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Tag Archives: Popular Education

Education System

Education System

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION RESEARCH SEMINAR ON MARXISM, CRITICAL PEDAGOGY AND EDUCATION

Wednesday 9th July 2014 3.00pm-7.30pm

Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, England

Department of Education

International Education Research Seminar on Marxism, Critical Pedagogy and Education

 

(Followed by social event / eating out near Chelmsford Station

Room: SAW 005 or other room (tbc)

 

Introduced by Alpesh Maisuria (University of East London, England) and Professor Dave Hill (Anglia Ruskin University, England)

 

SPEAKERS:

Dr. Ayse Elitok (Adnan Menderes University, Aydin, Turkey)`Village Institutes’ in Turkey- the development of secular education in rural Turkey and their demise in the face of landlord and religious opposition’

Dr. Tom Griffiths (Newcastle University, NSW, Australia) `Critical Education and World-Systems Analysis’

Dr. Lilia Monzo (Chapman University, Orange, California, USA) A Critical Pedagogy for Democracy: Confronting Higher Education’s Neoliberal Agenda with a Critical Latina Feminist Episteme

Dr. Paolo Vittoria (Universidade do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) Popular Education and Social Change in Latin America: another school is possible?

 

For information: paulette.luff@anglia.ac.uk or dave.hill@anglia.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

International Conference on Critical Education

International Conference on Critical Education

Education Crisis

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 4th NOVEMBER 2012

EVENTS

2013 OCUFA Conference “Academia in the Age of Austerity”
January 10-11, 2013
Pantages Hotel, Toronto

The Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations conference will critically explore how government austerity policies have affected faculty, students, administrators, and institutions in Ontario, in Canada, and globally. It will examine whether austerity is inevitable, or if there are alternatives. And it will ask what universities might do now, and in the future, in response to austerity policies and possible alternatives.

The conference will feature speakers from Canada, the US, the UK and Europe, and have keynote address and interviews, panel presentations, and opportunities for informal discussion and audience participation.  The conference will also release OCUFA’s new polling data on public perceptions of austerity and its impact on higher education. 

The deadline for early-bird registration is Thursday, November 15, 2012.

For more info: http://ocufa.on.ca/conferences/academia-in-the-age-of-austerity/

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Re/imagining Feminist Popular Education:  A Conversation and Book Launch
5-7 pm
Wednesday, November 21
William Doo Auditorium, 45 Willcocks St., Toronto

Join a conversation with practitioner-authors Jenny Horsman, Barbara Williams, Carol-Lynn D’Arcangelis and Audrey Huntley and help us launch Feminist Popular Education in Transnational Debates: Building Pedagogies of Possibility, edited by Linzi Manicom and Shirley Walters (Palgrave, 2012).

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From Chicago to Toronto: Educational Activism in Increasingly Conservative Times!

5:00-8:00 p.m. (refreshments will be served at 5:00 pm)
Tuesday, November 27, 2012
OISE Library
252 Bloor Street West (St George Subway)

Join us for a panel & discussion – educators, students & community members welcome!

– Jackson Potter is a Chicago teacher and founding member of the Caucus of Rank and File Educators (CORE) and the Grassroots Education Movement. Jackson was a leader in the recent Chicago Teachers strike. He currently serves the Chicago Teachers Union as its staff coordinator.

– Nigel Barriffe is a TDSB elementary school teacher in Rexdale. Nigel has been serving the community of Etobicoke-North through civic engagement, community development and youth leadership for many years.

– Tim McCaskell is a long-time Toronto writer, activist and educator who in 2005 published “Race to Equity: Disrupting Educational Inequality”, a history of the struggle for equity in Toronto public schools.

– Monica Rosas is a secondary school teacher who describes herself as an artist, educator, and agitator. Monica challenges and provokes discussion on gender, the environment and the experiences of racialized young people throughout Toronto’s urban schools.

What are the roles of educational activists within their classrooms, schools, communities and unions in responding to the challenges we all face in increasingly conservative times? Join us for an opportunity to share experiences and build networks!

Space is limited: Please RSVP to Nina Lewis at 416-978-0146 or cusforum@utoronto.ca

Sponsored by the Centre for Urban Schooling

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Indigent Workers and Capitalist Crises in Toronto (1830-1930)

Intersections + Bousfield Lectures
Program in Planning Department of Geography University of Toronto

3:00-5:00pm
Friday, Nov. 9
100 St. George Street, Room SS2125
Refreshments provided

Speakers:

Gaetan Heroux
Anti-Poverty Activist, OCAP
Bousfield Distinguished Visitor,
University of Toronto (2011/2012)
-and-
Bryan D. Palmer
Professor and CRC Chair,
Canadian Studies and History
Trent University

What is proletarianization? The conventional answer to this question rests on waged labour. Yet many workers, past and present, are routinely unable to secure paid employment, in part because of the persistence of capitalist crises of various kinds. This study of indigent workers in Toronto from the 1830s to the 1930s is premised on an understanding of proletarianization as dispossession, on the one hand, and, on the other, of the ways in which capitalism necessarily produces recurrent crises, leaving many workers wageless. It addresses how wagelessness and poverty were criminalized through the development of institutions of ostensible charitable relief, such as the Toronto House of Industry, in which those seeking shelter and sustenance were required to chop wood or, more onerously, break stone in order to be admitted to the ranks of those ‘deserving’ of such support. Against these measures, numerous protests took place in Toronto, where the black flag was carried in demonstrations demanding ‘work or bread’. Refusals to ‘crack the stone’ and calls for different kinds of relief were common in mobilizations of the wageless in the opening decades of the twentieth century, in which socialists often took the lead. By the time of capitalism’s severe crisis in the Great Depression of the 1930s, Toronto’s wageless were well situated to mount an outcasts’ offensive.

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Canadian History through the Stories of Activists – Downtown Toronto Book Launch and Talk

7:00pm
Tuesday, November 13, 2012
Room 5250, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE)
252 Bloor Street West, Toronto
   
Join author and activist Scott Neigh for a talk and book signing as he launches two new books published by Fernwood Publishing: ‘Gender and Sexuality: Canadian History Through the Stories of Activists’ and ‘Resisting the State: Canadian History Through the Stories of Activists’. Hear about some of the many struggles that have shaped the Canada of today, and talk about new ways of relating to the past as we struggle for a transformed tomorrow.

Scott will be joined by Frank Showler, who has been active in anti-war and social justice movements in Toronto since the late 1930s and whose words (along with his late wife Isabel’s) are at the heart of Chapter 1 of ‘Resisting the State’. He will also be joined by Don Weitz, a pillar of anti-psychiatry organizing in Ontario in the last several decades and the activist whose words are at the heart of Chapter 6 in ‘Resisting the State’. Both will speak briefly about their experiences and about the importance of paying attention to history for movements today.

To learn more about the books and the project of which they are a part, and to read and hear excerpts from the interviews around which the books are organized, visit http://talkingradical.ca/.

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NEWS & VIEWS

Worker Exploitation Is Not Just a Chinese Problem

by Syed Hussan, Huffington Post

Stuck as we are in the midst of a U.S. Presidential campaign in that has consistently framed China as the “boogey man,” the homogenizing outrage against the Canada-China Investment Agreement focused, it is as if China-and Chinese-bashing is all the rage right now.

If you’ve been following all the flare-up in British Columbia in the last few weeks about migrant workers from China coming to work in B.C.’s coal mines you’d think that migrant workers being charged recruitment fees is something that’s never been done before.

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/syed-hussan/migrant-worker-exploitation-canada_b_2065974.html

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‘Onwards from Occupy’ Project/Contest – Submit your Contribution!

by Toronto Media Co-op

Got a story about Occupy that needs to be told? A personal experience, or an interesting anecdote that never got out?  Have you started some awesome group projects out of Occupy that should be covered with a news story or photo essay?  Do you have some video footage you never got around to editing because you were too busy living in a park?  Now’s the time to post it up on the Toronto Media Co-op as part of our “Onwards from Occupy” project.  We’ll hoping we’ll get posts from this project throughout the anniversary of the southern Ontario ‘occupy’ encampments from now ‘till November.

More info: http://toronto.mediacoop.ca/newsrelease/13990?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=021112

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In Sandy’s Wake, New York’s Landscape of Inequity Revealed

by Michelle Chen, Common Dreams   

The shock of Sandy is still rippling across the north-eastern United States. But in the microcosm of New York City, we can already see who’s going to bear the brunt of the damage. As Hurricane Katrina demonstrated, floodwaters have a way of exposing the race and class divisions that stratify our cities.

Read more: http://www.commondreams.org/view/2012/11/02-0

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Video – The Monster in the Closet: Income Inequality

by rabble staff

An illustration of a scary problem haunting Canada — income inequality. This video is part of NUPGE’s ‘All Together Now’ campaign for public services and tax fairness.

Watch the video: http://rabble.ca/rabbletv/program-guide/2012/10/best-net/monster-closet-income-inequality

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Social Assistance Review Commission’s Final Report and Recommendations plus Roundup of Responses

Please note that the Social Assistance Review Commission’s final report and recommendations was released on Wednesday, October 24. Look here for a roundup of media articles and various responses to the report.

Read the report: http://www.socialassistancereview.ca/home?language=en_CA&

Media articles and responses to the report: http://us4.campaign-archive2.com/?u=095b12c98935ecaadd327bf90&id=516055b03d&e=f67f28a7b9

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

No Future

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 22nd AUGUST 2011

EVENTS

DAYCARE ACTION ORGANIZING MEETING

Tuesday, September 6
6:30 – 8 pm
Sanderson Library (Dundas and Bathurst)
Toronto

Ford’s City government is looking to slash daycare funding at the end of September! As parents, we’re all too aware that daycare is already in crisis; yet we are facing potential cuts of 2000 desperately needed subsidies, privatization of city-run daycares, an end to quality control inspections, and cuts to wage and rent subsidies for existing daycare facilities.

Let’s show the City that our children’s needs are non-negotiable!
Please join us for an emergency daycare demonstration organizing meeting!

* Childcare will be provided
* Wheelchair accessible
* All are welcome, and those directly effected are strongly encouraged to attend

Organized in conjunction with broader Stop the Cuts Coalition Efforts.

For more information please contact:
Sarah Vance at vance.sarahj@gmail.com
(Parent of a child at Brock Early Learning Centre and member of Davenport-Perth Stop the Cuts Committee)

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NEWS & VIEWS

REPORT: “UNDER THE RADAR: POPULAR EDUCATION IN NORTH AMERICA”

by Drick Boyd, Associate Professor of Urban Studies, Eastern University

During his sabbatical in the spring of 2011 Drick Boyd set out to learn about the current work of popular educators in North America. with two objectives: First, to see what was actually happening on the ground in the world of popular education, and two, to use the knowledge gathered from the research to develop a start-up plan for a popular education center in the city of Philadelphia where he lives and works.

In the course of his research he interviewed 25 popular educators either in person or by phone, and perused over 30 websites for popular education-type organizations. He writes in the short version of his final report

Amidst all the insights and analysis in longer versions of this report, the results of my study can be summed up this way: “Popular education in North America today involves a vast network of highly skilled and dedicated individuals and organizations operating in a variety of settings doing their work tirelessly and without much reward or notice. …if my research is at all accurate, even so popular education is part of a dynamic progressive social movement that is resisting oppression, fighting injustice, and bringing hope to people in communities large and small.”

To see the report, email Drick Boyd at dboyd@eastern.edu

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VIDEO: THE TAX CUTS QUIZ – STREETS OF TORONTO

Can you guess the right answers?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dYro5JUI1EU&feature=share

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REPORT: BLEEDING HEARTS AND HEADS

By Sherri Torjman and Ken Battle, Caledon Institute

There is no excuse for the shocking violence taking place on the streets of London. The rioters and looters have destroyed the livelihoods and lives of many innocent people.

While there are no excuses, there certainly are explanations for these angry rampages.

For years, a burgeoning body of international literature has been warning about the potential unrest bubbling beneath the surface of so-called “prosperous” societies. Exhaustive evidence from around the world leads to the same conclusion: Extreme inequality is bad for both individuals and nations. Governments have a crucial role to play in fighting the growing gap… Implementing measures that target social exclusion is equally important…Those who write off social exclusion as a “woolly concept” of concern only to bleeding hearts must now pay attention − to the bleeding heads on the streets.

Read more: http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/957ENG.pdf

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(END)

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

If you have any questions about the list, or have an event you would like to promote or news to share, send an email to csew-broadcast-oise-l@listserv.utoronto.ca Messages will be reviewed before posting.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

World Crisis

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 10th APRIL 2011

EVENTS

POPULAR EDUCATION: LEARNING TO ORGANIZE FOR CHANGE

Popular Education: Learning to Organize for Change is designed to build your understanding and experience in processes to lead groups in social justice education and activist organizing. If you are an educator, community organizer or worker looking for an experiential process to help you build greater consciousness in groups and lead others to act, this course could be for you.

After exploring an overview of popular education principles, you will participate in hands-on approaches and tools for; bringing groups together, creating spaces for dialogue, analysing the situation you hope to change, planning and taking action and evaluating group processes. In the final two evenings of the course, we will focus on specific feedback and problem solving to help each participant use popular education relevant to their own context. All participants will have the opportunity to present possible workshop processes, activities or dilemmas so that the group can offer their ideas and support. No experience necessary, but experience is welcome!

Dates and Times: (attendance for each day required for the certificate)
Saturday June 25th:  10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Sunday June 26th:  10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Wednesday June 28th:  6:00-9:00 p.m.
Thursday June 29th:  6:00-9:00 p.m.

Cost: $203.40 (Cdn). Scholarships and bursaries are available. Email heather.read@utoronto.ca to inquire.

To register: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/tlc/Summer_Institute/Registration.html
CODE SI-009 W
Deadline June 21

About the Facilitator: Christine McKenzie is a popular educator who has developed and facilitated anti-oppression organizing processes with diverse groups in Canada and Central America for the past 15 years. She has led popular education trainings with groups such as the Canadian Auto Workers Union, Equitas International Centre for Human Rights Education, and the Girls Action Foundation, among others.

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SANCTUARY SCHOOLS FORUM

Saturday May 7th
10am – 1pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), Room 2-211
252 Bloor St. West
Toronto

Our schools, and especially our students and their parents, are increasingly under attack. Teachers have a unique and special responsibility to ensure that our schools can be places of sanctuary where we can all create the socially just and equitable communities we expect and deserve.

Often teachers find ourselves working in isolation from our colleagues, from the communities we work in, and from the lives of our students and their families. The Sanctuary Schools Forum will be an opportunity to break this isolation, and connect teachers to each other as well as to the social movements being led by our students and their communities.

Forum topics:        
* Gender Based Violence & Supporting LGBTQ2 Youth and their Families
* Don’t Ask Don’t Tell: Keeping Students Safe from Deportation
* Protecting Students from Police in Schools
* Movement Building: Mobilizing Teachers to Resist Neo-Liberalism

Child care provided upon request.
Organized by Educators for Peace & Justice and No One Is Illegal

Register at: http://bit.ly/SanctuarySchoolForum

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BEARING WITNESS, CREATING HOPE: 10 YEARS OF RABBLE.CA

April 18, 2011
7:00pm – 11:00pm
The Gladstone Hotel
1214 Queen Street West
Toronto

rabble.ca invites you to join us in celebrating 10 years of rabble.ca, April 18th at the Gladstone Hotel in Toronto!

Join moderator and rabble founder Judy Rebick, and special guests for a panel discussion on the state of Canadian left politics, historical memory, and the upcoming federal election, and stay on after for a reception and party featuring Toronto’s criticaly acclaimed LAL and dancing with DJ b#!

Can’t join in person? This event will also be streamed live: http://rabble.ca/rabbletv

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EXHIBITION – EDWARD BURTYNSKY: OIL
Opens Saturday, April 9

Institute for Contemporary Culture
Roloff Beny Gallery, Level 4
Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto

Ryerson Gallery and Research Centre, Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival and Scotiabank Group present Edward Burtynsky: Oil, hosted by the ROM’s Institute for Contemporary Culture. The exhibition features fifty-three beautiful and provocative large-format photographs by internationally renowned Canadian artist Edward Burtynsky. His images explore the hotly-debated effects of oil extraction, our international dependency on the substance, and with an unflinching eye, Burtynsky presents us with the reality of oil production as its role in our civilization undergoes massive transformation.

Read more about the exhibition: http://www.rom.on.ca/exhibitions/special/oil.php

Related Event at the ROM:
Downstream: The Oil Sands Industry and the Athabasca River April 13, 7-8 pm

Learn of the controversy over the role of pollution from the oil sands industry in causing cancer deaths in Fort Chipewyan on the Athabasca River in Alberta.
http://www.rom.on.ca/programs/lectures/index.php?ref=showinfo&program_id=6839

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RICE (RESEARCHING INTERNATIONAL & CONTEMPORARY EDUCATION) SYMPOSIUM – THEORIZING INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION: (SHIFTING) CONTEXTS, CONCEPTS, METHODS

Friday, April 15, 2011
Faculty of Education – Althouse College
University of Western Ontario
London, ON

Featuring Keynote Speaker Dr. Jane Kenway, Monash University, Australia

We are anticipating a thought-provoking, discussion-rich day. To see more details and to register please go to: http://www.edu.uwo.ca/research/cie/rice/symposiumDetails.html

If you are planning on coming to the event, a couple of important notes:
– We have had some technical difficulties with the registration process, but the system is now fixed. If you have already registered please do so again as we might not have received your submission.
– Once you register please mail in your cheques as soon as possible (according to the details on the website) so they we can better organize the catered lunch and drinks.
– Check out the website for more details in early April for a suggested format on how you can contribute your research in our last informal sharing session and also to read invited paper submissions (will be posted by April 8) that will be discussed during session ii of our symposium.

