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Peter Hudis

Peter Hudis

MARX’S LATER WRITINGS ON THE PARIS COMMUNE AND THE ALTERNATIVE TO CAPITALISM

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2014

6:00-8:00 PM

WestsidePeaceCenter

3916 Sepulveda Blvd., near Venice Blvd. (free parking in rear)

Suite 101-102, press #22 at door to get into building

Culver City (LA area)

 

Speakers:

MICHAEL PUGLIESE, longtime left observer

HYUNHO C., student activist

In his CIVIL WAR IN FRANCE, Marx pointed to the concrete measures taken by the Paris Commune, including the abolition of the state, as harbingers of a new form of radical democracy, communism.  He discussed the nature of that communism and the way it could be achieved in CRITIQUE OF THE GOTHA PROGRAM, where it would culminate in a society based upon the principle of from each according to their abilities to each according to their needs.  This and other aspects of Marx’s writings bearing on alternatives to capitalism will be the subject of free and open discussion.

Suggested reading:

Ch. 4 of Peter Hudis’s MARX’S CONCEPT OF THE ALTERNATIVE TO CAPITALISM:  “Marx’s Later Writings on Post-Capitalist Society”

[Copies of book available at a discount at the meeting]

[This is the third in a series of meetings on this topic, in preparation for the author’s visit to LA in March 16, when he will give an overview of his book and engage in dialogue]

See also the recently published book reviews by MARXIST-HUMANIST workers and intellectuals http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/articles/marx-alternative-capitalism-review-symposium-karel-ludenhoff-marija-krtolica-dale-parsons  and from a sympathetic/critical ANARCHIST: http://www.anarkismo.net/article/26446   

Sponsored by the West Coast Chapter, International Marxist-Humanist Organization

More information: arise@internationalmarxisthumanist.org

http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org

Join our new Facebook page: “International Marxist-Humanist Organization” https://www.facebook.com/groups/imhorg/

 

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

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Paris Commune

Paris Commune

THE HISTORY OF THE PARIS COMMUNE OF 1871

NEW TITLE:

VERSO’S WORLD HISTORY SERIES:

THE HISTORY OF THE PARIS COMMUNE OF 1871

by Prosper-Olivier Lissagaray

Preface by Eric Hazan

OUT NOW

——————————–

The classic history of the Paris Commune, part of Verso’s highly praised and affordable World History Series.

In 1871, the working class of Paris, incensed by their lack of political power and tired of being exploited, seized control of the capital. This book is the outstanding history of the Commune, the heroic battles fought in its defence, and the bloody massacre that ended the uprising. Its author,LISSAGARAY, was a young journalist who not only saw the events recounted here first-hand, but fought for the Commune on the barricades. He spent the next twenty-five years researching and writing this history, which refutes the slanders levelled at the Communards by the ruling classes and is a vivid and valuable study in urban political revolution, one that retains its power to inspire to this day.

This revised edition includes a foreword by the writer and publisher ERIC HAZAN.

———————————

PROSPER-OLIVIER LISSAGARAY (1838–1901) was a socialist, duelist, republican journalist and sometime lover of Eleanor Marx.

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“Lissagaray relives the Commune with all the bitterness of a man who could see the tragedy unfold, even as he played his part, dutifully, to the end.”

– PAUL MASON, economics editor of the BBC’s Newsnight and author of WHY IT’S KICKING OFF EVERYWHERE

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464 pages       /         $26.95 / £14.99 / $28.50CAN      /      ISBN: 9781844677764

———————————–

For more information about THE HISTORY OF THE PARIS COMMUNE OF 1871, or to buy this or any other part of the series, visit:

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1055-the-history-of-the-paris-commune-of-1871

——————————-

Visit Verso’s website for information on our upcoming events, new reviews and publications and special offers: http://www.versobooks.com

Sign up for the Verso mailing list:

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Become a fan of Verso on Facebook

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And get updates on Twitter too!

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First published: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-title-from-verso-the-history-of-the-paris-commune-of-1871-by-prosper-olivier-lissagaray

 

Paris Commune

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

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Dialectics

TOWARD A DIALECTIC OF PHILOSOPHY AND ORGANIZATION – BY EUGENE GOGOL

Just off the press from Brill — Toward a Dialectic of Philosophy and Organization, by Eugene Gogol 

Toward a Dialectic of Philosophy and Organization is an exploration of Hegel’s dialectic and its radical re-creation in Marx’s thought within the context of revolutions and revolutionary organizations in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Does a dialectic in philosophy itself bring forth a dialectic in revolutionary organization? This question is explored via organizational practices in the Paris Commune, the 2nd International, the Russian Revolutions of 1905 and 1917, the Spanish Revolution of 1936-37 and the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, as well as the theoretical-organizational concepts of such thinkers as Lassalle, Lenin, Luxemburg, Trotsky and Pannekoek.

“What Philosophic-Organizational Vantage Point Is Needed for Revolutionary Transformation Today?” is examined by engaging the theoretical arguments of a number of thinkers. Among them: Adorno, Dunayevskaya, Hardt and Negri, Holloway, Lebowitz, Lukcás, Mészáros and Postone.

Table of contents

Introduction: Philosophy, Organization, and the Work of Raya Dunayevskaya
Prologue: The Dialectic in Philosophy Itself

PART I: ON SPONTANEOUS FORMS OF ORGANIZATION VS. VANGUARD PARTIES
1: Marx’s Concept of Organization: From the Silesian Weavers’ Uprising to the First Years of the International Workingmen’s Association
2: The Commune of Paris, 1871: Mass Spontaneity in Action and Thought; Responsibility of the Revolutionary Intellectual: The Two-War Road Between Marx and the Commune
3: The Second International, The German Social Democracy, and Engels after Marx—Organization without Marx’s Organization of Thought
4: The 1905 Russian Revolution: Mass Proletarian Self-Activity and Its Relation to the Organizational Thought of Marxist Revolutionaries
5: The Russian Revolution of 1917 and Beyond
6: Out of the Russia Revolution: Legacy and Critique—Luxemburg, Pannekoek, Trotsky
7: Organizational Forms from the Spanish Revolution
8: The Hungarian Workers’ Councils in the Revolution: A Movement from Practice that Is a Form of Theory 

PART II: HEGEL AND MARX
9: Can “Absolute Knowing” in Hegel’s Phenomenology Speak to a Dialectic of Organization and Philosophy?
10: Rereading Marx’s Critique of the Gotha Program Today

PART III: HEGEL AND LENIN
11: Lenin and Hegel—The Profound Philosophic Breakthrough that Failed to Encompass Revolutionary Organization
12: Hegel’s Critique of the Third Attitude to Objectivity—Its Relation to Organization

PART IV: DIALECTICS OF ORGANIZATION AND PHILOSOPHY IN POST-WORLD WAR II WORLD: THE WORK OF RAYA DUNAYEVSKAYA
13: Moments in the Development of Dunayevskaya’s Marxist-Humanism

PART V: CONCLUSION
14: What Philosophic-Organizational Vantage Point Is Needed?

Bibliograhy
Index

Originally published: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-from-brill-toward-a-dialectic-of-philosophy-and-organization-by-eugene-gogol

**END**

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Karl Marx

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON THE PARIS COMMUNE 1871

International Conference. Views on the Commune of 1871 in France. New approaches and prospects.

Narbonne (Aude, France), City Hall – former Archbishop’s Palace
March 24-26, 2011

International Conference co-organised by the Centre de Recherche Espaces, Sociétés, Culture (CRESC, EA 2356, Université Paris 13 / PRES Sorbonne Paris Cité), the Commission Archéologique et Littéraire de Narbonne (CALN) and the Institut d’Histoire Sociale (IHS) – CGT of Aude

For the 140th anniversary of the Commune of 1871, an important conference will be held from 24 to 26 March 2011. Entitled “Views on the Commune of 1871 in France –. New approaches and prospects”, it means to bring forward the new works and original paths of research relating to The Commune of Paris, the Communes of the Province and the movements around The Commune which developed in France in 1871. This international symposium is the result of a unique collaboration between Paris 13-  PRES Sorbonne Paris Cité, a university of Ile-de-France (Paris area) and the research laboratory CRESC, the CALN, a learned institute created in 1833 and ISH-CGT, a militant institute of social history. It will be held in the town of Narbonne, which, in March 1871, witnessed the proclamation of a Commune.

This international symposium intends to focus on new approaches to the event and to open new prospects. Beyond questioning the contribution of modern research on the Communes of the province, it’s aim is to work at the margins of the global event so as to open new paths of research and to renew the national interpretation of the communalist movement inside an expanded geographical and temporal framework.

The choice of Narbonne meets the required objective: 40 years after the international Symposium organized in 1971 for the centenary of The Commune, researchers’ views on the Commune have changed. Holding this conference in Narbonne instead of Paris is also a symbolic way to insist on those changes: a greater attention will be given to provincial France, to the legacy left between 1848 and 1871, to the national dimension of the different “Communes”. This symposium will be an opportunity to highlight new research carried out on the anonymous actors of the Commune, the life in the different town districts, law and order, violence and the army, the cultural representations, the links between individual stories and collective history and eventually, the tensions between history and memory.

The members of the Scientific Committee of the conference and the speakers’ national as well as international fame turns this event into a powerful moment in this 140th anniversary; not only will speeches be delivered by renowned historians, but also by outstanding young researchers.

Lectures will be held in the two magnificent Synods’ Room and Consuls’ Rooms in the Archbishop’s Palace, now the City Hall, where the “Commune of Narbonne” was proclaimed on 24 March 1871.

Program and practical information are available on http://www.colloque-commune1871.fr/en/  or on the CRESC website: http://www.univ-paris13.fr/cresc/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=82&Itemid=28     

Free entrance, but registration required at inscription@colloque-commune1871.fr

Steering Committee :
·         Marc César (CRESC, Université Paris 13)
·         Laure Godineau (CRESC, Université Paris 13)
·         Jacques Michaud (President of the Archaeological and Literary Commission of Narbonne)
·         Xavier Verdejo (Institute for Social History of the Aude)

Scientific Committee
·         Sylvie Aprile (Université de Lille 3)
·         Sylvie Caucanas (Departemental archives of the Aude)
·         Quentin Deluermoz (CRESC, Université Paris 13)
·         Laura Frader (Northeastern University – Boston, associate at the CES, Harvard University)
·         Jacques Girault (CRESC, Université Paris 13)
·         Christopher Guthrie (Tarleton State University)
·         Raymond Huard (Université Paul Valéry Montpellier 3)
·         Laurent Mc Falls (Université de Montréal)
·         Rémy Pech (Université de Toulouse 2 – Le Mirail)
·         Alceo Riosa (Université de Milan)
·         Jean-Louis Robert (Université Paris 1)
·         Jacques Rougerie (Université Paris 1)
·         Jean Sagnes (Université de Perpignan)
·         Benjamin Stora (CRESC, Université Paris 13)
·         Robert Tombs (St John’s College, University of Cambridge)
·         Paul-Henri Viala (Archives of Narbonne)

Partnerships
·         City of Narbonne
·         Languedoc-Roussillon Region
·         General Council of the Aude
·         Agglomeration community of Grand Narbonne
·         Local and regional organizations of the CGT (represented by Mr. Patric Grèze)

Scientific partnerships
·         Archives of Narbonne
·         Departmental archives of the Aude
·         Université de Perpignan- Via Domitia
·         Université Montpellier 1
·         UMR FRAMESPA (Université de Toulouse 2 – Le Mirail / CNRS)
·         Research centre on intercultural relations in English and French speaking areas (CRIDAF), Université Paris 13 – PRES (Research and Upper Education Pole) Sorbonne Paris Cité
·         Association Maitron Languedoc-Roussillon (represented by Mr. Raymond Huard)

Contact:
Marc César marc.cesar@univ-paris13.fr or Laure Godineau laure.godineau@univ-paris13.fr

Postal adress : CRESC / UFR LSHS / 99 av. J-B. Clément 93380 Villetaneuse / FRANCE
        
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 Raya Dunayevskaya

DEMOCRATIC ALTERNATIVES TO CAPITALISM: MARX’S WRITINGS ON EXITING CAPITALISM, PART 1

Sunday, January 30, 2011

Speaker: Kevin Anderson, author of Marx at the Margins

A discussion of Marx on the Paris Commune of 1871, an experiment in socialist freedom in which both capital and the state were challenged in what he called “the political form at last discovered under which to work out the economical emancipation of labor”

Sponsored by West Coast Marxist-Humanists

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Karl Marx

BOOKS FROM THE MARXIST INTERNET ARCHIVE

Erythros Press and Media, who distribute books on behalf of MIA publishing, now has two new titles in stock. The first, */Communards/*, is something every one of you will want to read, whatever current of communism you support. The other – */The Communist Manifesto & its Genesis/* – will not be new to you, but you should buy it as an act of solidarity. *Please promote these books with all your friends and comrades*.

All proceeds go to paying the expenses of running the MIA.

———————————————————

Communards: The Story of the Paris Commune of 1871, As Told by those Who Fought for It. Texts selected, edited, and
translated by Mitchell Abidor 302 pp: http://www.marxists.org/admin/books/communards/index.h tm

In this unique collection of texts translated into English for the first time, we hear the genuine voices of the Paris Commune of 1871. Every Communard drew something different from the experience of the Commune, and *Communards* allows all of them to have their say.

”If socialism wasn’t born of the Commune, it is from the Commune that dates that portion of international revolution that no longer wants to give battle in a city in order to be surrounded and crushed, but which instead wants, at the head of the proletarians of each and every country, to attack national and international reaction and put an end to the capitalist regime” – Edouard Vaillant, a member of the Paris Commune.

Documents include the records of stormy meetings of the Commune deciding on the execution of hostages, minutes of meetings of the First International throughout the siege as well as reminiscences of participants written down 25 years after the event.

Much of this would be new to French-speakers; it is all new for those who do not normally read in the French language. No history of the Commune may be written in the future without reference to *Communards*.

Mitchell Abidor is a writer and translator living in Brooklyn. He is also the author of The Great Anger: Ultra-Revolutionary Writing in France from the Atheist Priest to the Bonnot Gang.

ISBN 978-0-9805428-9-9
Price US$25+postage.
Proceeds to Marxists Internet Archive

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Karl Marx

NEW YORK STUDY GROUPS ON MARXISM AND REVOLUTIONS

From Loren Goldner

I am considering various topics for study groups for the coming year, based on what people are most interested in. The groups will start in mid-October and run to the end of June 2011. They will meet every other week in Manhattan, most probably on Thursday evenings (the time that seems most convenient for most people), and involve about 100 pages of reading per session. Participants should be committed to doing the reading and attending regularly.

The Capital group of fall 2009-June 2010 and the summer Grundrisse group have been (IMHO) quite successful, with high levels of participation and discussion by all involved. Participants in the 2010-2011 groups will be asked to make presentations on parts of the reading or (with option No. 3) reporting back to the group on independent reading. I have found this to be a very workable way to encourage maximum participation.

The main topics I’m considering are:
Marx’s Capital, 3 volumes.

Marx’s Theories of Surplus Value, plus readings from Smith, Ricardo and Hegel.

The history of revolutions from the English Revolution to the present (English, French, 1848, Paris Commune, Russian Revolutions (1905 and 1917), German, Spanish) and various working-class upsurges and insurrections since 1945. Given the near-infinite character of the topic and of the possible readings, the focus will depend in part on the interests of the group.

I will choose two of the above, based on the response.

For those of you not familiar with where I’m coming from, check out my web site

http://home.earthlink.net/~lrgoldner

…and the new on-line journal of which I am a co-editor

http://insurgentnotes.com

If any of the proposed topics grab you, and you have the time and energy to participate, contact me asap at

lrgoldner@yahoo.com

Loren

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Alain Badiou

BADIOU’S COMMUNIST HYPOTHESIS

In celebration of its 40th anniversary, Verso, America’s preeminent radical press, is proud to announce the third volume in its ongoing Pocket Communism series:

THE COMMUNIST HYPOTHESIS

By ALAIN BADIOU

“A figure like Plato or Hegel walks here among us!”—Slavoj Žižek

“In sum, a heartless bastard”—New Republic

Unwilling to neglect the stigmatizing burden of historical failure that communism has come to bear, Alain Badiou has set out to formulate a hypothesis that will resurrect and reinvigorate the communist ideal. 

In the wake of the financial crisis, Badiou presents his argument with a controlled urgency and a sincere conviction that “Communism is the right hypothesis.” Pointing to the emptiness in neoliberal capitalism’s promise of “human rights,” Badiou aims for a new kind of “universal emancipation” in his reconceptualization of communism. 

Badiou insists that his book is not a work of politics, but one that deals with the issues it raises at a fundamentally philosophical level: rather than taking for granted the “failure” of communism, he is intent on defining failure as such, crediting with sagacity only those “who are not blinded by the propagandist notion of failure.” With this in mind, Badiou takes us from May 1968 to the Cultural Revolution to the Paris Commune. Rather than flinching from the historical precedent set by these events, Badiou invites the possibility that these so-called failures may be thought of as a sequence that is far from complete. He argues, in other words, “that the apparent, and sometimes bloody, failures of events closely bound up with the communist hypothesis were and are stages in its history.”

Concerning the ultimate goal of The Communist Hypothesis, the book speaks for itself: 

“To put it in a nutshell: we have to be bold enough to have an idea. A great idea. We have to convince ourselves that there is nothing ridiculous or criminal about having a great idea. The world of global and arrogant capitalism in which we live is taking us back to the 1840s and the birth of capitalism. Its imperative, as formulated by Guizot, was: ‘Get rich!’ We can translate that as ‘Live without an idea!’ We have to say that we cannot live without an idea. We have to say: ‘Have the courage to support the idea, and it can only be the communist idea in its generic sense.’ ”

FOR INTERVIEWS & REVIEW COPIES OF ALL TITLES IN THE SERIES PLEASE CONTACT CLARA HEYWORTHclara@versobooks.com

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Karl Marx

CONFERENCE IN PARIS ON COMMUNISM, 22-23 JANUARY 2010

Collloque: Puissances du communisme
22-23 janvier 2010
Programme (pour tout renseignement : societelouisemichel@free.fr)
Université Paris 8
2, rue de la Liberté 93526 Saint-Denis
métro : Saint-Denis Université

Vendredi 22

Matin, 09.00
Table ronde n° 1 : Un communisme sans Marx ?

Participants : Isabelle Garo, Rastko Mocnik, Massimiliano Tomba, Pierre Dardot, Stéphane Rozès

Modératrice : Cinzia Arruzza
Le mot de communisme est né avant Marx et il continue aujourd’hui d’être employé, en des sens très divers. Pourtant, peut-on penser le communisme sans le référer d’une façon ou d’une autre à Marx, c’est-à-dire sans le relier à une critique du capitalisme qui en analyse les contradictions profondes et l’abolition nécessaire ? C’est le poids politique de la référence à Marx aujourd’hui, poids problématique, qu’il s’agit de discuter, en s’interrogeant sur la persistance, voire la remontée d’une telle référence après l’effondrement des pays dits socialistes. Le récent anniversaire de la chute du Mur, salué à grands fracas médiatiques, s’est voulu l’enterrement de toute perspective communiste. Pourtant, ce tohu-bohu de circonstance prouve lui aussi le retour de la radicalité politique et pose à nouveau le problème de son rapport contemporain à Marx et à ses approches marquées par une diversité de plus en plus affirmée. Question multiple bien  évidemment ! Ainsi, elle inclut la question de savoir en quoi le communisme a été ou non pensé et défini par Marx dans son oeuvre. Plus largement, le retour de la question communiste n’implique-t-elle pas le retour de ces questions politiques que sont les problèmes de transition et de médiation ? Loin de faire du communisme une visée qui les néglige ou les dénonce, n’est-ce pas le propre de la référence à Marx que de réfléchir à la place des luttes sociales, mais aussi à la nature et à la structure des organisations politiques, des formes politiques d’intervention ? Parler de communisme aujourd’hui oblige à aborder de front la question de la « vraie démocratie », pour citer le jeune Marx, et à rouvrir enfin le dossier central de la propriété. De ce point de vue, la question communiste oblige aussi à reposer la question du socialisme qui lui est parfois opposé après lui avoir été assimilé. Bref, la question ouverte d’un rapport contemporain et vivant à Marx pourrait bien être au cœur de la discussion si celle-ci doit se poursuivre et parvenir à réassocier les dimensions théorique et stratégique. On pourrait alors envisager que le communisme n’est ni un pur concept ni le nom d’une défaite.

Après-midi
Table ronde n° 2 : Un communisme sans histoire ?

Participants : Alex Callinicos, Alberto Toscano, Etienne Balibar, Catherine Samary, André Tosel

Modérateur : Nicolas Vieillescazes

« J’étais, je suis, je serai » écrivait Rosa Luxemburg juste avant son assassinat, en parlant de la révolution et de l’idée du communisme qu’elle faisait remonter, au moins, à la révolte de Spartakus. Ainsi le communisme s’inscrirait comme une idée de portée presque anthropologique, reflétant la part humaine qui pousse à l’égalité et à la liberté. En ce sens, elle serait, pour ainsi dire, insensible à l’histoire, même si sa puissance dépend des périodes. Sans ontredire directement cette approche, avec Marx et la généralisation du salariat, naît un point de vue matérialiste qui ancre dans les contradictions du capitalisme la possibilité effective de la réalisation du rêve. Un communisme en puissance autrement dit, au sens de la physique, dont les conditions historiques de réalisation prennent un aspect concret, mais dont la mise en énergie dépend des évènements, du tour que prend une conjonction particulière de rapports de force économiques, idéologiques, sociaux et politiques et des évènements qui en découlent. Approches opposées, disjointes ou complémentaires ?

Samedi 23

Matin, 09.00
Table ronde n° 3 : A la recherche du sujet perdu

Participants : Thomas Coutrot, Christian Laval, Elsa Dorlin, Samuel Johsua

Modérateur : François Cusset

Autrefois incarné par une classe ouvrière consciente d’elle-même et de son rôle historique, le sujet de la révolution communiste semble avoir aujourd’hui disparu sous les assauts conjugués d’une mutation du capital ayant totalement intégré la sphère culturelle à la sphère marchande, de forces politiques et idéologiques qui se sont employées à discréditer toute idée d’alternative politique et ont promu le mythe d’une classe moyenne universelle, ou, conséquemment, d’un relativisme généralisé qui a renvoyé aux oubliettes de l’histoire l’idée même de révolution. Comment donc, aujourd’hui, reformuler la question du sujet d’un possible renversement du capitalisme ? Pour Toni Negri, le communisme est appelé à naître spontanément d’un bouleversement des rapports de production qui permettrait à la « multitude » du general intellect de se « libérer » ; et il ne manque pas d’auteurs qui considèrent que la question est mal posée, soit qu’il faille chercher une issue dans les luttes micropolitiques en s’inspirant des travaux de Michel Foucault ou de Félix Guattari et Gilles Deleuze, soit qu’elle ne puisse se trouver que dans un « peuple » non assignable à quelque coordonnée sociologique que ce soit. Dans ce contexte, alors que les inégalités sont pourtant plus criantes qu’elles ne l’ont jamais été et que sembleraient pouvoir se dessiner les conditions d’une solidarité politique minimale, la question même d’un sujet communiste révolutionnaire a-t-elle encore un sens ? Le problème, finalement, n’est peut-être pas tant celui du sujet perdu que celui, plus général, de la construction d’une alternative crédible au capitalisme.

Après-midi
Table ronde n° 4 : Des communistes sans communisme ?

Participants : Jacques Rancière, Slavoj Zizek, Daniel Bensaid, Michel Surya, Gaspar Tamas

Modérateur : à signaler

Selon une célèbre phrase de Lénine, il n’est de mouvement révolutionnaire sans théorie révolutionnaire. La théorie est à la fois ce qui permet de s’orienter dans un réel tumultueux, de conférer une «identité » au collectif révolutionnaire, et de doter ce dernier d’un programme, c’est-à-dire d’un objectif à atteindre via une période de transition. Pendant plus d’un siècle, le marxisme a fourni l’ossature de cette théorie, même si d’autres courants y ont bien entendu également contribué. Parmi les éléments dont les mouvements anti-systémiques (y compris les parties révolutionnaires) se trouvent dépossédés avec la clôture du cycle historique initié en Octobre 1917, et la fin de l’expérience du communisme « réel », on compte cette dimension « doctrinale » de l’activité révolutionnaire. Il existe actuellement des personnes et des collectifs qui se déclarent «communistes » mais, comme théorie (relativement) cohérente et unifiée, le communisme semble introuvable. Faut-il se réjouir de ce fait, l’absence de doctrine hégémonique permettant aux micro-pratiques et micro-théories correspondantes de proliférer (hypothèse des « mille marxismes ») ? Faut-il au contraire le déplorer, et s’atteler à la reconstruction de long terme d’une théorie révolutionnaire ?

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk