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Postcolonial

Postcolonial

POSTCOLONIAL THEORY AND THE SPECTRE OF CAPITAL

Vivek Chibber, Professor of Sociology at New York University (NYU) and the author of Locked in Place: State-Building and Late Industrialization in India (2003), will present his new book at SOAS on: Thursday 17 October, 7pm, SOAS main building, DLT (G2).

Chair: Gilbert Achcar, Development Studies

From the book’s back cover:

Postcolonial theory has become enormously influential as a framework for understanding the Global South. It is also a school of thought popular because of its rejection of the supposedly universalizing categories of the Enlightenment. In this devastating critique, mounted on behalf of the radical Enlightenment tradition, Vivek Chibber offers the most comprehensive response yet to postcolonial theory. Focusing on the hugely popular Subaltern Studies project, Chibber shows that its foundational arguments are based on a series of analytical and historical misapprehensions. He demonstrates that it is possible to affirm a universalizing theory without succumbing to Eurocentrism or reductionism.

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/postcolonial-theory-and-the-spectre-of-capital-with-vivek-chibber-soas-17-october

 

**END**

 

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Egypt

THE MYTH OF HUMANITARIAN WAR

International Socialist Review: http://isreview.org/
Issue 77: May–June

The Myth of Humanitarian War

Lance Selfa 
Libya’s revolution, U.S. intervention, and the left

Michael Corcoran and Stephen Maher 
Hypocrisy, ideology, and imperialism 
The myth of humanitarian intervention inLibya

Lee Wengraf 
Somalia’s Operation Restore Hope, 1992-1994 
How an ostensible “humanitarian” operation made things worse

Roger Annis and Kim Ives 
Haiti’s humanitarian crisis 
Haiti’s crisis is rooted in a history of military coups andU.S. occupations

Learning from Wisconsin

Phil Gasper • Critical Thinking 
Class Struggle in Wisconsin 
Signs of the end of a one-sided class war?

Lee Sustar 
Lessons of Wisconsin’s labor revolt

Other features

Mostafa Omar 
Egypt’s unfinished revolution 
The dictator is gone‹and the battle begins over how far the revolution will go

Chris Williams 
The case against nuclear power 
In the shadow of a still-unfolding nuclear crisis inJapan, an argument for why nuclear power should be dismantled everywhere

Arundhati Roy, interviewed by David Barsamian 
Rebellion and revolt in India

Duncan Hallas 
The nature of revolutions 
Speech to a socialist conference in 1998

Reviews

Lee Sustar 
What are the roots of capitalist crisis? 
Review of Chris Harman’s Zombie Capitalism

Hadas Thier 
Roots of Egypt’s revolution 
Review of Egypt: The Moment of Change

PLUS: Sharon Smith on voices of U.S. labor, Jason Farbman review’s From Rebellion to Reform in Bolivia; Natalia Tylim reviews The Millenium trilogy; Elizabeth Schulte reviews The Triangle Fire; Gary Lapon reviews The History of White People

 

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The Island

DECOLONIZATION IN THE THIRD WORLD: CHALLENGES, HOPES AND LIMITATIONS

International Conference
Lucienne-Cnockaert Chair and the Department of History, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada)
17-18 November 2011

CALL FOR PAPERS
_______________

In Africa, Latin America and Asia, the end of European colonial domination is a period of particular interest as it leads, almost invariably, to a new era characterized by uncertainty and the unknown. Upon achieving independence, previously colonized countries are often confronted with unprecedented cultural, ideological and political upheaval. This is usually indicative of an effort to exorcise the country’s colonial heritage, to rebuild the nation, and to look for ways and means of renewing the culture and social and economic development. The management of independence in the new Third World countries deals not only with which ideological model is best for the development of the nation, but also with establishing proactive socio-cultural, educational and economic policies. These policies are meant to build or re-build societies and nation-states, and to re-establish national identity, as well as combat the inequality and economic under-development inherent to colonialism. However, it would seem that despite important changes and significant results, postcolonial policies must contend with a number of limitations due, in part, to the persistence of prior dependence, to the nature of the political regimes in place and to new forms of economic dependence.

In consideration of the fiftieth anniversary of the decolonization of several African countries, the Lucienne-Cnockaert Research Chair in Modern History of European and Africa will be holding a conference entitled “Decolonization in the Third World: Challenges, Hopes and Limitations” on 17-18 November 2011. This conference will be an opportunity to study the magnitude and complexity of the responsibilities and challenges, and the various administrative paths chosen by the post-colonial societies of Africa, Asia and Latin America.

The aim of this conference is first and foremost to examine the objectives and challenges of cultural, educational and economic reforms in the Third World after attaining independence. Researchers will be invited to examine the nature of interracial and inter-religious relations, as well as the role of minority groups and demographically diverse populations (women, youth, ethnic groups, descendents of colonizers, regional groups, etc.) in the process of identity-building and socio-economic development within the new nation-states. A critical evaluation of the various reforms undertaken in postcolonial societies will allow researchers to take note of their limitations and their success, however limited the latter may appear to be. Finally, particular attention will be given to the various types of relations established between Third World countries and the Western world as a whole, and with international organizations and institutions such as UNESCO, the UN, the IMF, the Francophonie and the Commonwealth.

We welcome conference proposals touching upon the following themes:
– Cultural and economic aspects of colonialism
– Discourses and intellectual trajectories of the leaders of  independence movements
– The meaning of national symbols: national anthems, mottos and flags
– The nature of the postcolonial State and the ideologies of independence
– Cultural policies established in order to restore a national identity
– Relationships between native populations and the descendents of colonizers
– Policies respecting women and/or minorities
– Studies of particular concepts or ideologies (pan-Africanism, pan-Asianism, non-alignment, post- colonialism, socialism, etc.)
– Management of regional, ethnic and religious diversity
– Economic planning and development
– Neo-colonialism and international relationships between North and South
– International relationships amongst the South
– Interventions of the IMF and the World Bank: challenges and results
– Memories of independence

Researchers, professors and students interested in participating in this conference are invited to send proposals approximately 300 words in length before 1st March 2011.

Registration fees for this conference are $150 CAD. Travel and accommodation expenses may be reimbursed depending on funding received from granting agencies.

Please send proposals along with a brief CV by email to Professor Patrick Dramé: patrick.drame@usherbrooke.ca
http://www.pages.usherbrooke.ca/lucienne-cnockaert/

The conference will take place at the Université de Sherbrooke on 17-18 November 2011. Papers and presentations may be in either French or English.

Program Committee:
Patrick DRAMÉ, History Departments, Université de Sherbrooke and Bishop’s University
Élikia M’BOKOLO, École des Hautes Études en Sciences sociales, Paris
Samir SAUL, History Department, Université de Montréal
Muriel GOMEZ-PEREZ, History Department, Université Laval
Magali DELEUZE, History Department, Royal Military College, Kingston
Ibrahima THIOUB, History Department, Université de Dakar
Christopher GOSCHA, History Department, Université du Québec à Montréal
Maurice DEMERS, History Department, Université de Sherbrooke
Jean-Bruno MUKANYA KANINDA-MUANA, History Department, Université de Montréal

Organizing Committee:
Patrick DRAMÉ, History Department, Université de Sherbrooke
Muriel GOMEZ-PEREZ, History Department, Université Laval
Magali DELEUZE, History Department, Royal Military College, Kingston
Pascal SCALLON-CHOUINARD, Ph.D. candidate, Université de Sherbrooke
Maxime LANDRY-VALLÉE, Graduate student, Université de Sherbrooke
Alexander MAJOR, Graduate student, Université de Sherbrooke

Contact:
Pascal Scallon-Chouinard
Université de Sherbrooke
Email: Pascal.Scallon-Chouinard@USherbrooke.ca
Web: http://pages.usherbrooke.ca/lucienne-cnockaert/index.php?id=2

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Economic Crisis

DEBT, THE IMF, AND THE WORLD BANK: SIXTY QUESTIONS, SIXTY ANSWERS

Debt, the IMF, and the World Bank: Sixty Questions, Sixty Answers
By Éric Toussaint and Damien Millet

Translated by Judith Abdel Gadir, Elizabeth Anne, Vicki Briault, Judith Harris, Brian Hunt, Christine Pagnoulle and Diren Valayden, with the collaboration of Francesca Denley, Virginie de Romanet and Stephanie Jacquemont

http://www.monthlyreview.org/books/sixtyquestions.php

ISBN: 978-1-58367-222-8
$17.95 paperback
368 pages
September 2010

Economics / Imperialism & War

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“This excellent handbook on the Washington-based international financial institutions and the debt mechanism by means of which the Global South is subjugated is not only an indispensable tool for pro-poor anti-debt activists, but also a very useful synthesis that can and should be used in classrooms.” —Gilbert Achcar, Professor of Development Studies School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London.

“Éric Toussaint is one of the brightest and most influential economists of his generation. He is the founder of the CADTM, and has gained a worldwide reputation for his exemplary struggle against the ‘odious debt’ strangling countless countries in the South.” —Jean Ziegler, former UN Special Rapporteur

Mainstream economists tell us that developing countries will replicate the economic achievements of the rich countries if they implement the correct “free-market” policies. But scholars and activists Toussaint and Millet demonstrate that this is patently false. Drawing on a wealth of detailed evidence, they explain how developed economies have systematically and deliberately exploited the less-developed economies by forcing them into unequal trade and political relationships. Integral to this arrangement are the international economic institutions ostensibly created to safeguard the stability of the global economy—the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank —and the imposition of massive foreign debt on poor countries. The authors explain in simple language, and ample use of graphics, the multiple contours of this exploitative system, its history, and how it continues to function in the present day.

Ultimately, Toussaint and Millet advocate cancellation of all foreign debt for developing countries and provide arguments from a number of perspectives—legal, economic, moral. Presented in an accessible and easily-referenced question and answer format, Debt, the IMF, and the World Bank is an essential tool for the global justice movement.

Éric Toussaint, a doctor in political science, is president of the Committee for the Abolition of Third World Debt, CADTM Belgium. He is author of A Diagnosis of Emerging Global Crisis and Alternatives, and The World Bank: A Critical Primer, among other books.

Damien Millet teaches mathematics and is spokesperson for CADTM France. He is the author of L’Afrique sans dette, and co-author with Éric Toussaint of Tsunami Aid or Debt Cancellation.

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Rosa Luxemburg

ROSA LUXEMBURG AND THE CRITIQUE OF POLITICAL ECONOMY

Rosa Luxemburg and the Critique of Political Economy
Edited by Riccardo Bellofiore

This book analyzes the important contributions of Rosa Luxemburg to economic theory as well as devoting some space to her background as a left social-democratic politician and her personality.

The book’s main focus of attention is the theory of capitalist development and the theory of the crash, but its connection with the theory of value, the theory of the monetary circuit, the theory of distribution and the theory of international finance are also explored.

The contributors to the volume come from different theoretical perspectives, both from within and outside the Marxian tradition – Post-Keynesians, Kaleckians and Circuitists are all included.

Table of Contents

Rosa Luxemburg and the Critique of Political Economy, edited by Riccardo Bellofiore, Routledge Studies in the History of Economics, Routledge: Thirteen papers discuss Rosa Luxemburg’s contribution to Marxian critical political economy.

Papers explore:

Rosa Luxemburg’s on capitalist dynamics, distribution and effective demand crises (Riccardo Bellofiore);

Luxemburg’s critique of Karl Marx’s schemes of reproduction–a re-evaluation and a possible generalization (Meghnad Desai and Roberto Veneziani);

Where does the money and demand come from?–Rosa Luxemburg and the Marxian reproduction schema (Andrew B. Trigg);

The monetary circuit of capital in the Anti-Critique (Riccardo Bellofiore);

Late Marx and Luxemburg–opening a development within political economy (Paul Zarembka);

Rosa Luxemburg and finance (Jan Toporowski);

Economics, politics, and crisis theory–Luxemburg, Bukharin, and Grossmann on the limits of capital (Paul Mattick);

Luxemburg’s and Kalecki’s theories and visions of capitalist dynamics (Tadeusz Kowalik);

Imperialism today (Joseph Halevi);

Rosa Luxemburg on imperialism–some issues of substance and method (Roberto Veneziani);

Rosa Luxemburg’s The Accumulation of Capital: East and West (He Ping);

A very political political economist– Rosa Luxemburg’s theory of wages (Michael R. Kraetke);

Rosa Luxemburg on trade unions and the party–the polemics with Kautsky and Lenin—an assessment (Andrea Panaccione); and

Luxemburg–the woman, the revolutionary (Edoarda Masi).

Index

Riccardo Bellofiore is Professor of Political Economy at the University of Bergamo and Research Associate with the Centre for the History and Methodology of Economics at the University of Amsterdam.

June 2009: 216pp | Hardback: 978-0-415-40570-6 £70.00 DISCOUNTED PRICE: £56.00 €66.00

For more information visit: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415405706/

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Socialism and Hope

INTERNATIONAL SOCIALIST REVIEW 72

ISSUE 72:
July-August 2010

¡Todos Somos Arizona!

Letter from the editors

http://www.isreview.org/index.shtml

ANALYSIS IN BRIEF

Sharon Smith
Laws that need breaking: It’s impossible to avoid comparing Arizona today to the South in the era of Jim Crow

PLUS: plus Nicole Colson on abortion rights in peril; Giles Ji Ungpakorn on the Red Shirt revolt in Thailand; John Pilger on the modern class war in Greece

COLUMN

Phil Gasper • Critical thinking

Economic crisis and class struggle: Are recessions better for the left or the right?

FEATURES

Orlando Sepúlveda
¡Todos somos Arizona!
The revival of the immigrant rights movement since the passage of SB1070

Noam Chomsky, interviewed by David Barsamian
The new imperialism

Tikva Honig-Parnass
Apartheid Israel and the contradictions of left Zionism

Dave Zirin
Women, gender, and sports

Eric Kerl
Contemporary anarchism

Chris Williams
Marxism and the environment
The real track record, from Marx and Engels to the Bolsheviks and beyond: An excerpt from the New Ecology and Socialism

Frances Fox Piven
The working class in the Great Depression
A celebrated left sociologist introduces new editions of Irving Bernstein’s The Lean Years and The Turbulent Years

BOOK REVIEWS

Michael Steven Smith and Paul Le Blanc
Learning from a revolutionary
Review of Peter Camejo’s memoir, North Star

Sherry Wolf
Are men really better athletes?
Review of Playing with the Boys: Why Separate is Not Equal

PLUS: Greg Love on the business of capturing and transporting Africans to be slaves; Ashley Smith on Dilip Hiro’s After Empire: Helen Redmond on why surgical errors are no accident; Paul D’Amato on Lenin’s Marxism

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Globalization

 

DEVELOPMENT AND GLOBALIZATION: A MARXIAN ANALYSIS

A new book by David F Ruccio

 
    • Price: £29.99 £26.99
    • Binding/Format: Paperback
    • ISBN: 978-0-415-77226-6
    • Publish Date: 28th September 2010
    • Imprint: Routledge
    • Pages: 320 pages

Series: Economics as Social Theory

Details at: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415772266/

Since the mid-1980s, David F. Ruccio has been developing a new framework of Marxian class analysis and applying it to various issues in socialist planning, Third World development, and capitalist globalization. The aim of this collection is to show, through a series of concrete examples, how Marxian class analysis can be used to challenge existing modes of thought and to produce new insights about the problems of capitalist development and the possibilities of imagining and creating non-capitalist economies.

The book consists of fifteen essays, plus an introductory chapter situating the author’s work in a larger intellectual and political context. The topics covered range from planning theory to the role of the state in the Nicaraguan Revolution, from radical theories of underdevelopment to the Third World debt crisis, and from a critical engagement with regulation theory to contemporary discussions of globalization and imperialism.

Foreword Stephen Resnick and Richard Wolff

Introduction

1. Rethinking Planning, Globalization, and Development from a Marxian Perspective Planning

2. Essentialism and Socialist Economic Planning: A Methodological Critique of Optimal Planning Theory

3. Planning and Class in Transitional Societies

4. The State and Planning in Nicaragua 
5. Nicaragua: The State, Class, and Transition Development

6. Radical Theories of Development: Frank, the Modes of Production School, and Amin

7. The Costs of Austerity in Nicaragua: The Worker-Peasant Alliance, 1979-1987

8. When Failure Becomes Success: Class and the Debate over Stabilization and Adjustment

9. Power and Class: The Contribution of Radical Approaches to Debt and Development

10. Capitalism and Industrialization in the Third World: Recognizing the Costs and Imagining Alternatives

11. ‘After’ Development: Reimagining Economy and Class

12. Reading Harold: Class Analysis, Capital Accumulation, and the Role of the Intellectual in Globalization

13. Fordism on a World Scale: International Dimensions of Regulation

14. Class Beyond the Nation-State

15. Global Fragments: Subjectivity and Class Politics in Discourses of Globalization

16. Globalization and Imperialism

David F. Ruccio is Professor of Economics at the University of Notre Dame, USA and past editor of the journal Rethinking Marxism.

Observations and Comments on Development and Globalization: A Marxian Analysis

Development, and Globalization is anti-essentialist social theory at its very best. Whether re-reading socialist planning debates, economic and social development struggles in the global South, or capitalist and alter-capitalist theories of globalization, David Ruccio engages the contemporary conjuncture in fresh and exciting ways, demonstrating throughout the successes of the rethinking Marxism project and the immense potential and range of contemporary Marxian analysis. What Maurice Dobb did for twentieth-century critiques of socialist planning, capitalist development, and imperialist expansion, Ruccio redoubles for a new age of post-Communist and globalized political economy — John Pickles, Earl N. Phillips Distinguished Professor of International Studies and Chair of the Department of Geography, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and author of A History of Spaces: Cartographic Reason, Mapping, and the Geo-Coded World

David Ruccio is a central figure in the exciting and innovative “postmodern” school of Marxian thought. Through his own writing and his stewardship of the journal Rethinking Marxism he has contributed immensely to this tradition. In this collection, Ruccio draws together, sharpens, and extends central insights from that school of thought and applies them to debates over socialist planning, economic development, and globalization. The essays demonstrate the depth of Ruccio’s intellect and the range of his expertise, to be sure, while also conveying the power of the postmodern Marxian tradition in helping us to overcome the malaise that now affects much contemporary left scholarship about prospects for radical reform in the Global South. In Ruccio’s hands, Marxism emerges as a vibrant tradition that continues to generate new avenues of scholarship and practical politics in pursuit of a more just world. — George DeMartino, Josef Korbel School of International Studies, University of Denver and author of Global Economy, Global Justice: Theoretical and Policy Alternatives to Neoliberalism

Whether one agrees or not with the basic premises and analysis of this book, it will provide an intellectual challenge to everyone. Focusing on issues related to planning, development and globalization, particularly in Latin America, Ruccio questions the prevailing wisdom in circles of both the Right and the Left. His privileging of class analysis provides the unifying thread to the wide variety of themes covered in the sixteen chapters. In our post-crisis search for new economic thinking and alternatives for social transformation, Ruccio’s book comes at a perfect time to contribute to the debates. — Lourdes Beneria, Cornell University and author of Gender, Development, and Globalization: Economics as if All People Mattered

Pathbreaking in its originality and breathtaking in its coverage, the truly outstanding volume David Ruccio has delivered is indispensable in critiquing a variety of prevailing developmental paradigms. Rather than simplistically noting the ‘failures’ of capitalism, this book reveals how neoliberal development policies can be considered successful in terms of promoting the emergence and strengthening of capitalist class processes and the appropriation of surplus-value in Latin America and beyond. It is obligatory reading for scholars and students seeking to construct Marxian class analyses and to formulate alternatives to the world economy today. — Adam David Morton, University of Nottingham and author of Unravelling Gramsci: Hegemony and Passive Revolution in the Global Political Economy

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Marxism

Marxism

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM 17:1 & 17:2

 

 

http://www.brill.nl/hima

Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory
Volume 17 Issue 2
2009

CONTENTS

Isaac and Tamara Deutscher Memorial Prize Lecture
Rick Kuhn
Economic Crisis, Henryk Grossman and the Responsibility of Socialists

Articles

David McNally
From Financial Crisis to World Slump: Accumulation, Financialisation, and the Global Slowdown

Steve Edwards
Apocalyptic Sublime: On the Third Brighton Photo Biennal

Symposium on the Global Financial Crisis
Samantha Ashman
Editorial Introduction

Costas Lapavitsas
Financialised Capitalism: Crisis and Financial Expropriation

Gary A. Dymski
Racial Exclusion and the Political Economy of the Subprime Crisis

Paulo L. Dos Santos
On The Content of Banking in Contemporary Capitalism

Reflections on ‘Gewalt’ (contd.)
Luca Basso
The Ambivalence of Gewalt in Marx and Engels: On the
Interpretation of Balibar

Review Articles

Ian Hudson & Mark Hudson
on Gavin Fridell’s Fair Trade Coffee: The Prospects and Pitfalls of Market Driven Social Justice, Daniel Jaffee’s Brewing Justice: Fair Trade Coffee, Sustainability, and Survival, and Laura Raynolds’, Douglas Murray’s & John Wilkinson’s Fair Trade: The Challenges of Transforming Globalization

Richard Westra
on Pierre Bourdieu’s Firing Back: Against the Tyranny of the Market 2, Global Turbulence: Social Activists’ and State Responses to Globalization, edited by Marjorie Griffin Cohen and Stephen McBride, John Rapley’s Globalization and Inequality: Neoliberalism’s Downward Spiral and Anti-Capitalism: A Marxist Introduction, edited by Alfredo Saad-Filho

Michele Filippini
on Alberto Burgio’s Gramsci storico

Richard Seymour
on Markku Ruotsila’s John Spargo and American Socialism

Robert Knox
On Alain Supiot’s Homo Juridicus

Historical-Critical Dictionary of Marxism
Stefan Bollinger & Juha Koivisto
Hegemonic Apparatus

 

Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory
Volume 17 Issue 1
2009

CONTENTS

Articles

Marcus E. Green and Peter Ives
Subalternity and Language: Overcoming the Fragmentation of Common Sense

Henry Heller
The Longue Durée of the French Bourgeoisie

Michael Löwy
Capitalism as Religion: Walter Benjamin and Max Weber

Daniel Cho
Adorno on Education, or, Can Critical Self-Reflection Prevent the Next Auschwitz?

Reflections on ‘Gewalt’
Étienne Balibar
Violence

Massimilano Tomba
Another Type of Gewalt: Beyond Law. Re-Reading Benjamin

Interventions
Guglielmo Carchedi
The Fallacies of ‘New Dialectics’ and Value-Form Theory

Christopher J. Arthur
Contradiction and Abstraction: A Reply to Finelli

Review Articles

Benjamin Noys
on Ian Parker’s Revolution in Psychology: Alienation to Emancipation, and Yannis Stavrakakis’s The Lacanian Left: Psychoanalysis, Theory, and Politics

Marcel Bois
on Christian Gotthardt’s Die radikale Linke als Massenbewegung. Kommunisten in Harburg-Wilhelmsburg 1918–1933

Tyson E. Lewis
on Peter McLaren’s Capitalists and Conquerors, and McLaren and Ramin Farahmandpur’s Teaching Against Global Capitalism and the New Imperialism

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