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WORKERS’ ASSEMBLY COFFEEHOUSE: PUBLICATIONS, MOVEMENT BUILDING, AND RADICAL TRANSFORMATION

Thursday, April 21
7:30 pm
Reagle Beagle
335 Bloor St West (east of Spadina), back room
Toronto

This forum brings together a multi-generational panel of activists who have been involved in publishing movement publications on the political left, from the older and more well-established to more recent projects. By sharing their experiences and reflecting on both the significance and challenges of this work – from political to financial – it is our hope that we can develop and expand on our analysis of the important role such publications play for advancing our struggles, as places for dialogue and debate, educating, agitating and organizing, as well as for strategizing and visioning otherwise.

Speakers:
– Clare O’Connor, Upping the Anti and UofT OPIRG
– Chanteal-Lee Winchester, UofT OPIRG – Action Speakers Louder
– Noaman Ali, Basics
– Paul Kellog, Former Editor of Socialist Worker
– Leo Panitch, Socialist Register
– Mick Sweetman, Linchpin

For more info: http://www.workersassembly.ca

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NEWS & VIEWS

VIDEO: RAISE WELFARE AND DISABILITY RATES, RESTORE THE SPECIAL DIET!

It has been 16 long years since Mike Harris cut welfare and froze disability. McGuinty’s Liberals have been in power for half that time and done nothing to deal with poverty. In fact people are worse off today. It would take a 55% increase to bring benefits to pre-Harris levels. If benefit levels were restored to the same level of spending power as they had in 1994, a single person on Ontario Works would now be receiving $904 a month instead of the miserable $593 now being issued.

Now as the economy continues to slump and the need is greater than ever, this government is destroying the vital Special Diet Allowance that has enabled people to survive…The new Special Diet comes into affect on April 1st, 2011 and all those who are not eligible under the new program will be cut off by July 31st.

Watch the video: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/ls98.php

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MINISTERS OF EDUCATION CELEBRATE INTERNATIONAL ADULT LEARNERS’ WEEK

TORONTO, April 8 /CNW/ – Ministers of education joined this week with Canadians to celebrate International Adult Learners’ Week (IALW 2011).

First established in 2000 by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), IALW serves to raise awareness of the importance of adult learning and its integral role in the lifelong learning process.

Read more: http://news.morningstar.com/all/canada-news-wire/20110408C2581/ministers-of-education-celebrate-international-adult-learners-week.aspx

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AGAINST CATASTROPHISM

By Doug Henwood, Left Business Observer

This is the text of my introduction to a panel on catastrophism that (Catastrophism and the Crisis of the Left) I MC’d at the Left Forum, March 19, 2011, at Pace University, New York.

Events in Japan have gotten me thinking about crises in general. At first, I thought that it might promote the realization that finding clean, renewable forms of energy may the most urgent task facing us today. But then I thought back a bit to other energy-related crises. One of my beefs with the peak oilers, aside from the empirical one in which I suspect that they’re just wrong about hydrocarbon production, is that impending scarcity doesn’t make people more amenable to rational argument—it inclines them to desperate measures.

Read more: http://lbo-news.com/2011/04/08/against-catastrophism/

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A NEW TRADE UNIONISM IN THE MAKING?

From The Bullet

A trade unionism that is able to facilitate and express the practical knowledge of its members, as workers and as citizens, is critical to the renewal of public services and for confronting a global politics of austerity. Hilary Wainwright has been at the forefront of such attempts to forge a new public sector unionism for some time. She has attempted to link the struggle over the state with the building of the popular power and democratic capacities necessary for a renewal of unionism, and also the socialist project.

We are at the beginning of what will likely prove to be a long phase of public sector struggle in Canada and the U.S. The Bullet publishes here a recent contribution by Wainwright to the debate on union renewal. There is a need for many more such interventions, from a variety of perspectives, from militants and activists in North America as part of the coming battles against the ruling classes’ attempts to forge a new ‘age of austerity’.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/488.php

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CORPORATE INCOME TAXES, PROFIT, AND EMPLOYMENT PERFORMANCE OF CANADA’S LARGEST COMPANIES

By David Macdonald, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

This study tracks 198 companies on the S&P/TSX composite from 2000 through 2009 and finds those companies—Canada’s largest corporations—are making 50% more profit and paying 20% less tax than they did a decade ago.

However, in terms of job creation, they did not keep up with the average growth of employment in the economy as a whole. From 2005 to 2010, the number of employed Canadians rose 6% while the number of jobs created by the companies in the study grew by only 5%. In essence, the largest beneficiaries of corporate tax cuts are dragging down Canadian employment growth.

Read more: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/corporate-income-taxes-profit-and-employment-performance-canadas-largest-compa

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NEW RESEARCH PAPER – HEALTH AND HEALTH CARE NEEDS IN RURAL AND NORTHERN ONTARIO: A HOLISTIC NURSING PERSPECTIVE

I would like to bring your attention to a newly released research paper I’ve written through my work with the Ontario Nurses’ Association, which is the RN union in Ontario. The paper is called “Health and Health Care Needs in Rural and Northern Ontario: a holistic nursing perspective.” The paper has a feminist analysis of health issues, as well as insight from front line nurses, among other elements. It can be found at: http://www.ona.org/political_action/submissions_to_government.html#ruralandnorthernhealthcare

Salimah Valiani, PhD
Policy Analyst/Economist
Communications and Government Relations Team
Ontario Nurses’ Association

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Sara Motta

Mike Cole

EDUCATION AND SOCIAL CHANGE IN LATIN AMERICA

A two day workshop organised in collaboration between:

MERD (Marxism and Education: Renewing Dialogues)
CSSGJ (Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice, University of Nottingham)
CESJ (Centre for Education for Social Justice, Bishop Grosseteste University College, Lincoln)

To be held at the
University of Nottingham
1st – 2nd July 2011

The role of education is increasingly important in the construction of new forms of anti-capitalist politics in Latin America. This is evidenced by the centrality of popular education and other forms of struggle influenced by radical education philosophy and pedagogy, and by social movements in their construction of new forms of participatory politics and mass intellectuality. It is also evidenced in the creation of formal and informal educational programmes, practices and projects that develop varieties of critical pedagogy and popular education with both organised and non-organised marginalised and excluded communities.

Particularly, noticeable in this regard is the centrality of education in the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela and the move towards 21st Century socialism. At the heart of the politicisation of education are the questions of whose knowledge counts in the process of social transformation and political change and if the ways in which such transformative knowledge is created impact upon the struggle to develop worlds beyond capitalism in the 21st century.

This workshop invites papers which develop theoretically grounded empirical analysis about the politicisation of education in the continent.

Key questions to be addressed are:

How is education politicised in contemporary anti-capitalist struggles?

How has neoliberalism closed down as well as opened up terrains of educational struggle?

What differences are there between the role of education in 20th century socialism and 21st century socialism?

How does Marxism shape such practices of radical pedagogy and how do such practices transform Marxism?

How does the focus on popular education in new forms of popular politics influence and reflect the type of politics developed?

What is the role of autonomous education in social movements in the construction of anti-capitalism?

What is the relationship between formal ‘progressive’ educational programmes and the politics of knowledge and education in informal community/social movement settings?

What can we (outside of the region) learn from Chavez’s concept of Venezuela as a ‘giant school’ and other radical pedagogies and educational practices in Latin America?

What is the role of popular educators within formal schooling in these processes?

Selected papers will be published in an edited collection with Palgrave Macmillan in their Marxism and Education Series.

Contact Sara Motta at sara.motta@nottingham.ac.uk and Mike Cole at mike.cole@bishopg.ac.uk  if you are interested in helping organise the workshop or would like any further information.

Please submit your paper proposal by March 1st 2011

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Critical Pedagogy

RADICALIZING LEARNING

New Title: Radicalizing Learning: Adult Education for a Just World

Brookfield, S. D., & Holst, J. D. (2010): Radicalizing learning: Adult education for a just world. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

$38.00 USD
Hardcover
http://www.josseybass.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0787998257.html

Radicalizing Learning calls for a total rethinking of what the field of adult education stands for and how adult educators should assess their effectiveness. Arguing that major changes in society are needed to create a more just world, Brookfield and Holst set out to show how educators can help learners envision and enact this radical transformation.

