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EduFactory

‘TO HAVE THE COURAGE OF UNCERTAINTY’: CULTURES OF PRECARITY

An International Conference

Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense, December 6-7, 2012

 

Key note speakers:

Judith Revel

Paolo Virno (tbc)

Giorgio Vasta

Maurizio Lazzerato (tbc)

 

Call for Papers

This international conference is the third and last in a cycle of conferences that started last year in Amsterdam, and continued at Chapel Hill (USA) in May 2012, and is part of the international research project Precarity and Post- autonomia: the Global Heritage, funded by NWO (The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research) which involves several Dutch universities (Universiteit Leiden/ Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Universiteit Utrecht) in collaboration with two North-American Universities (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) and the University of Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense. The project aims at stimulating the debate on today’s developments in “autonomist” movements, born mainly from Italy’s workers movements during the Seventies, and to connect these currents with a broader reflection on the topic of precarity within globalized capitalism.

The title of the conference originates in a newspaper article by the young Sicilian writer Giorgio Vasta in which he unpacks the identikit of the new generations. Vasta feels that those born in the 1970s, the 1980s and the 1990s, have grown up with the perception of the ‘end of the present’ and of the present as the ‘end’. If this impossibility or incapacity of having a perspective is proper to today’s youth, then this, says Vasta, should become their stronghold: “Because if our connotation is uncertainty – alienation not as an anomaly but as a permanent experience of the real – in that case it becomes fundamental to not turn uncertainty into an alibi but to use it as a tool for knowledge. To have the courage of uncertainty” (La Repubblica, 6-10-2009).

This uncertainty mentioned by Vasta is synonymous with crisis, with a two-faced precarity that therefore becomes ambivalent and that is not longer recomposable into a dialectical object. On the one hand the condition of economic insecurity, caused by the traumatic consequences of so-called labour “flexibility” in globalized capitalism, reduces the subject to a (biopolitical) state of permanent precarity. On the other hand, however, the claim of an identity that is precarious and resistant at the same time, and which is located outside and against the capitalist system, would entail that there still exists a margin from which we can pronounce a cultural critique. If we move our attention towards the ‘creative industries’, these seem to have incorporated precarity as a mode of cultural production. If this is true, the question is to determine the margin of “relative heteronomy” acceptable to survive economically without sacrificing artistic liberty. This could be a way to consider initiatives such as the Coordination des intermittents et précaires d’Ile de France in France and the occupation of the Valle Theatre in Rome, supported by the Generation TQ, the movement of cognitive laborers between thirty-forty (http://www.generazionetq.org/). One may ask what type of autonomy is envisioned by the artists’ resistance against capitalism and if their confinement to an “autonomous” margin could lead, on the contrary, towards the depoliticization of the aesthetic of the avant- gardes? What does marginality mean if we start from a general precarization of public and private space? In the past decade, art institutions and academic contexts have become privileged spaces for conversations concerning both the (partly subversive) knowledge of the precarious, and a search for commons (in order to constitute the political). As for academic contexts, a reference can be made to EduFactory (http://www.edu-factory.org/wp/), a transnational collective that focuses on conflicts and transformation of the university.

Narratives of precarity express two components: that of an inquiry of and a charge against post-Fordist society, and that of the creation of a new kind of precarious ontology. The case-study of Italy seems particularly interesting because it offers the opportunity to analyze the palimpsest both of a history of long duration, transmitted by (post)autonomous workers movements and radical thought in 1970s Italy, and a recent history of social movements that starts from the (tragic) events of the G8 summit at Genoa (2001) – but many other countries and movements must be taken into account, from the first EuroMayDay parade (2001), to the Madrid-based feminist activist group “Precarias a la deriva” (2004), to the transnational indignados movement (2011, Spain) and to the Occupy movement.

The intention of the conference is thus to establish a link between transnational narratives of precarity – narrative in the broad sense of storytelling, including various representational and performative arts in prose and in poetry – and different types of cultural activism. The central question is whether such cultures of resistance, when embedded within art institutions or social movements, do not risk becoming expressions of containment policies, of strategies of ‘governmentality’ (Foucault) that conforms the precarious subject to the cultural logic of capitalism. If the absence of dialectics allows instead for a multidirectional relationship between object and subject, the question is whether this ambivalence of precariousness may become a new way of being that invites an artistic and political revisioning of cultural activism operating at the margins. Therefore the conference also questions whether the ways of creating narratives, and indeed forms of representation of precarity, undergo the same dynamics as the biopolitical subject. Language itself is put into a state of precariousness, and comes to war with itself.

