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University for Strategic Optimism

University for Strategic Optimism

UNIVERSITY FOR STRATEGIC OPTIMISM

A university based on the principle of free and open education, a return of politics to the public, and the politicisation of public space.

About

Our basic public services, we are told, are simply too expensive. They must be thrown under the wheels of the megalithic debt that bears down upon us. They must be privatised, corporatised and commodified. All this so we can ensure the continuation of a system that funnels wealth into the hands of a privileged few. This failed and flailing market system, we are told, is the only one that is possible, drastic cuts the only alternative, the fairest thing to do. Any deviation from the path laid out for us will unleash the worst imaginable, a media-imagined Worst that threatens from our darkened skies.

The UfSO offers an emphatic No! to this description of our current situation, and sees instead a magnificent opportunity, a multiplication of possibilities, the opening of a space in which we might think about, and bring about, a fairer and and more fulfilling society for all. In short: Many good reasons for strategic optimism! We urge a rampant questioning of the ideological basis for the relentless privatisation and privation of our lives: Are these cuts incoherent, as some have said? Or is this a specific move/set of moves on the part of neoliberal capital? Are labour, education, healthcare, and the environment, mere commodities, to be consumed by those who will redeem them as more capital? Can the opposition to cuts begin moving towards a society ‘fit for purpose’? Is it still easier to imagine The End-of-the-World than The End-of-Capitalism?

University for Strategic Optimism: http://universityforstrategicoptimism.wordpress.com/

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

 

Education Crisis

JOURNAL FOR CRITICAL EDUCATION POLICY STUDIES: VOLUME 10 NUMBER 2 (2012)

Volume 10, Number 2: October 2012 – Now Out!

Some excellent and timely articles in this issue of Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies: Glenn Rikowski

See: http://www.jceps.com

ISSN 1740-2743 Online version / ISSN 2051-0959 Print version

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies (JCEPS) is a peer-reviewed international scholarly journal published by The Institute for Education Policy Studies (IEPS). The free, online version is published in association with the University of Athens (Greece). The print version (available on subscription or purchase – click on the Subscriptions and Purchasing link is published by IEPS). JCEPS will have three issues per annum, as from 2013. The journal website is www.jceps.com 

Enquiries should be addressed to dave.hill@ieps.org.uk or naomi.hill@ieps.org.uk

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies (JCEPS) seeks to develop Marxist and other Left analysis of education. JCEPS seeks and publishes articles that critique global, national, neo-liberal, neo-conservative, New Labour, Third Way, postmodernist and other analyses of policy developments, as well as those that attempt to report on, analyse and develop Socialist/ Marxist transformative policy for schooling and education from a number of Radical Left perspectives. JCEPS also addresses issues of social class, ‘race’, gender, sexual orientation, disability and capital/ism; critical pedagogies, new public managerialism and academic / non-academic labour, and empowerment/ disempowerment.

Contact: dave.hill@ieps.org.uk and dave.hill@anglia.ac.uk

 

CONTENTS:

Dave Hill: Immiseration Capitalism, Activism and Education: Resistance, Revolt and Revenge

Frank Truth: Pay Big to Publish Fast: Academic Journal Rackets

Mike Neary and Sarah Amsler: Occupy: a new pedagogy of space and time?

Periklis Pavlidis: The Antinomic Condition of the University: “Universal Labour” Beyond “Academic Capitalism”

Curry Malott: Rethinking Educational Purpose: The socialist challenge

Jennifer de Saxe: Conceptualizing Critical Feminist Theory and Emancipatory Education

Mike Cole: ‘Abolish the white race’ or ‘transfer economic power to the people’? : Some educational implications

Mike Neary: Teaching Politically: Policy, Pedagogy and the New European University

Ravi Kumar: The Charge of Neoliberal Brigade and Higher Education in India

Dionysios Gouvias: The Post-modern Rhetoric of Recent Reforms in Greek Higher Education

Babak Fozooni: The Politics of Encyclopaedias

Gun-Marie Frånberg and Marie Wrethander: The rise and fall of a social problem: Critical reflections on educational policy and research issues

Imed Labidi: Arabizing Obama: Media’s Racial Pathologies and the Rise of Postmodern Racism

Maria Nikolakaki: Building a Society of Solidarity Through Critical Pedagogy: Group Teaching as a Social and Democratic Tool

Navin Kumar Singh: Exploration of Praxis through Personal and Professional Journey: Implications

Olli-Jukka Jokisaari: A Philosophy for Education in the World of Technology

Reza Pishghadam and Elham Naji Meidani: A Critical Look into Critical Pedagogy

Geraldine Mooney Simmie: The Pied Piper of Neo Liberalism Calls the Tune in the Republic of Ireland: An Analysis of Education Policy Text from 2000-2012

 

**END**

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at: http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

Dave Hill

 

Alternative & Sustainable Universities

SUSTAINING ALTERNATIVE UNIVERSITIES

UK Free University Network (FUN)

Sustaining Alternative Universities

Collaborative Research Conference

1–2 December 2012

Oxford, UK

 

They will admit that little is to be expected from present-day governments, since these live and act according to a murderous code. Hope remains only in the most difficult task of all: to reconsider everything from the ground up, so as to shape a living society inside a dying society. [People] must therefore, as individuals, draw up among themselves, within frontiers and across them, a new social contract which will unite them according to more reasonable principles.’ (Albert Camus, ‘Neither victim nor executioner’, 1946)

Following on from the inaugural meeting of the UK Free University Network held in early 2012, we are calling out to representatives of all free universities and to all those who wish to participate in a conference with a more focused objective.

In recent years, we have witnessed the accelerated neoliberal capitalist colonisation of the university. In the UK (and far beyond) many students are now priced out of higher education and the academic finds him/herself subservient to the logic and interests of capital. In response to this intolerable reality, many groups of scholars, students, and others have come together independently to create alternative, ‘free’ universities.

The ‘Sustaining Alternative Universities’ conference, as a space for coordinating research and sharing knowledge and experience, seeks to support these projects in taking further decisive steps towards the creation of a national movement of individuals and organisations dedicated to the construction and development of alternative democratic, critical, and ultimately sustainable higher education communities.

 

Sustainability: history, dialogue, and practice

The successes of this movement hinge on its sustainability. ‘How can we build, develop, and maintain truly sustainable educational communities outside the existing institutional frameworks?’ is the question upon which our collective investigations and discussions should be founded. Therefore, our collective task is to conceptualise, research, imagine, and, ultimately, cultivate a sustainable movement based on a network of locally-based, sustainable, free universities. We believe that this conference can help us to successfully undertake this task through a three-step process.

Step one: history. An intrinsic element of building sustainability today must surely be to learn from the history of previous projects of popular, democratic and radical education here in the UK, and beyond. Therefore, we invite representatives of each free university to conduct and present research into the history of these traditions in their specific locality, drawing on their own particular influences. Researchers should keep in mind the practical purpose driving this research and consider issues such as: Who participated in these efforts? How were they structured, organised, and sustained? What was the significance of their historical and spatial context? What lessons can be derived from these efforts for our own endeavours today?

We hope that this shared research effort will allow us to both map out a history of popular / democratic / radical higher education in the UK, and to identify ways these can inform our own current projects. Ultimately, this collaborative research endeavour could also help us trace the roots of our network.

Step two: dialogue. The next step is to engage in dialogue with one another, and with our histories. We need to both imagine our ideals and talk freely and openly about the challenges and obstacles that impede our ambitions and objectives today. We need to name the material, social and subjective conditions that constrain the actualisation of our imagination and hopes. At the conference, we aim to draw on our collective experiences in democratic education to create a supportive, democratic space in which participants feel able to share their thoughts, feelings, and ideas in these areas.

Step three: practice. Finally, we need to take the lessons and ideas derived from our historical research and dialogue and put them into practice. The conference will culminate in a session in which we all make plans for practical action to take things forward on a local and national level.

 

Affinities and collaborations

We invite collaboration and co-operation with all. Beyond the Free University Network itself, we particularly welcome collaboration from members of the following groups:

Academic members of the ‘For a Public University’ working group and Campaign for the Public University. We at FUN have not forsaken the mainstream university, and many of our members are not only academics or students, but also active in defending the public university. We recognise the rich traditions of critical pedagogy within the university and the enduring possibilities of its democratic promise. We welcome contributions from all academics.

Members of the Co-operative Movement. Clearly, the co-operative model of organisation offers much for free universities today to draw on, and at least one in the UK is explicitly organised upon co-operative principles. We welcome members of the Co-operative Movement who might contribute to our historical and contemporary understanding of co-operative education, and/or who would like to build bridges between these two movements.

University workers who are not academics. All too often, non-academic staff working in universities are marginalised within or excluded from these discussions. Their contributions, knowledges, experiences and possibilities are overlooked. We seek to redress this situation and invite all those making invaluable contributions to higher education in ways that are not specifically ‘academic’ to participate in this conference.

Students and all those desiring to learn. Critical pedagogy aspires to break down hierarchical boundaries between students and teachers, and to expand the right of learning to everyone whether they occupy the role of ‘student’ or not. In the democratic universities we envisage, students shape their own learning experiences. We welcome contributions from students, past, present, and future.

All others who share our principles, and who are active in creating alternative institutions in other areas of social life, particularly in education. There is much we can learn from each other.

 

An open, democratic, egalitarian, anti-elitist intellectuality

This is a critical pedagogical and political project. This conference is not intended to be a typical academic conference based exclusively on theoretically dense papers and presentations. There is validity, truth, importance, and profound insight in many other methods and ways of expressing knowledge, and we open our conference and minds to these. We believe that narrative – telling stories – is a particularly important means for reaching the personal and social heart of the obstacles and challenges that confront us in our ambitions to create democratic and sustainable learning communities.

 

Where and when

In the spirit of the Occupy movement, we have decided to host this conference on higher education in Oxford for obvious historical reasons.

We propose that the conference will be held on the weekend of 1–2 December 2012.

We recognise the high cost of transport and accommodation and ask those in a position to do so to offer contributions to help unwaged participants to attend. A system will be created to make this transparent and possible.

 

Impact and output

Only joking!

We want this conference to be the turning point at which we really begin to cultivate a sustainable and flourishing free university movement. We hope you can join us for this conference.

If you are interested in participating in the conference and/or in its planning of and preparation, please contact either Sarah Amsler (samsler@lincoln.ac.uk) or Joel Lazarus (joel_lazarus@hotmail.com). 

We aim to have a coordinating committee established by 13 August.

 

Venue

The location of the conference venue will depend on final numbers. However, what is certain is that this conference’s organisation will be guided by fully inclusive principles. This means a family friendly venue with park/playground nearby and a safe indoor space for children of all ages to play. Childcare duties will not preclude participation at this conference. Equally, we will ensure that the venue is fully accessible and that all dietary requirements are catered for. Please contact us if you have any concerns, ideas, or requests.

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Gigi Roggero

Gigi Roggero

DOING AND UNDOING ACADEMIC LABOUR

CENTRE FOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE 2012

Conference 2012

Doing and Undoing Academic Labour

June 7, 2012
9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Learning Landscapes (MB1019)
University of Lincoln

 

In recent decades, a wealth of information has been produced about academic labour: the financialisation of knowledge, diminution of professional autonomy and collegiality through managerialism and audit cultures; the subsumption of higher education into circulations of capital, proletarianisation of intellectual work, shift from dreams of enlightenment and emancipation to imperatives of ‘employability’, and experiences of alienation and anger amongst educators across the world.

This has also been a period of intensifying awareness about the significance of these processes, not only for teachers and students in universities, but for all labour and intellectual, social and political life as well. And now we watch the growth of a transnational movements that is inventing new ways of knowing and producing knowledge, new forms of education, and new possibilities for pedagogy to play a progressive role in struggles for alterantives within the academy and beyond.

Yet within the academy, the proliferation of critical work on these issues is not always accompanied by qualitative changes in everyday practice. The conditions of academic labour for many in the UK are indeed becoming more precarious and repressive – and in unequal measure across institutions and disciplines, and in patterns that retrench existing inequalities of gender, physical ability, class, race and sexuality. The critical analysis of academic labour promises much, but often remains disconnected from the ways we work in practice with others.

This conference brings together scholars and activists from a range of disciplines to discuss these problems, and to consider how critical knowledge about new forms of academic labour can be linked to struggles to humanise labour and knowledge production within and beyond the university.

 

Contributions from:

Mette Louise Berg

Rob Coley

Anna Curcio

Richard Hall

Maria Do Mar Pereira

Dean Lockwood

Andrew McGettigan

Justine Mercer

Sara Motta

Adam O’Meara

Gigi Roggero 

Howard Stevenson

 

Public / Free / Open

This conference is public, free and open to everyone. Please register so we know how many people will be attending. If you have any questions about the event, please contact Dr. Sarah Amsler at samsler@lincoln.ac.uk.

Getting here

Doing and Undoing Academic Labour will be held in Learning Landscapes,  MB1019, the University of Lincoln. Click here for a map of the site.

 

Link to Conference: http://cerd.blogs.lincoln.ac.uk/conference/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

 

Education Crisis

GLOBAL DISRUPTIONS AND HIGHER EDUCATION

Occupy: A New Pedagogy of Space and Time?

Professor Mike Neary, Dean of Teaching and Learning, Director of Centre for Educational Research and Development,University ofLincoln

Dr Sarah Amsler, Senior Lecturer, Centre for Educational Research and Development,University ofLincoln

Friday 9th March 2012, 15.00 – 16.30, Room 120, Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol, 35 Berkeley Square

Dear All

Welcome to the first SRHE Southwest Higher Education Network Seminar of 2012!  

Full details of the event are attached to this email.

Booking: To book a place or for further information, please contact:  Richard.Budd@bristol.ac.uk

Look forward to seeing you there.

Dr Lisa Lucas

Co-Director Teaching, Learning and Assessment DirectorMPhil/PhD Programme Graduate School of Education University of Bristol, 35 Berkeley Square, Bristol, BS8 1JA, Tel: +44 (0)117 331 4351 (internal number 14351)

Email: Lisa.Lucas@bristol.ac.uk

Webpage: http://www.bris.ac.uk/education/people/person/lisa-lucas/overview.html

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Paula Allman

SYMPOSIUM ON THE WORK OF PAULA ALLMAN

Marxism and Education: Renewing Dialogues XVI

A Day Seminar, 10.30 – 4.30

Saturday February 4th, 2012

University of London, Institute of Education

20 Bedford Way, London WC1

The Drama Studio

 

SPEAKERS:

Sara Carpenter (University of Toronto)

Helen Colley (Manchester Metropolitan University)

Margaret Ledwith (University of Cumbria)

Peter Mayo (University of Malta)

Michael Neary (University of Lincoln)

Glenn Rikowski (University of Northampton)

 

This is an open seminar and tickets are free.

To reserve a place email: amaisuria@ioe.ac.uk    

Convenors: Tony Green, Alpesh Maisuria & Glenn Rikowski

 

Times Higher Education (Obituary): Paula Allman (1944-2011) – http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=26&storycode=418263&c=2   

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski

MARXISM AND EDUCATION: WORKS BY GLENN RIKOWSKI – VERSION NOVEMBER 2011

This is a list of the main works on Marxism and Education by Glenn Rikowski, revised and updated on 6th November 2011:

Online Articles and Papers

Rikowski, G. (1990) The Recruitment Process and Labour Power, unpublished manuscript, Division of Humanities & Modern Languages, Epping Forest College, Loughton, Essex, July. Online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Recruitment%20and%20Labour%20Power

Rikowski, G. (1996) Apprenticeship and the Use-value Aspect of Labour Power, First Paper prepared for the ESRC Seminar Series on ‘Apprenticeship in Work and Education’, Nene Research Centre, Nene College of Higher Education, Northampton, 31st May, at The Flow of Ideas web site: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Apprenticeship%20and%20the%20Use-value%20Aspect%20of%20Labour%20Power

Rikowski, G. (1996) Revealed Recruitment Criteria Through the Use-value Aspect of Labour-power, Second Paper prepared for the ESRC Seminar Series on ‘Apprenticeship in Work and Education’, Nene Research Centre, Nene College of Higher Education, Northampton, 31st May, at The Flow of Ideas web site: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Revealed%20Recruitment%20Criteria%20through%20the%20Use-value%20Aspect%20of%20Labour-power

Rikowski, G. (1996) Education Markets and Missing Products, Revised and extended paper first presented at the Conference of Socialist Economists, University of Northumbria, Newcastle, 7-9th July 1995. This revised version dated 18th December 1996: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Education%20Markets%20and%20Missing%20Products

Rikowski, G. (1998) Three Types of Apprenticeship, Three Forms of Mastery: Nietzsche, Marx, Self and Capital, a Departmental Paper, School of Education, University of Birmingham, 5th June: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Three%20Types%20of%20Apprenticeship%20-%20Three%20Forms%20of%20Mastery

Rikowski, G. (2000) Why Employers Can’t Ever Get What They Want. In fact, they can’t even get what they need, a paper presented at the School of PCET Staff/Student Seminar, University of Greenwich, Queen Anne’s Palace, 30 Park Row, Greenwich, London, 27 March. Online at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Why%20Employers%20Can[a]t%20Ever%20Get%20What%20They%20Want

Rikowski, G. (2000) That Other Great Class of Commodities: Repositioning Marxist Educational Theory, BERA Conference Paper, Cardiff University, 7-10 September. At Education-line:
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/educol/documents/00001624.htm

Rikowski, G. (2000) Messing with the Explosive Commodity: School Improvement, Educational Research and Labour-Power in the Era of Global Capitalism, paper presented at the British Educational Research Association Annual Conference, Cardiff University, 7-10 September. Available from Education-line:
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/educol/documents/00001610.htm

Rikowski, G. (2001) The Importance of Being a Radical Educator in Capitalism Today, Guest Lecture in Sociology of Education, The Gillian Rose Room, University of Warwick, Coventry, 31st May, available at The Institute for Education Policy Studies: http://www.ieps.org.uk.cwc.net/rikowski2005a.pdf

McLaren, P. & Rikowski, G. (2001) Pedagogy for Revolution against Education for Capital: An E-Dialogue on Education in Capitalism Today, Cultural Logic: An Electronic Journal of Marxist Theory and Practice, Vol.4 No.1:
http://clogic.eserver.org/4-1/mclaren%26rikowski.html

Rikowski, G. (2001) After the Manuscript Broke Off: Thoughts on Marx, Social Class and Education, a paper prepared for the British Sociological Association Education Study Group Meeting, King’s College London, 23 June. Available at Education-line: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/educol/documents/00001931.htm

Rikowski, G. (2002) Methods for Researching the Social Production of Labour Power in Capitalism, School of Education Research Seminar, University College Northampton, 7th March, at:
http://www.ieps.org.uk.cwc.net/rikowski2002b.pdf

Rikowski, G. (2004) Marx and the Education of the Future, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.2 Nos. 3 & 4, pp.565-577, online at: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=2&issue=3&year=2004&article=10_Rikowski_PFEO_2_3-4_web&id=195.93.21.71

Gibson, R. & Rikowski, G. (2004) Socialism and Education: An E-Dialogue, available from The Rouge Forum web site:
http://www.pipeline.com/~rougeforum/RikowskiGibsonDialogueFinal.htm

Rikowski, G. (2005) Distillation: Education in Karl Marx’s Social Universe, Lunchtime Seminar, School of Education, University of East London, Barking Campus, 14th February: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Distillation

Rikowski, G. (2006) Education and the Politics of Human Resistance, Information for Social Change, Issue No.23 (Summer): http://libr.org/isc/issues/ISC23/B3%20Glenn%20Rikowski.pdf

Gibson, R. & Rikowski, G. (2006) Education for a Socialist Future: An E-Dialogue, Information for Social Change, Issue No.23 (Summer): http://libr.org/isc/issues/ISC23/C1%20Rich%20Gibson%20and%20Glenn%20Rikowski.pdf

Rikowski, G. (2006) On the Capitalisation of Schools in England, a paper prepared for The Flow of Ideas, 1st November:
http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=On%20the%20Capitalisation%20of%20Schools%20in%20England

Rikowski, G. (2006) Ten Points on Marx, Class and Education, a paper presented at Marxism and Education: Renewing Dialogues IX Seminar, University of London, Institute of Education, 25th October:
http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Ten%20Points%20on%20Marx,%20Class%20and%20Education

Rikowski, G. (2007) Marxist Educational Theory Unplugged, a paper prepared for the Fourth Historical Materialism Annual Conference, 9-11th November, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London:
http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Marxist%20Educational%20Theory%20Unplugged

Rikowski, G. (2008) Marx and Education Revisited, 21st April, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Marx%20and%20Education%20Revisited

Rikowski, G. (2008) Marxism and Education Revisited, 25th April, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Marxism%20and%20Education%20Revisited

Rikowski, G. (2011) Capitorg: Education and the Constitution of the Human in Contemporary Society, A paper prepared for the Praxis & Pedagogy Research Seminar, The Graduate School of Creative Arts and Media (GradCAM), Dublin, Ireland, 25th May 2011, available online at ‘The Flow of Ideas’: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Capitorg

 

Key Chapters in Edited Collections

Rikowski, G. (1998) Only Charybdis: The Learning Society Through Idealism, in: S. Ranson (Ed) Inside the Learning Society, London: Cassell Education.

Rikowski, G. (1999) Nietzsche, Marx and Mastery: The Learning Unto Death, in: H. Rainbird & P. Ainley (Eds.) Apprenticeship: Towards a New Paradigm of Learning, London: Kogan Page.

Rikowski, G. (2000) The Rise of the Student-Worker, in: K. Moti Gokulsing & C. DaCosta (Eds.) A Compact for Higher Education, Aldershot: Ashgate.

Rikowski, G. (2002) Education, Capital and the Transhuman, in: D. Hill, P. McLaren, M. Cole & G. Rikowski (Eds.) Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory, Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

Rikowski, (2002) Prelude: Marxist Educational Theory After Postmodernism, in: D. Hill, P. McLaren, M. Cole & G. Rikowski (Eds.) Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory, Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

Rikowski, G. (2002) Fuel for the Living Fire: Labour-Power! In: A. Dinerstein & M. Neary (Eds.) The Labour Debate: An Investigation into the Theory and Reality of Capitalist Work, Aldershot: Ashgate.

Rikowski, G. (2004) Labour’s Fuel: Lifelong Learning Policy as Labour Power Production, in: D. Hayes (ed.) The RoutledgeFalmer Guide to Key Debates in Education, London: RoutledgeFalmer.

McLaren, P. & Rikowski, G. (2005) Pedagogy for Revolution Against Education for Capital: An E-Dialogue on Education in Capitalism Today, in: P. McLaren, Red Seminars: Radical Excursions into Educational Theory, Cultural Politics, and Pedagogy, Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.

Allman, P., McLaren, P. & Rikowski, G. (2005) After the Box People: The Labor-Capital Relation as Class Constitution and Its Consequences for Marxist Educational Theory and Human Resistance, in: P. McLaren, Capitalists and Conquerors: A Critical Pedagogy Against Empire, Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

 

Articles in Journals (not online)

Rikowski, G. (1992) Work Experience and Part-time Jobs in a Recruitment Context, British Journal of Education and Work, Vol.5 No.1, pp.19-46.

Rikowski, G. (1996) Left Alone: End Time for Marxist Educational Theory? British Journal of Sociology of Education, Vol.17 No.4, pp.415-451.

Rikowski, G. (1997) Scorched Earth: Prelude to Rebuilding Marxist Educational Theory, British Journal of Sociology of Education, Vol.18 No.4, pp.551-574.

Rikowski, G. (2001) Education for Industry: A Complex Technicism, Journal of Education and Work, Vol14 No.1, pp.29-49.

 

Books & Booklets

Hill, D., McLaren, P., Cole, M. & Rikowski, G. (Eds.) (1999) Postmodernism in Educational Theory: Education and the Politics of Human Resistance, London: Tufnell Press.

Rikowski, G. (2001) The Battle in Seattle: Its Significance for Education, London: Tufnell Press.

Cole, M., Hill, D., Rikowski, G. & McLaren P. (2001) Red Chalk: On Schooling, Capitalism & Politics, Brighton: The Institute for Education Policy Studies. Available online from The IEPS, at: http://www.ieps.org.uk.cwc.net/redchalk.pdf

D. Hill, P. McLaren, M. Cole & G. Rikowski (Eds.) (2002) Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory, Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

Rikowski, G. (2005) Silence on the Wolves: What is Absent in New Labour’s Strategy for Education, Education Research Centre, Mayfield House, University of Brighton, Occasional Paper, May.

Green, A., Rikowski, G. & Raduntz, H. (Eds.) (2007) Renewing Dialogues in Marxism and Education – Openings,London: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

 

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Situationism

DevXS

DevXS is a FREE developer marathon spread across three days, where students from across the UK and beyond are encouraged to team up and build cool things that contribute to university life. All you need to do is get here! If you are not a student, it would be great if you could pass this email onto relevant people in your organisation.

Please note we actively encourage you to speak to computer science tutors, who are also welcome to attend as long as they bring along some students! Tutors might be able to organise a team of you to attend (e.g. travelling by minibus etc). If you think you might have difficulty getting here, please contact us on hello@devxs.org, and we might be able to help.

Tell others about it by printing off a poster and putting it somewhere visible where others can see it!

See: http://devxs.org/assets

DevXS is about students sharing their ideas, mashing up data and building prototypes that improve, challenge and positively disrupt the research, teaching and learning landscapes of further and higher education.

We’re going to award prizes to the best ideas, prototypes and collaborations and there are going to be developers from universities around the country hanging around to help you out.

So if you are a student (undergraduate or postgraduate) or a tutor, please register for this event as soon as possible, places are limited and it is a fantastic opportunity to improve your CV and work with some of the best young developers in the country! You may even get the chance to speak to recruiters from industry.

The event will take place at the University of Lincoln on the weekend of 11-13 November, 2011. We will provide free accommodation on the night of the 11th (twin rooms) and then a relaxation zone on the 12th (bring your sleeping bag!). There will also be free food and refreshments!

Register now before it is too late: http://devxs.org/register

For more information about the event, please see: http://devxs.org/

ΔΔΔΔΔΔΔ
Mr Mahendra Mahey

Project Manager DevCSI
Research Officer
UKOLN,
University of Bath,
Bath,
BA2 7AY

Tel: ++44 (0) 1225 384594
Fax: ++44 (0) 1225 386256
Mobile: ++44 (0) 07581069575
Email: m.mahey@ukoln.ac.uk
skypeID: mr_mahendra_mahey
http://devcsi.ukoln.ac.uk/
http://cerify.ukoln.ac.uk/
http://www.ukoln.ac.uk

 

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Higher Education Crisis - but now there is Hope

THE SOCIAL SCIENCE CENTRE – LINCOLN

The Social Science Centre (SSC) provides an opportunity for students and academics to have a very special co-operative experience of higher education. All courses at SSC are taught and assessed at the same level as similar courses in mainstream universities in the UK. The courses are taught by experienced academics, including professors and lecturers with national and international reputations based on the quality of their scholarship in the social sciences.

One of the unique features of the Centre is that it is run as a ‘not-for-profit’ co-operative. The Centre is managed on democratic, non-hierarchical principles with all students and staff having an equal involvement in how the Centre operates.

The co-operative principles on which the management of the Centre is based extend to the ways in which courses are taught. All classes will be participative and collaborative, so as to include the experience and knowledge of the student as an intrinsic part of the course. Students will have the chance to design courses with the professors and lecturers, as well as deliver some of the teaching themselves with support from other students and the teaching staff. Students will be able to work with academics on research projects as well as publish their own writings. A core principle of the Centre is that teachers and students have much to learn from each other.

The subjects taught at the Centre are the core subjects in social science: Sociology, Politics and Philosophy. The Centre will provide teaching at all levels including undergraduate, Masters and Doctorates in Philosophy.

The urgent need for such a centre is the decision by the Coalition Government to remove all funding for teaching the social sciences in English universities. While staff involved with the Centre are protesting this decision and fighting for funding to be restored, they are, at the same time, establishing an alternative model for Higher Education, which will not depend on the funding decisions of politicians.

The SSC believes that university degrees are being devalued by a system of Higher Education increasingly focused on the perceived needs of the business sector. SSC provides a learning experience based on academic values, including critical thinking, experimentation, sharing, peer review, co-operation, collaboration, openness, debate and constructive disagreement. SSC believes that these academic values, rather than the short-termist, highly competitive, profit driven motives of the private sector, are more likely to provide a better future for us all.

The Centre is entirely self-funded. All members of the Centre will pay an annual subscription, based on the level of their salary. For those students and academics who are unemployed or are on a low income there will be no subscription charge. The Centre accepts monies, and other forms of ‘payment in kind’, from donors who share their ethics and values. The Centre staff will donate their time and expertise freely and will not receive any payment.

Students will not leave the Centre with a university degree, but they will have a learning experience that is equivalent to the level of a degree. Each student will receive a certificate in higher education, with an extensive written transcript detailing their academic and intellectual achievements. The Centre believes that given the current constraints of university teaching, the Centre will provide academics and students with a learning and teaching experience that compares favourably with what is provided by English universities.

By joining the Centre, students will be part of a unique experiment in higher education. We think this experiment in co-operative learning has the potential to transform the way in which higher education is designed and delivered.

The Centre will make use of the most up to date educational technologies, but this is not an online or web-based provision. It is important that the Centre is in a real space at the heart of its local community.

The Centre is designed for students who do not wish to take on the burden of debt currently imposed by the government, but do wish to receive a higher level of education.

It is envisaged that the Centre will have about twenty students at any one time, and a pool of about twenty lecturers. All students will be part-time, with most teaching taking place in the evenings and at weekends. While a full-time degree normally takes three years, it is envisaged that students at the Centre will take up to six years to obtain their undergraduate certificate in higher education, up to four years for the equivalent of a Masters and up to eight years for the equivalent to a PhD.

While this Centre is located in Lincoln and based around the Social Sciences it is hoped and expected this model of small scale, self-funded higher education provision will be adapted for different subject areas and in different locations nationally and internationally. These multi-various Centres will provide a supportive and co-operative network to further advance this sustainable and resilient model for higher education.

For more information see: http://socialsciencecentre.org.uk/

 

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All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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Peter McLaren

NOTTINGHAM CRITICAL PEDAGOGY

The Nottingham Critical Pedagogies Group is a fluid network of academics, education workers and students interested in discussing the potentials for (and problems with) taking a critical pedagogical  approach to higher education in the UK.

To that end we organise reading groups and workshops; discuss critical pedagogy with current students; invite visiting speakers and run this blog.

Membership is informal and members may commit as much or as little time to the project as they wish.

We have close ties with the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice and have received funding for the Centre for Integrative Learning.

If you would like to be kept informed of our activities, please email Heather Watkins on ldxhw@nottingham.ac.uk and ask to join our mailing list.

Nottingham Critical Pedagogy: http://nottinghamcriticalpedagogy.wordpress.com/

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Paulo Freire

NOTTINGHAM CRITICAL PEDAGOGY

Michael Neary

MARKETISATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND THE STUDENT AS CONSUMER

Marketisation of Higher Education and the Student as Consumer, jointly edited by Mike Molesworth, Lizzie Nixon and Richard Scullion and was published by Routledge in October 2010.

The Marketisation of Higher Education and the Student as Consumer was launched at the House of Commons on 28th October. The launch was hosted by Baroness Estelle Morris in the Thatcher Room in Portcullis House.

About the Book:

Until recently government policy in the UK has encouraged an expansion of Higher Education to increase participation and with an express aim of creating a more educated workforce. This expansion has led to competition between Higher Education institutions, with students increasingly positioned as consumers and institutions working to improve the extent to which they meet ‘consumer demands’.

Especially given the latest government funding cuts, the most prevalent outlook in Higher Education today is one of business, forcing institutions to reassess the way they are managed and promoted to ensure maximum efficiency, sales and ‘profits’. Students view the opportunity to gain a degree as a right, and a service which they have paid for, demanding a greater choice and a return on their investment. Changes in higher education have been rapid, and there has been little critical research into the implications. This volume brings together internationally comparative academic perspectives, critical accounts and empirical research to explore fully the issues and experiences of education as a commodity, examining:

The international and financial context of marketisation

The new purposes of universities

The implications of university branding and promotion

League tables and student surveys vs. quality of education

The higher education market and distance learning

Students as ‘active consumers’ in the co-creation of value

Changing student experiences, demands and focus

With contributions from many of the leading names involved in Higher Education including Ron Barnett, Frank Furedi, Lewis Elton, Roger Brown and also Laurie Taylor in his journalistic guise as an academic at the University of Poppleton, this book will be essential reading for many.

About the Authors

Mike Molesworth is Senior Lecturer in Online Marketing and Consumer Behaviour at the Media School, Bournemouth University, UK.

Richard Scullion is Senior Lecturer in Marketing Communications and Political Communications at the Media School, Bournemouth University, UK.

Elizabeth Nixon is Lecturer in Marketing Communications at the Media School, Bournemouth University, UK.

The book can be bought from:

Routledge: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415584470/

Amazon UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Marketisation-Higher-Education-Student-Consumer/dp/0415584477/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1289775427&sr=1-1

Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Marketisation-Higher-Education-Student-Consumer/dp/0415584477/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1289775597&sr=1-1

A pre-print version of a chapter in the book by Michael Neary and Andy Hagyard, Pedagogy of Excess: An alternative political economy of student life can be viewed here: http://studentasproducer.lincoln.ac.uk/files/2010/10/Pedagogy-of-Excess-preprint.pdf  

Michael Neary and Joss Winn’s chapter 10 in the book, Student as Producer: reinventing the student experience in higher education can be found at: http://eprints.lincoln.ac.uk/1675/1/Future_of_HE_-_Chapter_10.pdf

See also:

Neary, M. (2010) Student as Producer: A Pedagogy for the Avant-Garde; or, how do revolutionary teachers teach? Learning Exchange, Vol.1 No.1, online at: http://learningexchange.westminster.ac.uk/index.php/lej/article/viewFile/15/13

Student as Producer blog, is at: http://studentasproducer.lincoln.ac.uk/blog/

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Marketisation of Higher Education

HAL

SOCIAL LEARNING SPACES: KNOWLEDGE SPACES

The 5th Space Symposium will be taking place at Warwick University on 29th March 2010. 

Registration is open and details of the event are below.

The Fifth Symposium on Social Learning Space: Knowledge Spaces

The Reinvention Centre for Undergraduate Research, Westwood Campus, University of Warwick, Monday 29 March, 2010  

‘Knowledge spaces are the thick social spaces through which truth, knowledge and power are created’ (Sarah Wright, 2005: 908)

Following the success of the previous four Space Symposia, Knowledge Spaces addresses the role of architecture, spatial planning and the use of different spaces in the construction and experience of curricula and pedagogy in Higher Education.

The symposium will address the question of how the spaces we create, occupy and challenge, both within the university and beyond it, affect what and how we know, as well as considering who plays what roles in the process of knowledge creation and communication. In particular, the symposium will explore:

* The landscapes of learning in Higher Education

* The use of ‘real life’ spaces such as urban, public, employment and community settings for the development and enactment of curricula and assessment

* The relationship between physical classroom spaces and different pedagogical approaches 

* The role of university buildings and curricula in shaping pedagogical and political relations between students and staff

The event offers an exciting and diverse programme of keynote lecture(s), participatory workshop(s) and an interactive research exhibition.

Confirmed speakers and workshop leaders:

Professor Mike Neary, University of Lincoln: (Learning Landscapes and the struggle for the idea of the University)

Professor Jonothan Neelands: Institute of Education, University of Warwick (tba)

Oscar van den Wijngaard and Wilfred van Dellen, University College Maastricht: (Colleagues and Peers at University College Maastricht: Collaboration and reciprocity as educational strategy)

Dr Sarah Czerny and Students, University of Rijeka, Croatia:  (Blocked Spaces: (Re)considering the staff-student relation form the perspective of the blokada in Rijeka)

Registration

The cost of the conference is £75 for waged delegates and £10 for students.

Online registration is now available via this web page: www.warwick.ac.uk/go/reinvention/spaces/symposia/fifth/

If you have any queries please send an email to: conference.reinvention@warwick.ac.uk  or telephone Sumila Bhandari on 024 76575125.

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