Praise for Radicalizing Learning

“This is a book that is so interesting that I had trouble putting it down. It is well written; there is new material; it articulates familiar concepts in such novel ways that your thought patterns get hijacked reading it. Adult learning and its processes are examined from a socialist perspective with a focus on social justice.” –Phyllis M. Cunningham, Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus, Northern Illinois University

“Read this book and rub shoulders with Nelson Mandela, Septima Clark, Antonio Gramsci, Paulo Freire, Jane Thompson, Myles Horton, and a whole horde of inspiring leaders, learners, teachers, trainers, and activists. Engage with remarkable writers you have heard of, and, if you are like me, encounter a number of remarkable writers for the first time. This is a splendid, extraordinary book, which will stir and trouble you. But why am I not surprised? It is a seamlessly collaborative work by two of the best minds in the field—John Holst, the challenging, unremittingly rigorous theorist; and Stephen Brookfield, the inspired and cannily perceptive analyst. This book earns my highest praise: it will make you think.” —Michael Newman, author, Teaching Defiance

“Stephen Brookfield and John Holst have written a monumental text in the field of adult education. It is a bold, ambitious book, beautifully written and uncompromising in its social justice agenda. It is sure to become a classic in the field.” —Peter McLaren, Professor, University of California, Los Angeles

“This book offers new readings of the theory, politics, policy, and practice of radical adult education and learning where people’s lives are understood as complex and interrelated matters. Brookfield and Holst’s poetics and deeply human prose sound rebellious; the authors confront some of the main radical trends in the field of adult education including critical theory, transformative learning, and popular education.” —Shahrzad Mojab, Professor, Department of Adult Education and Counseling Psychology, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Education Crisis

CRITICAL EDUCATION FOR CRITICAL TIMES

14 May 2010

University of Nottingham

The development of a critical educational movement has been long in the making, and is now urgently overdue. These are without doubt critical times. The futures of public and common life hang in the balance. Intellectual and political openness and academic space are being increasingly curtailed and foreclosed. How should we as educators be orienting our work, our relationships with each other, and with publics, communities of struggle and social movements? What constitutes critical education in these critical times?

‘Critical Education for Critical Times’ explores different responses to these questions through a series of participatory workshops and dialogues. Each workshop, facilitated by educators with experience in critical pedagogy and/or popular education, will draw on this experience to introduce new work in empowering, prefigurative, transformative and critical pedagogies that are linked to social and political movements. We will open these examples up for criticism and discussion, and hope to consolidate the knowledge produced during the day into a common resource for further developments of educational theory and practice.

CECT ORGANISED BY THE CRITICAL PEDAGOGY AND POPULAR EDUCATION MIDLANDS WORKING GROUP

And sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/cssgj/), with support from the Nottingham Freeschool (http://nottinghamfreeschool.wordpress.com/) and Critical Pedagogies Group (CSSGJ)

Workshops/Discussions

1 | Learning alternatives to neoliberalism – resistance and renewal in critical education – Stephen Cowden, Social and Community Studies, Coventry University

2 | Prefigurative epistemologies and nomadic subjectivities: in, against, beyond the university – Sara Motta, Politics, University of Nottingham

3 | Learning from each other’s struggles – knowledge from and for social movements – Laurence Cox, Sociology, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, co-founder Grassroots Gathering

4 | ‘Climate Justice’ and popular education in social movement organisation – and Alice Cutler, TRAPESE Popular Education Collective, http://hbfc.clearerchannel.org/abouttrapese.php

5 | Revalorizing critique in academic and activist education – Sarah Amsler, Sociology and Public Policy, Aston University

Location and time | Registration begins at 9:00 a.m. in the foyer of the Law and Social Sciences Building, University of Nottingham (University Park Campus), and the final session will end at 4:30 p.m.

Sessions will be held in A105 and A106 of the Hallward Library. For maps and directions, see the University website at: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/about/datesandcampusinformation/mapsanddirections/mapsanddirections.aspx
To participate | The day is free and open to all.

To pre-register| contact Sara Motta at: sara.motta@nottingham.ac.uk Please include your name, postal address and email. All those who register early will receive a packet of relevant readings for each workshop.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Critical Pedagogy

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

2009102016401brazilmid2[1]POLITICS, POETICS AND POPULAR EDUCATION IN BRAZILIAN CINEMA, 1962-1979

‘Stronger are the powers of the people’: politics, poetics and popular education in Brazilian cinema, 1962-1979

December 4 (6.30pm – 10pm) 
December 5th and 6th (2pm to 10pm)

At No-w-here, First Floor, 316-318 Bethnal Green Road, London, E2 OAG

Full programme and further information: http://www.no-w-here.org.uk/index.php?cat=1&subCat=docdetail&&id=212

The late 1950s and early 1960s were a period of intense social and economic transformation in Brazil. It was also a period of political upheaval, curbed by the 1964 military coup, and one in which the relations between politics, poetics and popular education, the role of the cultural producer, the vanguard-popular-mass culture nexus, were absolutely central to the cultural and political debate.

‘Stronger are the powers of the people’, a programme of films and debates curated and presented by Brazilian philosopher, artist and political activist Rodrigo Nunes, uses Brazilian films from 1962 to 1979 as ‘monuments’ whose animating forces can be put again into play to understand how the problems posed by the period are expressed in the aesthetic and political choices of filmmakers.

In particular, it examines one of the most neglected experiences of that time – the Popular Culture Centres (CPCs) – as a central node of the practical and theoretical articulation of those debates. With this, the programme addresses them not only in their historical situatedness, but above all in relation to those problems that animate artistic and political practice in the present, when so much is made of the intersections between politics, art, and pedagogy, and there is a growing interest in recovering past experiences of this convergence – above all, from the 1960s, and increasingly, from peripheral countries such as Brazil. What can the problems of those years teach us regarding what we are or would like to be doing today? How can the proposals emerging in this field then – Paulo Freire’s pedagogy, Liberation Theology, Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed,tropicalismo, Helio Oiticica’s, Lygia Clark’s and Lygia Pape’s researches, cinema novo – resonate with us today?

The programme includes the rare collective work Five Times Favela, the only CPC-produced film, and the first film for many of that generation’s directors; Glauber Rocha’s internationally acclaimed Land in Anguish and Antonio das Mortes; Ruy Guerra’s The Guns and its sequel, The Fall; and Leon Hirszman’s ABC of the Strike.

Rodrigo Nunes has a PhD in philosophy from Goldsmiths College, University of London, where he prepared a thesis on immanence and philosophy in Foucault and Deleuze with a grant from CAPES – Brazilian government. As an organiser, popular educator and artist, he has been involved in many political initiatives in Latin America and Europe, including the organisation of the first three editions of the World Social Forum. He is a member of the editorial collective of Turbulence (http://www.turbulence.org.uk). His work, as writer and translator, has appeared in such publications as ephemera, Mute, Transform, and he has forthcoming papers in Radical Philosophy and Third Text.

This project is supported by Raven Row, the Brazilian embassy in London, and No.w.here.

Films

Cinco vezes favela (Five times favela), various authors, 1962: The only film the Popular Culture Centre (CPC) brought to completion, it comprises five episodes directed by Miguel Borges, Joaquim Pedro de Andrade, Caca Diegues, Marcos Farias and Leon Hirszman, and was responsible for a split between the CPC and the cinema novo group. Some of the key figures in the CPC reportedly considered the film both a commercial and a political flop, and filmmakers such as Diegues and Arnaldo Jabor (though not Hirszman) left after decrying a narrow, instrumental conception of the relation between aesthetics and politics. With a cast including many of Augusto Boal’s colleagues from Teatro de Arena (and, most notably, CPC founder Oduvaldo Viana Filho), it captures a group of young filmmakers grappling with the same problems – how to create a form adequate to the specificity of Brazilian content? How to do so in a way that reaches beyond a middle-class audience, and plays a role in the transformation of Brazilian society from below? What is popular culture, and how must the artist deal with it? – while working through a host of influences, from Russian revolutionary cinema to neo-realism. Joaquim Pedro de Andrade’s Couro de gato (Catgut) was included in a list of the 100 best shorts of all times selected by the Clermont-Ferrand Festival.

Os Fuzis (The guns), Ruy Guerra, 1964: One of the greatest achievements of the first crop of cinema novo – alongside Nelson Pereira dos Santos’ Vidas secas (Barren lives) and Glauber Rocha’s Deus e o Diabo na Terra do Sol (Black God White Devil) (1964) –, it showcases many of the period’s defining traits: the rural Northeastern setting, the use of location, natural light and non-professional actors. At the same time, in its plot about the existential and moral crises undergone by a group of soldiers sent to a small town to stop the starving victims of the draught from attacking a food warehouse, it provides in arguably the clearest way the keys to reading some of the political limitations of cinema novo at this stage. It won the Silver Bear at the Berlin Festival.

Terra em transe (Land in anguish), Glauber Rocha, 1967: Part roman à clef about the Joao Goulart government and the 1964 military coup, part schematic description of the dynamics of the post-colonial world, part baroque allegory about the destiny of Latin America, part gauntlet thrown at the right and left of post- coup Brazil: one of Rocha’s most celebrated films, it finds the effects of his ‘epic-didactic’ cinema all the more effective because its target is much clearer. A whole generation at a crossroads appears in the vacillations of the main character, his multiple allegiances to social transformation and to his own class, to aesthetics and to politics, to utopia, the heat of the struggle, and his professional situation as a hired pen; the choice for armed struggle, which the film suggests in ambiguous fashion, was already brewing as it was produced. Nominated to the Palme d’Or at Cannes, best film at the Havana Film Festival.

O Dragão da Maldade contra o Santo Guerreiro (Antônio das Mortes), Glauber Rocha, 1969: Rocha’s first international co-production, first film in colour, and first using direct sound. He would often refer to it as ‘my western’, but, despite some nods at John Ford and Howard Hawks, it is clear that the oeuvre in question here is above all his own. Like a revision of his two earlier films that relaunches its questions, but also seems to run out of answers, it already points towards some of the procedures (such as the long, semi-improvised takes) that would characterise his work in the exile that immediately follows it. The plot finds Antônio das Mortes, the gunman hired by landowners to kill cangaceiros (highwaymen), brought out of retirement for one last job which, once executed, causes him to question the side on which he has fought over the years. Won best director and a nomination to the Palme d’Or at Cannes.

A Queda (The Fall), Ruy Guerra, 1976: An accident at a construction site, resulting in one death, sets one worker off on a struggle for justice that exposes the mechanisms of exploitation and the class relations of a country that had undergone one decade of fast-paced ‘conservative modernisation’ at the hands of the military. As a sort of sequel to the classic The Guns (1964), following the fate of those characters as they move from enforcers of exploitation to exploited, it offers more than a snapshot of the period: the correspondent time lapses in fiction and reality capture the passage of a chunk of Brazilian history between the two films, and, therefore, also the transformations in cinematographic approaches to the social and political between the two moments. Equally daring in content and form, and in the originality of the adequacy of one to the other, it won the Silver Bear at Berlin.

ABC da greve (ABC of the strike), Leon Hirszman, 1979-91: While preparing the cinema version of groundbreaking 1957 Teatro de Arena play Eles não usam black tie on location in the ABC (the auto industry belt around São Paulo), Hirszman has the opportunity to document the most powerful strikes in over a decade of Brazilian history. The latter would become a catalyst and a convergence point for the opposition to the military regime, intellectuals, artists, returning exiles, eventually leading to the creation of the Worker’s Party – whose biggest leader, Lula, was the president of the metalworkers union who led the strikes. Running into problems with the regime’s censorship because of the material, Hirszman dies in 1987 leaving the film unfinished until 1991, when his two daughters and son eventually release a final cut. The narration and text are provided by Ferreira Gullar, poet, who was president of the CPC at the time of the military coup.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Work No More

Work No More

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 21st SEPTEMBER 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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RESOURCE AVAILABLE FROM CSEW: EDUCATION FOR CHANGING UNIONS

By B. Burke, J. Geronimo, D. Martin, B. Thomas, C. Wall

This book is destined to become a key work in popular education. Education for Changing Unions presents a rich, stimulating, and provocative storehouse of practical and structured activities, ideas, and debate about union education. Written in a clear and accessible style, the authors have created a book to inspire working people and teachers in many settings and locations. All the exercises and activities have been widely tested.

Between the Lines, 2003. Available online from publisher: http://www.btlbooks.com or on-line at http://www.amazon.ca

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FORUM: JOBLESS RECOVERY – BROKEN EI

Who is going to fix EI? As election fever starts to heat up, the Tories are desperate to pretend that they have dealt with the nagging issue of thousands of laid-off workers who can’t get EI benefits.

Monday, Sept. 21
Registration: 6:00 p.m.
Event starts: 6:30 p.m.

Location: Rogers Communications Centre, Ryerson University, 80 Gould Street (at Church Street), Room 204

Speakers:
Unemployed workers from the GTA;
Judy Rebick, CAW Sam Gindin Chair in Social Justice and Democracy; and
Gilles Paquette, Quebec Federation of Labour/Unemployed Coalition.

Contact: 416-441-3663 ext.224

Organised by the Good Jobs for all Coalition (http://www.goodjobsforall.ca)

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FORUM: SOLIDARITY. RESISTANCE. CHANGE: ORGANIZING WORKING CLASS COMMUNITIES

Public forum featuring: Steve Williams, Co-Director and co-founder of the California based group “People Organized to Win Employment Rights (POWER)” and co-author of the book “Towards Land, Work and Power”.

Friday October 2, 2009
7pm
Ryerson Student Centre
55 Gould Street, Room 115
Toronto

Directions: http://www.oakhamhouse.com/pages/directions.php

Co-sponsored by Socialist Project and Centre for Social Justice
Endorsed by Black Action Defence Committee (BADC), No One Is Illegal (NOII) and Ontario Coalition against Poverty (OCAP)

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TWITTER IS A MALL: WADE RATHKE, CHIEF ORGANIZER BLOG   

Author of Citizen Wealth: Winning the Campaign to Save Working Families (http://chieforganizer.org/citizen-wealth-the-book/)

Stephanie Ross from York University and Peter Sawchuk from University of Toronto had invited me to be the first speaker to discuss organizing with a group of academics and activists coming together on a 5-year project called APCOL:  Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning, a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. The project is fascinating and it will be interesting to see how it progresses and what conclusions it draws over the years, but right now it was interesting for the discussion it allowed about organizing and the challenges before us.

To read more: http://chieforganizer.org/2009/09/18/twitter-is-a-mall/

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DEBORAH BARNDT: POPULAR EDUCATION PHOTO EXHIBITS AVAILABLE

Over the past year, I produced two photo exhibits which are now available for use in conferences, community centres, and classes. They relate to popular education, community art, and social movements and are meant to stimulate the integration of these three.

“Cross-Pollinations: Photography and Social Change in the Americas – A Retrospective” is an exhibit of 18 photographs drawn from Deborah Barndt’s work in Peru, Nicaragua and Canada between 1976 and 1992.The photographs traces four key moments in Barndt’s photographic work – from creating foto-novelas and Freirean codes for literacy classes in Peru in the 1970s to making photo-stories and posters for ESL classes in Toronto in the 1980s, from teaching photo-journalism to adult educators in Nicaragua in the 1980s to coordinating collective photo-story production in the Moment Project in Toronto into the 1990s.

“If the Walls Could Speak…What Stories Would They Tell” is a traveling photo exhibit of community murals. Community murals are more than paintings on the wall – they encourage communities to dig into their histories, memorialize loved ones, express diverse identities, honour the land, name critical issues, brighten streets and alleys, tell stories of local people, envision a healthier community.

If you are interested in booking either one of them for an upcoming event or for display, please contact Andie Shabbar (andie13@yorku.ca), production and distribution assistant, and copy me at dbarndt@yorku.ca.

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JUST RELEASED: UNIONS, EQUITY AND THE PATH TO RENEWAL

Editors: Janice Foley and Patricia Baker

Trade unions in Canada are losing their traditional support base, and membership numbers could sink to US levels unless unions recapture their power. Advancing equity within an increasingly diverse membership has been identified as one important step in the union renewal process. This book shows that equity within unions is not simply one path among many — it is the path to union renewal.

Unions, Equity, and the Path to Renewal brings together a distinguished group of union activists and equity scholars to document how traditional union cultures, practices, and structures have eroded solidarity and activism and created an equity deficit in Canadian unions. Informed by a feminist vision of unions as instruments of social justice — and by an appreciation of the decades-long effort by labour and feminist activists to build union democracy, solidarity, and strength — the contributors propose the changes needed to encourage member participation and to reposition organized labour as a central institution in workers’ lives.

University of British Columbia Press, 2009. For more information or to order: http://www.ubcpress.ca/search/title_book.asp?BookID=299172753

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FROM SOCIAL JUSTICE TO POETIC JUSTICE: UN INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PEACE CELEBRATION

* Do you look at the world and feel that things need to change?
* Do you watch the news everyday in sadness and despair waiting for that one news item that would give you hope for the world you live in?
* Do you publicly laugh at beauty queens talking about world peace but secretly hope for the same?

Then come join The Transformative Learning Centre at OISE in observance of the UN International Day of Peace as we read, exhibit, and compose poems for peace. The Centre invites all those interested to come out and compose a peace poem or bring a poem/quote for peace from diverse traditions around the world. Everyone is invited!

Monday September 21, 2009
12:00 to 3 pm
7th Floor Peace Lounge
OISE, 252 Bloor St. W (at St. George)

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A NIGHT ON WATER JUSTICE: FILM AND DISCUSSION

with Susan Koppelman and Shawn Brant

Tuesday, September 22, 2009
7:30 – 9:30 p.m.
Koffler Auditorium, Room 108
569 Spadina Avenue, just north of College

First Nations peoples in Canada, and Palestinians, are facing similar challenges and systemic discrimination in obtaining their basic water needs. Join us for an evening of film screening and discussion on the challenges to obtain equity and justice in access to water, on how different communities are mobilising to obtain this basic right, and on how we can develop effective solidarity for these causes.

Organizers:  Bike Chain, GSU Social Justice Committee, Greenpeace, Science for Peace, the Really Free Market, Trinity College, Streets are for People, UTERN, OCAA, UTSU
Endorsers: OPIRG Toronto, SAIA

For more information:
http://www.opirguoft.org/index.php?cmd=ShowData&section=4&subsection=14&type=3

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2009 MAYTREE LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE – TELLING STORIES; CREATING CHANGE

Do stories matter to you and your organization?

Register now for the 2009 Maytree Leadership Conference – Telling Stories; Creating Change on Thursday, October 1.

This year’s Maytree Conference examines how organizational narrative and personal stories can become compelling and powerful catalysts for social change. John Cruikshank, publisher of the Toronto Star, kicks off the conference telling us why stories are so important to the media and what creates a story that “sticks.” Acclaimed author and filmmaker Nelofer Pazira closes the conference with the story of her own journey from Afghanistan to Canada and how she is rebuilding women’s lives in her native country.

You can choose from a range of workshops which give expert advice in the art of persuasion, communication and media skills, storytelling and much more.

Register now to avoid disappointment: http://www.maytree.com/training/2009-maytree-leadership-conference/registration

Become part of the conversation. Read our conference blog with daily posts on storytelling techniques, social change through storytelling, narrative as persuasion and other topics: http://www.maytree.com/2009-leadership-conference-blog/

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO SYMPOSIUM – BUILDING THE FUTURE WE WANT: FINDING OPPORTUNITY IN ADVERSITY

The symposium will bring together a broad range of individuals and organizations to explore the ways in which the current economic and social crisis may provide opportunities to rethink how government, the non-profit sector and business can renew our social safety net for the 21st century. Ratna Omidvar, president of Maytree, will be one of the speakers.

Friday, October 2, 2009, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
New College, University of Toronto
Cost: $50.00 (includes lunch and refreshments)

For more information and registration: http://www.socialplanningtoronto.org/symposium.

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CENTRE FOR SOCIAL INNOVATION TOUR AND INFORMATION SESSION – SEPTEMBER DATES!

September 24, 2009
Centre for Social Innovation
215 Spadina Avenue, Suite 400
Toronto

Are you interested in permanent or part-time work space at CSI? Are you curious about our model? Do you want to check out the space and learn more about ‘how we do what we do’?

Join us for our weekly Tour and Information Session! Every week, a member of our staff team will offer a brief tour and then answer any questions you have about the Centre, the work we do, and how you can get involved.

Visit our events list for a listing of times and additional dates: http://socialinnovation.ca/community/events/listing

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LABOUR RIGHTS WEBSITE: UFCW CANADA VS. WALMART

The United Food & Commercial Workers (UFCW) Canada created and has maintained an excellent labour rights website at http://www.walmartworkerscanada.ca for workers at Walmart stores.  It’s an excellent example of grass-roots organizing by using the internet. Supporters of the workers are urged to go to http://www.walmartworkerscanada.ca/freespeech to join them in sending protest letters to Walmart; they are also using Facebook to spread the word about their campaign.

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DO THE MATH!

The Stop Community Food Centre is engaged in grass-roots work in all their work.  An imaginative campaign to build support for the province to increase financial assistance for persons who receive inadequate assistance is to add a healthy food supplement to what people receive now. “Do the Math” is explained at http://dothemath.thestop.org/ to illustrate how much money is necessary for a person to live with dignity and in health.

Indeed, some people are meeting their own MPPs to “do the math” with them, and so lobby for change using the exercise to educate their MPP. Groups of people who want to do this can get help and advice from Jonah Schein at the Stop, and also they can inform Jonah afterwards how successful their meeting was. Jonah is available at (416) 652-7867 x235 or at civicengagement@thestop.org.

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LEARN AT WORK WEEK: THE POWER OF A COMMUNITY LEARNING NETWORK INSPIRING LEADERSHIP IN LEARNING INNOVATION

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009
6:00pm Light lunch and refreshments
6:30pm-7:20pm Speaker introduction, presentation, and Q & A
7:20pm- Networking

Royal Canadian Legion, 10425 Kingsway NW
Edmonton, Alberta
(FREE parking; license plate number sign-in)

Price:
Member price: $25.00+GST
Non-Member price: $30.00+GST

Payment Method:
VISA/MasterCard/AMEX only

The Canadian Society for Training and Development (CSTD) Edmonton chapter invites you to attend an interactive learning and networking event during Learn @ Work Week – Sept 21-25/09.

The Community Learning Network (CLN) is a provincial not-for-profit organization that supports community adult learning by providing leadership, resources and connections to Alberta’s 81 Community Adult Learning Councils who assist adults in the areas of ESL, literacy, general interest courses and courses that support the work environment.

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CANADIAN INDEX OF WELLBEING (CIW) FRONT AND CENTER AS A PICTURE OF CANADIAN WELLBEING

Sept 15 – Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/comment/article/695624

Sept 14 – National Post
http://www.nationalpost.com/news/world/story.html?id=1992691

Sept 13 – Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/comment/article/694584

Check out our website…
To find out more about the Institute, and look for our latest reports, please check out our website at http://www.ciw.ca. Everything produced by the Institute is available free of charge in both user-friendly and research-rich format.

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CANADIANS TO CLEAR UP HEALTH CARE MYTHS FOR AMERICANS
rabble.ca posts U.S. health care page debunking myths and posting health care testimonials

TORONTO – In the wake of President Obama’s health care speech, rabble.ca is asking Canadians to weigh in on the American health care debate by providing testimonials on a new section of their website that can be found at: http://rabble.ca/issues/healthcareUSA.

rabble.ca’s new “Health Care USA” section presents some simple facts about Canadian health care, links to resources on single-payer for Americans and testimonials from Canadians from all walks of life on the Canadian health system.

“Canadians are shocked and even angry that their health-care system, what we call ‘Medicare’, has been used to frighten Americans trying to make up their minds. Some of what has been said about our Medicare system are outright falsehoods, like the claim that we can’t choose our own doctors or that government ‘bureaucrats’ can deny us needed treatment,” said rabble Senior Contributing Editor Murray Dobbin. “These falsehoods would be laughable were it not for the fact that Americans might abandon the opportunity for excellent, less expensive health care because they believe these stories,” Dobbin said.

rabble will be posting testimonials from ordinary Canadians who have used our system and from the professionals, doctors, nurses, and administrators who provide the service.

rabble.ca is Canada’s most popular source of independent news and views, and features original news, opinion, book reviews, podcasts and live and pre-recorded video exploring issues facing Canadians. rabble.ca is in its 9th year of providing 100% free news content to Canadians.  rabble is a non-profit, community supported organization.

For more information contact:
Murray Dobbin, Contributing Senior Editor (604) 483-9667
Derrick O’Keefe, Editor (604) 803-6927
Kim Elliott, rabble.ca, Publisher (647) 477-8534
http://rabble.ca

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DOWN IN THE VALE: SUDBURY STEELWORKERS STRIKE AT VALE INCO

By Petra Veltri

For a valley so used to being torn up, spit out, and poisoned daily, everything is eerily quiet in and around Sudbury, Ontario these days. Beginning June 1st with a Vale Inco plant shutdown, that was then followed by a strike on July 13 when 3300 members of United Steelworkers of Canada (USW) Local 6500 rejected the concessionary demands of the Brazilian multinational subsidiary, the mines, smelter, mill, and refinery, and ‘superstack’ have all been closed. In addition, many mining supply and service companies are temporarily shuttered, idling thousands more usually employed in spin-off businesses.

To read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/253.php

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO FORUM: IMPACTS OF SCHOOL CLOSURES ON CHILDREN AND COMMUNITIES

Friday, September 25
9:30 am to 12:30 pm

Presenters:

* Dr. Ranu Basu, York University
* Dr. David Clandfield, University of Toronto
* Annie Kidder, People for Education

The forum will address issues of school closures and the impact on citizenship; the role public policy plays in determining school closures and the importance of community hubs; and the Toronto District School Board perspective from the Toronto Lands Corporation.

To register, click here: http://socialplanningtoronto.org/machform/view.php?id=1

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Critical Pedagogy

Critical Pedagogy

CRITICAL PEDAGOGY AND POPULAR EDUCATION – PODCASTS

 

The Critical Pedagogy Podcasting Project was launched at a day seminar on 3rd July 2009 at Aston University, Birmingham, UK. The event was called ‘Podcasting Critical Pedagogy and Popular Education’.

See: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2009/06/17/critical-pedagogy-and-popular-education/ for details on the development and history of this project. It is recommended that you check this out first, to see the organisational roots of the podcasts referred to below.

Gurnam Singh and colleagues at Coventry University developed a series of podcasts for the day seminar on 3rd July. These are:

‘Critical Pedagogy, Critical Theory and Critical Hope – Interview with Sarah Amsler’

‘Popular Education and Higher Education – Interview with Jim Crowther’

‘Indigenous Pedagogy – Interview with Michael Williams’

‘Critical Reflection and Critical Pedagogy – Interview with Philip Chambers’

‘Autonomist Marxism, Social Movements and Popular Education – Steve Wright’

‘The Neoliberal University, Critical Pedagogy and Popular Education – Part 1: Joyce Canaan’

‘The Neoliberal University, Critical Pedagogy and Popular Education – Part 2: Joyce Canaan’

‘The Workers Education Association and Popular or Informal Learning – Mogs Russell’

Gurnam Singh (Coventry University) is the Interviewer  

The podcasts are now available at: http://coventryuniversity.podbean.com/category/education/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 22nd JUNE 2009

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

To change your subscriptions settings, visit: http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

TABLE OF CONTENTS

•    AVAILABLE IN SUMMER 2009! EDUCATION & JOBS: EXPLORING THE GAPS
•    JOBS & JUSTICE: DRIVE TO WORK CARAVAN
•    WORKERS ARTS AND HERITAGE CENTRE – EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR (PERMANENT FULL TIME)
•    CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS – WORKPLACE ACTIVISM, THE LABOUR MOVEMENT AND THE ECONOMIC CRISIS (Briarpatch Magazine)
•    FORUM – TIME FOR A BOLD REVIEW: MAKING SOCIAL ASSISTANCE MEET THE POVERTY REDUCTION TEST   
•    OUR TIMES LABOUR MAGAZINE SUMMER ISSUE
•    TEN+ YEARS LATER – WE ARE VISIBLE REPORT AVAILABLE ONLINE
•    COURSE – POPULAR EDUCATION: LEARNING TO ORGANIZE FOR CHANGE
•    ARTICLE – COMMUNITY GROUPS FIGHT FOR BETTER LIVING, WORKING CONDITIONS FOR TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS AND LIVE-IN CAREGIVERS
•    ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

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AVAILABLE IN SUMMER 2009! EDUCATION & JOBS: EXPLORING THE GAPS
D.W. Livingstone (Editor)
ISBN: 978-1-44260-050-8
Paperback $32.95 US & CDN

“Education and Jobs is a profound contribution to our understanding of modern economies and education systems. Edited by one of the world’s leading educational sociologists, based on national survey data and close-focus case studies, this book makes a powerful case for new policy, industrial, and educational thinking.” – Raewyn Connell, University of Sydney

The Education-Job Requirement Matching (EJRM) Research Project team, including M. Lordan, S. Officer, K.V. Pankhurst, M. Radsma, M. Raykov, J. Weststar, and O. Wilson worked closely together for several years conducting and analyzing both survey and case study data. Education and Jobs is the most thorough exploration to date of relations between workers and jobs. The book develops a new paradigm intended to reshape future studies of learning and work.

D.W. Livingstone is Canada Research Chair in Lifelong Learning and Work at the University of Toronto, Head of the Centre for the Study of Education and Work at OISE/UT, and Director of the SSHRC national research network on “The Changing Nature of Work and Lifelong Learning” (see http://www.wallnetwork.ca).

For more information, please visit http://www.utphighereducation.com

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JOBS & JUSTICE: DRIVE TO WORK CARAVAN

The Ontario Coalition for Social Justice’s choice of a campaign on Jobs & Justice is especially apt for the continuing economic crisis affecting so many people. Talking about the public need for good jobs and in general, about  everyone’s need to be treated with justice, is a clear contrast to the sheer greed by a few persons, who seem to be able to get “bailouts” to add to the wealth they already have. The OCSJ and allies and partners advocate different goals:

+++DRIVE TO WORK CARAVAN

The Ontario Federation of Labour (OFL) is completing its caravan next week, continuing to visit communities in all regions of Ontario, to encourage people to speak out about how the economy is affecting them. Supporters of the OCSJ in numerous communities are joining union members at events in the remaining days:

June 22    At 10:00 a.m. a rally in London will be held outside London City Hall, to reinforce the points made yesterday at a rally with the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers, and Grain Millers’ picket-line at Kellogg’s in that city.

June 23    From 4:15 – 7:00 p.m. a rally will be held at the CAW Local 1999 Hall in St. Catharine’s at 124 Bunting Rd.

June 23    A rally will also take place at 4:30 p.m. in Hamilton at the Hamilton General Hospital at 237 Barton St. E.

June 25    The caravan’s final rally will take place in Toronto at 2:00 p.m. outside the Legislature at Queen’s Park.

The OFL website at http://www.ofl.ca has a link to this campaign named Join the DRV2WRK on a licence plate, with more detail for the events of the caravan. As well, at the bottom of the opening page for the Drive to Work link, you can “have your say” – that is, you can add an anecdote of how you are affected by the economic crisis.

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WORKERS ARTS AND HERITAGE CENTRE – EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR (PERMANENT FULL TIME)

The Workers Arts and Heritage Centre, located in Hamilton, Ontario is seeking a dynamic, creative and motivated individual to fill the position of Executive Director. This is a permanent position which will start no later than September 1, 2009. The purpose of the job is to provide professional competency and effective strategic leadership for the Workers Arts and Heritage Centre. The Executive Director reports to the Board of Directors through the Executive Committee of the Board. 

Located in the Historic Custom House in Hamilton, Ontario, WAHC works collaboratively with others to engage in artistic activity, preserving the historical, cultural and contemporary experiences of working people in their diverse identities. WAHC performs a number of services including education, research, exhibits, facility rental and a virtual museum. We have a diverse market including workers, their unions and organizations, politicians, youth, heritage supporters, newcomers, aboriginal artists, women and the public. At a provincial and national level we work in a network of labour and community arts practitioners and organizations to produce, support and otherwise engage communities in exchanges and production of cultural events, activities and projects.

For more information, visit: http://www.wahc-museum.ca/w-jobs.php

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS – WORKPLACE ACTIVISM, THE LABOUR MOVEMENT AND THE ECONOMIC CRISIS (Briarpatch Magazine)

Striking Back: Workplace activism, the labour movement and the economic crisis

The economic crisis is taking a grim toll on working people and on the labour movement. Is labour condemned to watch decades of hard-fought gains undone, or can it organize an effective response and go on the offensive?

In our November/December issue, “Striking Back: Workplace activism, the labour movement and the economic crisis,” Briarpatch will assess the impact of the global economic crisis on working people and on the labour movement, and investigate the opportunities for advancing a new vision of economic wellbeing grounded in workplace democracy, respect for human rights and an equitable distribution of resources.

If you’ve got something to contribute to this discussion, then we want to hear from you. We are looking for articles, essays, investigative reportage, news briefs, project profiles, interviews with luminary thinkers, reviews, poetry, humour, artwork & photography that shed light on the current situation.

Queries are due by July 6. If your query is accepted, first drafts are due by August 10.

For more information, visit: http://briarpatchmagazine.com/2009/06/11/call-for-submissions-5/

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FORUM – TIME FOR A BOLD REVIEW: MAKING SOCIAL ASSISTANCE MEET THE POVERTY REDUCTION TEST   

June 23, 2009
9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Multi-Faith Centre Auditorium, Koffler Institute Building
University of Toronto, 569 Spadina Avenue

In December 2008, the Ontario government committed to review the province’s social assistance system. This commitment was part of Ontario’s new Poverty Reduction Strategy and was restated in the 2009 budget.

765,000 people rely on Ontario Works and the Ontario Disability Support Program. And thousands of newly unemployed Ontarians will soon be forced to turn to these programs. We are all entitled to a system that gives real assistance when we need it. Social assistance must provide adequate income and meaningful supports to ensure recipients can live lives marked by dignity, decency and opportunity.

Our four insightful and powerful panellists will discuss why we need a bold Social Assistance Review, and how this kind of significant change can take place:

Crystal Chin- Crystal is currently a recipient of ODSP and an active advocate on the Barrier Free Council at Ann Johnston Health Station. Crystal has recently become involved with the ODSP Action Coalition and is a long-time volunteer at Bloorview Kids Rehab.

Marion Overholt- Marion is Staff Lawyer at Legal Assistance of Windsor and a long time poverty law activist and social justice advocate. She is the Social Justice Representative on the Windsor and District Labour Council and chairs the Ford/CAW Local 200 Workplace Adjustment Committee.

Angela Robertson- Angela is the Executive Director of Sistering — A Woman’s Place, and a dedicated community advocate with a commitment to anti-racism, feminism, community-based research, and social justice. Angela is the 2009 YWCA award recipient for social change.

Judy Rebick- Judy is a well-known social justice activist, educator, writer and speaker, and holds the Sam Gindin chair in Social Justice and Democracy at Ryerson University. She is also the founder of rabble.ca, Canada’s most popular independent online news and discussion site.

Join us to make a clear and compelling call for a bold and broad Social Assistance Review- one that leads to economic security for all Ontarians.
 
For more information about this event: email isac@lao.on.ca or call 416-597-5820.

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OUR TIMES LABOUR MAGAZINE SUMMER ISSUE

“In Cornwall, a high school teacher told us that while they used to raise funds for school trips and sports teams, now they raise money to buy food, because too many students are too hungry to learn.”- Irene Harris, Ontario Federation of Labour’s Drive to Work Caravan

Our Times’ summer issue (Vol. 28 No.3) will be heading to the printer shortly. In this issue, we’re highlighting the courageous struggle of migrant agricultural workers for safe and healthy working conditions and the right to unionize. We’re also featuring the recent historic union stewards’ assembly in Toronto. Plus we’ve got some great creative fiction and non-fiction, including Part 2 of Newfoundland writer Mike Heffernan’s story about a deadly explosion aboard an oil tanker. It’s a great issue, geared to building solidarity in hard times.

If you think you may want to order extra copies of this issue as an education resource for your workshops, schools, or to include in your conference or convention kits, please contact our business manager by June 25 at the latest. Telephone: 416-703-7661. Toll-free: 1-800-648-6131. E-mail: office@ourtimes.ca. Discounted prices are available for bulk orders.

For more information, visit: http://www.ourtimes.ca/index.php

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TEN+ YEARS LATER – WE ARE VISIBLE REPORT AVAILABLE ONLINE

Ten+ Years Later – We Are Visible: Ethno-cultural/racialized women with disabilities speak out about health care issues was launched on June 5, 2009 at the People in Motion Exhibition, Toronto.

Project Partners: Ethno-Racial People with Disabilities Coalition of Ontario (ERDCO) and Ontario Women’s Health Network (OWHN)

Ten+ Years Later – We Are Visible updates the innovative community-based research project, We are Visible, conducted in 1996, and highlights the experiences of health and health care of ethno cultural/racialized women with disabilities in Toronto. Through community-based research and a literature review, this project works to understand the barriers to health and health care that ethno-cultural/racialized women with disabilities face and whether any progress has been made to address the issues discussed by the women in the original We Are Visible project.

Both Ten+ Years Later – We Are Visible and the original We are Visible report are available online at http://owhn.on.ca/wearevisible.htm and http://erdco.ca

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COURSE – POPULAR EDUCATION: LEARNING TO ORGANIZE FOR CHANGE

‘Popular Education: Learning to Organize for Change’ is designed to build your understanding and experience in processes to lead groups in social justice education and activist organizing. If you are an educator, community organizer or worker looking for an experiential process to help you build greater consciousness in groups and lead others to act, this course could be for you.

After exploring an overview of popular education and feminist popular education principles, you will participate in hands-on approaches and tools for; bringing groups together, creating spaces for dialogue, analysing the situation you hope to change, planning and taking action and evaluating group processes.
In the final part of the course you will apply these approaches to the work you are doing (or hope to do). All participants will have the opportunity to present possible workshop processes, activities or dilemmas so that the group can offer their ideas and support.

No experience necessary, but experience is welcome.

Facilitator: Christine McKenzie is a popular educator who has developed and facilitated anti-oppression organizing processes with diverse groups in Canada and Central America over the past 15 years. She has led popular education trainings with groups such as the Canadian Auto Workers Union, Equitas International Centre for Human Rights Education, and the Girls Action Foundation, among others.

Dates and Times: (attendance at each day & evening required for the certificate)
Sat July 25 (10:00-6:00), Sun July 26 (10:00-6:00), Tues July 28 (6:00-9:00 pm) and Wed July 29 (6:00-9:00 pm)
Location: OISE – 252 Bloor St W. Toronto, Ont.
Cost: $175 (Cdn).  sliding scale available – please ask!

To Register:  Fill out and mail in the registration form on the Transformative Learning Centre website – http://tlc.oise.utoronto.ca/wordpress/si2008/registration/registration-form/ Course Code: SI09 –C04

For questions contact Christine at: c-mckenzie@sympatico.ca.

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ARTICLE – COMMUNITY GROUPS FIGHT FOR BETTER LIVING, WORKING CONDITIONS FOR TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS AND LIVE-IN CAREGIVERS

by John Bonnar (reprinted from rabble.ca)
June 11, 2009

Eleven o’clock Tuesday morning at the Workers’ Action Centre. Media and supporters are jam-packed into a room to listen to representatives of the newly formed Caregivers Action Centre, comprised of former and current caregivers working for change in Temporary Foreign Worker programs including the Live-In Caregiver Program and the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program.

To read more, visit: http://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/johnbon/2009/06/community-groups-fight-better-living-working-conditions-temporary-for

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ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

Social Services, Faith-Based Organizations, and the Poor
Marci B. Littlefield
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly published 8 June 2009, 10.1177/0899764009337627
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0899764009337627v1

The outsourcing of social care in Britain: what does it mean for voluntary sector workers?
Ian Cunningham and Philip James
Work Employment Society 2009;23 363-375
http://wes.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/23/2/363

Book Review: Gay W. Seidman Beyond the Boycott: Labor Rights, Human Rights, and Transnational Activism New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 2007, $26.00 hbk (ISBN: 0871547619) xvi + 176 pp
David Bartram
Work Employment Society 2009;23 385-387
http://wes.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/23/2/385

Community Service Among A Panel of Beginning College Students: Its Prevalence and Relationship to Having Been Required and to Supporting “Capital”
James Griffith
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly published 18 June 2009, 10.1177/0899764009338218
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0899764009338218v1

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

CRITICAL PEDAGOGY AND POPULAR EDUCATION

C-SAP Critical Pedagogy and Popular Education Special Interest Group

LAUNCH OF CRITICAL PEDAGOGY PODCASTING PROJECT

“Podcasting Critical Pedagogy and Popular Education”

Date: 3rd July 2009, 10:00 – 3:30.

Venue: Aston University, Main Building, Room 404C,

Aston Triangle, Birmingham, B4 2ET

http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?hl=en&q=Aston%20university&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wl

The C-SAP – Critical Pedagogy/Popular Education Special Interest Group (SIG) seeks to hold a day seminar to expand upon ideas discussed at its 20 February 2009 event 

Whilst the prior event explored the relevance and importance of the bodies of ideas known as Critical Pedagogy and Popular Education for HE teachers and educators, the 3 July event seeks to take forward the discussion from that day with a slightly different focus.  In 2008 Dr Gurnam Singh, one of the members of the SIG, obtained funding from C-SAP to develop a series of podcasts on themes associated with Critical Pedagogy and Popular Education. Gurnam, with, support from other colleagues, has now completed a series of 8 podcasts that will provide the basis for the day’s activities. The day will be divided into two sessions, with the morning session bringing together as many as possible of those who participated in making the dialogical podcasts with Gurnam will discuss the significance of this process for themselves and the wider audience. The afternoon will focus on the work of the Critical Pedagogy and Popular Education SIG to both publicise the availability of the material on the C-SAP website and consider the wider issues raised by the podcasts.

 

 The programme of the day will be as follows:

10:00 Coffee and welcome

10:30 – 11:15 Overview of Podcasting Project: Gurnam Singh will offer a general overview of the project, what he sought to achieve and what came out of it.

11:15   – 12:30 Responses from Interviewees in which the issues raised within the interviews will be discussed.

12:30 – 1:30 Lunch

1:30 – 3:30 Developing and Extending the work of the Special Interest Group.

This discussion aims to respond to the prior event and is entitled, “We have the analysis, now what do we do with it?”

Much of what happens in academia concerns discussion and analysis of the current situation in which we find ourselves.  Whilst this is essential work, as Critical Pedagogy is not just a method but a practice, we also want to think about how we build a bridge between theory and practice, in other words how can Critical Pedagogy and Popular Education be used as means to facilitate real change in HE today. 

Cost and who can attend: The workshop is free for participants and places will be allocated on a first come first served basis. The event is primarily aimed at HE teachers and students.

If you would like to attend please contact Sarah Amsler: S.S.Amsler@aston.ac.uk  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk