Skip navigation

Tag Archives: MySpace

Information Society

CRITIQUE, DEMOCARCY, AND PHILOSOPHY IN THE 21st CENTURY INFORMATION SOCIETY

Call for Contributions/Abstracts

Critique, Democracy, and Philosophy in 21st Century information Society. Towards Critical Theories of Social Media

The Fourth ICTs and Society-Conference
UppsalaUniversity

May 2nd-4th, 2012

http://www.icts-and-society.net/events/uppsala2012/
http://fuchs.uti.at/wp-content/CfA.pdf

A unique event for networking, presentation of critical ideas, critical engagement, and featuring leading critical scholars in the area of Critical Internet Studies and Critical Studies of Media & Society.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:

* Andrew Feenberg (Simon Fraser University, Canada): Great Refusal and Long March: How to Use Critical Theory to Think About the Internet.
* Charles Ess (Aarhus University, Denmark): Digital Media Ethics and Philosophy in 21st Century Information Society
* Christian Christensen (Uppsala University, Sweden): WikiLeaks: Mainstreaming Transparency?
* Christian Fuchs (Uppsala University, Sweden): Critique of the Political Economy of Social Media and Informational Capitalism
* Graham Murdock (Loughborough University, UK): The Peculiarities of Media Commodities: Consumer Labour, Ideology, and Exploitation Today
* Gunilla Bradley (KTH, Sweden): Social Informatics and Ethics: Towards a Good Information Society
* Mark Andrejevic (University of Queensland, Australia): Social Media: Surveillance and Exploitation 2.0
* Nick Dyer-Witheford (University of Western Ontario, Canada): Cybermarxism Today: Cycles and Circuits of Struggle in 21st Century Capitalism
* Peter Dahlgren (Lund University, Sweden): Social Media and the Civic Sphere: Perspectives for the Future of Democracy
* Tobias Olsson (Jönköping University, Sweden): Social Media Participation and the Organized Production of Net Culture
* Trebor Scholz (New School, USA): The Internet as Playground and Factory
* Ursula Huws (University of Hertfordshire, UK): Virtual Work and the Cybertariat in Contemporary Capitalism
* Vincent Mosco (Queen’s University, Canada): Marx is Back, but Will Knowledge Workers of the World Unite? On the Critical Study of Labour, Media, and Communication Today
* Wolfgang Hofkirchner (Vienna University of Technology, Austria): Potentials and Risks for Creating a Global Sustainable Information Society

Conference Topic

This conference provides a forum for the discussion of how to critically study social media and their relevance for critique, democracy, politics and philosophy in 21st century information society.

We are living in times of global capitalist crisis. In this situation, we are witnessing a return of critique in the form of a surging interest in critical theories (such as the critical political economy of Karl Marx, critical theory, etc) and revolutions, rebellions, and political movements against neoliberalism that are reactions to the commodification and instrumentalization of everything. On the one hand there are overdrawn claims that social media (Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, mobile Internet, etc) have caused rebellions and uproars in countries like Tunisia and Egypt, which brings up the question to which extent these are claims are ideological or not. On the other hand, the question arises what actual role social media play in contemporary capitalism, power structures, crisis, rebellions, uproar, revolutions, the strengthening of the commons, and the potential creation of participatory democracy. The commodification of everything has resulted also in a commodification of the communication commons, including Internet communication that is today largely commercial in character. The question is how to make sense of a world in crisis, how a different future can look like, and how we can create Internet commons and a commons-based participatory democracy.

This conference deals with the question of what kind of society and what kind of Internet are desirable, what steps need to be taken for advancing a good Internet in a sustainable information society, how capitalism, power structures and social media are connected, what the main problems, risks, opportunities and challenges are for the current and future development of Internet and society, how struggles are connected to social media, what the role, problems and opportunities of social media, web 2.0, the mobile Internet and the ubiquitous Internet are today and in the future, what current developments of the Internet and society tell us about potential futures, how an alternative Internet can look like, and how a participatory, commons-based Internet and a co-operative, participatory, sustainable information society can be achieved.

Questions to be addressed include, but are not limited to:

* What does it mean to study the Internet, social media and society in a critical way? What are Critical Internet Studies and Critical Theories of Social Media? What does it mean to study the media and communication critically?
* What is the role of the Internet and social media in contemporary capitalism?
* How do power structures, exploitation, domination, class, digital labour, commodification of the communication commons, ideology, and audience/user commodification, and surveillance shape the Internet and social media?
* How do these phenomena shape concrete platforms such as Google, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, etc?
* How does contemporary capitalism look like? What is the role of the Internet and social media in contemporary capitalism?
* In what society do we live? What is the actual role of information, ICTs, and knowledge in contemporary society? Are concepts like network society, information society, informational capitalism, etc adequate characterizations of contemporary society or overdrawn claims? What are the fundamental characteristics of contemporary society and which concept(s) should be used for describing this society?
* What is digital labour and how do exploitation and surplus value generation work on the Internet? Which forms of exploitation and class structuration do we find on the Internet, how do they work, what are their commonalities and differences? How does the relation between toil and play change in a digital world? How do classes and class struggles look like in 21st century informational capitalism?
* What are ideologies of the Internet, web 2.0, and social media? How can they be deconstructed and criticized? How does ideology critique work as an empirical method and theory that is applied to the Internet and social media?
* Which philosophies, ethics and which philosophers are needed today in order to understand the Internet, democracy and society and to achieve a global sustainable information society and a participatory Internet? What are perspectives for political philosophy and social theory in 21st century information society?
* What contradictions, conflicts, ambiguities, and dialectics shape 21st century information society and social media?
* What theories are needed for studying the Internet, social media, web 2.0, or certain platforms or applications in a critical way?
* What is the role of counter-power, resistance, struggles, social movements, civil society, rebellions, uproars, riots, revolutions, and political transformations in 21st century information society and how (if at all) are they connected to social media?
* What is the actual role of social media and social networking sites in political revolutions, uproars, and rebellions (like the recent Maghrebian revolutions, contemporary protests in Europe and the world, the Occupy movement, etc)?
* What can an alternative Internet look like and what are the conditions for creating such an Internet? What are the opportunities and challenges posed by projects like Wikipedia, WikiLeaks, Diaspora, IndyMedia, Democracy Now! and other alternative media? What is a commons-based Internet and how can it be created?
* What is the role of ethics, politics, and activism for Critical Internet Studies?
* What is the role of critical theories in studying the information society, social media, and the Internet?
* What is a critical methodology in Critical Internet Studies? Which research methods are needed on how need existing research methods be adapted for studying the Internet and society in a critical way?
* What are ethical problems, opportunities, and challenges of social media? How are they framed by the complex contradictions of contemporary capitalism?
* Who and what and where are we in 21st century capitalist information society? How have different identities changed in the global world, what conflicts relate to it, and what is the role of class and class identity in informational capitalism?
* What is democracy? What is the future of democracy in the global information society? And what is or should democracy be today? What is the relation of democracy and social media? How do the public sphere and the colonization of the public sphere look like today? What is the role of social media in the public sphere and its colonization?

The conference is the fourth in the ICTs and Society-Conference Series (http://www.icts-and-society.net). The ICTs and Society-Network is an international forum that networks scholars in the interdisciplinary areas of Critical Internet Studies, digital media studies, Internet & society studies and information society studies. The ICTs and Society Conference series was in previous years organized at the University of Salzburg (Austria, June 2008), the University of Trento (Italy, June 2009) and the Internet Interdisciplinary Institute (Spain, July 2010).

About Uppsala, Uppsala University and the Department of Informatics and Media:

Uppsala University (http://www.uu.se) was founded in 1477 and is the oldest university in the Nordic countries. Every year 45 000 undergraduate and graduate students enroll for classes. Uppsala is an academic and students-oriented city with old academic tradition. The Department of Informatics and Media (http://www.im.uu.se) is a newly established institution at Uppsala University. Its research focuses on understanding and designing digital media in the information society. Among its educational programmes is a new master’s programme in Digital Media & Society that will start in August 2012.

Early May is a particularly nice time to come and visit Uppsala. It is the time of spring festivities and the awakening of nature and the city. The end of April has since medieval times been a time of celebrating the spring, especially in Eastern Sweden. Uppsala and especially Uppsala’s students have participated in this tradition, especially on the last of April (“sista april”, Valborg, http://www.valborgiuppsala.se/en) that features various celebrations and special activities all over the town.

Time Plan:
February 29th, 2012, 17:00, Central European Time (CET): Abstract Submission Deadline
Until March 11th, 2012: information about acceptance or rejection of presentations
March 30th, 2012, 17:00, CET: registration deadline
May 2nd-4th, 2012: Conference, Ekonomikum, University of Uppsala, Kyrkogårdsgatan 10, Uppsala

Abstract Submission:
a) For submission, please first register your profile on the ICTs and Society platform:
http://www.icts-and-society.net/register/
b) Please download the abstract submission form:
http://fuchs.uti.at/wp-content/uploads/ASF.doc ,
insert your presentation title, contact data, and an abstract of 200-500 words. The abstract should clearly set out goals, questions, the way taken for answering the questions, main results, the importance of the topic for critically studying the information society and/or social media and for the conference.
Please submit your abstract until February 29th, 2012, per e-mail to Marisol Sandoval: marisol.sandoval@uti.at

Organizer:
Uppsala University, Department of Informatics and Media, Kyrkogårdsgatan 10, Box 513, 751 20 Uppsala, Sweden http://www.im.uu.se
Contact for academic questions in respect to the conference:
Prof. Christian Fuchs, christian.fuchs@im.uu.se , Tel +46 18 471 1019
Contact for questions concerning conference organization and administration:
Marisol Sandoval, marisol.sandoval@uti.at

Co-organizers:
* ICTs and Society Network
* European Sociological Association – Research Network 18: Sociology of Communications and Media Research
* tripleC – Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society
* Unified Theory of Information Research Group (UTI), Austria
* Department of Information and Media Studies, Aarhus University, Denmark
* Institute for Design & Assessment of Technology, Vienna University of Technology, Austria
* Jönköping University, School of Education and Communication, Sweden

Conference Board and Organization Committee:
Charles Ess, Aarhus University
Christian Christensen, Uppsala University
Christian Fuchs, Uppsala University + UTI Research Group
Göran Svensson, Uppsala University
Marisol Sandoval, Unified Theory of Information Research Group
Sebastian Sevignani, Unified Theory of Information Research Group
Sylvain Firer-Blaess, Uppsala University
Thomas Allmer, Unified Theory of Information (UTI) Research Group
Tobias Olsson, Jönköping University
Verena Kreilinger, Unified Theory of Information Research Group
Wolfgang Hofkirchner, Vienna University of Technology + UTI Research Group

Welcome to Uppsala in Spring 2012!

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Sociology

NEW COMMUNICATIONS AND DEMONSTRATIONS

How are demonstrations represented in the mass media?  How do activists use new media to organise and communicate protest? What benefits do Social Media provide? 

The BSA Media Study Group and the University of Leicester are proud to announce a symposium called ‘New Communications and Demonstrations’. This event will showcase a plethora of valuable research in this field and invite discussions and comments on this topic.

A full programme for the day and online registration are now available at: http://www.britsoc.co.uk/specialisms/Media.htm

 

‘New Communications and Demonstrations’

Wednesday 13th July 2011, 10.30am – 4.30pm

Attenborough Building, University of Leicester

Directions: http://www2.le.ac.uk/maps

 

Symposium fees (Places are limited, so sign up early!)

£25 BSA members and Postgraduates

£35 for non-members

 

For more details about the study group please visit: http://www.britsoc.co.uk/specialisms/Media.htm

Please direct any administrative enquiries to the BSA office at events@britsoc.org.uk and any academic enquires to Dr. Julian Matthews jpm29@leicester.ac.uk  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Archive

BEYOND 2.0: NEW MODELS OF INFORMATION

A Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) in Sussex Event

Thursday 19th May, 4-6pm – University of Brighton

As the web matures and Web 2.0 and social media services become embedded in our everyday lives the information world is entering a new phase. The vast quantities of data being generated by these new services, the challenges posed to traditional publishers and the plethora of new devices such as iPads and smart phones will change the work of information professionals over the coming decade.

This talk, by Dr Martin De Saulles of the University of Brighton, will outline some of the challenges as well as the opportunities for those who work with information. It will be followed by an opportunity for questions and discussion. 

Venue: Watts Building, University of Brighton, Lewes Rd, Brighton BN2 4GJ

Cost: £5 for CILIP members, £10 for non-members

Light refreshments will be available.

To book your place, contact Audrey Marshall by email: a.m.marshall@brighton.ac.uk

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

New Media

YOUTH, NEW MEDIA AND SOCIAL CHANGE

CALL FOR PAPERS:

YOUTH, NEW MEDIA & SOCIAL CHANGE

Media Annual Conference:

Organised by the School of Social Sciences, Park Campus, University of Northampton, UK

Date: Saturday 8th May 2010

Venue: LT-C101, University of Northampton, Park Campus, Boughton Green Road, Northampton NN2 7AL, UK

Why this conference?

This conference gathers academics, journalists, researchers, policy makers and civil society organisations to discuss youth use of new media and the implication this has on identity construction, public opinion, citizenship and social change. Although their development is a recent phenomenon, new media have not only opened up new opportunities for journalism but also empowered audiences and civil society organisations with unprecedented platforms for ‘free’ expression and social activism around the world. New technologies are said to have reinvigorated a sense of a ‘transnational public sphere’ and strengthened marginalized communities and provided a platform for subcultural groups and the voiceless. The possible consequences of such rapid developments on social and political change are not hard to imagine. The sweeping victory of US president elect Barak Obama (in the latest American presidential elections) characterised by the unprecedented outreach to marginalised communities including the youth through YouTube, Facebook, and other internet platforms is a case in point.

This conference aims to map out the above mentioned phenomena, focusing on the role of new media in the perceived social changes. It debates how audiences, users, civil society organisations, political/social groups and subcultures have understood and found in these technologies the right tools and strategies to power their work sustainably.

Conference themes:

This conference will cover (but not necessarily limited to) the following areas of enquiry:

– Blogging and bloggers as citizen journalists; are bloggers making a social difference?

– Satellite TV and the internet as cites of resistance/alternative media or sets of ‘censored national enclosures’

-E-campaigning and political/social groups

– How are  activists/the youth interacting with platforms like ‘YouTube’, ‘MySpace’, ‘Flicker’, ‘Faithtube’, ‘Facebook’ and ‘Blogging’ to pursue their objectives?

– Challenges of the Internet in war zones

– The new media and women empowerment amongst ethnic minorities.

– Youth subcultures and new media, what is going on?

– In the absence of real democracy in some parts of the Arab and Muslim world is new media creating a new form of social/political capital: e-democracy?

– What functions are the internet and satellite TV playing in mobilising public opinion?

– What expectations and perceptions are there regarding changes in cultural and political values?

Attendance: Participation in this conference will be open to academics, researchers, policy makers, government agencies, youth workers, students, parents and other members of the public.

Fees: £35 waged; £10 non-waged and students

Call for submissions: Abstracts of no more than 400 words, along with a short bio should be submitted by the 30th November 2009. Papers should reflect one or more of the conference themes mentioned above. Particularly welcome are papers based on empirical work and a clear research method (s). Deadline for full papers is 10th April 2010.

Selected conference papers will be published in an edited volume.

Contact: Please send all submissions and enquiries to:

Dr Noureddine Miladi (conference coordinator),

Senior Lecturer in Media & Sociology

School of Social Sciences

University of Northampton

Park Campus

NORTHAMPTON

NN2 7AL

UK

Tel: +44 (0) 1604892104

E-mail: noureddine.miladi@northampton.ac.uk + www.northampton.ac.uk

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Academic Labor and Law

Special Section of Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor

 

Guest EditorJennifer Wingard

University of Houston

 

The historical connections between legislation, the courts, and the academy have been complex and multi-layered. This has been evident from early federal economic policies, such as the Morell Act and the GI Bill, through national and state legislation that protected student and faculty rights, such as the First Amendment and affirmative action clauses. These connections continue into our current moment of state and national efforts to define the work of the university, such as The Academic Bill of Rights and court cases regarding distance learning. The question, then, becomes whether and to what extent the impact of legislation and litigation reveals or masks the shifting mission of the academy. Have these shifts been primarily economic, with scarcities of funding leading many to want to legislate what is considered a university education, how it should be financed, and who should benefit from it? Are the shifts primarily ideological, with political interests working to change access, funding, and the intellectual project of higher education? Or are the shifts a combination of both political and economic influences? One thing does become clear from these discussions: at their core, the legal battles surrounding higher education are about the changing nature of the university –the use of managerial/corporate language; the desire to professionalize students rather than liberally educate them; the need to create transparent structures of evaluation for both students and faculty; and the attempt to define the types of knowledge produced and disseminated in the classroom. These are changes for which faculty, students, administrators, as well as citizens who feel they have a stake in higher education, seek legal redress. This special section of Workplace aims to explore the ways in which legislation and court cases impact the work of students, professors, contingent faculty, and graduate students in the university. Potential topics include but are not limited to:

 

Academic Freedom for students and/or faculty

* Horowitz’s Academic Bill of Rights

* Missouri’s Emily Booker Intellectual Diversity Act

* First Amendment court cases concerning faculty and student’s rights to freely express themselves in the classroom and on campuses

* Facebook/Myspace/Blog court cases

* Current legislative and budgetary “attacks” on area studies (i.e. Queer Studies in Georgia, Women’s Studies in Florida)

Affirmative Action

* The implementation of state and university diversity initiatives in the 1970s

* The current repeal of affirmative action law across the country

* Benefits, including Health Benefits, Domestic Partner Benefits

* How universities in states with same-sex marriage bans deal with domestic partner benefits

Collective Bargaining

* The recent rulings at NYU and Brown about the status of graduate students as employees

* State anti-unionization measures and how they impact contingent faculty

Copyright/Intellectual Property

* In Distance Learning

* In corporate sponsored science research

* In government sponsored research

Disability Rights and Higher Education

* How the ADA impacts the university

* Sexual Harassment and Consensual Relationships

* How diversity laws and sexual harassment policies impact the university

Tenure

* The Bennington Case

* Post 9/11 court cases

 

Contributions for Workplace should be 4000-6000 words in length and should conform to MLA style. If interested, please send an abstract via word attachment to Jennifer Wingard (jwingard@central.uh.edu) by Friday, May 22, 2009. Completed essays will be due via email by Monday, August 24, 2009.

 

E. Wayne Ross

Professor

Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy

University of British Columbia

2125 Main Mall

Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4

Canada

604-822-2830

wayne.ross@ubc.ca

 

http://www.ewayneross.net

 

Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor: http://www.workplace-gsc.com

Cultural Logic: http://eserver.org/clogic

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski