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London Radical BookfairRESILIENCE: THE GOVERNANCE OF COMPLEXITY

A new book by David Chandler

BOOK LAUNCH AND ROUNDTABLE

Speakers: David Chandler (University of Westminster), Julian Reid (University of Lapland), Phil Hammond (London South Bank University)

Books will be 20% off cover price and there will be wine and nibbles (sponsored by Routledge and the Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster)

Time: 6.00 – 8.00pm, Wednesday 14 May 2014
Venue: Westminster Forum, 5th Floor, 32-38 Wells Street (5 mins from Oxford Circus), University of Westminster.

Resilience: The Governance of Complexity
(Routledge: Critical Issues in Global Politics)
Amazon page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Resilience-Governance-Complexity-Critical-Politics/dp/0415741408/ref=dp_return_1?ie=UTF8&n=266239&s=books

Resilience has become a central concept in government policy understandings over the last decade. In our complex, global and interconnected world, resilience appears to be the policy ‘buzzword’ of choice, alleged to be the solution to a wide and ever-growing range of policy issues. This book analyses the key aspects of resilience-thinking and highlights how resilience impacts upon traditional conceptions of governance.

This concise and accessible book investigates how resilience-thinking adds new insights into how politics (both domestically and internationally) is understood to work and how problems are perceived and addressed; from educational training in schools to global ethics and from responses to shock events and natural disasters to long-term international policies to promote peace and development. This book also raises searching questions about how resilience-thinking influences the types of knowledge and understanding we value and challenges traditional conceptions of social and political processes.

It sets forward a new and clear conceptualisation of resilience, of use to students, academics and policy-makers, emphasising the links between the rise of resilience and awareness of the complex nature of problems and policy-making.

Table of contents: 1. Introduction: The Rise of Resilience, Part One: Thematics 2. Governing Complexity 3. Resilience: Putting Life to Work Part Two: Resilience and the International 4. The Politics of Limits: The Rise of Complexity in Peacebuilding, 5. The ‘Everyday’ Policy Solution: Culture, from Limit to Resource 6. A New Global Ethic: The Transformative Power of the Embedded Subject Part Three: The Politics of Resilience 7. Revealing the Public: The Reality of the Event and the Banality of Evil 8. The Democracy of Participation 9. The Poverty of Post-Humanism 10. Conclusion: Resilience, the Promise of Complexity

Review: David Chandler’s Resilience takes a fashionably vague catchword and subjects it to a masterful critique and reconstruction. In his words, resilience is ‘a way of thinking about how we think about the being of being.’ As such it is nothing less than an epistemic revolution in the making, a shift in what, following Foucault, it is possible to think. Nicholas Onuf, Professor Emeritus, Department of Politics and International Relations, Florida International University, USA.

About the Author: David Chandler is Professor of International Relations and Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster. He is the founding editor of the journal Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses. His recent books include: Hollow Hegemony: Rethinking Global Politics, Power and Resistance (Pluto, 2009); International Statebuilding: The Rise of Post-Liberal Governance (Routledge, Critical Issues in Global Politics, 2010); and Freedom vs Necessity in International Relations: Human-Centred Approaches to Security and Development (Zed, 2013).

David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.

Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20

Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0 ;

Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/;
Twitter: @DavidCh27992090

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

The Future of Education

The Future of Education

NEARLY TEN YEARS AFTER: EXAMINING EDUCATION REFORM POST-KATRINA

CALL FOR PAPERS

Policy Futures in Education

NEARLY TEN YEARS AFTER: examining education reform post-Katrina
Guest Editor: LUIS MIRÓN, Loyola University New Orleans, USA

It has been almost 10 years since Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast region of the USA, wreaking in its path billions of dollars of damage and flooding 80% of buildings and homes in New Orleans. At the same time education activists, civic elites, and policymakers seized upon this crisis largely inflicted by the failures of the levee system, to enact unprecedented school reform measures. Today nearly all of the public schools in New Orleans are charter schools, semi privately led entities, which enjoy considerable autonomy to redesign curricula, contract with outside vendors to fiscally manage and operate the schools, hire and fire teachers and school leaders, and set pay scales largely as they see fit. As the New Orleans model gains traction nationally, this near-tenth anniversary of the storm presents an ideal opportunity to assess on balance, whether or not these reform have largely benefited or hurt students, their families, and the communities that their schools serve.

This Special Issue of Policy Futures in Education (www.wwwords.co.uk/PFIE) proposes to examine nearly a decade following Hurricane Katrina, both the educational and social consequences of the devastating man-made disaster, as well as its symbolic meaning. In particular the selection of invited articles will seek to analytically assess the claims of proponents and opponents of school reform and ‘ universal school choice.’ The latter includes the proliferation of charter schools, which, collectively, comprise nearly 90% of all public schools in New Orleans. Nearly Ten Years After will also seek to determine theoretically what these reforms and their long-term societal consequences might mean for specific populations.

The substantive issues that this special issue will address include but are not limited to the following:
– Quantitative and qualitative impacts on student achievement.
– The effects of ‘universal choice’ on students and families.
– The use of MGOs (management governance organizations).
– Privatization
– Unionization/collective bargaining
– National/international implications of the New Orleans model
– Spatial dynamics (geographical)
– Comparative case studies (e.g. Detroit and New Orleans)
– Neo-liberal trends
– African-American diaspora
– The meaning of ‘public education’
– The future of school reform

Deadline for the final draft of your paper is January 6, 2014. However, if you would find it helpful, please send a draft of your article by November 15, and the Guest Editor will provide feedback for any suggested revisions.

Please send contributions to: lfmiron@gmail.com

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Education

Education

PISA, POWER, AND POLICY

Just Published…

OXFORD STUDIES IN COMPARATIVE EDUCATION

PISA, Power, and Policy: The emergence of global educational governance

Edited by HEINZ-DIETER MEYER & AARON BENAVOT

2013 paperback 336 pages US$56.00
ISBN 978-1-873927-96-0

 
IN STOCK NOW   FREE delivery on all orders
All books are sent AIRMAIL worldwide

Click here to view further information and to order this book

Over the past ten years the PISA assessment has risen to strategic prominence in the international education policy discourse. Sponsored, organized and administered by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), PISA seems well on its way to being institutionalized as the main engine in the global accountability regime.

The goal of this book is to problematize this development and PISA as an institution-building force in global education. It scrutinizes the role of PISA in the emerging regime of global educational governance and questions the presumption that the quality of a nation’s school system can be evaluated through a standardized assessment that is insensitive to the world’s vast cultural and institutional diversity. The book raises the question of whether PISA’s dominance in the global educational discourse runs the risk of engendering an unprecedented process of worldwide educational standardization for the sake of hitching schools more tightly to the bandwagon of economic efficiency, while sacrificing their role to prepare students for independent thinking and civic participation.

 

Contents

Heinz-Dieter Meyer & Aaron Benavot. Introduction. PISA and the Globalization of Education Governance: some puzzles and problems

Taya L. Owens. Thinking beyond League Tables: a review of key PISA research questions

THE FINLAND PARADOX
Janne Varjo, Hannu Simola & Risto Rinne. Finland’s PISA Results: an analysis of dynamics in education politics

Tiina Silander & Jouni Välijärvi. The Theory and Practice of Building Pedagogical Skill in Finnish Teacher Education

Paul Andrews. What Does PISA Performance Tell Us about Mathematics Teaching Quality? Case Studies from Finland and Flanders

PISA, INSTITUTIONS, AND THE GLOBALIZATION OF
EDUCATION GOVERNANCE
David H. Kamens. Globalization and the Emergence of an Audit Culture: PISA and the search for ‘best practices’ and magic bullets

Daniel Tröhler. The OECD and Cold War Culture: thinking historically about PISA

Marlaine Lockheed. Causes and Consequences of International Assessments in Developing Countries

Sam Sellar & Bob Lingard. PISA and the Expanding Role of the OECD in Global Educational Governance

NON-EDUCATIONAL INFLUENCES ON PISA OUTCOMES
Heinz-Dieter Meyer & Kathryn Schiller. Gauging the Role of Non-educational Effects in Large-scale Assessments: socio-economics, culture and PISA outcomes

Xin Ma, Cindy Jong & Jing Yuan. Exploring Reasons for the East Asian Success in PISA

Jaap Dronkers & Manon de Heus. Immigrant Children’s Academic Performance: the influence of origin, destination and community

Yong Zhao & Heinz-Dieter Meyer. High on PISA, Low on Entrepreneurship? What PISA Does Not Measure

Stephen P. Heyneman. The International Efficiency of American Education: the bad and the not-so-bad news

POLICY
Alexander W. Wiseman. Policy Responses to PISA in Comparative Perspective

Notes on Contributors; Index

 

Related and Recent Titles:

Globalisation and Europeanisation in Education ROGER DALE & SUSAN ROBERTSON

Education in the Broader Middle East: borrowing a baroque arsenal GARI DONN & YAHYA AL MANTHRI

Globalisation and Higher Education in the Arab Gulf StatesGARI DONN & YAHYA AL MANTHRI

Higher Education and the State: changing relationships in Europe and East AsiaROGER GOODMAN, TAKEHIKO KARIYA & JOHN TAYLOR

Comparing Standards Internationally: research and practice in mathematics and beyond BARBARA JAWORKSI & DAVID PHILLIPS

An Atlantic Crossing? The Work of the International Examination Inquiry, its Researchers, Methods and Influence MARTIN LAWN

Europeanizing Education: governing a new policy space MARTIN LAWN & SOTIRIA GREK

 

SYMPOSIUM BOOKS
PO Box 204, Didcot, Oxford OX11 9ZQ, United Kingdom
info@symposium-books.co.uk
Specialist publishers of Comparative and International Education.
Please see our online catalogue at www.symposium-books.co.uk for bibliographical details, contents pages, and a secure order form.

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 16th DECEMBER 2012

EVENTS

12 DAYS OF ACTION TO STOP WAGE THEFT!

This holiday season the Workers’ Action Centre needs you to take action to stop wage theft.

Starting this week, we will profile 12 stories highlighting wage theft.
Please join us every day – we only need a minute or two of your time.

To find out more: http://www.workersactioncentre.org/12-days-of-action/

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RALLY FOR RIGHTS AND DEMOCRACY

Protest at the at the Ontario Liberal Convention
1:00 pm
Saturday, January 26, 2013

Rally at Allan Gardens in Toronto (Jarvis & Carlton), followed by march to the Ontario Liberal Convention at Maple Leaf Gardens.

The Ontario government has been shut down while worker’s rights are under threat and cuts to jobs and services are hurting every community.

It’s time to defend everyone’s democratic and economic rights.

For details, visit: http://ofl.ca/index.php/campaigns/democraticrights

Rally hosted by the Ontario Federation of Labour.

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CLC WINTER SCHOOL 2013 – REGISTER ONLINE

The CLC Ontario Region’s 2013 Winter School will be held from March 3 to 8, 2013 at the CAW Family Education Centre in Port Elgin.

We are pleased to let you know that online registration is now available. In order to secure the space in your selected course, your payment must be received within 10 days of your online registration.

Register here: http://sms.clc-ctc.ca/imis15_prod_public/Core/Events/eventdetails.aspx?iKey=13ONS-WS&TemplateType=A

For further details and course descriptions, please read the Winter School 2013 brochure:
http://documents.clc-ctc.ca/ontario/2013-Winter-School-Brochure.pdf

If you need a hard copy of the brochure, please do not hesitate to contact our office at 416-441-3710 Ext. 222 or 221 or ontario@clc-ctc.ca

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SOCIAL ECONOMY WORKSHOP: FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT IN COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS

Presenter: Eric Plato, Director of Finance, Frontier College

Friday, Jan 11, 2012
9:30 am – 4:00 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
University of Toronto, 252 Bloor Street West (St. George subway station).

– Do you find it difficult to put together a budget for a proposal?
– Do you ask yourself ‘what am I looking at?’ when someone gives you financial reports?
– Are you responsible for managing the finances for a project, but are not sure what that means?

If so, join us in this workshop to learn:
– How to put together a budget for an organization or project
– Methods to deal with overhead costs
– How to read financial reports
– How to monitor a budget

Cost: $140 + HST; each additional participant from the same organization will receive a $15 discount, as will those who register for more than one workshop. Student rate available.

To register: complete the online registration form here: https://socialeconomy.wufoo.eu/forms/the-social-economy-centre-sec-workshop-option-2/ or contact Keita Demming at secworkshops@gmail.com or at 416-978-0022

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HOLIDAY SALE AT PM PRESS – 50% OFF ALL BOOKS UNTIL DECEMBER 31
   
By using the coupon code below everyone gets a taste of being a Friend of PM (FOPM), isn’t it great? The other fantastic benefit, getting monthly shipments of every release while supporting radical writers, filmmakers, and artists, can be had by joining as a FOPM (which also makes a great gift).

From politics and the economy to prison abolition and parenting – we have books, CDs, and DVDs that span a wide assortment of topics and genres that we are offering to you at the phenomenal rate of 50% off list price through December.

To get your 50% discount at checkout, type in the coupon code: Holiday

This special offer does not have a minimum (or maximum) quantity required for getting the 50% discount, so strike while it’s hot!

Please also note: this special offer is not available for any further discount to resale customers or Friends of PM.

See more about the month long sale here: http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?llr=8s7txxcab&v=001BowwB-ubI_EvWD4wecYddZoDUVdiFALeIyA8MbCGsa0w83HvGUY9Xy3laa1YYZ5mTB3h7Y3GkuMY8kxyl5LPFdoMGod9LnWa6FoNvKmEtKQ%3D

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NEWS & VIEWS

BOOK REVIEW – PETE SEEGER: “YOU STICK TOGETHER ’TIL IT’S WON”

By Kim Ruehl, YES! Magazine

When a pair of writers expressed interest in publishing Pete Seeger: In His Own Words, one of Seeger’s first requests was “Don’t make me out to be a saint.”

Banjo in hand, Seeger has championed causes from labor to civil rights to the environment, revived our oldest folk songs, and co-authored new folk classics like “If I Had a Hammer,” so the impulse to portray him as saintly is understandable.

He has considered, at every turn, what it means to sing out in a world where the din of injustice is often deafening. But his songs assert that to sing is to recognize the power of one’s own voice, to declare and defend its worth.

Read more: http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/what-would-nature-do/pete-seeger-you-stick-together-til-its-won

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CORPORATE CANADA SHAPING INEQUALITY – CANADIAN CENTRE FOR POLICY ALTERNATIVES

The latest study from our Growing Gap project, “A Shrinking Universe: How concentrated corporate power is shaping income inequality in Canada”, links the rise of the richest Canadians with a shift toward more concentrated power within the country’s largest corporations. The study finds that effectively 60 Canadian-based firms are dominating the push for corporate profits, and are accelerating the trend toward inequality.

Read more: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/shrinking-universe

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THE CAMPAIGN AGAINST THE RAND FORMULA

By Evert Hoogers, Donald Swartz and Rosemary Warskett, The Bullet

It has been widely reported that Pierre Poilievre, the Federal Conservative MP for Nepean-Carleton, has launched a campaign to change the rules regarding the payment of union dues [See his November 2012 letter to his constituents]. The object of Mr. Poilievre’s ire is the “Rand Formula” – the union security clause found in most collective agreements and labour relations legislation in Canada. Under this formula, no employee in a unionized workplace is required to be a union member, but all have to pay union dues, with the employer deducting the money from the pay checks of all
employees and transferring it to the union.

This dues paying formula was created by Supreme Court Justice Ivan Rand in 1946 when settling a strike between the Ford Motor Company and its workers. At its core is the principle that all those who benefit from the negotiated collective agreement should pay union dues and that there should be no free riders.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/736.php

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SOVEREIGN DEBT CRISIS: OUR SUFFERING IS THEIR ABUNDANCE

By Jack Gerson, Facts for Working People

Even before Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp swallowed the Wall Street Journal, that newspaper was renowned for its free marketer editorials and opinion pieces. Not only has this policy remained intact under Murdoch, but also the coverage of news and features is now fully in line with the right-wing
editorial policy.

So I was quite surprised a week ago to find, tucked away on page A-11 of the November 30 edition, a piece by the WSJ’s Stephen Fidler that actually hinted at the identity of the real beneficiaries of the bailouts and debt crises:

“Despite the complications, this week’s deal on Greece’s debt points to an (almost) iron rule of sovereign-debt crises: Significant losses fall on taxpayers in creditor countries because debt originally extended by private creditors, one way or another, ends up on the balance sheet of the public sector.”

This sounds eerily like the searing indictment of the bailout in a recent book by York University professor David McNally:

“In short, the bad bank debt that triggered the crisis in 2008 never went away – it was simply shifted on to governments. Private debt became public debt. And as the dimensions of that metamorphosis became apparent in early 2010, the bank crisis morphed into a sovereign debt crisis. Put differently, the economic crisis of 2008-9 did not really end. It simply changed form. It mutated.”

Read more: http://weknowwhatsup.blogspot.ca/2012/12/sovereign-debt-crisis-our-suffering-is.html

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JOIN THE MAYWORKS BOARD OF DIRECTORS!

Mayworks Festival of Working People and the Arts is currently inviting applications to be considered for new Board members. We are a multi-disciplinary arts festival that celebrates working class culture. Founded in 1986 by the Labour Arts Media Committee of the Toronto and York Region Labour Council, Mayworks is Canada’s largest and oldest labour arts festival. The Festival was built on the premise that workers and artists share a common struggle for decent wages, healthy working conditions and a living culture.

For more information on Mayworks Toronto, please visit our website: http://mayworks.ca/

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TEN THOUSAND AGHAST AS ‘RIGHT TO WORK’ PASSES IN MICHIGAN

By Jane Slaughter, Labor Notes

Union protesters in front of the Michigan Capitol today knocked down an enormous tent erected by Americans for Prosperity, the Koch-brothers-funded group that helped bring right to work to the state. State troopers arriving on horseback were helpless, bringing to mind images of Humpty Dumpty and all the king’s men.

Several dozen protesters were sitting down in the Capitol Rotunda, risking arrest, and more were outside the governor’s office. Three school districts were forced to close schools because so many teachers called off for the day.

Four giant inflatable rats in the 10,000-person crowd were named for prominent Republican politicians and their richest backer.

But despite the anger and the chants, the legislature made it official.

Read more: http://labornotes.org/2012/12/ten-thousand-aghast-right-work-passes-michigan

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

*****END*****

 

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

Capitalism IS Crisis

NEOLIBERALISM AND CRISIS IN THE MEDITERRANEAN

European University Institute
14th Mediterranean Research Meeting
Mersin (Turkey), 20-23 March 2013
Workshop 16: Neoliberalism and Crises in the Mediterranean: Causes, Policy Responses, Forms of Resistance

Galip Yalman,
Middle East Technical University, Turkey.
yalman@metu.edu.tr

Alfredo Saad-Filho,
University of London, UK
as59@soas.ac.uk

Abstract

Neoliberalism has been the dominant form of global capitalism since the early 1980s. Despite their political, historical, geographical and economic diversity, and their widely distinct modalities of integration into the world economy, this has also been the experience of several Mediterranean countries. Indeed, the tensions and displacements embedded within global neoliberalism are now nowhere more evident than in the Mediterranean region where they have led to a variety of political economic responses and/or regime changes. While the implementation of the neoliberal policy agenda has initiated a process of cumulative transformations in class relations and property rights, it has also propelled a variety of forms of resistance since it effectively undermined the ‘politics of redistribution’ which had hitherto seemed to characterize most of the countries across the region, albeit under different political regimes. Yet, the experiences of different Mediterranean countries seem to suggest a rather paradoxical outcome which requires further examination: the political and economic crises turn out to be the driving forces of neoliberal transformation as the outcome of these crises tends to be the reinforcement of the rule of neoliberalism.

This workshop is intended to provide a forum to discuss the impact of neoliberalism on both the state structures and the societal actors with a specific focus on the developments since the turn of the century across three main areas of the Mediterranean region: South European countries of the Eurozone, the ‘Arab Spring’ countries of North Africa and Eastern Mediterranean, and Turkey.

The sessions of the workshop will be planned so as to bring together participants working on different aspects of neoliberal transformation and its political, economic and social consequences in these three areas of the region. No doubt, there will be contributions by specialists residing within the region as well as outside it.

Description

Neoliberalism has been the dominant form of global capitalism since the early 1980s. As a hegemonic social, political and economic project, neoliberalism emerged gradually, both feeding upon and contributing to the partial disintegration of post-war Keynesian consensus in the West and developmentalism in the countries of the South. Neoliberal transitions in various countries have been based on the systematic use of state power at different scales – including the international, supra-national and national – to initiate a hegemonic project for the reconstitution of the rule of capital in most areas of social life. Despite their political, historical, geographical and economic diversity, and their widely distinct modalities of integration into the world economy, this has also been the experience of several Mediterranean countries. Indeed, the tensions and displacements embedded within global neoliberalism are now nowhere more evident than in the Mediterranean region. These have led to a variety of political economic responses and/or regime changes on different parts of the Mediterranean basin.

The neoliberal transitions have transformed the material basis of social reproduction, basically initiating what is referred as ‘debt-and speculation-driven’ model of capitalism. These changes include shifts in economic and social policy, property rights, the country’s mode of insertion into the international economy, and the modalities of exploitation and social domination. There has been significant changes in the traditional ways in which social welfare have been provided by the states, thereby undermining the role of the family as service provider. With the erosion in the material basis of modern citizenship (universal identity), the vacuum thus created tended to be filled by integrating subordinate classes into a web of financial relations through private pensions, consumer credit and mortgages and/or social support systems via charitable organizations and the like. The latter in turn has paved the ground for the emergence of a symbiotic relationship between Political Islam and neoliberalism in the countries of North Africa and Eastern Mediterranean, including Turkey.

The political counterpart of these processes has been the incremental limitation of the domestic political sphere through the insulation of ‘markets’ and investors from democratic and social accountability, and the imposition of a stronger imperative of labour control allegedly to promote international competitiveness. While the implementation of the neoliberal policy agenda has initiated a process of cumulative transformations in class relations and property rights – a process which has been characterised as “accumulation by dispossession”, it has also reduced the scope for universal welfare provision and led to regressive distributive shifts and higher unemployment and job insecurity in most countries. With concerted attacks on the trade union movements in many countries by the imposition of legislative constraints on their capacities to promote the interests of their membership, there was a deliberate attempt to discredit them as mechanisms of collective action. In many instances, the actual brunt of the neoliberal assault has been carried especially by the workers of the privatized companies who tended to lose their jobs in mass and were increasingly deprived of their social rights. Consequently, it has also propelled a variety of forms of resistance since it effectively undermined the ‘politics of redistribution’ which had hitherto seemed to characterize most of the countries across the region, albeit under different political regimes.

The inclination to remove the perceived obstacles to capital accumulation with the initiation of structural adjustment reforms, accompanied by the attempts to take politics out of the decision-making processes has often been in conflict with the contemplation of using the state to ensure the democratic legitimacy of the market order. That is to say, it underlines the need to widen the debate on neoliberalism by problematizing the extent to which the states of the region attempt to reconcile imperatives of the reforms with securing political legitimacy and social cohesion. Moreover, the protracted nature of the global financial crisis since 2008 could also be construed as a turning point whilst the theoretical edifice of neoliberalism has increasingly come under scrutiny with important implications on both the political and economic structures and practices. Yet, the experiences of different Mediterranean countries seem to suggest a rather paradoxical outcome which requires further examination: the political and economic crises turn out to be the driving forces of neoliberal transformation as the outcome of these crises tends to be the reinforcement of the rule of neoliberalism.

The unifying theme of the workshop pertains to the need of conceptualizing the impact of neoliberalism on both the state structures and the societal actors with a specific focus on the developments since the turn of the century across three main areas of the Mediterranean region: South European countries of the Eurozone, the ‘Arab Spring’ countries of North Africa and Eastern Mediterranean, and Turkey. The selection of these areas is especially pertinent for such a theoretical evaluation since the countries in each area have experienced in distinct ways and through diverse channels, the contradictions and limitations in neoliberalism through political regime shifts, changes of government and/or reconfiguration of state-civil society relations. The diverse dynamics entailed in these groups of states need not be an obstacle for the development of fruitful debates regarding the potential implications and transformations entailed in each.

The comparison of different ‘mechanisms’ involved in historically specific national contexts such as the transmission of policy discourses and/or accumulation strategies and/or different forms of financialisation which assume the need for change in the so-called path-dependent forms of state will, in turn, shed light about the ways in which different interests are structured. In this regard, the impact and management of the economic crises experienced, including the shift in priorities from price stability to financial stability, as well as the perceptions and attitudes of key international organisations such as the IMF, World Bank, European Central Bank, etc. should be taken into consideration. Furthermore, the forms of resistance against the repercussions of neoliberalism more generally tend to instigate the crisis of the state, hence the salience of democracy in many countries of the region as a negation of the status quo rather than its positive delineations become germane. This includes the ‘technocratic’ turn in such countries as Greece and Italy, the rise of neoliberal authoritarianism in Turkey, and the political transformations in the ‘Arab Spring’ countries.

Since there is yet no comparative analysis of these historical processes, such an endeavour will be of interest not only for enhancing our understanding of the processes of change experienced by the countries of the region, but also contribute to the theoretical advancement of the literature concerned in the fields of comparative politics and/or international political economy.

In the light of the above, thematic priorities of the workshop, without necessarily being exhaustive, can be summed as follows:

1. Transformation/adaptation of the states to the new realities (i.e. to changing configurations of power within the societies and/or changing modes of integration with the world economy/ European Union / Mediterranean region etc.)
– Changes in state forms and/or political regimes, structure of the political system
– Transformations taking place in the coercive apparatuses of states

2. Restructuring of the state in line with the requirements of a globalized market economy.
– The impact and management of the economic crises, including the shift in priorities from price stability to financial stability as an integral part of the process of financialisation, and the reproduction of neoliberalism
– The ways in which financialization developed through both old and new regulatory bodies
– Perceptions and attitudes of key international organisations
– Changes in property rights, legislation, regulation, economic role of the state.

3. Social welfare programmes, including their main features and limitations within the neoliberal order
– Changes in the traditional structures of social welfare provision, family as service provider, gender divisions, etc.
– The ever-increasing integration of ‘working people’ into capitalist financial relations.

4. Differentiated experience of the crises
– The resistances against neoliberalism more generally, the crises of the state in particular, and its implications for the processes of democratisation in the region
– The extent to which the forms of resistance experienced by the resisting workers/labouring classes made an impact on their consciousness and/or political orientations

It is envisaged that the workshop will include four sessions each comprising 3 or 4 papers examining each of the four topics listed above. Outcomes will include a set of publications, including one edited volume to be submitted to a highly-reputed academic publishing company (such as Routledge or Palgrave/Macmillan).

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/european-university-institute-workshop-neoliberalism-and-crises-in-the-mediterranean-causes-policy-responses-forms-of-resistance-mersin-20-23-march-2013  

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Black Rock

WORLD CONGRESS OF ADMINISTRATIVE AND POLITICAL SCIENCES – CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

ADPOL-2012

29 November -02 December 2012

Queen Elizabeth Elite Suite Hotel & Spa, Antalya, Turkey

Dear Colleagues

We would like to invite you to submission proposals for the “World Congress of Administrative and Political Sciences” which will take place on November 29 – November 02, 2012, at the Queen Elizabeth Elite Suite Hotel & Spa in Antalya in Turkey.

We made a special agreement with the Queen Elizabeth Elite Suite Hotel & Spa for you. While you have been sharing ideas with your colleagues coming from all over the world at the conference, you can catch a wonderful holiday opportunity with your family or partner with prices start from “all inclusive” 35 € (all meals, soft and alcoholic beverages will be unlimited) . Furthermore, it is free of charge for your children!

Let’s meet the historical and holiday city inAntalyainTurkey. 

Best regards

Professor Dr. Andreea Iluzia IACOB

President of the Conference

Abstract submissions due: June 30, 2012.

Start here to submit abstracts to this conference
Step one of the submIssIon process

For more information please visit the conference official web site:
www.adpol.org
 
IN COLLABORATION WITH:

Manchester Metropolitan University

Pretoria University

John Hopkins University

Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies

Ankara University

Turkish Informatics Association

Elsevier Publication LTD.

ScienceDirect

Thomson Reuters

 

PUBLICATION OF THE PAPERS

All accepted papers of the conference will be published in Procedia-Social and Behavioral Journal (ISSN: 1877-0428) by ELSEVIER and will be indexed ScienceDirect, Scopus, and Thomson Reuters Conference Proceedings Citation Index (ISI Web of Science).

All proposals will be subjected to peer-reviews. Selected papers from the conference will be considered for extended version publication in the supporting journals. 

 

TYPES OF SUBMISSIONS

All submissions are subject to a peer-review process.

Full and Short Papers

Reflection Papers

Posters/Demonstrations

Exhibits

Tutorials

Panels

Roundtables

Workshop

Virtual Presentation

Product/Services Presentations

 

TOPICS

Agriculture Policies Law and Economics
Apartment Management Local Government and Urban Politics
Business Administration Management Information Systems
Business Law Management Science
Change Management Management Theories
Civil Society Management Marketing Research and Strategy
Communications Management Office Management
Construction Management Operations Research
Corporate Governance Organizational Behavior & Theory
Cost Management Organizational Communication
Decision Sciences Policies
Development Planning and Policy Political Sciences
Economic Development Political Sciences and International Relations
Economic Methodology Political Sociology
Economic Policy Political Theories
Economic Systems Politics
Economics Policies Product Management
Education Policies Production and Organizations
Educational Management Production/Operations Management
Entrepreneurship Public Administration
European Union Policies Public Administration and Small Business Entrepreneurship
European Union Relations Public Choice
Finance & Investment Public Economics and Finance
Financial Economics Public Policies
Global Business Public Relations
Government Management Public Responsibility and Ethics
Growth; Aggregate Productivity Regulatory Economics
Healthcare Management Resource Management
Healthy Policies School Management
Higher Education Management Strategic Management Policy
Household Behavior and Family Economics Stress Management
Human Resources Management Supply Change Management
Information Technology Management Systems Management
International Business Systems Thinking
International Economics Taxes (related areas of taxes)
International Finance Technological Change; Research and Development
International Management Technology & Innovation
International Relations Time Management
International Relationship Total Quality Management
Labor Economics Tourism and Hospitality Management
Labor Relations Travel/Transportation/Tourism
Law Welfare Economics

 

ACCOMMODATION

We were special agreement with the Hotel for the conference participants only. The all-inclusive room rate (per person); triple 35 Euro, Double 35 Euro and single 48 Euro. For more information please visit the conference official web site:  www.psysoc.net. if you make hotel reservation, historical places tour is free for you in 01 December 2011 (Perge, Aspendos & Side). For more information: http://www.adpol.org/accammodation.htm

Deadlines & Important Dates

Abstract Submissions*: June 30, 2012

Full Paper Submissions: September 30, 2012

Early Hotel Reservation: October 15, 2012

Early Registration: October 15, 2012

Conference Dates: November 29 – December 02, 2012

Camera-ready for Elsevier: December 20, 2012

* After the submission date, the authors of abstracts will be notified in four (4) day.

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION

The abstracts can be one-page long (200-300 words). The abstract include Problem Statement, Purpose of Study, Methods, Findings and Results, and Conclusions and Recommendations (These elements may need some adaptation in the case of discussion papers: Background, Purpose of Study, Sources of Evidence, Main Argument, and Conclusions). Please note that some elements are optional in abstracts. 

Start here to submit abstracts to this conference
Step one of the submIssIon process

VIRTUAL PARTICIPATION

Researchers who are unable to resolve the funding issue concerning the conference expenses will be provided with an alternative approach for participation, namely, Virtual Online Presentation. Those who would like to make their presentations online from their home countries will also be awarded with a certificate and their papers will be considered for publications similar to other participants as if they were present physically. Those who would like to make use of the Virtual Online Presentation facility will be requested to send their virtual posters or other soft copy materials such as power point presentations to the secretariat. In addition, these participants who would prefer to make use of the Virtual Online Presentation facility may also contribute to the conference through video conferencing.

 

WEATHER

The winter is mild and rainy in Antalya. Nearly 300 days of the year is sunny and one can swim from April to November. In Antalya in the day time, the average weather at the end of the November is high 24°C and low 16°C.

TRAVEL AND VISA

The direct and regular flights are available to Antalyafrom most of the countries of the world in April. You can find concerned flight companies’ names from the web-site of Antalya International Airport (AYT). http://www.antaliaairport.com/en/index.asp . Some countries citizens will need a visa for Turkey which can be easily obtained directly from the immigration office in Istanbul Airport. Please visit Turkish Ministry of Foreign Affairs guide for visa information www.e-konsolosluk.net/Visa/Visa_Welcome.aspx.  

 

We will provide you FREE transfer services from the Antalya Airport– Hotel –Antalya Airport transfer.

PERGE, ASPENDOS & SIDE TOUR (December 01 or 2, 2012)

ANTALYA SHOPPING – OLD CITY& MUSEUMS TOUR (EVERYDAY)

Start here to submit abstracts to this conference
Step one of the submIssIon process

 

For more information please visit the conference official web site: www.adpol.org         

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

 

Education

POLICY FUTURES IN EDUCATION – VOLUME 10 NUMBER 2 (2012)

Now available at:
http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pfie/content/pdfs/10/issue10_3.asp

POLICY FUTURES IN EDUCATION
Volume 10 Number 3, 2012, ISSN 1478-2103

CONTENTS: 

Brian D. Barrett & Camille Anne Martina. Towards a Non-deterministicReading of Pierre Bourdieu: habitus and educational change in urban schools

Selva Guimarães. Public Policy and Teacher Education inBrazil after 1990

Peter H. Koehn. Transnational Higher Education and Sustainable Development: current initiatives and future prospects

Ravi Kumar. Imagining a Socialist, Democratic and Secular Society through Possibilities of a Common School System inIndia

Andrea Liesner. Peer Pressure: comments on the European educational reform

Alberto de Oliveira & Gilberto Abrantes Filho. Education and the Labour Market in Brazil

Mia Quint-Rapoport. Open Source in Higher Education: towards an understanding of networked universities

Johanna Ringarp. The Problem of the Welfare Profession: an example – the municipalisation of the teaching profession

David Geoffrey Smith. The Deep Politics of War and the Curriculum of Disillusion

James Stillwaggon. The Old Deluder, Educational Salvation, and the Limits of Distributive Justice

 

SCIENCE AND SOCIETY IN BRIEF

Alan Cottey. Clean People in a Clean World

 

Access to the full texts of current articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION (single user access) Subscription to the January-December 2012 issues (which includes full access to ALL back numbers), is available to individuals at a cost of US$54.00. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribePFIE.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access) If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge them to purchase a Library subscription so access is provided throughout your institution; full details for libraries can be found at www.symposium-journals.co.uk/prices.html

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editor, Professor Michael A. Peters (mpeters@waikato.ac.nz).

In the event of problems concerning a subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the articles, please contact the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski and Ruth Rikowski have a number of articles in Policy Futures in Education. These include:

Rikowski, Ruth (2003) Value – the Life Blood of Capitalism: knowledge is the current key, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.1 No.1, pp.160-178:http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=1&issue=1&year=2003&article=9_Rikowski_PFIE_1_1&id=195.93.21.68

Rikowski, Glenn (2004) Marx and the Education of the Future, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.2 Nos. 3 & 4, pp.565-577, online at:http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=2&issue=3&year=2004&article=10_Rikowski_PFEO_2_3-4_web&id=195.93.21.71

Rikowski, Ruth (2006) A Marxist Analysis of the World Trade Organisation’s Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.4 No.4: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=4&issue=4&year=2006&article=7_Rikowski_PFIE_4_4_web&id=205.188.117.66

Rikowski, Ruth (2008) Review Essay: ‘On Marx: An introduction to the revolutionary intellect of Karl Marx’, by Paula Allman, Policy Futures in Education,Vol.6 No.5, pp.653-661: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/validate.asp?j=pfie&vol=6&issue=5&year=2008&article=11_Rikowski_PFIE_6_5_web

 

Note: These articles can be accessed without subscription, as they were published more than 3 years ago.

 

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Aesthetics

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE IN INTERPRETIVE POLICY ANALYSIS

Special Panel on Globalisation, Discourse and Education Policy, to be held at the International Conference in Interpretive Policy Analysis, Tilburg, the Netherlands (July 5-7, 2012)

See: http://event.globe-view.com/event/wvDhkJP4ln/panel/279/ 

It is part of the 7th International Conference in Interpretive Policy Analysis: Understanding the Drama of Democracy, Policy Work, Power and Transformation.

The International Conference in Interpretive Policy Analysis has travelled throughEurope. After visiting Birmingham, Amsterdam, Essex, Kassel, Grenoble and Cardiff, interpretivists of various kinds will gather in Tilburg, the Netherlands.

Michael Farrelly
m.farrelly@open.ac.uk

Dr. Jane Mulderrig
j.mulderrig@sheffield.ac.uk

Few would disagree that the perceived relevance and impact of contemporary policy-making is no longer confined to the nation state. Whether in economic or social policy, the spectre of globalisation and its perceived exigencies plays a significant role in circumscribing the parameters of the ‘thinkable’ and ‘doable’. This is partly due to the increased power of international governmental organisations in promoting a neoliberal agenda in both national and transnational contexts. Within this political rationality the dominant logic of competitiveness has leaked from economic to other policy domains like education. In the context of the EU this is closely linked to, and justified on the basis of, visions of achieving global economic competitiveness as a knowledge-based-economy.

Since the global banking crisis and subsequent recession the financial climate in which policy-making is now taking place has altered radically. This state of affairs potentially adds strength to neoliberal policy agendas in education (as elsewhere). In an era of acute fiscal squeeze and harsh austerity measures imposed across numerous advanced liberal economies, does the logic of the market take a firmer hold?  Papers in this panel will explore the current state of education policy through the lens of discourse. Adopting a variety of empirical approaches they will probe discourses of and about education policy in a range of national and transnational contexts. They will explore such questions as: conceptions of globalisation as a driving force in policy; the logic and rhetoric of the market; identities and roles in education; governance and financing structures; and tensions between regionalism and internationalism.

**END**

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Aesthetics

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR RESEARCHER DEVELOPMENT

The International Journal for Researcher Development is the first international journal devoted exclusively to the scholarship of researcher development. Its purpose is to further understanding of all aspects of  researcher development and related policy and practice across any sector and context, including conceptual issues such as what researcher development is, and (socio-)psychological an d socio-cultural issues, such as how it occurs. The interpretation of “researcher” is wide and includes research students and other early career researchers, established researchers, those for whom research is a component of their work, experienced and distinguished researchers, and those who aspire to be researchers.

Coverage Includes:

Original empirical research, conceptual analyses, policy analyses, and theoretical perspectives are discussed within the context of researcher development.

Key benefits:

– Two distinct journal sections: i) Research and Theory and ii) Researcher Development in Practice ensure that the understanding of all aspects of researcher development and related policy and practice across all sectors and context is covered

– A transparent and stringent peer review ensures that articles are read and adjudicated by leading experts from around the world

– All research published has strong implications for the workplace.

Submit a paper:

Submissions to the International Journal for Researcher Development are made using ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission and peer review system. Registration and access are available at:

http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/ijrd

Any questions can be sent to the Editor: Dr Linda Evans, Reader in Education, University of Leeds, UK

E-mail: L.Evans@education.leeds.ac.uk

For full author guidelines and more information please see the journal homepage: www.emeraldinsight.com/ijrd.htm

With best wishes,

Caroline

Caroline Moors, Assistant Publisher / Assistant Commissioning Editor, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Tel: +44 (0) 1274 785267, Email: cmoors@emeraldinsight.comwww.emeraldinsight.com

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

The Institute for Education Policy Studies

Website Update – May 2009

The Institute for Education Policy Studies is an independent Radical Left/ Socialist/ Marxist institute for developing analysis of education policy. It is at http://www.ieps.org.uk . The Institute seeks to develop Marxist analysis of policy, theory, ideology and policy development. It also seeks to develop Marxist transformative education theory, analysis and policy analyse and develop socialist/Marxist transformative policy for schooling and education from a number of Radical Left perspectives, including Freirean perspectives. The IEPS and its journal address issues of Social Class, ‘Race’, Gender and Capital/ism; Critical Pedagogy; New Public Managerialism and Academic / non-Academic labour, and Empowerment/ Disempowerment.

The IEPS critiques global, national, neo-liberal, neo-conservative, New Labour, Third Way, and postmodernist analyses and policy, together with New Public Managerialism . It was set up in 1989 and hosted the formation of the Hillcole Group of Radical Left Educators (1989-2001). The IEPS organises and publicises national conferences and also publishes on-line papers by Radical Left/ Socialist/ Marxist writers.

IEPS publishes an online journal, the Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies (http://www.jceps.com/) twice a year. The editors of JCEPS are Prof Dave Hill (Chief/ Managing Editor), Prof Pablo Gentile (Latin America) and Prof Peter McLaren (North America). The journal welcomes articles from academics and activists throughout the globe. It is a refereed / peer juried international journal.

The Institute for Education Policy Studies has recently updated its web site. In particular, the biographical details of the Institute’s key writers have been updated, for: Dave Hill, Glenn Rikowski, Paula Allman, Mike Cole, Peter McLaren and Sharhzad Mojab. You can view these updates at: http://www.ieps.org.uk/iepsbios.php

 

The Institute for Education Policy Studies: http://www.ieps.org.uk/

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com