 

Topics include but are not limited to:

            -­‐  Aesthetics of precarity in arts and in social movements

            -­‐  Forms of cultural activism

            -­‐  Cultural “events” of precarity

            -­‐  Precarity and memory

            -­‐  The luxury of precarity? Whose precarity?

            -­‐  The aesthetization of precarity

            -­‐  Precarity and new forms of cultural production (i.e. the ‘creative industries’)

            -­‐  Precarization as constituent power

            -­‐  Precarity and new forms of local, regional or global ethics of ‘relationality’

            -­‐  A ‘geo-aesthetics’ of precarity 

 

The languages of the conference are English, French, and Italian.

Abstracts of about 200 words together with a brief biography should be sent before 09/20/2012 to the following two Email addresses: scontari@u-paris10.fr / M.M.Jansen@uu.nl  

Acceptance of proposals will be communicated by 10/15/2012. 

Scientific Project and Organization: Silvia Contarini (Paris Ouest Nanterre) and Monica Jansen (UtrechtUniversity).

In collaboration with: Luca Marsi and Christophe Mileschi (Université Paris Ouest Nanterre); Judith Revel (Université Paris 1) NWO partners: Vincenzo Binetti (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), Joost de Bloois (University of Amsterdam), Silvia Contarini (Université Paris Ouest, Nanterre La Défense), Frans-Willem Korsten (Leiden University/Erasmus University Rotterdam), Federico Luisetti (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill), Monica Jansen (Utrecht University).

Originally published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-to-have-the-courage-of-uncertainty.-cultures-of-precarity-nanterre-6-7-december-2012  

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

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Mediation

MEDIATIONS: VOLUME 25 NUMBER 1

‘Marx, Politics … and Punk’

Mediations 25.1 is out. The web site has some minor improvements, the PDF edition some major ones. If the links below don’t work, just navigate to mediationsjournal.org.

Please distribute widely!

MARX, POLITICS… AND PUNK

Volume 25, No. 1Fall 2010

Editors’ Note

Contributors

ARTICLES

Fredric Jameson: A New Reading of Capital

Is Capital about labor, or unemployment? Does Marxism have a theory of the political, or is it better off without one? Fredric Jameson previews the argument of his forthcoming book, Representing Capital.

Anna Kornbluh: On Marx’s Victorian Novel

As out of place as Marx himself might have been in Victorian England, Capital is less out of place than one might have thought among Victorian novels. But this does not have to mean that its mode of truth is literary. Anna Kornbluh explores the tropes that propel Capital in order to establish the novel relationship Marx produces between world and text.

Roland Boer: Marxism and Eschatology Reconsidered

The variations on the thesis of Marxism’s messianism are too many to count. But is it plausible to imagine that Marx or Engels took up Jewish or Christian eschatology, in any substantial form, into their thought? Roland Boer weighs the evidence.

Reiichi Miura: What Kind of Revolution Do You Want? Punk, the Contemporary Left, and Singularity

What does punk have to do with Empire? What does singularity have to do with identity? What does the logic of rock ‘n’ roll aesthetics have to do with a politics of representation? What does the concept of the multitude have to do with neoliberalism? The answer to all these questions, argues Reiichi Miura, is a lot more than you might think.

Alexei Penzin: The Soviets of the Multitude: On Collectivity and Collective Work: An Interview with Paolo Virno

One of the principle conundrums that confronts the theorization of the multitude is the relationship it entails between individual and collective. Alexei Penzin, of the collective Chto Delat / What Is To Be Done? Interviews Paolo Virno.

BOOK REVIEWS

Nataša Kovačević: New Money in the Old World: On Europe’s Neoliberal Disenchantment

What is left of the promise that was Europe? Does anything Utopian remain of the European project, or is it destined to become just another neoliberal power? Nataša Kovačević reviews Perry Anderson’s The New Old World.

Kevin Floyd: Queer Principles of Hope

In the “marketplace of ideas,” Marxism and queer studies are often presumed to be divergent and even opposed discourses. Contemporary work in both fields makes the case for a convergence. Kevin Floyd reviews José Esteban Muñoz’s Cruising Utoptia: The Then and There of Queer Futurity.

Madeleine Monson-Rosen: Under a Pink Flag

Is there a feminine relation to copyright in the contemporary period? Madeleine Monson-Rosen reviews Caren Irr’s Pink Pirates: Contemporary Women Writers and Copyright.

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Paolo Virno

PAOLO VIRNO ON ’THE TURMOIL AND THE THEORY OF EXODUS’ – LIVE STREAMING

Friday 18 March,
6pm GMT/ 7pm CET/ 1pm EST

Live Streaming: http://www.globalproject.info/it/produzioni
New Website: http://www.lumproject.org

::2011 Research Event::
The Virtue of Turmoil: the Revolt between Exodus and Revolution

In full swing of the systemic crisis of global capitalism, the debate among radical transformations is a living one. In fact, on the one hand the financial capitalism and transnational corporations do not accept any form of regulation and consider the crisis to be a structural condition to be viewed as part of the contemporary production of value. On the other hand, the parabola of Obama indicates that reformism has come to halt and neo-Keynesian receipts are blunt weapons. This situation causes a rise in social tension, above all in the old continent, where deflationist policies dragged by Central Bank and Germany hit with more harshness. For about one year now on both sides of the Mediterranean turmoil has been spreading. The protagonists of these movements are the young, students, precarious and migrants. This turmoil indicates a powerful resistance to austerity and raises the question concerning the project of transformation: what is the goal of metropolitan riot? Is the no-future issue enough to explain the passions and the discord that animate the revolts that are taking place from Rome to London, from Athens to Tunis, from Paris to Cairo?

The aim of the LUM cycle of seminars is to deal with these questions, starting from the assumption that the events of the last months have opened a new space of possibility, a space that must not be limited to the cheering narration of the “burned generation”, a generation that rebels against its parents. There is undoubtedly a gap in the future, a lack of job prospects as well as an existential void. There is however also a search for a new kind of politics, for a new way to qualify the transformation that is taking place in the revolts carried out by students and by the young. It is something that urgently questions life and language, social relations and knowledge, the line of colour and sexual difference.

But how can we articulate this research with the revolutionary theory and praxis that we have known and that has taken shape over the past two centuries? Does the desire to gain a monopoly on political decision, the state, lurk among the tumult that penetrates European markets? Does the violent breakthrough differ from the everyday construction of meaning that aims at creating new political institutions? Does the concept of exodus – on which critical thinking has focused on several occasions during the last years – take full account of the unprecedented relationship among turmoil and constitutional praxis?

In order to answer these questions the LUM cycle of seminars sets two goals:

a) To qualify a theoretical and political conceptual constellation able to deal with contemporary change: we will do this through a critical review of texts and political materials that have most informed the debate of movements over the past twenty years.

b) To focus the attention on some revolutionary historical events of the last two centuries, to trace the irreducible discontinuities concerning the present and also, on the contrary, the problematic knots that the great revolutionary experiences have exhibited and that still today remain unresolved.

Seminar Program: [All events will start at 6pm GTM]

1. Actuality of the Revolt (from Europe to the Maghreb, and Egypt) – Augusto Illuminati (Friday, 18th February)

2. On the Concept of Turmoil (in Machiavelli) – Gabriele Pedullà (Friday 4th March)

3. The Turmoil and the Theory of the Exodus – Paolo Virno (Friday 18th March)

4. The Revolution in Europe from 1848 to the Commons (through the political writings of Marx) – Paolo Vinci (Tuesday, 1st April)

5. Jacqueries and Political Institutions – Marco Bascetta (Friday 15th April)

6. 1968 and the Politics of Difference (through the political writings of Carla Lonzi) – Federica Giardini (Wednesday, 29th April)

7. “War Machine” and the Multitude – Francesco Raparelli and Alberto De Nicola (Friday 13th May)

8. Haiti and the Black Jacobins – Fred Moten and Laura Harris (Friday 20th May)

Info:
info@lumproject.org
http://www.lumproject.org
—–

LUM (Libera Università Metropolitana)
presenta:
Il tumulto e la teoria dell’esodo – Paolo Virno

Venerdì 18 marzo, ore 17
Presso Esc, atelier autogestito (via dei Volsci 159 – Roma)
Diretta streaming: http://www.globalproject.info/it/produzioni
Nuovo website: http://www.lumproject.org

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Books

REVIEWING BOOKS FOR HISTORICAL MATERIALISM

The journal Historical Materialism is looking for book reviewers.

