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Mediation

RECONNECTING POLITICAL DISCONNECTION

Hello!

We are delighted to announce that the first issue of JOMEC Journal is now online!

Issue Title: Reconnecting Political Disconnection

See the JOMEC Journal: Journalism, Media, and Cultural Studies at: http://www.cf.ac.uk/JOMECjournal

Best wishes
Paul Bowman

CV, Biography, and Publications: http://cardiff.academia.edu/PaulBowman/About

Note by Glenn: All articles available in PDF format. This is a well presented and exciting new journal. There is also a Call for Papers on the following topics: Migration; PR and News; Comparative Journalism; Journalism, Affect and Emotions; and New Media Technologies.

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Ben Linus

THE CONDEMNED

By Paul Bowman 

Jacques Rancière once lamented the loss of the word “proletarian” from common political language. Without the use of this term, a really important conceptual and political category is lost, and with it, an ability to mobilize and act politically is lost too.

This term has never really worked in the UK anyway. But clearly, the UK needs a new political term that can act as a banner to unite all of those who will bear the brunt of the political violence being wreaked by the pantomime-villain coalition government. The people that need to be united include social services (from all areas of social services, and that is A LOT), teachers, lecturers, students, Northerners, etc.

The term needs to ‘work’ in the way that Stuart Hall argued the word “black” came to *work* at a certain point in history: namely, to connect diverse ethnic identities in terms of their shared experience of racism in the UK. It needs to be a rallying point, a point of and for identification and the establishment of political identity.

We can’t have anything ‘left-wing-sounding’, as this is clearly too partisan. It isn’t going to work in Britain. It just isn’t. So we need to be creative and discursive and not obviously party political. No one wants to be obviously party political. But remaining single-interest is a dead end.

So may I suggest that the term we adopt to name (and rally) all who suffer under the obscene acts of this shocking government is “The ConDemned”.

And may I suggest that we use this term to try to forge links and alliances and chains of equivalence with all areas of UK society, rather than singling out “the students” as if they are some single interest exception to the norm. We need to show that The ConDemned are the norm – are becoming the norm.

But – and this is the crucial thing – we need to be clear that this is not a group or an entity who even want to exist. We certainly don’t want to continue to exist as a group. We desire not to exist. We want to be dissolved. We are being created by the negative political energies of the Coalition government. We have been ConDemned. We will go away when they do. When their actions are stopped and reversed, redressed, rectified.

Paul Bowman at: http://ranciere.blogspot.com/2010/11/condemned.html

Just a thought:

Maybe the Coalition Government should be known as ‘The ConDemned’, rather than us. They are ConDemned (and will be consigned to history) by us.

Do we want to take on this label?

Glenn Rikowski

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Culture

REVIEWS IN CULTURAL THEORY – UPDATE AUGUST 2010

New reviews in Reviews in Cultural Theory are now accessible online at reviewsinculture.com. We’re also seeking reviewers for new and forthcoming books. Please see our list of books for which we’re seeking reviewers below and email us at editors@reviewsinculture.com, if you are interested in contributing a review.

Summer reviews:

Erin Wunker reviews Barbara Godard’s Canadian Literature at the Crossroads of Language and Culture.

Will Straw reviews Davin Heckman’s A Small World: Smart Houses and the Dream of the Perfect Day. 

Evan Mauro reviews Seth Moglen’s Mourning Modernity: Literary Modernism and the Injuries of American Capitalism.

Matthew MacLellan reviews Gerald Raunig’s A Thousand Machines: A Concise Philosophy of the Machine as a Social Movement.

Gerry Canavan reviews Mark Bould and China Miéville’s Red Planets: Marxism and Science Fiction.

Melissa Aronczyk reviews Guy Julier and Liz Moor’s Design and Creativity: Policy, Management and Practice.

Books for review:

Anderson, Patrick. So Much Wasted: Hunger, Performance, and the Morbidity of Resistance. Duke UP, 2010.

Aronczyk, Melissa, and Devon Powers, eds. Blowing Up the Brand: Critical Perspectives on Promotional Culture. Peter Lang, 2010.

Blanco, Maria del Pilar and Esther Peeren. Popular Ghosts: The Haunted Spaces of Everyday Culture. Continuum Press, 2010. 

Bowman, Paul, ed. The Rey Chow Reader. Columbia UP, 2010. 

Chatterjee, Partha. Empire and Nation: Selected Essays. Columbia UP, 2010.

Coole, Diana and Samantha Frost, eds. New Materialisms: Ontology, Agency, and Politics. Duke UP, 2010.

Dabashi, Hamid. Brown Skin, White Masks. Pluto Press, 2010.

The Edu-factory Collective. Toward a Global Autonomous University: Cognitive Labor, The Production of Knowledge, and Exodus from the Education Factory. Autonomedia, 2009.

Foley, Barbara. Wrestling with the Left: The Making of Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man. Duke UP, 2010.

Floyd, Kevin. The Reification of Desire: Toward a Queer Marxism.  University of Minnesota Press, 2009.

Fumagalli, Andrea and Sandro Mezzadra, eds. Crisis in the Global Economy: Financial Markets, Social Struggles, and New Political Scenarios. Semiotext(e), 2010.

Gregg, Melissa and Gregory J. Seigworth, eds.  The Affect Theory Reader. Duke UP, 2010.

Grossberg, Lawrence. Cultural Studies in the Future Tense. Duke UP, 2010.

Hill, Rod and Tony Myatt. The Economics Anti-Textbook: A Critical Thinker’s Guide to Microeconomics. Zed, 2010.

Hitchcock, Peter. The Long Space: Transnationalism and Postcolonial Form. Stanford UP, 2010.

Holmes, Brian. Unleashing the Collective Phantoms: Essays in Reverse Imagineering. Pluto Press, 2010.

Johnson-Woods, Toni. Manga: An Anthology of Global and Cultural Perspectives. Continuum Press, 2010.

Kim, Jodi. Ends of Empire: Asian American Critique and the Cold War. U of Minnesota Press, 2010.

Kusch, Rodolfo. Indigenous and Popular Thinking in America. Duke UP, 2010.

Lanza, Fabio. Behind the Gate: Inventing Students in Beijing. Columbia UP, 2010.

Latour, Bruno. On the Modern Cult of the Factish Gods.  Duke UP, 2010.

Lepecki, Andre and Jenn Joy, eds. Planes of Composition: Dance, Theory and the Global. U of Chicago P, 2010.

Merrifield, Andy. Magical Marxism: Subversive Politics and the Imagination. Pluto Press, 2010.

Nguyen, Vinh-Kim. The Republic of Therapy: Triage and Sovereignty in West Africa’s Time of AIDS. Duke UP, 2010.

Paik, Peter. From Utopia to Apocalypse: Science Fiction and the Politics of Catastrophe. U of Minnesota P, 2010.

Pasotti, Eleonora. Political Branding in Cities: The Decline of Machine Politics in Bogota, Naples, and Chicago. Cambridge UP, 2010.

Rancière, Jacques, and Steven Corcoran. Chronicles of Consensual Times. Continuum, 2010.

Seth, Vanita. Europe’s Indians: Producing Racial Difference, 1500–1900. Duke UP, 2010.

Sharpe, Christina. Monstrous Intimacies: Making Post-Slavery Subjects. Duke UP, 2010.

Sholette, Gregory. Dark Matter: Art and Politics in the Age of Enterprise Culture. Pluto Press, 2010.

Toscano, Alberto. Fanaticism: On The Uses of An Idea. Verso, 2010.

Reviews in Cultural Theory

Department of English and Film Studies

3-5 Humanities Centre

University of Alberta

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

T6G 2E5

For more about, and the origins of, Reviews in Cultural Theory see: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2010/03/31/reviews-in-cultural-theory/

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Community

THE ECSTACY OF COMMUNITY AND THE FORECLOSURE OF THE POLITICAL FIELD

Dr Margret Grebowicz

Date: Wednesday 17th March

Time: 4pm – 5.30pm

Venue: Birt Acres Lecture Theatre, Bute Building

Host: JOMEC, Cardiff University

Contact: Paul Bowman, BowmanP@cf.ac.uk

Feminist critiques—and defences—of pornography have been around for decades.  But how does the advent of porn as an internet phenomenon change the way we think of the relationships between speech, freedom, and sex? Engaging with Baudrillard and Butler, I argue that cyberporn has important consequences for political ontology in general, which should reorient critics of pornography to focus on questions of community, sexual/political intelligibility, and the conditions of the possibility of social change.

Dr Margret Grebowicz (Goucher College, Baltimore) is spending 2009-10 as a Researcher at The University of Dundee. She is interested in social and political philosophy through a continental lens, with particular emphasis on gender and the production of knowledge and culture.  She is editor of Sci-Fi in the Mind’s Eye: Reading Science through Science Fiction (2007) and Gender After Lyotard (2007). Her most recent projects concern internet pornography, radical democratic theory, and animal studies—sometimes even in conjunction.  She is currently working on two books: one on Donna Haraway’s later work, and the other, a short book on internet pornography and American democracy. 

ALL WELCOME

Dr Paul Bowman

JOMEC, Cardiff University

http://cardiff.academia.edu/PaulBowman

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Postcolonial Ethnicity, Visuality & Cultural Politics Conference

 

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/jomec/newsandevents/index.html  

 

Date: 27th February 2009.

 

Venue: Room 1.63, Glamorgan Building, Cardiff University, CF10 3NB.

 

Registration: The event is free.

All Welcome – Space is Limited

Please PRE-REGISTER by emailing name(s) to: BowmanP@cf.ac.uk

 

 

Timetable:

 

 

11.00 – 11.30 – Paul Bowman (Cardiff University) “All the girlies say I’m pretty fly for a white guy”: Coercive Mimeticism & Cultural Studies

 

 

11.30 – 12.30 – Ben Pitcher (Middlesex University) Race and Racism after Anti-Racism

 

 

12.30 – 13.30 – Lunch

 

 

13.30 – 14.30 – Mónica Moreno Figueroa (Newcastle University) Looking Emotionally: Photography, Racism and Intimacy in Research

 

 

14.30 – 15.00 – Nasheli Jiménez Del Val (Cardiff University) Pinturas de casta: Mexican caste paintings, a Foucauldian Reading

 

 

15.00 – 15.15 – break

 

 

15.15 – 16.15 – Birgit Breninger & Thomas Kaltenbacher (Salzburg University) Tracking the Cultural Gaze: Acquired Acts of Looking and Learned Plots of Identities in Austria

 

 

16.15 – 16.30 – break

 

 

16.30-17.00 – Corbett Miteff (Cardiff University) Looking through Ethnic Eyes And Finding Global Animation

 

 

17.00-18.30 – Martin McQuillan (Leeds University) Deconstructing Disney, Part II

 

 

For further information & to Reserve A Place: BowmanP@cf.ac.uk

 

 

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