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Feminism

Feminism

FEMINIST CRITICAL ANALYSIS

Please find below the Call for Applications for the upcoming Feminist Critical Analysis course, which will take place in Dubrovnik(Croatia) from May 28 to June 1. Note that the extended deadline is April 28, but we urge you to apply as soon as possible.

We would also like to draw your attention to the stipends offered to doctoral/PhD students by the Inter-University Center in Dubrovnik. You can find more information here: http://www.iuc.hr/hesp-osi.php  

Sincerely yours,
Center for Gender Studies Jove Ilića 165 11000 Belgrade

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Feminist Critical Analysis
Inter-University Center (IUC), Dubrovnik
May 28th to June 1st, 2012

The Center for Gender and Politics of the Belgrade University (Political Science Department), Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers of the State University of New Jersey, and the Department of Gender Studies of the Central European University (CEU) in Budapest are pleased to announce the next annual postgraduate course in

Feminist Critical Analysis: Science, Bodies and the New Materialism

The course will be held at the Inter-University Centre, Dubrovnik (www.iuc.hr) from May 28 to June 1 (2012).

The course is co-directed by Dasa Duhacek, Center for Gender and Politics, University of Belgrade, Ethel Brooks, Women’s and Gender Studies Department, Rutgers University and Anna Loutfi, Gender Studies Department, Central European University (CEU).

The course is built on the intellectual dialogue among a diverse body of scholars from different geographical locations and the participating faculty is drawn from different universities.

Topic

The seminar invites discussion of a key issue currently bringing together disciplines from across the humanities, social, physical and life sciences: the nature of materiality. What are the significant philosophical and theoretical contributions to materialism – past and present? Why does it become necessary for political or social theory to engage with particular ideas of materialism or materiality at certain historical junctures? What does it mean to speak of the social, cultural, political and historical meanings of natural or material concepts? How might the ‘natural sciences’ incorporate social theories of ontology and agency, and how might the ‘social sciences’ incorporate issues around materiality as they surface in, say, neurobiology or physics? How can knowledge help situate and make sense of embodiment and lived experience? We encourage explorations of ecological frameworks that challenge reductionist, mechanistic, and exclusively molecular approaches to life and living systems. We encourage reading and debate around the work of contemporary thinkers in the fields of biopolitics who interrogate ‘the politics of life itself’ (e.g. Giorgio Agamben). We also invite discussion around the work of ‘the new materialists’. This is a rich field that takes on a wide range of modern philosophical traditions. These include, but are not confined to, ‘vitalistic’ theories (e.g.Henri Bergson, Gilles Deleuze), neo-Marxian materialisms (Bourdieu, Balibar), phenomenological accounts of agency and materiality (Merleau-Ponty, Heidegger), theories of psychic power as a materialist force in the world (Nietzsche, Freud), feminist re-engagements with materiality, lived experience and biology (Moira Gatens, Elizabeth Wilson, Coole and Frost, Elizabeth Grosz), as well as social scientific investigations of problems in the neurosciences, such as the problem of consciousness or the mind-brain relation (Fernando Vidal).

ELIGIBILITY

IUC courses are conducted at a postgraduate level. All postgraduate students interested in the topic may apply for participation. Participants should seek funds from their own institutions to cover travel and accommodation costs. Limited financial support is available for participants from Central and Eastern Europe. All meetings are conducted in English.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE

A short narrative (up to 250 words) explaining your interest in the topic and your C.V. with your current complete contact information should be submitted by e-mail;

Final deadline for applications is April 28, 2012

Please send your applications to the Center for Gender and Politics University of Belgrade, Faculty of Political Sciences, at studijeroda@fpn.bg.ac.rs with Dubrovnik 2012 in the subject heading.

 

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Mike Cole

Mike Cole’s latest book

RACISM AND EDUCATION IN THE U.K. AND THE U.S. – TOWARDS A SOCIALIST ALTERNATIVE

By Mike Cole

Marxism and Education Series: Palgrave Macmillan

‘This is one of the most important contributions to the debates about international racism from one of the most outstanding Marxist scholars. This book is a gem.’ –– Alpesh Maisuria, Senior Lecturer, Anglia Ruskin University, UK

‘Mike Cole offers a devastating dissection of the appalling history and current realities of racism in the UK and the U.S., and in particular its manifestations in the educational system. He also presents an excellent synopsis of Venezuela’s efforts to develop a new, socially just and inclusive alternative in education which is an integral part of that country’s pioneering struggle to build ‘socialism for the twenty-first century.’ Cole’s latest book will be of great value in making students and educationalists consider progressive alternatives to the impoverished curricula and structures within which they operate at present.’ –– Diana Raby, Senior Research Fellow, Latin American Studies, University of Liverpool, UK

Following the success of the widely acclaimed Critical Race Theory and Education: a Marxist Response (Palgrave, 2009), in this new book Mike Cole extends his Marxist analysis to include key concepts from the work of neo-Marxists Antonio Gramsci and Louis Althusser. Cole begins by addressing what is distinctive about a neo-Marxist analysis. He then provides his own broad definition of racism and examines the differences between schooling and education, while outlining some practical antiracist classroom strategies for use in the UK and the U.S.

Racism and Education in the U.K and the U.S. – by Mike Cole: http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?pid=412084  

CONTENTS:

Socialism, Marxism, and neo-Marxism

Racism in theU.K.

Racism in theU.S.

Racism, Schooling and Education Against Racism in theU.K.and theU.S.

Twenty-First Century Socialism and Education in theBolivarianRepublicofVenezuela

Implications for Multicultural Antiracist Socialist Practice in the Educational Institutions

MIKE COLE is Emeritus Research Professor in Education and Equality and Director of the Centre for Education for Social Justice at Bishop Grosseteste University College Lincoln, UK. He is the author of Marxism and Educational Theory: Origins and Issues, (2008), and editor of Professional Attributes and Practice for Student Teachers, 4th Edition (2008), Equality in the Secondary School: Promoting Good Practice Across the Curriculum (2009), and Education, Equality and Human Rights: Issues of Gender, ‘Race’, Sexual Orientation, Disability and Social Class, 3rd Edition (2011).

*For information about Mike Cole’s previous book: http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?PID=329203

June 2011 Hardback £55.00 £27.50* 978-0-230-10379-5; Paperback £18.00 £14.40* 978-0-230-10380-1

Marxism and Education Series (Palgrave Macmillan): http://www.palgrave.com/products/series.aspx?s=ME

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Capitalist Crisis

CRISIS AND CHANGE TODAY

Crisis and Change Today: Basic Questions of Marxist Sociology
Second Edition

By Peter Knapp and Alan Spector

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

Crisis and Change Today provides a solid introduction to Marxist social theory. The work’s unique voice is expressed in its Socratic-dialogic approach, structured around forty questions that students have about society and social change. Topics range from theories of history, economics, unemployment, racial oppression, the state, fascism, the collapse of the Soviet bloc, and points of convergence and difference between the dialectical approach and other approaches to social science. The content and tone of the work invites students to evaluate various traditional and current explanations of social institutions and social processes and encourages them to weigh the debates and investigate further.

The first edition was very well received (recipient of the Distinguished Scholarship Award of the Section on Marxist Sociology of the ASA), and the second edition has been thoroughly revised and updated to be relevant for students today. Though the first edition was written during the wake of the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of the Soviet Union, the growing gap between the rich and the poor and the economic crisis have generated more interest in using Marxist analysis as a tool to understand both the crises of capitalism and the weaknesses of past Marxist praxis.

Peter Knapp is Professor of Sociology at Villanova University and author of books and articles on Marx and Hegel.

Alan Spector is Professor of Sociology at Purdue University Calumet. In addition to publishing, he has served as Chair of the Section on Marxist Sociology of the American Sociological Association and is currently on the editorial board of Critical Sociology.

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More information on the book is available here: http://www.rowmanlittlefield.com/Catalog/SingleBook.shtml?command=Search&db=^DB/CATALOG.db&eqSKUdata=0742520439&thepassedurl=collegepublishing&exam_copy=true

For European readers: http://www.rowmanlittlefield.com/Catalog/Eur/Singlebook.shtml?command=Search&db=^DB/CATALOG.db&eqSKUdata=0742520439

Prepublication reviews from Bertell Ollman, Rhonda Levine, David Fasenfest, and Berch Berberoglu are available here: http://www.rowmanlittlefield.com/Catalog/Reviews.shtml?command=Search&db=^DB/CATALOG.db&eqSKUdata=0742520439

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Global Capitalism

EXAMINING THE RELEVANCE OF MARX AND MARXISM TO CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL SOCIETY

 

Please Circulate around your lists:

2nd Call for Papers
Examining the Relevance of Marx and Marxism to Contemporary Global Society
Newcastle University, 29th and 30th of January 2011

Rationale, Outline and Aims
The 21st century has so far seen US-led military interventions, global financial crises, identity conflicts, terrorism on a grand scale, environmental disasters and fraught industrial/labour relations. These dramatic events have challenged the notion of an ‘end to history’ and the widespread belief that the collapse of the Soviet Union has made Marx and Marxism irrelevant. With growing instability in the social, political and economic functioning of human societies, we wish to examine the relevance of Marx to contemporary global society.

In order to do this, Global Discourse (http://global-discourse.com) is organising a two-day conference at Newcastle University on Saturday 29th and Sunday 30th of January 2011.

The aims of the event are:
* To examine the relevance and application of Marxian, Marxist, Neo-Marxist and Post-Marxist thought to contemporary issues.
* To reassess scriptural and doctrinal commitments within various ‘Marxisms’.
* To facilitate interdisciplinary, inter-paradigmatic discourse on a range of contemporary issues.

Papers from this event will form the basis of a special issue of Global Discourse to be released in February 2011.

Keynote Papers
The keynote talks will be given by Professor Norman Geras, author of Marx and Human Nature, whose paper will relate to the general theme, ‘What does it mean to be Marxist?’, and Professor Stuart Sim, author of Post-Marxism: An Intellectual History, who will be examining the achievements of Post-Marxism.

Topics, Deadlines and Publishing Process
We are currently soliciting papers addressing the two topics covered by the keynote speakers, namely: ‘What does it mean to be Marxist?’ and ‘Post-Marxism and its discontents’.

We invite the submission of abstracts on these topics by November 15th.
Authors whose abstracts are accepted will then be invited to submit full papers by December 17th. This will enable refereeing priori to publication of the special issue of Global Discourse in February 2011.

We aim, subsequently, to publish a collected edition in print based on these papers.

Please submit all abstracts, papers and panel proposals to the editors at editor@global-discourse.com.

Costs
There will be no conference fee.

A lunch buffet and refreshments will be provided free of charge.

An optional evening conference meal on Saturday 29th of January will be held at a nearby restaurant. We will seek to organise a special rate for the meal and will circulate details in due course. Participants shall bear the cost of their meal.

Places
There will be space for 40 paper-givers and 20 non-paper-giving participants.

Please address all queries and submit all papers to Matthew Johnson and Mark Edward at editor@global-discourse.com.

Global Discourse: http://global-discourse.com/

Global Economic Crisis

With best wishes
Matthew Johnson

 

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RETHINKING 1968

Call for Papers
“Rethinking 1968”
PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture
Special Issue

The events of 1968 shook the world. On the 40th anniversary > of the protests in France, Germany and the United States, the EPTC organized a series of panels to investigate these industrial and student actions, and whether they can serve as a basis for critiquing our current political climate. We want to ask if the philosophical underpinnings of these revolutionary acts have continued relevance today.

For example, in France, the French phenomenologist and existentialist, turned Marxist, Jean-Paul Sartre was held up as one of the intellectuals who could provide an intellectual basis for the revolution. Alongside structuralists like Althusser, Sartre was viewed as an intellectual god-father of the movement, not only because of his writings critical of capitalism and the bourgeois system, be they his early writings on existentialism, or his later reformulation of Marxism in the Critique of Dialectical Reason, nor because he linked left-wing activism in the first world with support for the oppressed elsewhere, but because he was willing to lend his name and support to the Maoists against the Gaullist government.

Similarly, in Germany, two philosophers, the phenomenologically-inspired and Marxist Herbert Marcuse and the neo-Marxist and member of the Frankfurt School Jürgen Habermas were central figures for the student revolutionaries. As a member of the Frankfurt School’s second generation, Habermas was viewed by the students as safely removed from the alleged post-World War II conservatism of Adorno and Horkheimer. For the first several years following its publication, Habermas’s habilitation thesis, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, was a text central to the student struggle in Germany. Similarly, Marcuse’s texts, Reason and Revolution, Eros and Civilization, and One-Dimensional Man, as well as his occasional writings, were used as rallying cries by the left both in Europe and in the United States.

The question we propose for this volume is: what relevance do these philosophers’s works have today, in light of the continued expansion of the capitalist system, and the fact that student leaders like Daniel Cohn-Bendit, Bernard Kouchner, and Joschka Fischer have renounced extra-political activities and joined the political mainstream? We are interested in papers that explore the relevance of the philosophical critiques that inspired the movements of 1968 for present day radical politics, including papers that use the philosophical inspirations behind 1968:

(1) To critique global capitalism while providing a positive way forward,
(2) To examine American hegemony,
(3) To examine possibilities for overturning existing political structures in either the developed or developing world,
(4) To examine issues surrounding the environment or environmental justice,
(5) Or any other topic, provided that the paper deals extensively with the philosophical ideas of 1968 and their relevance for today’s changed political landscape.

Interested authors should submit a copy of their paper in RTF or WORD format to PhaenEx’s website: http://www.phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex

Queries should be sent to Kevin W. Gray at: kevin-william.gray.1@ulaval.ca

The submission deadline is July 1, 2009.

Contact: Kevin W. Gray, Faculté de Philosophie, Université Laval,Québec, QC G1K 7P4, Canada. Phone: +1 845 228.8548, Skype: kevinwgray, Email: kevin-william.gray.1@ulaval.ca
Web: http://www.phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex

 

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