Books to be Reviewed:

If you wish to review any of these books, or would like to propose other books for review, please write to a.toscano@gold.ac.uk 

Theodor W. Adorno, Current of Music (2009)

Chris Alden et al. (eds.), China Returns to Africa: A Rising Power and a Continent Embrace (2008)

Chris Alden, China in Africa (2007)

Bastian van Apeldoorn et al. (eds.), Contradictions and Limits of Neoliberal European Governance: From Lisbon to Lisbon (2009)

Paige Arthur, Unfinished Projects: Decolonization and the Philosophy of Jean-Paul Sartre (2010)

Maurizio Atzeni, Workplace Conflict: Mobilization and Solidarity in Argentina (2010)

Simon Baker, Surrealism, History and Revolution (2007)

Giorgio Baratta, Antonio Gramsci in contrappunto (2007)

Luciano Barca, Cronache dall’interno del vertice del PCI, 3 vols. (2005)

Andrew E. Barshay, The Social Sciences in Modern Japan: The Marxian and Modernist Traditions (2004)

Peter Beilharz, Socialism and Modernity (2009)

Daniel Bensaïd, Strategies of Resistance + ‘Who are the Trotskyists?’ (2009)

Olivier Besancenot and Michael Löwy, Che Guevara: His Revolutionary Legacy (2009)

Roland Boer and Jorunn Okland (eds.), Marxist Feminist Criticism of the Bible (2008)

Sergio Bologna, Ceti medi senza futuro? Scritti, appunti sul lavoro e altro (2007)

AA.VV. Condizioni e identità nel lavoro professionale. Riflessioni sul saggio di Sergio Bologna Ceti medi senza futuro? (2008)

Werner Bonefeld (ed.), Subverting the Present, Imagining the Future: Insurrection, Movement, Commons (2008)

Derek Boothman, Traducibilità e processi traduttivi. Un caso: A. Gramsci linguista (2004)

Philip Bounds, Orwell & Marxism: The Political and Cultural Thinking of George Orwell (2009)

Sarah Bracking, Money and Power: Great Predators in the Political Economy of Development (2009)

Peter Bratsis, Everyday Life and the State (2006)

Dennis Broe, Film Noir, American Workers, and Postwar Hollywood (2009)

Michael E. Brown, The Historiography of Communism (2009)

Alex Callinicos, Bonfire of Illusions: The Twin Crises of the Liberal World (2010)

Andrew Chitty and Martin McIvor, Karl Marx and Contemporary Philosophy (2009)

Mike Cole, Critical Race Theory and Education: A Marxist Response (2010)

Sam Coombes, The Early Sartre and Marxism (2008)

Cristina Corradi, Storia dei Marxismi in Italia (2005)

Sean Craven, Against the Spiritual Turn: Marxism, Realism and Critical Theory (2010)

Eric Leif Davin, Crucible of Freedom: Workers’ Democracy in the Industrial Heartland, 1914-1960 (2010)

Michael Decker, Tilling the Hateful Earth: Agricultural Production in the Late Antique East (2009)

Nick Dyer-Witheford and Greig de Peuter, Games of Empire: Global Capitalism and Video Games (2009)

Terry Eagleton and Matthew Beaumont, The Task of the Critic: Terry Eagleton in Dialogue (2009)

Stuart Elden, Terror and Territory: The Spatial Extent of Sovereignty (2009)

Ben Fine, Theories of Social Capital: Researchers Behaving Badly (2010)

Roberto Fineschi, Un nuovo Marx. Filologia e interpretazione dopo la nuova edizione storico-critica (Mega 2) (2008)

Maurice Godelier, In and Out of the West (2009)

Jane Hardy, Poland’s New Capitalism (2009)

David Harvey, A Companion to Marx’s Capital (2010)

David Harvey, The Enigma of Capital (2010)

Wang Hui, The End of the Revolution: China and the Limits of Modernity (2009)

Mobo Gao, The Battle for China’s Past: Mao & the Cultural Revolution (2008)

Richard H. Immerman, Empire for Liberty: A History of American Imperialism from Benjamin Franklin to Paul Wolfowitz (2010)

Ken Jones et al. Schooling in Western Europe: The New Order and its Adversaries (2008) 

Paul R. Josephson, Would Trotsky Wear a Bluetooth? Technological Utopianism Under Socialism, 1917-1989 (2010)

Ray Kiely, Rethinking Imperialism (2010)

John Milios and Dimitris P. Sotiropoulos, Rethinking Imperialism: A Study of Capitalist Rule (2009)

David Laibman, Deep History: A Study in Social Evolution and Human Potential (2007)

Luca La Rovere, Storia dei Guf (2003) and L’Eredità del fascismo (2008)

Gianpasquale Santomassimo, La terza via fascista. Il mito del corporativismo (2006)

Tommaso Baris, Il fascismo in provincia (2007)

Loreto Di Nucci, Lo Stato-partito del fascismo. Genesi, evoluzione e crisi, 1919-1943 (2009)

Domenico Losurdo, Marx e il bilancio storico del Novecento (2009)

Manning Marable, Beyond Black & White, 2nd ed (2009)

Marco Maurizi, Adorno e il tempo del non-identico (2004)

George E. McCarthy, Dreams in Exile: Rediscovering Science and Ethics in Nineteenth-Century Social Theory (2009)

Terrence McDonough et al. (eds.), Contemporary Capitalism and its Crises: Social Structure of Accumulation Theory for the 21st Century (2010)

Patrick McGee, Theory and the Common from Marx to Badiou (2009)

Jim McGuigan, Cool Capitalism (2009)

István Mészáros, The Challenge and Burden of Historical Time: Socialism in the Twenty-First Century (2008)

Claire Metelits, Inside Insurgency: Violence, Civilians, and Revolutionary Group Behavior (On the Front Lines with the FARC, SPLA, and PKK) (2010)

Andrew Milner (ed.), Tenses of Imagination: Raymond Williams on Science Fiction, Utopia and Dystopia (2010)

Sandra Moog and Rob Stones (eds), Nature, Social Relations and Human Needs: Essays in Honour of Ted Benton (2009)

Rosalind C. Morris (ed.), Can the Subaltern Speak? Reflections on the History of an Idea (2010)

Jerry Z. Muller, Capitalism and the Jews (2010)

Antonio Negri, The Labor of Job: The Biblical Text as a Parable of Human Labor (2009)

Jose Neves, Comunismo e Nacionalismo em Portugal. Politica, Cultura e Historia no Seculo XX (2008)

Aldo Pardi, Il sintomo e la rivoluzione. Georges Politzer crocevia tra due epoche (2007)

David Parker (ed.), Ideology, Absolutism and the English Revolution: Debates of the British Communist Historians, 1940-1956 (2008)

Elizabeth J. Perry, Patrolling the Revolution: Worker Militias, Citizenship, and the Modern Chinese State (2006)

Colloque de Cerisy. La Philosophie Déplacée. Autour de Jacques Rancière (2006)

Jonah Raskin, The Mythology of Imperialism: A Revolutionary Critique of British Literature and Society in the Modern Age, new ed. (2009)

Ferruccio Rossi-Landi, Ideologia (2005)

Andrew Sartori, Bengal in Global Concept History: Culturalism in the Age of Capital (2008)

Simon Skempton, Alienation After Derrida (2010)

Kate Soper et al. (eds.), The Politics and Pleasures of Consuming Differently (2009)

Marc Stears, Demanding Democracy: American Radicals in Search of a New Politics (2010)

Simon Stewart, Culture and the Middle Classes (2010)

Yvette Taylor, Classed Intersections: Spaces, Selves, Knowledges (2010)

Kenneth Surin, Freedom Not Yet: Liberation and the Next World Order (2009)

Leila Simona Talani (ed.), The Global Crash: Towards a New Global Financial Regime? (2010)

Hiroshi Uchida (ed.), Marx for the 21st Century (2006)

Paolo Virno, Multitude Between Innovation and Negation (2008)

Sheldon S. Wolin, Democracy Inc.: Managed Democracy and the Specter of Inverted Totalitarianism (2010)

Mark P. Worrell, Dialectic of Solidarity: Labor, Antisemitism and the Frankfurt School (2008)

Li Xing (ed.) The Rise of China and the Capitalist World Order (2010)

Update 6th July 2010 – Revised List

At: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/books-for-review/books-to-be-reviewed/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Polygraph 21

Polygraph 21

POLYGRAPH 21

 

Study, Students, Universities

Issue Editors: Luka Aarsenjuk and Michelle Koerner

Introduction: Available as a PDF file, Luka Arsenjuk and Michelle Koerner

Creating Commons: Divided Governance, Participatory Management, and Struggles Against Enclosure in the University, Isaac Kamola and Eli Meyerhoff

Surplus Knowledge; or, Can We Teach Today? Juliet Flower MacCannell

Destinies of the University, Alessandro Russo, Translated by Roberta Orlandini

Risky Business: Why Public Is Losing to Private in American Research, Christopher Newfield

The Financialization of Student Life: Five Propositions on Student Debt, Morgan Adamson

Axiomatic Equality: Jacques Rancière and the Politics of Contemporary Education, Nina Power

A ‘Nueva Politicidad’, A Different Epistemology: An Introduction to ‘Colectivo Situaciones’ and ‘Universidad Trashumante’, Beatriz Llenin-Figueroa

An Elephant at School and Other Texts, Colectivo Situaciones, Translated by Beatriz Llenin-Figueroa

Walking the Other Country: Reflections on ‘Trashumancia’ and Popular Education, Universidad Trashumante, Translated by Beatriz Llenin-Figueroa

On Study: A ‘Polygraph’ Roundtable Discussion with Marc Bousquet, Stefano Harney, and Fred Moten, Available as a PDF file.

Universities in France: Forty Years After May ’68, Renaud Bécot, Translated by Justin Izzo

The Gated Campus, Its Borderless Subjects, and the Neighborhood Nearby, Gökçe Günel, Books in Review

Marc Bousquet, How the University Works: Higher Education and the Low-Wage Nation (2008), Available as a PDF file, Review by Gerry Canavan

Antonio Negri, The Porcelain Workshop: For a New Grammar of Politics (2008); Paolo Virno, Multitude: Between Innovation and Negation (2008); Christian Marazzi, Capital and Language: From the New Economy to the War Economy (2008), Review by Alex Greenberg

John R. Betz, After Enlightenment: The Post-Secular Vision of J. G. Hamann (2009), Review by Lucas Perkins

‘Polygraph’ 21 is at: http://www.duke.edu/web/polygraph/poly21.html

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Nihilism

Nihilism

THE ITALIAN DIFFERENCE: BETWEEN NIHILISM AND BIOPOLITICS

 

The Italian Difference: Between Nihilism and Biopolitics

Lorenzo Chiesa and Alberto Toscano (eds.)

Price: $35.00 AUD; $25.00 USD; £16.00 GBP

ISBN-13: 978-0-9805440-7-7

ISBN-ebook: 978-0-9806665-4-0

Publication date: July 2009

Pages: 180

Format: 216×140 mm (5.5×8.5 in) Paperback

Series: ‘Transmission’

Download book as PDF (Open Access): http://www.re-press.org/content/view/66/38/

Description

This volume brings together essays by different generations of Italian thinkers which address, whether in affirmative, problematizing or genealogical registers, the entanglement of philosophical speculation and political proposition within recent Italian thought. Nihilism and biopolitics, two concepts that have played a very prominent role in theoretical discussions in Italy, serve as the thematic foci around which the collection orbits, as it seeks to define the historical and geographical particularity of these notions as well their continuing impact on an international debate. The volume also covers the debate around ‘weak thought’ (pensiero debole), the feminist thinking of sexual difference, the re-emergence of political anthropology and the question of communism. The contributors provide contrasting narratives of the development of post-war Italian thought and trace paths out of the theoretical and political impasses of the present—against what Negri, in the text from which the volume takes its name, calls ‘the Italian desert’.

Contents

Antonio Negri, ‘The Italian Difference’

Pier Aldo Rovatti, ‘Foucault Docet’

Gianni Vattimo, ‘Nihilism as Emancipation’

Roberto Esposito, ‘Community and Nihilism’

Matteo Mandarini, ‘Beyond Nihilism: Notes towards a Critique of Left-Heideggerianism in Italian Philosophy of the 1970s’

Luisa Muraro, ‘The Symbolic Independence from Power’

Mario Tronti, ‘Towards a Critique of Political Democracy’

Alberto Toscano, ‘Chronicles of Insurrection: Tronti, Negri and the Subject of Antagonism’

Paolo Virno, ‘Natural-Historical Diagrams: The ‘New Global’ Movement and the Biological Invariant’

Lorenzo Chiesa, ‘Giorgio Agamben’s Franciscan Ontology’

Authors, editors and contributors: Lorenzo Chiesa and Alberto Toscano

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk