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Harvesting

NATURE INC? QUESTIONING THE MARKET PANACEA IN ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND CONSERVATION

The Second Call for Papers for a conference next year 30 June – 2 July on Nature™ Inc? Questioning the Market Panacea in Environmental Policy and Conservation.

Please consider sending in an abstract, and/or send it on to your networks

Second Call for Papers
Nature™ Inc? Questioning the Market Panacea in Environmental Policy and Conservation

International Conference
30 June – 2 July 2011
ISS, The Hague, The Netherlands

Special guests:  Amita Baviskar (IEG, Delhi University), Nancy Peluso (University of California, Berkeley), Fander Falconi (FLACSO, Former Foreign Minister, Ecuador) and Ton Dietz (University of Leiden)

Nature is dead. Long live Nature™ Inc.! This adagio inspires many environmental policies today. In order to respond to the many environmental problems the world is facing, new and innovative methods are necessary, or so it is argued, and markets are posited as the ideal vehicle to supply these. Indeed, market forces have been finding their way into environmental policy and conservation to a degree that seemed unimaginable only a decade ago. Payments for ecosystem services, biodiversity derivatives and new conservation finance mechanisms, species banking, carbon trade and conservation 2.0 are just some of the market mechanisms that have taken a massive flight in popularity in recent years, despite, or perhaps because of the recent ‘Great Financial Crisis’.

The conference seeks to critically engage with the market panacea in environmental policy and conservation in the context of histories and recent developments in neoliberal capitalism. The conference is steeped in traditions of political economy and political ecology, in order to arrive at a deeper understanding of where environmental policies and conservation in an age of late capitalism come from, are going and what effects they have on natures and peoples.

‘Nature™ Inc’ follows a successful recent conference in Lund, Sweden, in May 2010 and several earlier similar initiatives that have shown the topic to be of great interest to academics, policy-makers and civil society. The present conference is thus meant not only to deepen and share critical knowledge on market-based environmental policies and practices and nature-society relations more generally, but also to strengthen and widen the networks enabling this objective.

 Topics include but are not limited to:
   • General trends in market-based environmental policies and instruments
   • New forms of neoliberal conservation (including web 2.0, species banking, etc)
   • Agro-food systems, the meat-industrial complex, and aquaculture
   • Agro-fuels, energy and climate change
   • The relation between conservation and land (including protected areas, etc.)
   • Financialisation of the environment
   • New social, environmental and peasant movements and left alternatives
   • Accumulation by dispossession, property regimes, and the “new” enclosures
   • Ecological imperialisms, including the recent ‘land grabs’
   • Urban and rural political ecologies and the links between them
   • Theoretical advancements in nature-society relations

Paper proposals are due 15 December 2010. Please send a 250-300 word proposal, with title, contact information, and three keywords as a Word attachment to: nature2011@iss.nl. Proposals for complete panels are welcome.

Conference language is English. Authors will be notified by 15 January 2011. Complete papers are due by 1 April, 2011. More information on: http://www.iss.nl/nature2011 and http://www.worldecologyresearch.org  
 
Organization
The conference is organized by the Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam, together with the University of Manchester and the University of Queensland.

Conference organizing committee (OC): Bram Büscher, Murat Arsel, Lorenzo Pellegrini, Max Spoor (ISS, Erasmus University, the Netherlands) Wolfram Dressler (University of Queensland, Australia) Dan Brockington (SERG, Manchester University, UK)

Conference advisory committee (AC): Ben White (ISS, Erasmus University) Patrick Bond (University of KwaZulu Natal) Sian Sullivan (Birkbeck College) Jason W. Moore (Umeå University) Blessing J Karumbidza (Socio-Economic Rights Institute, South Africa) Eric Swyngedouw (SERG, Manchester University) Noel Castree (SERG, Manchester University) Rosaleen Duffy (SERG, Manchester University) Holly Buck (Lund University) Scott Prudham (University of Toronto) Jun Borras (ISS, Erasmus University) Dean Bavington (Nipissing University) Mark Hudson (University of Manitoba)
Jim Igoe (Dartmouth College) Dhoya Snijders (VU University Amsterdam) Caroline Seagle (VU University Amsterdam) Diana C. Gildea (Lund University) Christian Alarcon Ferrari (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences) Katja Neves (Concordia University) Roldan Muradian (Nijmegen University)

 ———————————————
Dr. Bram Büscher
Lecturer in Environment & Sustainable Development
International Institute of Social Studies
Erasmus University
Kortenaerkade 12
2518 AX The Hague
The Netherlands
T +31 (0)70 4260 596
buscher@iss.nl
http://www.iss.nl/buscher

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

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Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Capitalism

THE POINT IS TO CHANGE IT

Antipode
Volume 41, Issue 1, 2010

Online ISSN: 1467-8330 Print ISSN: 0066-4812

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/123329956/issue

Journal compilation © 2010 Editorial Board of Antipode

Introduction

1-9
Introduction: The Point Is To Change It
Noel Castree, Paul Chatterton, Nik Heynen, Wendy Larner, Melissa W. Wright
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00713.x

Original Articles

10-26
Now and Then1
Michael J. Watts
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00714.x

27-49
The Idea of Socialism: From 1968 to the Present-day Crisis
Hugo Radice
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00715.x

50-65
The Revolutionary Imperative
Neil Smith
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00716.x

66-93
To Make Live or Let Die? Rural Dispossession and the Protection of Surplus Populations
Tania Murray Li
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00717.x

94-116
Postneoliberalism and its Malcontents
Jamie Peck, Nik Theodore, Neil Brenner
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00718.x

117-141
D/developments after the Meltdown
Gillian Hart
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00719.x

142-165
Is the Globalization Consensus Dead?
Robert Wade
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00720.x

166-184
The Uses of Neoliberalism
James Ferguson
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00721.x

185-213
Crisis, Continuity and Change: Neoliberalism, the Left and the Future of Capitalism
Noel Castree
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00722.x

214-238
Money Games: Currencies and Power in the Contemporary World Economy
John Agnew
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00723.x

239-261
Pre-Black Futures
Katharyne Mitchell
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00724.x

262-280
The Shape of Capitalism to Come
Paul Cammack
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00725.x

281-297
Who Counts? Dilemmas of Justice in a Postwestphalian World
Nancy Fraser
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00726.x

298-319
The Communist Hypothesis and Revolutionary Capitalisms: Exploring the Idea of Communist Geographies for the Twenty-first Century
Erik Swyngedouw
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00727.x

320-346
An Economic Ethics for the Anthropocene
J. K. Gibson Graham, Gerda Roelvink
Abstract
Published Online: 25 Mar 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-8330.2009.00728.x

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Feelbad Britain

FEELBAD BRITAIN DISCUSSIONS

London: Wednesday 6 May, 6.45-9pm Staff Café (Tower Building) London Metropolitan University, 166-220 Holloway Road, N7
Speakers: Pat Devine, Angela McRobbie, Kate Soper, Martin Jacques (discussant)  

Manchester: Wednesday 29 April 6-7.30pm Blackwell’s Bookshop, The Precinct Centre, Oxford Road, M13
Speakers: Pat Devine, Jules Townshend (discussant)

FEELBAD BRITAIN: HOW TO MAKE IT BETTER is edited by Pat Devine, Andrew Pearmain and David Purdy and published by Lawrence & Wishart, London.

The central thesis of Feelbad Britain is that after the decades of neoliberalism the institutions and social relations on which solidarity, trust and citizenship depend have been undermined. This has left contemporary British society in a troubled and dysfunctional state, without the cohesion or confidence needed if we are to escape from recession, combat climate change and restore faith in government.
The authors put forward a theoretical framework for understanding contemporary politics; and they consider what is to be done to revitalise the British left, challenge neoliberal hegemony, and develop a political project aimed at creating a greener, fairer, happier, more democratic and less divided Britain.

Contributors: The editors, plus Patrick Ainley, Martin Allen, David Beetham, Noel Castree, Angela McRobbie, Linda Patterson,  Michael Prior, Kate Soper

More information on the book at: http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/books/archive/feelbad_britain.html
More information on meetings: sally@lwbooks.co.uk

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk