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New Materialism

New Materialism

WHAT IS NEW MATERIALISM? MARXISMS, NEW MATERIALISMS AND THE NATURE / CULTURE DIVIDE

4th March 2016

Westminster Forum

5th Floor

University of Westminster

32-38 Wells Street

London

W1T 3UW
Tickets here 

Programme:

12 – 2: Plenary panel: David Chandler, Felicity Colman, Nicholas Kiersey, Phoebe Moore.
2.30 – 5.30: Speakers: Helen Palmer, Paul Rekret, Daniela Tepe–Belfrage, Michiel van Ingen. Discussant: Christian Fuchs

In response to a perceived prioritization of ‘mind over matter or culture over nature’ in the humanities and cultural studies, contemporary philosophers Braidotti and DeLanda separately named a shift in research that brings attention to the body or corporeal and explores immanence over transcendence in ontology as new materialism (or neo-materialism) in the 1990s. Since then, feminist, poststructuralist, historical materialist, science and technology, geography and critical realist researchers have begun to explore what it means to move away from the confines of discourse analysis and research that is limited to analysis of the cognitive, introducing research on human subjectivity as embodied, denying quantification of the affective field, rethinking categories of agency and causality and taking seriously questions around what it means to be human. New materialism is a critical ontological position that transcends thought traditions and advances studies that transgress mind-body dualism from the side of the mind and rejects research that eliminates possibilities for lived experiences except as efficient, rational, managed subjects.

The workshop ‘What is new in new materialism? Marxisms, new materialisms and the nature/culture divide‘ serves partly as an introduction to new materialism and partly as a space to critique and develop nascent work in this emerging area. We will ask, what is the difference between immanent, transcendental approaches and materialist ontology? Where do historical materialists stand on questions of nature and culture? What new questions of the human can we pose and what is the promise of the posthuman? Is this arena one where Marxist and poststr ucturalist agendas harmonise? What is the difference between mechanical materialism, historical materialism and new materialism? And, what is at stake in the connection between the human and materialism?

Co-organised with the Materialisms Reading Group run by David Chandler and & the CSE South Group run by Phoebe Moore and Martin Upchurch. (Capital & Class is the CSE journal.)

Conference of Socialist Economists (CSE): Two Spring Events: https://phoebevmoore.wordpress.com/2016/01/23/cse-south-group-two-spring-events/

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

New Materialism

New Materialism

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THE RISE AND FALL OF CHEAP NATURES

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CALL FOR PAPERS

Paper session: The Rise and Fall of Cheap Natures

For the Annual meeting of the Association of American Geographers, San Francisco, 29 March-3 April 2016

Capitalism’s greatest strength – and the source of its most pressing problems today – has been its capacity to create Cheap Natures: labor, food, energy, and raw materials. That capacity is now in question. In these sessions, we explore the manifold geographies of environmental change and capital accumulation through state-, imperial-, and capital-centered projects to appropriate natures – including human natures – as cheaply as possible.

These explorations may engage the creation – or destruction – of Cheap Natures across the spectrum of scalar and geographical emphases: regions of the Global South and Global North, from the body to the biosphere. We welcome papers encompassing (but not limited to) historical and contemporary transformations of social reproduction, commodity frontiers, hegemonic projects, scientific regimes, imperial power, and capital accumulation on a world-scale.

We especially welcome proposals that seek to transcend Nature/Society dualisms in the pursuit of new syntheses of “ecological” and “capitalist” crisis.

Deadline 16 November.

Contact: Jay Bolthouse (jebbolt@gmail.com) and Christopher Cox (crc42@uw.edu).

download

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Dreamscape

Dreamscape

PRETERNATURAL ENVIRONMENTS: DREAMSCAPES, ALTERNATE REALITIES, LANDSCAPES OF DREAD

Call for Papers for a special issue of Preternature (Issue 6.1)

Preternatural Environments: Dreamscapes, Alternate Realities, Landscapes of Dread

Deadline for submissions: March 1, 2016.

This special issue of Preternature seeks papers that examine elements and/or depictions of the preternatural in all sorts of environments. Scholars are increasingly drawing attention to the importance of spaces and their contexts, the stories we tell about them, and our interactions with them. This volume focuses on preternatural aspects of natural and unnatural environments such as dreamscapes, alternate worlds, and eerie landscapes.

Papers should investigate the connections between preternatural environments and literary, historical, anthropological, and artistic forms of understanding. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Defining the “preternatural environment” / preternatural aspects of an environment.
  • Superstition and spaces.
  • Demonic domains.
  • Artistic representations of preternatural environments across the ages.
  • Aspects of the uncanny in various physical settings.
  • The pathetic fallacy and narrative theory.
  • “Unnatural” landscapes and environments.
  • Bridging natural and preternatural spaces.
  • Preternatural ecology and ecocriticism.
  • Connections between material environments, literary narratives, and the preternatural.
  • Eerie landscapes as characters or significant presences in literature, history, and culture.
  • How preternatural environments inform human behaviour, or how behaviour informs preternatural environments.

Preternature welcomes a variety of approaches, including narrative theory, ecocriticism, and behavioural studies from any cultural, literary, artistic, or historical tradition and from any time period. We particularly encourage submissions dealing with non-Western contexts.

Contributions should be 8,000 – 12,000 words, including all documentation and critical apparatus.

For more information, see: http://www.psupress.org/journals/jnls_submis_Preternature.html or submit directly at: https://www.editorialmanager.com/preternature/default.aspx.

Preternature is published twice annually by the Pennsylvania State Press and is available through JSTOR and Project Muse. This periodical is also indexed in the ATLA Religion Database® (ATLA RDB®), http://www.atla.com.

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Preternature: Critical and Historical Studies on the Preternatural can be viewed at: https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/preternature/

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

images (22)

The World Society Foundation

The World Society Foundation

WORLD SOCIETY, PLANETARY NATURES: CRISIS AND SUSTAINABILITY IN THE CAPITALOCENE AND BEYOND

CALL FOR PAPERS

World Society, Planetary Natures: Crisis and Sustainability in the Capitalocene and Beyond

Binghamton University, July 10-11, 2015

An international conference sponsored by the World Society Foundation

CONFIRMED SPEAKERS INCLUDE:

  • Christian Parenti
  • Harriet Friedmann
  • Larry Lohmann
  • Doug Henwood
  • Tony Weis
  • Sasha Lilley
  • Jason W. Moore

DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS IS EXTENDED TO MARCH 15, 2015

TO SUBMIT YOUR ABSTRACT, PLEASE REGISTER HERE: http://goo.gl/forms/fLL348cSPG

Since 2008, a broad consensus has emerged among scholars of global change: ours is an era of “converging crises.” Popularly expressed in the language of “triple crisis” – climate, energy, and finance – there is considerable uncertainty as to how these crisis-tendencies fit together, and if they are nearly so independent as the language of convergence suggests. If many scholars view the unfolding turbulence of the 21st century as an era of multiple crises, others have turned towards a different way of seeing crisis. This emerging alternative seeks to unify dimensions of human and extra-human natures in the world history of the present – as in the distinctive approaches of the Anthropocene and world-ecology perspectives. Through this different way of seeing, a crucial question has taken shape: Are we living the Age of Humans (the Anthropocene) or the Age of Capital (Capitalocene)?

World Society, Planetary Natures seeks to bring together scholars of global social change and global environmental change in the pursuit of new syntheses of “political economy” and “political ecology,” broadly conceived. The conference therefore privileges a double engagement: 1) with the core concerns of world-historical and global studies; and 2) with a broader multi-disciplinary community focused on global environmental change, past and present.

The conference pursues three major goals. First, we encourage a serious intellectual cross-fertilization between scholars engaged in the study of global social change and those engaged in the study of global environmental change. Second, the conference will facilitate a sustained exploration of the relations unifying the differentiated moments of 21st century crisis. These include not only the “triple crisis” argument, but comprise a wide range of crisis tendencies – such as food, inequality, employment, and social reproduction – as well as to the emergent possibilities of “commoning.” Third, the conference welcomes creative elaborations of globalization – in its manifold historical and contemporary expressions – as “ways of organizing nature.” In contrast to seeing neoliberalism as acting upon global natures, this alternative encourages a view of globalization as developing through the web of life. Such an alternative rethinks aspects of recent (and longue durée) world history as new human-environment configurations in which humans make environments, and environments enter into the constitution of power, re/production, and inequality. This entails the socio-ecological reconstruction of taken for granted “social” phenomena, such as the Washington Consensus, financialization, the European Union, or the rise of the BRICS. To investigate, analyze, and narrate historical change as if nature matters – as producer no less than product of capital and power – implies a much more decisive shift than commonly recognized: in our theoretical frames, methodological choices, and narrative strategies.

TO SUBMIT YOUR ABSTRACT, PLEASE REGISTER HERE: http://goo.gl/forms/fLL348cSPG

We welcome papers, panels, and proposals related – but not restricted to – the following topics:

  • The Financialization of Nature: Commodities, Carbon markets, Conservation, etc.
  • One, Two, Many “Sovereignties”: Food, Land, Energy, and Beyond
  • Planetary Urbanization
  • Cheap Labor, Unpaid Work, and the Crisis of Human Natures
  • Green Catastrophism and the Theory of Global Crisis
  • Narratives of Nature, Crisis, and Capitalism
  • Modernity and Climate Change
  • Scientific Revolutions and Capitalist Natures
  • Class Dynamics of Agro-Ecological Change, North and South
  • Crises: Social, Ecological, or World-Ecological?
  • Ecology and Imperialism
  • The ‘Long’ Green Revolution: Renewal or Demise?
  • Culture as Ecology
  • Green Keynesianism and the Myth of Sustainability
  • Industrialization and the Production of Nature
  • Anthropocene or Capitalocene?
  • New (and Old) Practices of Commoning
  • World-Literature and World-Ecology
  • Value, Nature, and Ontological Politics
  • Environmental Histories of Capital, Empire, and Commodities
  • Commodity Frontiers, Past and Present
  • The Environment-Making State
  • Markets, Trade, Investment: Does Nature Matter?
  • Nature as Accumulation Strategy
  • Crises of Social Reproduction
  • Neoliberalism’s Crises… or Not?
  • Surplus Humanities
  • Climate and Capitalism: Two Crises or One?
  • Nature and Hegemony
  • Ecological Exhaustion and War

We welcome proposals for individual papers as well as paper sessions and panel discussions. TO SUBMIT YOUR ABSTRACT, PLEASE REGISTER HERE: http://goo.gl/forms/fLL348cSPG

Inquiries may be sent to: planetarynatures@gmail.com.

Venue: The conference will be held 10-11 July, 2015 at Binghamton University (USA). As a family friendly conference we are able to extend conference pricing for food and lodging to participant families, and we are arranging childcare for those who may need it.

Travel grants: The World Society Foundation sponsors a small number of travel grants for postgraduate students, young researchers, and for participants from Africa, Asia, Latin-America and Eastern Europe (ISA country categories B and C). Travel grants will be allocated on the basis of a competitive assessment of full papers (of about 8.000 words) submitted. Deadline for submission of papers for travel grants is March 15, 2015. Applicants receiving travel grants will be notified before 15 April, 2015.

Publication: Outstanding conference papers will be published in a conference volume.

Conference Sponsorship: The main sponsor of the conference is the World Society Foundation (Zurich, Switzerland). In addition the conference is co-sponsored by the Department of Sociology, University of Neuchâtel, the Department of Sociology, Binghamton University, the World-Ecology Research Network. For more information on the World Society Foundation and its activities, please check out the web site: http://www.worldsociety.ch/.

Organizing Committee: Christian Suter, Université de Neuchâtel; Diana C. Gildea; Jason W. Moore, Binghamton University

KRISIS

KRISIS

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Philosophy and Romanticism

Philosophy and Romanticism

NATURE AND CULTURE IN GERMAN ROMANTICISM AND IDEALISM

UNSW Australia and the University of Sydney
12-14 March, 2014

The last two decades can be described as witness to a genuine revival of interest in German romantic and idealist philosophy. Philosophers working in a variety of areas have embraced the ideas of the romantics and idealists, disentangling them from false or misunderstood legacies, and reexamining them in light of contemporary debates. This conference aims to advance this significant historical and philosophical research, by investigating the two most central themes in German idealist and romantic philosophy: nature and culture and their interdependence.

Precisely because of the interdisciplinary character of romanticism and idealism, the conference approaches the two movements from a number of related angles. In the first instance, the goal is to consider how various thinkers from the romantic era conceived nature and culture, and sought to harmonize the sphere of the natural sciences (Naturwissenschaften) and the sphere of the humanities (Geisteswissenschaften), which, only some fifty years later, became fully separated. In addition, the conference seeks to investigate the interdisciplinary conception of “Geist” developed during that time, which today can be translated into “mind” as well as its various externalizations as “society,” “arts,” “institutions,” and “culture.” In these two ways, the conference will explore the uniqueness of the romantic and idealist views, and consider their potential significance for contemporary debates.

Conference organisers:
Heikki Ikäheimo (UNSW),
Dalia Nassar (Sydney) and
Paul Redding (Sydney)
E: Click here to email coordinators

Conference sponsored by the Sydney Intellectual History Network (SIHN) at the University of Sydney and the Faculty of Arts and Social Science and the School of Humanities and Languages at UNSW Australia.

Conference Registration

Registrations close 7 March 2014
Click here to register

Conference website: http://sydney.edu.au/arts/philosophy/about/ncgri_conference.shtml

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Harvesting

Harvesting

POLITICAL ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY

CALL FOR PAPERS: Political Ecology and Environmental Sociology: Towards Productive Engagement or Sustaining the Contract of Mutual Indifference?

DIMENSIONS OF POLITICAL ECOLOGY, CONFERENCE ON NATURE/SOCIETY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY February 27 – March 1, 2014 University of Kentucky Lexington, Kentucky, USA

Alan Rudy, Damian White, Christopher Oliver and Brian Gareau

The political ecologist Piers Blackie has observed in a stock-taking of political ecology that “a review of Environmental Sociology, a textbook by Hannigan, finds no mention of Political Ecology and yet most of its contents might well be claimed as Political Ecology” (Blackie, 2008: 772). One could similarly work through many political ecology textbooks and find little or no discussion of environmental sociology. Given the ritualistic appeals to “inter-disciplinarity” in the environmental social sciences, how can we account for the extra-ordinary disengagement between political ecology and environmental sociology? How can these seemingly overlapping and aligned sub-disciplines largely ignore each other? Why has political ecology taken socio-natural hybridity, post-human ethics and non-equilibrium ecologies so much more seriously than US environmental sociology has? Why is it that understandings of the relationship between capital and ecology are widely divergent between environmental sociologists and political ecologists? Are both fields increasingly disabled by their dis-engagement with each other?

Attempting to do justice to the diverse amalgam of movements, institutions and disciplines that have contributed to the many methods and foci involved, this panel will explore this strange contract of mutual indifference from a number of perspectives, e.g.

1.    Northern attitude and policy research relative to Southern development and ethnographic studies;

2.    Durkheimian empiricist, realist Marxist and neo-Malthusian approaches contrasted with relational Marxist, materialist feminist and post structuralist currents;

3.    Critical takes on risk society and the democratization of the state versus bureaucratic management derived from risk science-based policy;

4.     Local and lay knowledge leading in directions quite different than those of green neoliberalism;

5.    The primary roots of US environmental sociology in rural sociology versus political ecology’s founding of political ecology in European development geography.

The panel will consist of a series of short pieces (3000 words) en route to an open discussion. The aims of the panel will be to gain great understanding of the blockages that prevent broader engagements between political ecology and environmental sociology. It will also consider how we might imagine more productive relations between political ecology and environmental sociology.

Please submit proposed title and abstract to Alan Rudy alan.rudy@gmail.com Damian White dwhite01@risd.edu, Chris Oliver christopheroliver@uky.edu and Brian Gareau bgareau@gmail.com by December 1st 2013

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Jaguar in Rain Forest

PEOPLE AND NATURE

Please visit http://peoplenature.org, a new site aiming to “promote discussion about human society and its interaction with nature”.

The focus is on developing socialist ideas and interpretations of the people-nature relationship, the way it is ruptured by capitalism and how it may be transformed by movements towards communism.

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Taweret

UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT

NEW EDITION FROM VERSO:

UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT: Nature, Capital and the Production of Space

By NEIL SMITH

New and updated edition with a new foreword by DAVID HARVEY
—————————–
“Smith provides a brilliant formulation of how the production of a particular kind of nature and space under historical capitalism is essential to the unequal development of a landscape that integrates poverty with wealth.” –– EDWARD SAID
—————————–
In UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT, a classic in its field, NEIL SMITH offers the first full theory of uneven geographical development, entwining theories of space and nature with a critique of capitalism.

Featuring groundbreaking analyses of the production of nature and the politics of scale, Smith’s work anticipated many of the uneven contours that now mark neoliberal globalization.

DAVID HARVEY’S new foreword highlights the increasingly uneven nature of the globalized economy, and notes that this inequality, along with accelerating levels of urbanisation and environmental degradation, have only accelerated since the book was first published. Smith’s analysis is thus more urgent and relevant than ever.

While globalisation has not led to a weakening of state power in the political sphere, it is increasingly difficult to conceive of distinct state economies – for example by the 1980s the majority of trade across national borders took place within corporations. National and international organisations rival states in economic power – in 2007 Harvard University had more money in its bank account than the GDP of some 39 countries. Thus, Smith argues, the global system can increasingly be defined more in terms of geoeconomics than traditional geopolitics.

In recognition of the dramatic changes in capitalism and its geography over the quarter century since this volume was written, Neil Smith has updated the text with a discussion of the current crisis of neoliberalism and the rise of geoeconomics.

UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT is a radical attempt to reconstruct the politicalbasis of society, in order to produce a genuinely social geography by encouraging a revolutionary imaginary.
———————————-
Praise for UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT

“A foundational text of great historical significance, constantly worthy of reappraisal…You will not be disappointed.” David Harvey

“Smith attempts no less than the integration of nature and space in the Marxian theory of capitalist development … he improves the clarity even of the arguments made in disagreement with him. His book should be widely read, used, and discussed.’ –ENVIRONMENT AND PLANNING

“UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT provides a theoretical discussion of immense range – from nature through space and the economy – whereby Neil Smith extends David Harvey’s Marxist conception of the geography of capitalism” – GEOGRAPHICAL REVIEW

“One of the most important books of specifically geographical social theory to be written in the English language in the last thirty years.” – Scott Prudham, author of KNOCK ON WOOD: NATURE AS COMMODITY IN DOUGLAS-FIR COUNTY
———————————
NEIL SMITH is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography at the City University of New York and Director of the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics. He is author or editor of nine books that explore the broad intersection between space, nature, social theory, and history and is co-organizer of the International Critical Geography Group. His website is http://neil-smith.net/
———————————
ISBN: 978 1 84467 643 9 / £16.99 / Paperback / 344 pages
———————————
For more information and to buy the book visit:
http://www.versobooks.com/books/704-704-uneven-development
———————————
ACADEMICS BASED OUTSIDE NORTH AMERICA MAY REQUEST AN INSPECTION COPY – PLEASE CONTACT tamar@verso.co.uk

ACADEMICS BASED WITHIN NORTH AMERICA MAY REQUEST AN EXAMINATION COPY – PLEASE CONTACT clara@versobooks.com
———————————
Become a fan of Verso on Facebook:
UK page – http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Verso-Books-UK/122064538789
US page – http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/pages/Verso-Books-USA/123812329709

And get updates on Twitter too:
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Harvesting

NATURE INC? QUESTIONING THE MARKET PANACEA IN ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND CONSERVATION

The Second Call for Papers for a conference next year 30 June – 2 July on Nature™ Inc? Questioning the Market Panacea in Environmental Policy and Conservation.

Please consider sending in an abstract, and/or send it on to your networks

Second Call for Papers
Nature™ Inc? Questioning the Market Panacea in Environmental Policy and Conservation

International Conference
30 June – 2 July 2011
ISS, The Hague, The Netherlands

Special guests:  Amita Baviskar (IEG, Delhi University), Nancy Peluso (University of California, Berkeley), Fander Falconi (FLACSO, Former Foreign Minister, Ecuador) and Ton Dietz (University of Leiden)

Nature is dead. Long live Nature™ Inc.! This adagio inspires many environmental policies today. In order to respond to the many environmental problems the world is facing, new and innovative methods are necessary, or so it is argued, and markets are posited as the ideal vehicle to supply these. Indeed, market forces have been finding their way into environmental policy and conservation to a degree that seemed unimaginable only a decade ago. Payments for ecosystem services, biodiversity derivatives and new conservation finance mechanisms, species banking, carbon trade and conservation 2.0 are just some of the market mechanisms that have taken a massive flight in popularity in recent years, despite, or perhaps because of the recent ‘Great Financial Crisis’.

The conference seeks to critically engage with the market panacea in environmental policy and conservation in the context of histories and recent developments in neoliberal capitalism. The conference is steeped in traditions of political economy and political ecology, in order to arrive at a deeper understanding of where environmental policies and conservation in an age of late capitalism come from, are going and what effects they have on natures and peoples.

‘Nature™ Inc’ follows a successful recent conference in Lund, Sweden, in May 2010 and several earlier similar initiatives that have shown the topic to be of great interest to academics, policy-makers and civil society. The present conference is thus meant not only to deepen and share critical knowledge on market-based environmental policies and practices and nature-society relations more generally, but also to strengthen and widen the networks enabling this objective.

 Topics include but are not limited to:
   • General trends in market-based environmental policies and instruments
   • New forms of neoliberal conservation (including web 2.0, species banking, etc)
   • Agro-food systems, the meat-industrial complex, and aquaculture
   • Agro-fuels, energy and climate change
   • The relation between conservation and land (including protected areas, etc.)
   • Financialisation of the environment
   • New social, environmental and peasant movements and left alternatives
   • Accumulation by dispossession, property regimes, and the “new” enclosures
   • Ecological imperialisms, including the recent ‘land grabs’
   • Urban and rural political ecologies and the links between them
   • Theoretical advancements in nature-society relations

Paper proposals are due 15 December 2010. Please send a 250-300 word proposal, with title, contact information, and three keywords as a Word attachment to: nature2011@iss.nl. Proposals for complete panels are welcome.

Conference language is English. Authors will be notified by 15 January 2011. Complete papers are due by 1 April, 2011. More information on: http://www.iss.nl/nature2011 and http://www.worldecologyresearch.org  
 
Organization
The conference is organized by the Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam, together with the University of Manchester and the University of Queensland.

Conference organizing committee (OC): Bram Büscher, Murat Arsel, Lorenzo Pellegrini, Max Spoor (ISS, Erasmus University, the Netherlands) Wolfram Dressler (University of Queensland, Australia) Dan Brockington (SERG, Manchester University, UK)

Conference advisory committee (AC): Ben White (ISS, Erasmus University) Patrick Bond (University of KwaZulu Natal) Sian Sullivan (Birkbeck College) Jason W. Moore (Umeå University) Blessing J Karumbidza (Socio-Economic Rights Institute, South Africa) Eric Swyngedouw (SERG, Manchester University) Noel Castree (SERG, Manchester University) Rosaleen Duffy (SERG, Manchester University) Holly Buck (Lund University) Scott Prudham (University of Toronto) Jun Borras (ISS, Erasmus University) Dean Bavington (Nipissing University) Mark Hudson (University of Manitoba)
Jim Igoe (Dartmouth College) Dhoya Snijders (VU University Amsterdam) Caroline Seagle (VU University Amsterdam) Diana C. Gildea (Lund University) Christian Alarcon Ferrari (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences) Katja Neves (Concordia University) Roldan Muradian (Nijmegen University)

 ———————————————
Dr. Bram Büscher
Lecturer in Environment & Sustainable Development
International Institute of Social Studies
Erasmus University
Kortenaerkade 12
2518 AX The Hague
The Netherlands
T +31 (0)70 4260 596
buscher@iss.nl
http://www.iss.nl/buscher

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‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com
Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Harvesting

GREEN GONE WRONG

An event with Heather Rogers and Dr. James Hansen to launch 

Green Gone Wrong: How Our Economy is Undermining the Environmental Revolution

by Heather Rogers

Friday April 30th, 7pm

CUNY Graduate Center

Proshanky Auditorium

365 Fifth Avenue

New York, NY 10016

RSVP: jkhanduja@demos.org

Green Gone Wrong is published in the US by Scribner, and in the UK by Verso

Verso—Books with a Critical Edge

40 Years of Radical Publishing 1970—2010

Event sponsors: Demos, The Nation, The Center for Place, Culture and Politics at the CUNY Graduate Center, and the Investigative Fund

Co-sponsors: Brecht Forum, Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, Center for Humanities at CUNY Graduate Center, The Center for Sustainable Urban Development at the Earth Institute at Columbia University, Bluestockings Bookstore, Haymarket and Verso.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Mountain Lake

Mountain Lake

COUNTER NATURES

An upcoming symposium in November 2009 at Uppsala University

“Counter Natures” is a major interdisciplinary symposium featuring papers by 30 researchers from 10 countries collectively representing more than a dozen academic disciplines. The symposium seeks to initiate a fruitful series of cross-disciplinary conversations that may help to suggest renewed or innovative theorizations of nature, the most abiding motif of art and literature and the most fundamental of scientific and philosophical concepts.

Confirmed keynote speakers include Lawrence Buell (Harvard
University), Ursula Heise (Stanford University), David Nye (University
of Southern Denmark, Odense) and Sverker Sörlin (KTH: The Royal
Institute of Technology).

Here’s a link to the official symposium website: http://www.cemus.uu.se/counternature

Steven Hartman
Research Fellow in American Literature
Department of English
Uppsala University
Box 527
751 20 Uppsala
Sweden
Tel.: +46-(0)18 471 12 61
Fax: +46-(0)18 471 12 29

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com