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Aesthetics

Aesthetics

INTERNATIONAL POLITICS THROUGH ART AND PERFORMANCE
Date: Wednesday 22 April 2015
Time: 4.00pm – 8.00pm
Location: The Westminster Forum, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW
http://www.westminster.ac.uk/csd/events/the-international-politics-of-art-and-performance

4-6pm
Collage Methodology for Studying Visual World Politics
Saara Särmä, University of Tampere, Finland

6.30-8pm
Politics in Drag: Sipping Toffee with Hamas in Brussels
Catherine Charrett, University of Aberystwyth

Chaired by David Chandler and Thomas Moore, Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster

Collage Methodology for Studying Visual World Politics
Visual collaging is a playful and creative methodological approach which can be used in the study of everyday images of global politics, for example internet parody images and memes. It is an art-based intervention that disrupts the text-based modes of doing and writing up research which are dominant even in research which focuses on visuality and images. Collaging allows the use of images not only as decorative or as illustrations of an argument. Collages can also function as more than objects of analysis. In this presentation I present an overview of collage-making, describing the “data-collection”, composition, and the techniques I use. Different compositional techniques, e.g. repetition and exaggeration or unexpected juxtapositions, may produce different effects, aesthetically, emotionally, and politically. I explore collage as a mode of thinking, which can be aesthetic, analytical, and/or political. As a creative and artistic mode of studying global politics, collaging aims to unleash imaginations in order to gently deconstruct global and local hierarchies.
Saara Särmä is a feminist, an artist, and a scholar. Saara’s doctoral dissertation Junk Feminism and Nuclear Wannabe –Collaging Parodies of Iran and North Korea (2014, University of Tampere, Finland) focused on internet parody images and memes and developed a unique art-based collage methodology for studying world politics. She is interested in politics of visuality, feminist academic activism, and laughter in world politics. Currently she is working on developing the visual collage methodology further as both a research and a pedagogical tool and experimenting with collective possibilities of collaging. Her artwork can be seen at http://www.huippumisukka.fi

Politics in Drag: Sipping Toffee with Hamas in Brussels
Politics in Drag: Sipping Toffee with Hamas in Brussels is a 45 minute performance which attempts to re-envision the EU’s response to Hamas’s electoral success in the Palestinian legislative elections through a hyperbolic, melancholic and parodic telling of conversations that never took place. Hamas is a movement listed on the EU’s terrorist list and in 2006 the movement won elections that the EU had monitored and declared to be free and fair. The EU’s response was to diplomatically, financially and politically sanction the democratically elected body, which analysts argue was an opportunity missed to engage politically with Hamas. This live performance stages alternative encounters between the EU and Hamas by performatively addressing the vulnerabilities, intimacies and subjugations of their ritualised being not-together. It presents interviews with Hamas leaders and EU representatives conducted between 2012-2013 through the theoretical and aesthetic mode of the drag performance. By re-fictionalising the response to the 2006 elections, this performance imagines politics anew, allowing for different conversations to arise from performing what normally remains hidden in political encounters.
Catherine Charrett has a PhD in International Politics from Aberystwyth University and a MSc from the London School of Economics. Catherine researches EU-Palestinian relations and engages with theories of gender and performance studies to explore questions of ritualised subjectivity, agency and the possibility for creativity in diplomacy and foreign policy making.

Refreshments will be provided.

David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.

Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20

Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/
Twitter: @DavidCh27992090

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

The Black Rock

The Black Rock

JOURNEYS ACROSS MEDIA

Journeys Across Media (JAM)

The Body and The Digital

Friday 19th April 2013, University of Reading

2013 will mark the 11th anniversary of the annual Journeys Across Media (JAM) Conference for postgraduate students, organised by postgraduates working in the Department of Film, Theatre & Television at the University of Reading. JAM 2013 seeks to focus on and foster current research relating to the Body and the Digital, as today they are interactive and interdependent facets in the media of film, theatre and television; and more widely, in the areas of performance and art. It is a relationship which continues to develop and redefine cinematic, televisual and theatrical practices.

French phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty once stated: “The body is our general medium for having a world.” Today, the world of live and screened performance are perceived and received differently, due to the body’s relationship with the digital. Approaches and practices of phenomenology, embodiment, the haptic and the experiential are being re-examined as they continue to encounter digital culture in new ways. Representations and experiences of embodiment are often integral dynamics of theatre, television, film and television, and are preoccupations that can be explored through diverse media or digital influences.

This is a call for postgraduates engaging in contemporary discourses and practices relating to the Body and the Digital, to submit papers or practice-based research for the JAM 2013 Conference. Topics may include, but are not restricted to:

-Interactivity between Digital languages and the Body

-Sonic Representations of the Body in Digital Performance

-The Digitized Body in Performance

-The Role of the Body in Digital Games and Virtual Performance

-Post-Colonial Bodies in the Contemporary Moment

-Preparing the Body for Performance

-Notions of Embodiment (i.e. Violent, Disabled, Explicit)

-Traditions of Corporeally focused Film, Theatre and Television

-Embodied Spectatorship or Audiences, and Physicality

-Phenomenology of the Lived, Performed and Screened Body

-The Haunted Body

-Politics of the Body

-Unconventional and Other Bodies

The body, its presence, perceptions and experience, are becoming increasingly underpinned and influenced by the digital age. JAM 2013 will endeavour to open a dialogue about the relationship between the body and digital in contemporary scholarship and practice, posing many questions including: How does the body encounter digital media and how do digital media frames position the body – both in mainstream iterations, social media contexts and in art/installation/performance contexts? Furthermore, it will also be worth considering how digital technology has affected the way that humans approach unfamiliar body movement traditions, beyond regional and national borders?  

JAM 2013 will provide a discussion forum for current and developing research in film, theatre, television and new media. Previous delegates have welcomed this opportunity to gain experience of presenting their work at different stages of their development, while having the opportunity to meet and form contacts with fellow postgraduate students. Furthermore, participants at JAM 2013 have the possibility of being published in the Journal of Media Practice.

Non-Presenting delegates are also very welcome to attend this conference.

CALL FOR PAPERS deadline: 1st February 2013

Please send a 250-word abstract for a fifteen minute paper and a 50-word biographical note to Johnmichael Rossi, Gary Cassidy, Edina Husanovic, Shelly Quirk, Matthew McFrederick at jam2013@pgr.reading.ac.uk .

 

CALL FOR PRACTICE-BASED WORK deadline: 1st February 2013

Continuing from the success of last year’s JAM 2012 Conference: Time Tells, which experimented with conference structure to include live performances, film screenings and installations taking place throughout the day, we invite artists working in various mediums to propose presentations of their work, relevant to the conference theme.

Please send a 250-word outline describing the piece you are proposing to present, as well as duration and any specific technical/space requirements, and a 50-word biographical note. Relevant images and links to your work would also be helpful. As outlined above please e-mail the Conference organisers at jam2013@pgr.reading.ac.uk.

 

We would appreciate the distribution of this call for papers and wider promotion of this conference through your networks. Journeys Across Media is supported by the Department of Film, Theatre & Television at Reading and the Standing Conference of University Drama Departments.

 

**END**

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Aesthetics

PERFORMANCE AND LABOUR SYMPOSIUM

Call for Papers – Performance and Labour Symposium
3rd November – University College London
Supported by CRMEP, Kingston and the Centre for the Study of Contemporary Art, UCL

Keynote Speaker: Randy Martin (Tisch School of the Arts at NYU)

 

This symposium is an interdisciplinary event that will address performance in an expanded sense and as a form of labour. This means considering performance as an activity and a practice that takes place both within and outside the realm of art. The symposium will interrogate the physical and intellectual experiences of viewing and producing performances; these questions will be raised across the fields of art history, philosophy, performance studies, political economy, theatre and dance. Addressed in this expanded way, the aim of the symposium is to investigate the histories of mass performances and social choreographies in political contexts, to situate performance as a form of praxis and to interrogate the language of performance as a managerial strategy within late capitalism.

We invite papers on collective performance; reproductive labour and performance; aesthetics; the political economy of performance; histories of performance; divisions of labour and cultures of management within performance.

 

Collectivity and Mass Performance

Whilst theatre by its very nature generally tends to be thought of as a collective performance, the histories of performance art are overwhelmingly oriented towards a singular performer rather than a mass, or collective, and are therefore theorised through the body, rather than bodies. What are the political implications of this occlusion of histories of collective performance? How might this be negotiated by socially engaged or mass performance art? What is the pedagogy of performance?

 

Performance, Experience and Emancipation

This session aims to raise questions about the aesthetics of performance. Can we think about the aesthetic of performance as anemancipatory, transformative process for performers, rather than an experience directed towards an audience? What forms of aesthetic analyses are capable of theorising performance as a transformative experience? In thinking about our current moment, how have restrictions upon protest, gatherings, and occupations through the use of injunctions and dispersal orders implicated the possibilities of an emancipatory politics of collective movement?

 

Performance and the Commodity Form

Whilst the commodity form and the labour internal to it within art forms such as painting, sculpture and photography have been well examined – mainly through concepts such as reproducibility, technique and craft – performance art has frequently been neglected within this discussion. Many artists during the 1960s used performance as way to escape the increasing commodification of the visual arts and the rapid expansion of the art market.  But how can we relate the past aspirations of performance as an anti-commodity to the status of performance art today? How does performance circulate and re-produce itself on the art market and how can we conceptualise the labour internal to its production?

 

We ask for abstracts no longer than 500 words, papers are to be 20 minutes in length.

Please send your abstract proposals to performanceandlabour@gmail.com by 23rd of July. 

The conference will take place on Saturday 3rd November 2012 at University College London.

This symposium is organised by Larne Abse Gogarty and Josefine Wikström with support from the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy, Kingston University London, and the Centre for the Study of Contemporary Art, History of Art Department, University College London.

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Theodor Adorno

THE ACTUALITY OF ADORNO – CONFERENCE AND CALL FOR PAPERS

*****Call for Papers******

‘The Actuality of Adorno: Theatre, Performance, and the Culture Industry Reconsidered (again)’

The PSi Performance and Philosophy working group

@ Performance Studies international #18

University of Leeds,UK

27 June – 1 July 2012

 

Invitation to contribute to a panel organised by the ‘Performance and Philosophy Working Group’

‘The Actuality of Adorno: Theatre, Performance, and the Culture Industry Reconsidered (again)’

 

The aim of this panel is to revisit and interrogate Theodor W. Adorno’s seminal critique of the ‘culture industry’, which he articulated in his collaborative work with Max Horkheimer (Dialectic of Enlightenment) as well as in numerous studies of cultural criticism that explore the status of art in the administered world of advanced capitalism.

We invite paper presentations that pursue Adornian perspectives and compositional stylistics in order to re-engage with his dialectical critique of the culture industry through specific sentences, phrases, and ideas composed by Adorno himself. As such, we ask that those interested in contributing to this panel build a paper around a specific Adorno quotation that deals with the culture industry. Or, in other words, we ask that proposals treat Adorno quotations as fragments through which to re-view the workings of the culture industry as it extends into the realms of theatre and performance in the present.

You may choose from one of the following quotations or select your own from Adorno’s body of work.

 

From: ‘Culture and Administration’, Adorno: The Culture Industry, trans. Rolf Tiedmann (New York: Routledge, 1991).

‘Through the sacrifice of its possible relation to praxis, the cultural concept itself becomes an instance of organization; that which is so provokingly useless in culture is transformed into tolerated negativity or even into something negatively useful—into a lubricant for the system, into something which exists for something else, into untruth, or into goods of the culture industry calculated for the consumer. All this is registered today in the uncomfortable relation between culture and administration’ (117).

 

From: ‘Cultural Criticism and Society’, Prisms; Also in Critical Theory: A Reader, ed. Douglas Tallack (1995). The page numbers below refer to this edition:

‘Cultural criticism shares the blindness of its object.’ (291)

‘The dialectical critic of culture must both participate in culture and not participate. Only then does he do justice to his object and to himself.’ (296).

 

From: Aesthetic Theory, trans. Robert Hullot-Kentor (London: The Athlone Press, 1997):

‘The consumer arbitrarily projects his impulses – mimetic remnants – on whatever is presented to him. Prior to total administration, the subject who viewed, heard, or read a work was to lose himself, forget himself, extinguish himself in the artwork. The identification carried out by the subject was ideally not that of making the artwork like himself, but rather that of making himself like the artwork.

This identification constituted aesthetic sublimation; Hegel named this comportment freedom to the object. He thus paid homage to the subject that becomes subject in spiritual experience through self-relinquishment, the opposite of the philistine demand that the artwork give him something.’ (17)

‘The poles of the artwork’s deaestheticization are that it is made as much a thing among things as a psychological vehicle of the spectator. What the reified artworks are no longer able to say is replaced by the beholder with the standardized echo of himself, to which he hearkens.’ (17)

 

From: Negative Dialectics, trans. E.B. Ashton (1973): ‘All post-Auschwitz culture, including its urgent critique, is garbage….Whoever pleads for the maintenance of this radically culpable and shabby culture becomes its accomplice, while the man who says no to culture is directly furthering the barbarism which our culture showed itself to be’ (367).

‘The power of the status quo puts up the façades into which our consciousness crashes. It must seek to crash through’ (17).

‘Direct communicability to everyone is not a criterion of truth. We must resist the all but universal compulsion to confuse the communication of knowledge with knowledge itself, and to rate it higher, if possible—whereas at present each communicative step is falsifying truth and selling it out’ (41).

 

From ‘Culture Industry Reconsidered’ in Adorno: Essays on the Culture Industry (Routledge)

‘The masses are not the measure but the ideology of the culture industry, even though the culture industry itself could scarcely exist without adapting to the masses’ (99).

‘The autonomy of works of art, which of course rarely ever predominated in an entirely pure form, and was always permeated by a constellation of effects, is tendentially eliminated by the culture industry, with or without the conscious will of those in control’ (19).

‘The concept of technique in the culture industry is only in name identical with technique in works of art. In the latter, technique is concerned with the internal organization of the object itself, with its inner logic. In contrast, the technique of the culture industry is, from the beginning, one of distribution and mechanical reproduction, and therefore always remains external to its object’ (101).

 

Please send a 350-word abstract (including your affiliation and technical requirements) to the session organisers Will Daddario w.daddario@gmail.com and Karoline Gritzner kgg@aber.ac.uk

Deadline for proposals: Friday 7th October 2011

Please note that, as usual, the panel as a whole will still have to be submitted to the PSi 18 conference organizers – so even if session organizers accept your proposal, this is not a guarantee of participation in PSi 18.

 

Performance & Philosophy Working Group (PPWG) wiki: http://psi-ppwg.wikidot.com/

Performance Studies International (PSi) website: http://psi-web.org/

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com