the University of East Anglia (1972-75 and 1976-77), and then wouldn’t have met Ruth. It’s a long story.

Cybernaut (1971) – Tonto’s Expanding Head Band: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ec8BGEb7_iA

Battlefield (1971) – Emerson, Lake & Palmer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XUtsc6GZuU&feature=fvst

Echoes (1971) – Pink Floyd: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HehcJaTyd-E

Man Erg (1971) – Van der Graaf Generator: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5y0GZPtJRM

Silver Machine (1972) – Hawkwind: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IfniG-AdSC4

Sylvia (1972) – Focus: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OznS7X9BOxs

If there is Something (1972) – Roxy Music: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OnV-agq0Yzw

The Great Gig in the Sky (1973): Pink Floyd: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GVM7ZpQrCnQ

Sleepwalkers (1975) – Van der Graaf Generator: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DbepiON2u08

I’m Not in Love (1975) – 10cc: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rgepWg4rzw 

Don’t You Want Me (1981) – The Human League: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uPudE8nDog0&ob=av3e

Nothing But Flowers (1988) – Talking Heads: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=068AFYvd58E

Come Out Fighting (1989) – Easterhouse: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ErQHc9N2O08 

Family Ties (1992) – Innocence: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RxrMLiZQ9Sg

Matthew the Man (1992) – Iona: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_QefxfvXFY [I’m not religious, I hasten to add, but I love this track]

I Would Do Anything for Love (1993) – Meatloaf: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tuYKUgBZEc

Jurassic Shift (1993) – Ozric Tentacles: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lzNPlQjL13A

Book of Hours (1995) Anekdoten: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brmPb8DYfHo

Idiot Prayer (1996) – Porcupine Tree: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQYMYls0MoI

Kobresia (1997) – Biosphere: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKiuEHV6HWo

Toxicity (2001) – System of a Down: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWSxELGNShk

Science (2001) – System of a Down: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGpoEPcmOK4

Arriving Somewhere (But Not Here) (2005) – Porcupine Tree: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6FveZKs2IZI live version http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxiLuoWgi34

Lazarus (2005) – Porcupine Tree: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCTeDAh1_Pk [Live]

Lonely Day (2005) – System of a Down: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DnGdoEa1tPg&ob=av2e

Stop Making Speeches (2006) Khoma: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFHiuwCJpQY

The Incident (2009) – Porcupine Tree: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVXbe2pSjbM

Harmony Corine (2009) – Steven Wilson: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BClzBQmZZBc

Daystar (2010) – William Roberts: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s6f_pA5XUPk captures the magic of Bangor and Bangor University for me.

The Path (Part 2) (2010) – OrphanedLand: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eR9Eg8FbsyI

Cheerful Sin (2011) – Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

The Lamb (2011) – based on a poem by William Blake, and set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Human Herbs (2012 version) – Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Stagnant (2012 version) – Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo

Soft Coda (2012) – North Atlantic Oscillation: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZkAhSSeR8j0

 

I hope you like at least some of these tracksGlenn Rikowski, 2nd May 2012

 

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub,Bangor, northWales)  

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Fear of a Blank Plant

SCHOOL CULTURE AND FEAR OF A BLANK PLANET – BY DISHI PHILLIPS

This is an essay written by Dishi Phillips when she was a final year student in Education Studies at the University of Northampton.

It was written as an assignment for the Education, Culture & Society module (EDU3004) that Dishi studied during the 2010-2011 academic year.

Dishi’s essay can now be found at The Flow of Ideas website:

Phillips, D. (2011) School Culture and Fear of a Blank Planet, an essay written for EDU3004 ‘Education, Culture and Society’, Education Studies, School of Education, University of Northampton, 10th January, online at ‘The Flow of Ideas’: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=contributions&sub=School%20Culture%20and%20Fear%20of%20a%20Blank%20Planet%20-%20Dishi%20Phillips

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Porcipine Tree - The Incident

Porcupine Tree - The Incident

VALANCES OF THE DIALECTIC – FREDRIC JAMESON

 

NEW FROM VERSO

VALENCES OF THE DIALECTIC

BY FREDRIC JAMESON

After half a century exploring dialectical thought, renowned cultural critic Fredric Jameson presents a comprehensive study of a misunderstood yet vital strain in Western philosophy.

The dialectic, the concept of the evolution of an idea through conflicts arising from its inherent contradictions, transformed two centuries of Western philosophy. To Hegel, who dominated nineteenth-century thought, it was a metaphysical system. In the work of Marx, the dialectic became a tool for materialist historical analysis. More recently, the dialectic has come under attack from poststructuralist thinkers such as Deleuze or Laclau and Mouffe.

Jameson brings a theoretical scrutiny to bear on the questions that have arisen in the history of this philosophical tradition, contextualizing the debate in terms of commodification and globalization, and with reference to thinkers such as Rousseau, Lukács, Heidegger, Sartre, Derrida, and Althusser.

Through rigorous examination, Valences of the Dialectic charts a movement toward the innovation of a “spatial” dialectic. Jameson presents a new synthesis of thought that revitalizes dialectical thinking for the twenty-first century.

http://www.amazon.com/Valences-Dialectic-Fredric-Jameson/dp/185984877X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1257803840&sr=1-1

Hardback • $49.95 • ISBN 978-1-84467-877-7 • 640 pages
November 2009
Available now in good bookstores and online
Distributed by W.W. Norton: tel. 1800 233 4830
Please submit desk copy requests to clara@versobooks.com

“Fredric Jameson is America’s leading Marxist critic. A prodigiously energetic thinker whose writings sweep majestically from Sophocles to science fiction … One of the great writers of our times, not just one of the most formidably gifted critics and cultural theorists” – Terry Eagleton
“Probably the most important cultural critic writing in English today … It can truly be said that nothing cultural is alien to him.” – Colin MacCabe

FREDRIC JAMESON is the Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature at Duke University. His many books include Postmodernism, Brecht and Method, Late Marxism, The Cultural Turn, A Singular Modernity, The Modernist
Papers, Archaeologies of the Future, and The Ideologies of Theory. He was a recipient of the 2008 Holberg International Memorial Prize.

 Links:
   1. http://www.amazon.com/Modernist-Papers-Fredric-Jameson/dp/1844670961/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1257800242&sr=1-1
   2. http://www.amazon.com/Modernist-Papers-Fredric-Jameson/dp/1844670961/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1257800242&sr=1-1
   3. http://www.amazon.com/Modernist-Papers-Fredric-Jameson/dp/1844670961/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1257800242&sr=1-1
   4. http://www.amazon.com/Archaeologies-Future-Desire-Science-Fictions/dp/1844675386/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1257805858&sr=1-2

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Incident

The Incident

PORCUPINE TREE – ‘THE INCIDENT’

 

My favourite band, Porcupine Tree, will be releasing their tenth studio album on 21st September.  It will be a double CD on Roadrunner Records. The title track takes up the whole of the first CD!

You can find out more about this at: http://www.roadrunnerrecords.co.uk/page/News?news_id=78705

On the titles for the various sections on the first CD, see: http://blogs.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.view&friendId=61819211&blogId=495769004

Porcupine Tree official website: http://www.porcupinetree.com/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Insurgentes – Steven Wilson

 

 

As those familiar my MySpace Blog, Wavering on Ether* will know, I am a keen fan of the music of Porcupine Tree and Steven Wilson. I bought Wilson’s first solo album Insurgentes two days ago and have since been entranced by the music. I recommend most highly this album; not only to PT and Wilson followers but to all those that like beauty, towering craftsmanship, social edge, prescience, glorious dreams and images, and care and advanced skill with production in their music.

 

The words “musical genius” can sometimes be thrown around lightly. However, for me, they would not be misplaced regarding the works of Steven Wilson. Insurgentes includes the dynamic and kaleidoscopic percussion work of Gavin Harrison, and a most welcome contribution from Dave Stewart on one track.

 

Eighteen months ago, I wrote Fear of a Blank Planet Revisited. This was inspired by and, to some extent based on, the lyrics of Porcupine Tree’s Fear of a Blank Planet album. The article shows how the B Generation of policymakers and lawgivers have visited chaos and burdens on the youth of today**.   

 

Steven Wilson’s MySpace Profile – where you can here clips from Insurgentes, the ‘Harmony Korine’ (a track from Insurgentes) video and an extract from the Insurgentes film, directed by Lasse Hoile:

http://www.myspace.com/therealstevenwilson

 

Steven Wilson – Insurgentes, on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=krtkPF1OpOU

 

Press Release for Insurgentes is at: http://www.kscopemusic.com/stevenwilson/insurgentes/press-release.html

 

Steven Wilson’s official web site is at: http://www.swhq.co.uk/

 

Porcupine Tree MySpace Profile, at: http://www.myspace.com/porcupinetree

 

Porcupine Tree official web site, at: http://www.porcupinetree.com/

 

*Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

 

** Rikowski, G. (2007) Fear of a Blank Planet Revisited, 12th November, at ‘Wavering on Ether’: http://blog.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.view&friendID=14758904&blogID=327677941&Mytoken=44CF619A-7D98-4C30-AB4BD3DEC05464CF51361335

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.mysdpace.com/glennrikowski

Volumizer Resurrection Eight

 

 

The Volumizer was Glenn Rikowski’s AOL blog. It was started up on 29th September 2005. On 30th September 2008, AOL announced that all of its Hometown products, including its blogs and newsletters, would be closed down on 31st October 2008. Glenn’s articles, many of which were written for his students at the Volumizer, will be preserved at The Flow of Ideas. Work has begun on this project, and the latest articles to be included are now available, as listed below:

 

 

 

2007

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2007) My Tony Blair, and His Neoliberal Education Policies, 12th May, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=My%20Tony%20Blair

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2007) Edison Schools in the UK, 23rd April, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Edison%20Schools%20in%20the%20UK

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2007) Learning in the Earthworks of Capital@ The JCB Academy, 31st March, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Learning%20in%20the%20Earthworks%20of%20Capital

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2007) The ‘Standards’ Language-game for Schools in England Today, 26th March, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=The%20Standards%20Language-game%20for%20Schools%20in%20England

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2007) E-learning for Free at the BBC: Jam Jammed, 16th March, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=E-learning%20for%20Free%20at%20the%20BBC

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2007) Mrs Thatcher and Holes in the Kitchen Floor, 22nd February, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Mrs%20Thatcher%20and%20Holes%20in%20the%20Kitchen%20Floor

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2007) When the Bowers Break, 22nd February, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=When%20the%20Bowers%20Break

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2007) Ultra-Blairite, Contra Progress: Co-payment in Hospitals and Schools, 15th February, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Co-payment%20in%20Hospitals%20and%20Schools

 

 

Rikowski, G. (2007) Socialism is not Dead, 31st January, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Socialism%20is%20not%20Dead

 

 

 

The Rikowski web site, The Flow of Ideas is at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Profile is at: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Currently listening :
Fear of a Blank Planet
By Porcupine Tree
Release date: 2007-04-24

 

 

Whatever Happened to the Education Debate? Rouge Forum Update

 

A Message from Rich Gibson

 

 

Dear Friends
Remember to mark you calendars: the weekend of May 15th, the Rouge Forum Conference at Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti.

What with wars and economic collapse in the forefront of American
minds, it seems the hot education debate is vanished. Perhaps for
good reason as the major party candidates agree on the crux of NCLB,
merit pay, the expansion of charters, the heroification of Teach For
America’s drive-by projects in poor neighborhoods, and they must be
clear on what will be the school budget impact of the financial firestorms.

Depending on where you live, PBS and NPR plan discussions between
McCain and Obama surrogates, but really, what can be said to
demonstrate passionate disagreement? Not much. Here is Fairtest’s
examination of the candidates positions:
http://www.fairtest.org/what-presidential-candidates-are-saying-about-nclb

Having surveyed the web sites of the major unions in the US, only one
has anything to say about the bankster bailout—the American
Federation of Teachers, in support of it. The rest are pouring
millions of dollars into the Obama campaign.

Why would the huge National Education Association and AFT shower
Obama with member cash when his fundraising is already over the top, $150 million in September, within a billion dollar electoral
spectacle? In the case of NEA, it’s dues income and jobs. The early
childhood education centers Obama may set up will be contested
terrain for NEA, but rumor has it that Reg Weaver, outgoing NEA
president, is lined up for an administration job in that field.

Meanwhile, the tyranny deepens as banksters, AIG bailout recipients,
go partridge hunting on taxpayers’ nickels:
http://www.nydailynews.com/money/2008/10/14/2008-10-14_aigs_lords_and_lady_of_the_hunt_may_find.html
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/19/opinion/19dowd.html?ei=5070

 
 

 

(Defarge was right)
Those who were born with the least capital will get hurt first and
worst in these crises. And the wisdom they display will often be
exemplary, a lesson for us all. Right now, people in Morelos Mexico
(named for the revolutionary) are battling the police and the
military. They are led by teachers and other school workers who are
demanding an end to school privatization, a project of the “Alliance
for Quality Education”: which also seeks to demolish teacher benefits
won over decades. The fight has gone on for more than two months,
demonstrating that educators are centripetally positioned to initiate
social change. The Morelos fighters were recently joined by comreades
from Oaxaca—a learning from all; one lesson being that their top
union leadership consistently betrays them. The Morelos educators are
good examples of people connecting reason to power, with solidarity.
Here is one of many links: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TjVNKGMSqII

Thanks to Gil, Amber, Gina and Adam, Sandy. Bill and Bill, Greg and
Katie, Melissa, Nancy, Bonnie, Sarah, Giselle, Eva, Lisa, Liz, Betty,
Gloria and the Michigan gang, Kim, Bob, Dirty Edd, Pete, Dave, George
and family, Wayne, and Sue. H.

All the best

Rich Gibson

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Rikowski web site, The Flow of Ideas is at: http://www.flowieas.co.uk

Glenn’s MySpace Profile is at: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Currently listening :
sensoria
By HeadenD
Release date: 2008-10-07

Historical Materialism Conference 2008

 

7 – 9th November, School of Oriental & African Studies (SOAS), University of London, Thornhaugh Street, London WC1

 

Pre-registration details (and you save money if you register online before the conference), see: http://mercury.soas.ac.uk/hm/conference2008.htm

 

The fifth annual Historical Materialism Conference held in conjunction with the Isaac and Tamara Deutscher Prize Committee and with Socialist Register will take place between 7 – 9 November, 2008 at the School of Oriental and African Studies, London.

It is organised in association with the International Initiative for the Promotion of Political Economy, the journal Situations and the Journal of Agrarian Change, and with the assistance of the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences of SOAS.

Ever since its foundation in 1997, Historical Materialism has sought to contribute to the intellectual recomposition of the global Left by serving as an international venue for critical Marxist research. The journal’s initial wager – that Marxism remains a vital, and heterogeneous and many-faceted political and theoretical tradition – has been borne out in a conjuncture where Marxist thinkers have amply demonstrated the critical resources at their disposal (witness recent debates on imperialism and neoliberalism). Within the academy, the facile dismissal of Marxism seems to have run out of steam, and the attitudes of new generations of students and researchers have changed accordingly. Marxist intellectuals are no longer simply forced to survive in hostile conditions or to retreat into isolated academic subcultures, despite an often adverse global political context. In this setting, they face new challenges, which this conference seeks to address.

How can we develop the plurality of Marxist debates, fields and schools without making concessions to eclecticism, narcissism or compartmentalisation? How do we square the concrete multiplicity of Marxisms with the strong commonalities in intellectual vocabularies, theoretical sources and political aims? Hasn’t the question of the diversity of Marxism – of many Marxisms – accompanied the tradition’s entire development, a testament both to its internationalist horizon, and to the inexhaustible potential of its many critical insights and conceptual formulations? What strategies can allow us to confront, and perhaps overcome, some of the disparities or even misunderstandings born of these processes of differentiation?

Having tried to foster a form of critical cosmopolitanism and debate in past conferences, bringing together thinkers working in different fields, and out of different traditions, this year’s Historical Materialism conference wants to emphasise problems and opportunities raised by the existence of ‘Many Marxisms’. To this end, it aims to take stock of recent developments in Marxist thought, surveying the most vibrant recent debates; to confront critical moments in the historical development of Marxism; to identify crucial concepts and areas of research that can cut across any preconceived academic specialisation or geographical isolation of Marxism; to reflect on the ways in which Marxism has and continues to intervene in mainstream intellectual debates; and, finally, to generate a space in which the outlines of the many twenty-first century Marxisms may be delineated.

THE FULL TIMETABLE AND ONLINE REGISTRATION DETAILS WILL BE AVAILABLE SOON

For more details, please contact: historicalmaterialism@soas.ac.uk

THEMES COVERED WILL INCLUDE:

APPROACHING PASSIVE REVOLUTIONS * ART AND CAPITALISM * ASPECTS OF IMPERIALISM * BASE AND SUPERSTRUCTURE * BEYOND GLOBAL VALUE CHAIN ANALYSIS IN COMMODITY STUDIES * BOLSHEVISM: YESTERDAY AND TOMORROW * CAPITALISM / KNOWLEDGE CAPITALISM * CAPITALISM AND ARCHITECTURE * CLIMATE CHANGE, SUSTAINABILITY AND SOCIALISM * CONTEMPORARY RADICAL THOUGHT AND MARXISM: AGAMBEN, HOLLOWAY, ZIZEK * EARLY MODERN CAPITALISM * ECOLOGICAL CRISIS AND MARXIST THEORY * EVERYDAY LIFE * FINANCE AND NEO-LIBERALISM * FINANCIALISATION AND CRISIS * FOOD CRISIS * FROM THE GRUNDRISSE TO CAPITAL * FUTURE OF WORLD CAPITALISM * HISTORICAL MATERIALISM AND LATE DEVELOPMENT * HISTORIOGRAPHY IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF MARXISM * INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS * IS TODAY’S CAPITALISM ACTUALLY-EXISTING BARBARISM? * LABOUR-PROCESS AND RESISTANCE * LATIN AMERICAN LEFT TODAY * LEARNING FROM ENEMIES AND RIVALS: SCHMITT, STRAUSS, WEBER * LIFE, POLITICS & CAPITALISM * MANY MARXISMS AND INDIA * MANY MARXISMS: KEY FIGURES * MANY MARXISMS: PROBLEMS AND POLEMICS * MARX AND FETISHISM * MARX ON WORLD ECONOMY AND WORLD POLITICS * MARXISM AND CINEMA: FILM NOIR AND NEO-NOIR * MARXISM AND METROPOLITICS * MARXISM AND PHILOSOPHY * MARXISM AND THE SCIENCES * MARXISM OUTSIDE THE WEST * MARXISM, FEMINISM AND WOMEN’S POLITICS * MARXISMS AND LITERATURE * MARXISMS AND RELIGION * MARXISMS AND SOUTHERN AFRICA * MARXISMS AND VIOLENCES: GENDER AND RACE * MARXIST THEORIES OF PRACTICE * MODES OF FOREIGN RELATIONS * MONETARY POLICY AND BANKING UNDER NEOLIBERALISM * MONEY * NEGATIVITY AND REVOLUTION * NORTH EAST ASIAN MARXISMS AND SOCIALISMS * ON THE CONCEPT OF SURPLUS POPULATIONS * PERSPECTIVES FROM ALTHUSSER * PERSPECTIVES FROM MARX’S ‘JEWISH QUESTION’ * PHILOSOPHIES OF REVOLT AND REVOLUTION * PHILOSOPHY IN THE EARLY MARX * POLITICAL CATEGORIES OF MARXISM * POLITICAL ECONOMY AND ECONOMICS TODAY * POLITICS OF THE PROMOTION OF GLOBAL COMPETITIVENESS * RACISM, CLASS AND POLITICS * RESTRUCTURING, CAPITAL AND LABOUR * REVOLUTIONARY POLITICS IN THE MIDDLE EAST * SEXUAL LIBERATION: HISTORICAL MATERIALIST APPROACHES * SITUATIONISM AT THE LIMITS: MUST WE BURN DEBORD? * SOCIALISM IN SEARCH OF AN ECONOMIC SYSTEM * STATE IN THE BOLIVARIAN REVOLUTION * THEORIES OF CLASS * THEORIES OF IMPERIALISM * TIME, TEMPORALITY, HISTORY * TRANSFORMATIONS IN THE NEOLIBERAL STATE * UNEVEN AND COMBINED DEVELOPMENT: TOWARDS A MARXIST THEORY OF ‘THE INTERNATIONAL’? * US FINANCIAL POWER IN CRISIS * UTOPIANISM * VALUE: POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC DIMENSIONS * ‘WESTERN’ MARXISM AND THE ANTI-COLONIAL WORLD/INTELLECTUALS * WINDOWS ON EMPIRE: PERSPECTIVES FROM HISTORY, CULTURE AND POLITICAL ECONOMY * WORKERISM: A GENERATION LATER *

PARTICIPANTS INCLUDE:

Rabab Ibrahim Abdulhadi, Gilbert Achcar, Talat Ahmed, Greg Albo, Jamie Allinson, Kevin Anderson, Ricardo Antunes, Giovanni Arrighi, Sam Ashman, Antonio Carmona Báez, Richard Bailey, Metin Bal, Colin Barker, Kate Bayliss, Pınar Bedirhanoğlu, Mike Beggs, Riccardo Bellofiore, Aaron Benanav, Ted Benton, Henry Bernstein, Cyrus Bina, Werner Bonefeld, Mark Bould, Pepijn Brandon, Peter Bratsis, Robert Brenner, Dennis Broe, Dick Bryan, Ergun Bulut, Verity Burgmann, Alex Callinicos, Paul Cammack, Mauro Farnesi Camellone, Al Campbell, Bob Cannon, Gavin Capps, Thomas Carmichael, Emilia Castorina, Maria Elisa Cevasco, Hsiu-Man Chen, Vivek Chibber, Alexander Chryssis, Martin Cobian, Peter Custers, John Darwin, Neil Davidson, Charles Davis, Chuck Davis, Gail Day, Tim Dayton, Roni Demirbag, Radhika Desai, Pat Devine, Paulo dos Santos, Peter Drucker, Jean-Numa Ducange, Gérard Duménil, Nick Dyer-Witheford, Timm Ebner, Bolivar Echeverria, Juliane Edler, Ersin Vedat Elgur, Katsuhiko Endo, Sara R. Farris, Lucy Ferguson, Don Filtzer, Ben Fine, Robert Fine, Bridget Fowler, Carl Freedman, Alan Freeman, Andrea Fumagalli, Cristina Morini, Lindsey German, Melanie Gilligan, Ruth Wilson Gilmour, Saroj Giri, Richard Godden, Maya Gonzalez, Jamie Gough, Peter Gowan, Kevin Gray, Nick Gray, Chris Harman, Barbara Harriss-White, Owen Hatherley, Cristoph Hermann, Andy Higginbottom, Mike Hill, Christian Høgsbjerg, Evren Hosgor, Nik Howard, David Jack, Elinor Jean, Oliver Jelinski, Nicholas Joll, Ismail Karatepe, Ken Kawashima, Paul Kellogg, Geoff Kennedy, Sami Khatib, Aykut Kilic, Donald Kingsbury, Nick Knight, Martijn Konings, Michael Krätke, Rick Kuhn, Ishay Landa, Tim Lang, Spyros Lapatsioras, Paul LeBlanc, Sergio Lessa, Alex Levant, Peter Linebaugh, Alex Loftus, Rob Lucas, Dennis Maeder, Matteo Mandarini, Christian Marazzi, Jonathan Martineau, Paul Mattick, David Mayer, Andrew McGettigan, Philip McMichael, David McNally, James Meadway, John Milios, Owen Miller, Andrew Milner, Dimitris Milonakis, John Molyneux, David Moore, Cristina Morini, Adam Morton, Zwi Negator, Susan Newman, Jörg Nowak, Benjamin Noys, Bertel Nygaard, Bridget O’Laughlin, Keith O’Regan, Sebnem Oguz, Ulrich Oslender, Ceren Özselçuk, Maria Cristina Soares Paniago, Leo Panitch, F. Papadatos, Juan Pablo Painceira Paschoa, Leda Maria Paulani, Simon Pirani, Iain Pirie, Nina Power, Gonzalo Pozo-Martin, Thomas Purcell, Diana Raby, Michael Rafferty, Geert Reuten, Paul Reynolds, Ben Richardson, John Riddell, John Roberts, Bruce Robinson, John Rose, Thomas Sablowski, Spyros Sakellaropoulos, Jorgen Sandemose, Saskia Sassen, Michael Sayeau, Sean Sayers, David Schwartzman, Alan Sears, Lynne Segal, Ben Selwyn, Sanjay Seth, Stuart Shields, Nicola Short, Joe Sim, Rick Simon, Subir Sinha, Panagiotis Sotiris, Dimitris P. Sotiropoulos, Kerstin Stakemeier, Guido Starosta, Marcel Stoetzler, Robert Stolz, Gaspar Miklós Tamás, Bruno Tinel, Peter Thomas, Massimiliano Tomba, Alberto Toscano, Greg Tuck, Mehmet Ufuk Tutan, Kees van der Pijl, Jan Douwe van der Ploeg, Carlo Vercellone, Danga Vileisis, Sherryl Vint, Satnam Virdee, Andriana Vlachou, Elisa Waeyenberge, Jeffery R. Webber, Dominic Wetzel, Adrian Wilding, Evan Calder Williams, Frieder Otto Wolf, Andrew Wright, Steve Wright, Galip Yalman, Iván Zatz

 

Historical Materialism Annual Conference 2008,
7-9 November

2008 Conference Programme now available!! (pdf format)

 

 

The Rikowski web site, The Flow of Ideas is at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Profile is at: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski   

Marx and the Credit Crunch

 

Public Meeting
Tuesday October 21st
7pm Conway Hall, Red Lion Square, London


MARX AND THE CREDIT CRUNCH

SPEAKERS:

 

Istvan Mezsaros, author of Beyond Capital
Chris Harman, editor, International Socialism journal
Richard Brenner, author of The Credit Crunch – a Marxist Analysis

A global credit crunch. Banks collapsing. Prices soaring. Recession looming. Conventional economic theory appears to have no coherent explanation. Government stumps up hundreds of billions to rescue the bankers – and demands that working people’s pay be held down and spending cut on public services.

At this meeting, three Marxist writers examine the roots of this great crisis in the nature of capital itself. Tracing the current crisis to its origins, they show how workers can resist paying the price for a crisis they never made, and set out the case for systemic change.

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas is at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk