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Negri

FROM EMPIRE TO COMMONWEALTH: COMMUNIST THEORY AND CONTEMPORARY PRAXIS

Call for Papers
From Empire to Commonwealth: Communist Theory and Contemporary Praxis

Conference to be held at the University of Wollongong, 
25-26 November 2010

With the publication of Commonwealth in 2009 Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri’s three part series (which started with Empire and continued with Multitude) is complete. The series constitutes an almost unparalleled attempt to revitalise emancipatory communist politics for our time. Drawing on the Italian traditions of operaismo and autonomia and combining them with post‐structuralism, Hardt and Negri attempt a radical reworking of the basis of anti‐capitalist thought. Following the disasters of the 20th Century, two directions seemed open to radical thought: one denied the specificity of late capitalism and insisted that nothing had fundamentally changed while the other asserted that everything had changed and that the revolutionary transformation of society was no longer possible.

Hardt and Negri reject both these alternatives. They maintain the Marxian critique of capitalism, and emphasise the emancipatory potential of labour by attempting a challenging rethinking of the revolutionary project. They do so in a way which refuses the dominant ideologies of global capitalism, is heretical to orthodox Marxism, is refreshingly different from the staid left liberalism and reheated social democracy typical of the Academy, and resonates with struggles across the globe.

At ‘From Empire to Commonwealth’ we would like to open up a space for critical dialogue about Hardt and Negri’s work, their understanding of the world, their politics, the traditions with which they engage and the criticisms they have faced. We would also like to generate our own ideas and critiques and contribute to the development of emancipatory and rebellious theories of the world.

While this conference takes place within the boundaries of the university we would like to position ourselves on the edge of this space, challenging both the demarcations which separate the university from the rest of society and struggling within the university to open up the horizon of what and how we can think.

We are seeking papers on, but not limited to, the follow topics. Presentations that defy the genre of academic conferences are welcome:

·  The politics of love

· Affective, precarious and immaterial labour

·  Feminism and autonomy

· Empire as a theory of international relations

· Capitalism and the control society

· The intellectual history of autonomist Marxism

· Queer struggles against capitalism

· Post-structuralism and anti-capitalism

· Multitude and class composition

· Labour and value in contemporary capitalism

· Contemporary anti-capitalist politics

· Identity and subjectivity

Please email abstracts of approximately 200 words to Alexander Brown at: alexandersragtimeband@gmail.com by 30 July 2010. Further information will be posted on the conference blog, http://fromempiretocommmonwealth.wordpress.com as it becomes available. We are considering publishing the conference papers.

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Turbulence

WHAT WOULD IT MEAN TO WIN? TURBULENCE BOOK

Our book, ‘What Would it Mean to Win?’ is published by PM Press in April 2010. It contains all the articles from the now out-of-print first issue of the magazine, our collective text ‘Move into the Light? Postscript to a Turbulent 2007’, and a previously unpublished extended interview by PM Press author Sasha Lilly with Turbulence editors Michal Osterweil and Ben Trott. John Holloway has written a Foreword.

BACK COVER BLURB: “Movements become apparent as ‘movements’ at times of acceleration and expansion. In these heady moments they have fuzzy boundaries, no membership lists – everybody is too engaged in what’s coming next, in creating the new, looking to the horizon. But movements get blocked, they slow down, they cease to move, or continue to move without considering their actual effects. When this happens, they can stifle new developments, suppress the emergence of new forms of politics; or fail to see other possible directions. Many movements just stop functioning as movements. They become those strange political groups of yesteryear, arguing about history as worlds pass by. Sometimes all it takes to get moving again is a nudge in a new direction… We think now is a good time to ask the question: What is winning? Or: What would–or could–it mean to ‘win?’”

REVIEWS

“Where is the movement today? Where is it going? Are we winning? The authors of the essays in this volume pose these and other momentous questions. There are no easy answers, but the discussion is always insightful and provocative as the writers bravely take on the challenge of charting the directions for the Left at a time of ecological crisis, economic collapse, and political disillusionment.” – Walden Bello, Executive Director of Focus on the Global South

“Turbulence presents an exciting brand of political theorising that is directed and inspired by current strategic questions for activism. This kind of innovative thinking, which emerges from the context of the movements, opens new paths for rebellion and the creation of real social alternatives.“ – Michael Hardt, co-author of ‘Commonwealth’ , ‘Multitude’ and ‘Empire’.

“The history of the past half-century and particularly the last decade is as easily told as a series of victories as defeats, maybe best as both. Sometimes we won–and this is what makes the ‘What Does It Mean to Win?’ anthology
such a powerful vision of the possible and the seldom-seen present. The authors of this book connect some of the more remarkable events of the last decade–in Oaxaca, in the banlieus of Paris, in the crises of neoliberalism– into a constellation of possibilities and demands, demands on the world but also demands on the readers, to think afresh of what is possible and what it takes to get there. As one author begins, ‘The new movements embodied and posited deliberate reactions to the practical and theoretical failures of previous political approaches on the left.’ This is the book about what came after the failures, and what’s to come” – Rebecca Solnit, author of ‘Hope in the Dark’ and ‘A Paradise Built in Hell.’

CONTENTS

‘Preface’, by Turbulence Collective

‘Foreword: Hope Moves Faster than the Speed of Thought’, by John Holloway

‘Are We ‘Winning’?’, by Turbulence Collective

‘Politics in an Age of Fantasy’, by Stephen Duncombe

‘Enclosing the Enclosers’, by Gustavo Esteva

‘Singularisation of the Common’, by Sandro Mezzadra and Gigi Roggero

‘A New Weather Front’, by Paul Sumburn

‘Money for Nothing’, by Max Henninger

‘Walking in the Right Direction?’, by Ben Trott

‘Organise Local, Strike Global’, by Valery Alzaga and Rodrigo Nunes

‘Solidarity Economics’, by Euclides André Mance

‘Compositional Power’, an interview with Todd Hamilton and Nate Holdren

‘‘Becoming-Woman?’ In Theory or in Practice?’, by Michal Osterweil

‘Politicising Sadness’, by Colectivo Situaciones

‘Commonism’, by Nick Dyer-Witheford

‘The Crazy Before the New’, by Kay Summer and Harry Halpin

‘Move into the Light? Postscript to a Turbulent 2007’, by Turbulence Collective

‘An Interview with the Turbulence Collective’, by Sasha Lilly with Michal Osterweil and Ben Trott

BOOK DETAILS
Author: Turbulence Collective
Publisher: PM Press (Oakland, CA)
ISBN: 978-1-60486- 110-5
Published: April 2010
Format: Paperback
Page Count: 160
Dimensions: 9 by 6
Subjects: Politics, Philosophy, Activism

ORDER A COPY FOR YOUR LIBRARY
Ask your university, city or town library to order to a copy of the book. Just provide them with the ‘Book Details’ above and they should be able to do the rest themselves.

REVIEW THE BOOK
We’re looking for individuals and publications interested in reviewing the book. If this takes your fancy, drop us a note letting us know your name, address and the publication you’re considering writing for and we’ll get the publisher to send you a copy of the book.

LAUNCH EVENTS
We’ll be organising a series of events to launch the book, the first of which will take place in the San Francisco Bay Area, California, on March 14, 15 and 16.

For more information, see: http://turbulence.org.uk/2010/02/turbulence-events-in-san-francisco-bay-area-in-march/

Turbulence: http://turbulence.org.uk

AVAILABLE FOR PRE-ORDER FROM:

PM PRESS: https://secure.pmpress.org/index.php?l=product detail&p=193 

AMAZON.COM:
http://www.amazon.com/What-Would-Mean- Win-Press/dp/160486110X/ref=sr_1_ 1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1266057060&sr=8-1

BOOKS-A-MILLION: http://www.booksamillion.com/product/9781604861105 

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AUTONOMIST EVENTS

Antonio Negri

Antonio Negri

NEW YORK

Silvia Federici and George Caffentzis on the Politics of Oil
On Tuesday NOVEMBER 10th at 6:30PM

Join Silvia Federici and George Caffentzis as they discuss big oil’s cultural and political violence with Peter Maass, contributing editor at The New York Times Magazine and the author of the recently published Crude World: The Violent Twilight of Oil.

The event is moderated by Ashley Dawson, Associate Professor of English, The Graduate Center, CUNY.  The event will take place at the Graduate Center, 365 5th Ave btwn 34th and 35th (The Skylight Room, 9100)

Ariel Salleh on Eco-Sufficiency with Silvia Federici
On Wednesday, November 11th at 7:00PM, ARIEL SALLEH will be presenting on a feminist and ecologically integrated politics of the commons, themes central to her recently edited volume, Eco-Sufficiency & Global Justice: Women Write Political Ecology (Pluto Press, 2009).  She will be introduced by and in dialogue with SILVIA FEDERICI. The event takes place at Bluestockings Bookstore (172 Allen Street, NYC 10002).

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Autonomia

Autonomia

AUTONMIA, OPERAISMO AND CLASS COMPOSITION

 

Call for Papers

Autonomism, Class Composition, and Cultural Studies

2010 Cultural Studies Association Conference – Berkeley, CA – March 18th – 20th, 2010

Coordinators: Stevphen Shukaitis (Autonomedia / University of Essex) & Jack Z. Bratich (Rutgers University)

The publication of Hardt and Negri’s Empire (2000) brought new attention to a previously ignored current of revolutionary theory and practice, namely that of autonomist Marxism, or more broadly, autonomism. While the work of Hardt and Negri have receive quite a deal of attention within cultural studies research and writing since then, this have tended to neglect the vast wealth of engaged theoretical reflection contained within the history of autonomist thought and organizing, reducing it to the work of a few recent works by particular authors. For instance, the concept of class composition, or the ways in which class formations emerge from contestation and the primacy and determining role of social resistance, shares much in common with various strains of thought in cultural studies. Similarly, workers’ inquiry as a method of inquiring into the conditions of working class life to rethinking its ongoing subversive political potentiality, functions in similar ways to how early cultural studies shifted to an analysis of the everyday based on renewing and deepening radical politics.

Autonomist political analysis involves something very much like a form of cultural studies, exploring how the grounds for radical politics are constantly shifting in response to how capital and the state utilize social insurgencies and movements against themselves. How do cultural studies and autonomism converge and diverge over matters of power, the state, and subjectivity? The panel will explore the future behind our backs, focusing on how autonomist politics and analysis can inform cultural analysis and vice versa. Possible topics for consideration could include:

– Autonomy through and against enclosures

– Class composition and the creative class

– Immaterial labor and cultural production

– Libidinal parasites and desiring production

– Escape and the imperceptible politics of the undercommons

– The multitude and its dark side

– Affective labor and social reproduction

– Work drawing from/on particular autonomist theorists (Tronti, Virno, Fortunati, etc.)

– Precarity and the autonomy of migration

– Post-hegemonic & post-dialectical interventions

– Schizoanalysis & class formation

– Autonomism and the political

 

Send proposals of 500 words to Stevphen Shukaitis (stevphen@autonomedia.org).

The deadline for submissions is September 7th, 2009.

Stevphen Shukaitis is an editor at Autonomedia and lecturer at the University of Essex. He is the editor (with Erika Biddle and David Graeber) of Constituent Imagination: Militant Investigations // Collective Theorization (AK Press, 2007). His research focuses on the emergence of collective imagination in social movements and the changing compositions of cultural and artistic labor. For more on his work and writing, see http://stevphen.mahost.org.

Jack Z. Bratich is assistant professor of Journalism and Media Studies at Rutgers University. He is the author of Conspiracy Panics: Political Rationality and Popular Culture (2008) and co-editor of Foucault, Cultural Studies and Governmentality (2003), and has written articles that apply autonomist thought to such topics as audience studies, reality TV, secession, and popular secrecy.

Stevphen Shukaitis: Autonomedia Editorial Collective, http://www.autonomedia.org, http://info.interactivist.net

“Autonomy is not a fixed, essential state. Like gender, autonomy is created through its performance, by doing/becoming; it is a political practice. To become autonomous is to refuse authoritarian and compulsory cultures of separation and hierarchy through embodied practices of welcoming difference… Becoming autonomous is a political position for it thwarts the exclusions of proprietary knowledge and jealous hoarding of resources, and replaces the social and economic hierarchies on which these depend with a politics of skill exchange, welcome, and collaboration. Freely sharing these with others creates a common wealth of knowledge and power that subverts the domination and hegemony of the master’s rule.”  – subRosa Collective

 aut-op-sy mailing list: aut-op-sy@lists.resist.ca

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Power to the People?


…masses, proletariat, workers, soviets, nation, community, subalterns, multitude, commons…

Saturday 9th May 2009
Radical Philosophy Conference, Birkbeck College, Malet Street, London

BOOK NOW!

£25/£10 unwaged

Registration and further details: matt.charles@blueyonder.co.uk

Cheques payable to `Radical Philosophy Ltd’ should be sent to: 
Radical Philosophy Conference, Peter Osborne, CRMEP, Middlesex University, Trent Park Campus, Bramley Road, London N14 4YZ

 


PROGRAMME:


Plenary (chair: Peter Osborne, RP)
Gayatri Spivak (Columbia University, NY): ‘They, the People’

 


1. The General Will (chair: Peter Hallward, RP)


David Andress (Portsmouth): ‘The General Will on the Street: Parisian Activism, Sovereignty and Power, 1789–93’

 

Sophie Wahnich

(CNRS, Paris): ‘How Do the People Make Themselves Heard?’

 


2. Urban Collectivities (chair: David Cunningham, RP)

AbdouMaliq Simone (Goldsmiths): ‘Urban Intersections and the Politics of Anticipation’

Erik Swyngedouw (Manchester): ‘Reflections on the Post-Political City’

 

3. Population & Biopolitics (chair: Claudia Aradau, RP)

Couze Venn (Nottingham Trent): ‘Biopolitics, Diasporas and (Neo)Liberal Political Economy’

Encarnacion Gutierrez Rodriguez (Manchester): ‘Feminist Strategies Revisited – Sexopolitics, Multitude and Biopolitics’

 


4. Class, Commons & Multitude (chair: Esther Leslie, RP)

 

Massimo De Angelis

(UEL): ‘Crisis, Tragedies and the Commons’

Daniel Bensaid (University of Paris-VIII), ‘Can We (Still) Break the Vicious Circle of Domination?’

 

 

‘Power to the people!’ was once a revolutionary slogan, but reference to government by the people and for the people soon became an empty cliché of the post-revolutionary status quo. The people has become a notoriously ambiguous and contested term, for which numerous alternatives have been proposed: the proletariat, the workers, the masses, the soviets, the nation, the community, the multitude, the commons… And now? How might we assess the different  conceptions of political change embodied in these often conflicting ideas? What is the political and philosophical significance of `the people’ today?

 

£25/£10 unwaged

Registration and further details: matt.charles@blueyonder.co.uk

Cheques payable to `Radical Philosophy Ltd’ should be sent to: Radical Philosophy Conference, Peter Osborne, CRMEP, Middlesex University, Trent Park Campus, Bramley Road, London N14 4YZ

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk